Media & Entertainment

  • July 2, 2019

    FCC Urged To Stop Fiber 'Overbuild' Using Federal Funds

    A number of groups have weighed in on a petition from a group of Texas telecoms calling on the Federal Communications Commission to stop federal subsidies from going toward projects that “overbuild” fiber networks for schools and libraries that already have broadband connections.

  • July 2, 2019

    3rd Circ. Backs Viacom, Penguin In IP Suit Over Xmas Book

    Viacom and Penguin Random House scored a victory Tuesday when the Third Circuit declined to revive an author’s suit alleging the companies copied her children’s book about a tree that dreams of becoming the Christmas tree in New York City’s Rockefeller Center.

  • July 2, 2019

    Avenatti Won't Give Feds IPhone, IPad Passwords In Calif.

    Stormy Daniels’ former attorney Michael Avenatti won't give prosecutors his passwords to access an Apple desktop computer, iPhone, iPad and Apple laptop, according to a status report filed in the government's embezzlement case against the embattled lawyer in California federal court Monday.

  • July 2, 2019

    Charter Turning Blind Eye To Infringement, Record Labels Say

    Charter Communications Inc. has been making millions by letting music piracy slide, a group of record labels told a Colorado federal judge Monday, and shouldn’t be able to avoid a claim now that it is vicariously liable for illegal downloading by its subscribers.

  • July 2, 2019

    Ed Sheeran Trial On Hold For 9th Circ. Led Zeppelin Ruling

    A Manhattan judge has put off a September jury trial over whether Ed Sheeran's "Thinking Out Loud" infringes Marvin Gaye's "Let's Get It On," saying Tuesday that a coming decision by the full Ninth Circuit in a copyright appeal involving Led Zeppelin may be informative.

  • July 2, 2019

    Charter Internet Users Fight Bid To Stay False-Ad Suit

    A putative class of Charter customers who have sued the company and its Spectrum unit for allegedly falsely advertising its internet speeds told a California federal judge Monday not to stay the suit because the company will suffer no harm if it continues.

  • July 2, 2019

    Ticket Biz Seeks $378K In Atty Fees After Rival's Sanctions

    Lawyers who successfully represented Broker Genius Inc. in securing a $4.5 million verdict and effectively shutting down a rival over pilfered technology have asked a New York federal court to award their client more than $378,000 in attorney fees and costs for what the company spent on a contempt bid.

  • July 2, 2019

    Color Me Badd Singer Accused Of Taking TM For Solo Career

    A member of '90s R&B group Color Me Badd — known for its singles "I Wanna Sex You Up" and "All 4 Love" — filed a lawsuit in Indiana federal court on Monday against another member of the group alleging that he has hijacked the band’s trademark while trying to pursue a solo career.

  • July 2, 2019

    Supreme Court IP Recap: Copyrights & Trademarks

    The U.S. Supreme Court didn’t issue any landmark trademark or copyright rulings this term, but bigger decisions could be coming in the year ahead. Here's what you need to know about the term that just ended and what to watch for in the next session.

  • July 2, 2019

    US Soccer Can't Transfer Women's Pay Suit To Northern Calif.

    A California federal judge won't let the U.S. Soccer Federation transfer a suit by its women's national team accusing the organization of paying them less than the men's national team to the Northern District of California, saying the federation has already argued that district is an improper venue.

  • July 1, 2019

    Andy Warhol's 'Prince' Series Was Fair Use Of Photo: Judge

    A well-known Andy Warhol series in which the artist modified a photograph of legendary pop icon Prince doesn’t infringe the copyright of the photographer who took the photo, a New York federal judge ruled Monday, finding that Warhol’s works are “transformative” of the original photo and “add something new to the world of art.”

  • July 1, 2019

    FCC Must Keep Minimum Hours Of Kid TV, Senators Say

    The Federal Communications Commission should continue to require broadcasters to air three hours of regularly scheduled educational children's programming a week on their primary stations, instead of relaxing the rules, nine Democratic senators have said in a letter.

