Discrimination

  • October 15, 2021

    2nd Circ. Lets NYC Teacher Vax Mandate Stand

    A Second Circuit panel on Friday rejected claims from a group of New York City educators who argued that the city's COVID-19 vaccine requirement for public school teachers is unconstitutional, affirming a lower court's decision that preserved the mandate. 

  • October 15, 2021

    Chicago Radio Host Says Station Defamed Her In $10M Suit

    A Chicago morning radio host for popular station The Mix launched a $10 million defamation suit against its operator, claiming the company publicly portrayed her as a liar to protect her former co-host — its most successful personality — from sexual harassment allegations it knew were true.

  • October 15, 2021

    6th Circ. Nixes Ex-Teacher's Bid To Revive Disability Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit refused Friday to revive a disability bias suit by a former Ohio teacher who was removed from the classroom after discussing with students details about an out-of-body religious experience, saying her school district presented multiple valid reasons for terminating her.

  • October 15, 2021

    Ga. City to Pay $1M To Settle Police Chief Harassment Suit

    A Georgia city inked a $1 million settlement with three female former employees who claimed the city's ex-police chief sexually harassed and touched them without their consent while the former city manager did nothing to stop it, according to a Friday law firm press release.

  • October 15, 2021

    Police Union Sues Over Allegheny County Vaccine Mandate

    Allegheny County's police union claimed the government can't threaten to fire officers who don't get a COVID-19 vaccine, and asked a Pennsylvania court to bar the county's employee vaccine mandate permanently.

  • October 15, 2021

    11th Circ. Affirms Fla. City's Win In Cop's Bias Case

    A Florida city had legitimate reasons for not offering a Black female police officer a training officer position, the Eleventh Circuit ruled Friday, upholding the city's lower court win in a race and sex discrimination suit.

  • October 15, 2021

    NY Watchdog's Confidentiality Shift May Chill Settlements

    The agency that enforces New York state's human rights law will no longer allow private settlements to be confidential, a move panned by employment attorneys on both sides of the bar as a misguided change that will likely discourage those agreements. 

  • October 15, 2021

    Imminent NFL Race-Norming Deal To Be Sealed, For Now

    The anticipated agreement on how to remove controversial use of race-based norms from the NFL concussion settlement is nearing finalization, but it will be kept under seal, at least for now, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Friday after a request from the league, concussion class counsel Chris Seeger of Seeger Weiss LLP and attorneys for two Black former players.

  • October 15, 2021

    Atkinson Andelson Adds Public-Focused Employment Partner

    A labor and employment lawyer with litigation experience who specializes in representing public entities has joined California firm Atkinson Andelson Loya Ruud & Romo as a partner.

  • October 15, 2021

    Counsel Sanctioned In Newark Health Dept. Bias Suit

    An attorney representing a health inspector of Haitian descent in a national origin and retaliation bias suit against the Newark health department was ordered by a New Jersey federal judge on Thursday to reimburse the defendants for legal fees and costs incurred through the litigation.

  • October 15, 2021

    Jones Day Derides Paralegal's 'Excuses' On Serving Bias Suit

    A fired Jones Day paralegal's "feeble justifications" shouldn't win her a second chance to serve the international law firm with her discrimination and harassment suit, the firm told a Boston federal judge Friday.

  • October 15, 2021

    Jury Axes Sexual Harassment Claims Against MyPhillyLawyer

    A Pennsylvania federal jury cleared personal injury firm MyPhillyLawyer on Friday of allegations from a former paralegal that she was subjected to repeated sexual harassment from attorneys and other co-workers during her brief tenure with the firm three years ago.

  • October 15, 2021

    DC Circ. Says Capitol Cop's Media Leak Warranted Demotion

    The D.C. Circuit backed the U.S. Capitol Police Friday in gender discrimination suit, affirming a sergeant's suspension for saying female cops had to "sleep with someone" to advance and ruling the department rightly demoted her for sending a reporter a picture of an officer's unattended gun.

