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Media & Entertainment

  • April 10, 2019

    Where The 'Varsity Blues' Parents Stand In Court

    So far 13 parents have agreed to plead guilty in a nationwide college admissions bribery scheme, while others have remained silent. Here, Law360 recaps where the cases stand for each of the 33 parents charged in the scandal known as "Varsity Blues."

  • April 10, 2019

    CIA Reads Alleged Leaker's Defense Discussions, Judge Told

    Counsel for an ex-CIA programmer accused of spilling secrets to WikiLeaks told a Manhattan federal judge Wednesday the agency is reading the defendant's communications and argued that attorney-client discussions should not be subject to CIA review.

  • April 10, 2019

    FCC's Carr Wary Of Calls For Online Speech Oversight

    For FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr, the First Amendment trumps any desire to regulate online platforms like Facebook, even if the companies would prefer such regulation. In a recent interview with Law360, he discusses that and more — including teasing a new plan to inspire more people to join the communications infrastructure workforce.

  • April 10, 2019

    Cyberstalking Ex-Reporter To Be Resentenced, 2nd Circ. Says

    The Second Circuit on Wednesday ordered resentencing for a disgraced former journalist who got five years in prison after admitting to cyberstalking his ex-girlfriend and making bomb threats in her name, citing an error in the advisory sentencing guidelines calculation.

  • April 10, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Longpoint, Netflix, Sandstone

    Longpoint Realty has reportedly bought a Florida grocery-anchored shopping center for $37.53 million, Netflix is said to be in talks to buy the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood, and Sandstone Properties has reportedly sold a Los Angeles-area office building for $31 million.

  • April 10, 2019

    NC Senate Approves Cherokee Tribe's Sports Betting Bill

    The North Carolina Senate has handily passed a proposed bill that would allow the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to offer betting on sports and horse racing at its two casinos, teeing up the legislation for a vote in the state House of Representatives.

  • April 10, 2019

    Orioles Free To Pitch TV Profits Dispute To Arbitration Panel

    A New York state judge won't keep the Baltimore Orioles from going to the American Arbitration Association to settle the latest dispute between them and the Washington Nationals over profits from their regional sports TV network.

  • April 10, 2019

    Skadden Guides Chinese Streaming Co.'s $326M Follow-On

    China-based video game live-streaming platform Huya said Wednesday it raised $326.4 million in a Skadden-led follow-on offering that will be used to develop new products and expand the company overseas.

  • April 10, 2019

    Seuss-'Star Trek' Mashup Creator Seeks Atty Fees In IP Suit

    The creatives behind a Dr. Seuss-"Star Trek" mashup book asked a California federal judge Wednesday to award them attorney fees, saying a fizzled infringement case brought by the famed author's estate was "overly aggressive."

  • April 10, 2019

    House Passes Bill Undoing Repeal Of Net Neutrality Rules

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill on Wednesday that would undo the Federal Communications Commission's repeal of Obama-era net neutrality protections, although it appears unlikely to come up for a vote in the Senate.

  • April 10, 2019

    Bayard Gets Green Light To Pull Out Of Weinstein Ch. 11

    A hint of new trouble surfaced Wednesday for embattled media mogul Harvey Weinstein when a Delaware bankruptcy judge allowed the withdrawal of Bayard LLC as his "interested party" counsel in the Chapter 11 case for his entertainment empire.

  • April 9, 2019

    Former 'Ebony,' 'Jet' Magazine Publisher Files For Chapter 7

    The historic Johnson Publishing Co., former owner of Ebony and Jet magazines, has declared Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the company announced Tuesday.

  • April 9, 2019

    Ex-Atty, 'Housewives' Pal Is Victim In Fraud Case, Jury Told

    A disbarred Maryland attorney and "Real Housewives" sidekick facing charges she duped investors out of millions in a bogus trading scheme was actually a victim of the plot herself, a D.C. federal jury heard Tuesday at the opening of her securities fraud trial.

  • April 9, 2019

    Expansive Newsweek Fraud Case Headed To Trial In 2020

    A New York state judge on Tuesday refused to dismiss charges against a former co-owner of Newsweek, leaders of a Christian university and others accused of fraudulently obtaining tens of millions of dollars in loans, setting the stage for a criminal trial next year.

  • April 9, 2019

    FCC Circulates Order To Fix Radio Interference Complaints

    The Federal Communications Commission will vote at its May meeting on a proposed order that seeks to give broadcasters more avenues to resolve complaints of signal interference, Chairman Ajit Pai announced in remarks Tuesday.