  • July 1, 2019

    3rd Circ. Scraps ‘Sweeping’ Order Banning Ex-CEO's Book

    The Third Circuit on Monday vacated an injunction that blocked a banking tycoon from distributing his business book, finding that although TD Bank owns the exclusive rights to some of his life story and business philosophy, the lower court's "sweeping conclusions" would justify an injunction in every copyright case.

  • July 1, 2019

    AIG Unit Must Cover TCPA Suits, Yahoo Tells Calif. Justices

    Yahoo has urged California's highest court to hold that an AIG insurer must fund its defense of several Telephone Consumer Protection Act lawsuits accusing the web services provider of sending unsolicited text messages, arguing that TCPA claims plainly trigger the personal injury coverage in its policies.

  • July 1, 2019

    Investors Slam Crypto Co. For 'Willful' Default In Fraud Suit

    Investors in a cryptocurrency platform’s allegedly fraudulent $32 million initial coin offering urged a Florida federal judge Friday to block the business’ bid to set aside a default in the case, saying there is no excuse for the company’s "willful" delay in hiring new counsel.

  • July 1, 2019

    CAA Piles On To Writers Guild, Becoming 3rd Agency To Sue

    Creative Artists Agency on Monday became the latest Hollywood talent shop to accuse the Writers Guild of America of "attempting to restrain competition on a staggering scale" by orchestrating a boycott against payments that agents collect from pairing talent with studios.

  • July 1, 2019

    Casino Customer Wins $3M Verdict In Trip-And-Fall Suit

    A woman who tripped and fell over a collapsed “wet floor” sign while visiting a Cincinnati casino won a $3 million verdict in her personal injury suit after an Ohio jury found employees failed to use ordinary care to keep her safe.

  • July 1, 2019

    City Leaders Blast FCC's Bid To Kill Local Broadband Sharing

    A partnership of hundreds of city leaders criticized the Federal Communications Commission's controversial push to blunt a San Francisco policy aimed at drumming up local broadband competition, as the organization said Monday the effort runs counter to the agency's mission.

  • July 1, 2019

    AT&T Says Fla. Telecom Bilking It On Pole Attachment Rates

    Florida Power & Light Co. is charging unreasonable rates to telecoms that want to attach mobile equipment to electric poles, flouting a recent Federal Communications Commission regulation setting standard rates for such agreements, AT&T told the agency Monday.

  • July 1, 2019

    Lawmakers Gun For 'Deepfakes' In Bill Tackling Gov't Fixes

    Two bipartisan groups of lawmakers have filed bills to fight so-called “deepfake” videos that use artificial intelligence to distort real footage, mandating that the Department of Homeland Security put a microscope on the issue and come up with policy solutions.

  • July 1, 2019

    Strip Club Gets 'Cookie-Cutter' FLSA Suit Nixed, For Now

    A Florida strip club that criticized an exotic dancer's proposed wage class action as "cookie-cutter" won dismissal of the suit Friday, but a Florida federal judge gave the dancer two weeks to refile with more details about purported back wages she's owed.

  • July 1, 2019

    Climatologist Asks High Court Not To Block Defamation Suit

    High-profile climate scientist Michael E. Mann has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to ignore requests by two conservative publications that want the high court to consider halting Mann’s defamation suit launched after their writers called Mann “the Jerry Sandusky of climate science.”

  • July 1, 2019

    Ex-Judge Hit With $2.85M Suit Over Probation Power Grab

    A retired judge and former chief justice of the Massachusetts trial court has been hit with a $2.85 million civil suit by two former probation department officials who claim they were forced out and faced criminal charges due to a personal grudge and a desire to control department hiring.

  • June 28, 2019

    High Court Census Ruling Could Escalate Rule Challenges

    When a slim U.S. Supreme Court majority blocked the Trump administration from adding a citizenship question to the census because the government hadn't been forthcoming, the justices gave litigants an irresistible precedent to cite in future policy fights with federal agencies, experts said.