  • October 14, 2021

    Texas Justices Block School District's Vax Mandate

    The Texas Supreme Court stayed the enforcement of San Antonio Independent School District's employee COVID-19 vaccine mandate, which was slated to go into effect Friday, deciding Thursday to maintain the status quo while an appellate court considers the state's challenge to the mandate.

  • October 14, 2021

    FBI's Ex-No. 2 McCabe Inks Deal Over 'Political' Firing

    Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe reached a settlement with the federal government of a suit alleging he was illegally fired for refusing to enact the political agenda of former President Donald Trump, telling a Washington, D.C., federal court on Thursday that the deal makes McCabe eligible for his full pension and other retirement-related benefits.

  • October 14, 2021

    World Wildlife Fund Can't Avoid Pregnancy Bias Case

    A former senior shipping officer at the World Wildlife Fund can move forward with a claim that she was fired because her female boss was biased against pregnant employees, a D.C. federal judge ruled, while dismissing her retaliation claims.

  • October 14, 2021

    Prof Says Navy Employment Can't Excuse Harassment

    A national defense expert suing Navy personnel for harassment and retaliation in Maryland federal court pushed back against their attempt to dodge her suit by claiming immunity as federal employees, saying the allegations are outside the scope of their employment.

  • October 14, 2021

    Ill. Meat Processor, Staffing Co. Settle AG's Race Bias Claims

    An Illinois meat processing company and a staffing agency settled allegations that they engaged in "a brazen pattern of discrimination" against Black applicants, state Attorney General Kwame Raoul's office announced Thursday.

  • October 14, 2021

    Ex-'Hamilton' Performer Says Anti-Trans Bias Led To Ouster

    Broadway musical "Hamilton" failed to protect a transgender cast member from bullying and dropped them from the production as punishment for their request that performers in Los Angeles be provided with a gender-neutral dressing room, the actor alleges in a new civil rights charge.

  • October 14, 2021

    Health Care Workers Take Vax Mandate Challenge To 1st Circ.

    Health care professionals who claim Maine's requirement that they get immunized against COVID-19 is unconstitutional because it doesn't allow for religious exemptions urged the First Circuit on Thursday to block the state's vaccine mandate, a day after losing a round at district court.

  • October 14, 2021

    Texas Judge Wants Unions' Input On United Vaccine Mandate

    A Texas federal judge lamented Thursday the lack of union involvement in a dispute between United Airlines and a proposed class of employees challenging the airline's accommodations for workers exempted from its vaccine mandate for religious or medical reasons.

  • October 14, 2021

    Pot Patient Says Food Co. Illegally Yanked Job Offer

    A Pennsylvania woman with a medical marijuana card has hit food services giant Compass Group USA Inc. with a discrimination suit in state court, alleging the company rescinded a job offer after she failed a prehire drug screen.

  • October 14, 2021

    MyPhillyLawyer Boss Slams Ex-Staffer's Harassment Claims

    The managing partner of Philadelphia-based personal injury firm MyPhillyLawyer forcefully denied allegations during testimony on Thursday that he made an inappropriate comment to an ex-paralegal who's now pursuing a sexual harassment case against her erstwhile employer.

  • October 14, 2021

    Conn. Atty Accuses Criminal Justice Body Of Age Bias

    A senior assistant state's attorney in Connecticut filed a discrimination suit against the state's Criminal Justice Commission on Wednesday, alleging that its denial of interviews for multiple high-ranking state's attorney positions amounted to age discrimination.

  • October 14, 2021

    NYC Teacher Vax Rule Seems Likely To Pass 2nd Circ. Test

    A panel of Second Circuit judges appeared dubious on Thursday of claims that New York City's COVID-19 vaccine requirement for public school teachers violates the U.S. Constitution, signaling they're likely to back a Brooklyn federal judge's decision to let the mandate go forward.

Expert Analysis

  • Activision Gender Bias Probe Is A Cautionary Tale

    Author Photo

    Activision's recent $18 million settlement with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is an example to all human resource and executive leaders of the consequences if they do not take the necessary steps to ensure that their workplaces are free from gender bias, say Thomas Eron and Theresa Rusnak at Bond Schoeneck.