  • April 9, 2019

    Don't Change Colo. Contract Law For Our Case, Strippers Say

    A group of strippers suing their employers urged the Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday not to expand the state's rules governing arbitration agreements, telling the court it could end up altering Colorado's entire contract law scheme to deal with one case.

  • April 9, 2019

    LBI Junior Noteholders Say No To Ch. 11 Extension

    With a confirmation battle set to resume next week, junior noteholders of Spanish-language broadcasting company LBI Media Inc. told the Delaware bankruptcy court Tuesday that the period for the company to file and solicit approval of a Chapter 11 plan should not be extended.

  • April 9, 2019

    Dems Say Net Neutrality Bill Would Throttle 'Unjust' Practices

    A day ahead of a vote set for Wednesday, Democratic lawmakers urged their colleagues to support a bill that would undo the Federal Communications Commission’s repeal of Obama-era net neutrality protections, while Republicans warned their approach threatened a government takeover of the internet.

  • April 9, 2019

    Amazon Should Win 'Fire TV' Trademark Suit, Judge Says

    Amazon's Fire TV doesn't infringe the trademarks of a porn service called "FyreTV," a magistrate judge said Tuesday, stating consumers won't confuse a normal streaming device with an app dedicated to "hardcore pornography."

  • April 9, 2019

    Commerce Asks FCC To Pause Space Junk Mitigation Rule

    The U.S. Department of Commerce's telecommunications agency has asked the Federal Communications Commission to defer a proposed rulemaking intended to help reduce space debris, saying that the FCC should wait until other federal agencies complete their own similar pending rules.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    States May Take The Lead On Regulating AI

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    While artificial intelligence promises to revolutionize the way we live and work, there has been relatively little government regulation targeting it specifically. But legislation referring to AI is currently pending in at least 13 states, and more may be on the way, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • 5 Considerations For Both Sides In Stadium Naming Deals

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    The stadium and arena naming rights deal market remains highly active. The complexity of these agreements and the importance of the terms are growing, say Ryan Davis and Steve Smith of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.

  • Recent Trends In FTC Consumer Protection Enforcement

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    The Federal Trade Commission is focusing its enforcement efforts on financial services, web services and emerging technologies, data security and consumer privacy, telecommunications, and health care — these five areas represented 88 percent of consumer protection actions in 2017 and 2018, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Road To Legal Sports Betting: From Ethics To Economics

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    Recent state bills show how far the views of gambling have moved from the ethics of Major League Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis after the 1919 Black Sox scandal to pure dollars and cents, says Ronald Katz of GCA Law Partners LLP.

  • Lowered Bar For BIPA Lawsuits Will Raise Insurance Issues

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling in Rosenbach v. Six Flags is likely to continue the proliferation of Biometric Information Privacy Act litigation, in turn leading to more insurance coverage disputes over whether BIPA claims involve "personal and advertising injury" or "property damage," says Jonathan Viner of Nicolaides Fink Thorpe Michaelides Sullivan LLP.

  • Fresh Takes On Seeking Costs And Fees Under Rule 45

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    Recent case law reveals that courts vary widely in their approaches to shifting the costs and fees incurred in responding to a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 45 subpoena. Nonparties responding to such requests should consider certain district court trends, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • 3 Steps To Get Ahead Of ADA Web Accessibility Issues

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    Recent web accessibility cases — like a class action targeting Beyonce's website — highlight the lack of guidance in the Americans with Disabilities Act. But there are a few ways to make web content more accessible and reduce exposure to ADA claims, says Amihai Miron, co-founder and CEO of User1st.

  • 10th Circ. Engages Superstorm Scalia With New 'Monsoon'

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    The Tenth Circuit's recent extraterritorial application of securities law against Traffic Monsoon LLC and its founder was arguably inconsistent with the statutory text being examined. This case could bring the crux of Justice Antonin Scalia’s opinion in Morrison v. National Australia Bank back to the U.S. Supreme Court, says Timothy Work of Steptoe & Johnson LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Smith Camp Reviews 'Echo Of Its Time'

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    "Echo of Its Time" is the story of Nebraska’s federal district court from statehood in 1867 to the demise of Prohibition in 1933. Professors John Wunder and Mark Scherer have written an objective, unsentimental and insightful history, layered with context and rich in character study, says U.S. District Judge Laurie Smith Camp of the District of Nebraska.

  • 7 Tips For Tribal Governments To Reduce Member Taxes

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    While Congress focuses its attention on reinstating important tax extenders and debating technical corrections to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, several opportunities currently exist that can benefit tribal governments and their members when filing taxes, say attorneys at Holland & Knight LLP.