  • June 28, 2019

    Attys Can't Challenge Order That They Won, 2nd Circ. Finds

    The Second Circuit on Friday determined that it lacks jurisdiction to hear an appeal filed by two attorneys because a New York federal court ruled in the lawyers' favor when it held that emails related to a licensing deal for Trump Soho New York could not be kept under seal indefinitely.

Expert Analysis

  • DOJ's Wire Act Opinion Means Uncertainty For Tribal Gaming

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    While tribes may be split on the U.S. Department of Justice's new interpretation of the Wire Act, they should all note the DOJ's willingness to weigh in on otherwise established gaming laws, say Charles Galbraith and Julian SpearChief-Morris of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP.

  • Trump's NDA Use Raises 1st Amendment Questions

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    With respect to the First Amendment, the reported terms of President Donald Trump's nondisclosure agreements for White House staff do not conform with legal precedent because they extend past employees’ service and do not narrowly target classified or confidential information, says Leonard Samuels of Berger Singerman LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Advertisers Should Heed FTC Stats On NAD Referrals

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    While the Federal Trade Commission cannot be expected to act on every referral from the Better Business Bureau’s National Advertising Division, the FTC’s recent follow-up record demonstrates that companies choosing not to comply with NAD recommendations are making a risky bet, says Alexander Goldman, staff attorney at the National Advertising Division.

  • Watch Out For Lawsuits Arising From Programming Blackouts

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    Television distributors and content providers have become more willing to let licensing periods lapse without a renewal agreement in place. When this happens, both sides should be aware that material missteps in advertising and customer relations can bring litigation risks, say David Yolkut and Colin McGrath of Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Ethical Social Media Marketing For Lawyers

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    Social media presents rich opportunities to reach prospective clients. Attorneys should not let those opportunities pass them by, but they should keep their ethical obligations in mind as they post, says Cort Sylvester of Nilan Johnson Lewis PA.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Norton Rose Diversity Director Nina Godiwalla

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    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Nina Godiwalla, director of diversity and inclusion at Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • What Musical.ly Settlement Means For COPPA Compliance

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent settlement with lip sync music video app Musical.ly under the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act does not suggest that COPPA fines are necessarily rising, but sheds light on where the FTC believes responsibility for future regulatory shortcomings may fall, says Dana Gausepohl of The Norton Law Firm PC.

  • States Face Many Hurdles On The Way To Legal Sports Betting

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    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling last year in Murphy v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, it is possible that almost every state will legalize sports betting. But political and economic factors seem likely to delay legislation, says Aaron Swerdlow of Weinberg Gonser LLP.

  • What EU Investment Screening Will Mean For Dealmakers

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    Last week, the European Council approved a regulation to screen foreign direct investment into European Union member states on national security grounds. Dealmakers considering near-term transactions with a nexus to the EU will need to evaluate how the new regulations may impact deal timelines, disclosures, certainty and costs, say attorneys with Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

  • 5 Mistakes Law Firms Make When Responding To RFPs

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    More and more corporations are now using requests for proposals to make data-driven decisions about which law firms to work with, so it is more important than ever for law firms to avoid common RFP mistakes, says Matthew Prinn of RFP Advisory Group.

  • Opinion

    Antitrust Merger Remedies Should Address Potential Ills

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    Last month, the D.C. Court of Appeals affirmed a decision not to block the AT&T/Time Warner merger, questioning why the Justice Department contested the merger in the first place. The policy lesson here is that heavy-handed enforcement risks undermining the very goals of antitrust, say Matthew Cantor and Ankur Kapoor of Constantine Cannon LLP.

  • Germany's Facebook Decision Likely Won't Be Influential

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    The German Federal Cartel Office's decision last month against Facebook — the first time a competition authority ruled on a privacy-related abuse of dominance — is based on specific German case law and reasoning that seems questionable from an antitrust policy perspective, say Sean-Paul Brankin and Evi Mattioli of Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • Guest Feature

    Leon Panetta In The Courtroom, Langley And Area 51

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    Over the course of his career, Leon Panetta has served as a U.S. representative, director of the CIA and secretary of defense. But before all that, he was a lawyer. Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP asked him about his legal background — and about little men from outer space.

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