  • How Health Care Cos. Can Untangle Web Of Vaccine Mandates

    Author Photo

    While health care companies anxiously await further guidance from various federal agencies on overlapping COVID-19 vaccine mandates, there are several steps industry employers can take to tackle the compliance conundrum and prepare for accommodation requests, staffing shortages and other likely challenges, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • AI Hiring Tools Could Draw Increased EEOC Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    Given the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recent suggestion that commissioner charges may be used to investigate artificial intelligence hiring tools, employers should take several steps to ensure their use of AI complies with Title VII and the Americans with Disabilities Act, say Daniel Butler and Kevin White at Hunton.

  • Virus ADA Ruling May Prove To Be Double-Edged Sword

    Author Photo

    While a Pennsylvania federal court recently held in Matias v. Terrapin House that an employer illegally fired its worker for regarding her as disabled after she tested positive for COVID-19, the judge’s reasoning relied on outdated Americans with Disabilities Act case law, so plaintiffs should be careful when citing its authority, says Jonathan Mook at DiMuroGinsberg.

  • NYC Fair Chance Act Updates Challenge Finance Employers

    Author Photo

    Financial institutions may struggle to reconcile industry regulators’ criminal background check requirements for job applicants with new restrictions imposed by New York City’s Fair Chance Act amendments, but certain best practices can help employers in this arena balance their competing obligations, say Tyler Hendry and Pamela K. Terry at Herbert Smith.

  • Mental Health Discrimination And Protections At Work: Part 2

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Jennifer Mathis and Lewis Bossing at Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, and Sara Frank at Cozen O'Connor, discuss workplace discrimination issues related to psychiatric disabilities, including U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission case law, hiring best practices and concerns related to COVID-19.

  • Employers Face New Risks Under State Anti-Harassment Laws

    Author Photo

    With sexual harassment claims likely to rise as new state laws expand employee protections and in-person work returns, now is a good time for employers to brush up on the legislative trends that may expand their liability and ensure compliance accordingly, say Buena Vista Lyons and Nicole Herron at FordHarrison.

  • Mental Health Discrimination And Protections At Work: Part 1

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Jennifer Mathis and Lewis Bossing at Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, and Sara Frank at Cozen O'Connor, examine key considerations for employing people with psychiatric disabilities, as well as legal protections available to employees and job applicants who face discrimination for mental health challenges.

  • How Federal Vaccine Mandate Will Affect Gov't Contractors

    Author Photo

    Daniel Kelly at McCarter & English provides an in-depth look at the Biden administration's federal workplace vaccine mandate, and offers compliance tips for the requirement that federal contractors and subcontractors be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by Dec. 8, even if they are not working directly on a government contract.

  • 5th Circ. Rulings Guide On Avoiding FMLA Retaliation Claims

    Author Photo

    Two recent Fifth Circuit decisions in Lindsey v. Bio-Medical Applications of Louisiana and Campos v. Steves & Sons highlight the potential consequences for employers that retaliate against workers covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act, as well as administrative best practices, including proper documentation and progressive discipline policies, says Lionel Schooler at Jackson Walker.

  • Job App Compliance As State Fair Hiring Laws Proliferate

    Author Photo

    As more states and localities continue to pass fair hiring laws that bar employers from soliciting certain information from candidates at the prehire stage, businesses may need to eliminate employment application questions related to age, criminal history records, prior salary and more, say Carly Baratt and Nancy Popper at Epstein Becker.

  • Pa. Ruling Reminds Employers To Rethink Cannabis Testing

    Author Photo

    A Pennsylvania state court’s recent decision in Palmiter v. Commonwealth Health Systems joins other state court rulings prohibiting cannabis-related job discrimination, underscoring the need for businesses to develop drug testing policies that account for varying legal nuances and talent-specific considerations, say attorneys at Vorys Sater.

  • LGBTQ Ruling Shows Limits Of Title VII Religious Exception

    Author Photo

    A North Carolina federal court’s recent ruling in Billard v. Charlotte Catholic High School, finding the school unlawfully fired a gay teacher, narrows an exception that allows religious employers to evade Title VII bias claims when the facts point to a wholly secular job description, says Amy Epstein Gluck at FisherBroyles.