More Employment Coverage

  • July 23, 2021

    Accountant Gets 8 Years For $1.1M Employer, Lender Theft

    A suburban Chicago accountant has been sentenced to more than eight years in prison for misappropriating more than $1.1 million from several employers and making Ponzi-style repayments to some of his victims, federal prosecutors announced Friday.

  • July 22, 2021

    Chamber Tells 11th Circ. WARN Can't Apply To Virus Closures

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and restaurant and retail groups urged the Eleventh Circuit in an amicus brief Wednesday to side with Enterprise in a dispute over whether employers' obligations to alert workers to layoffs under the WARN Act apply to coronavirus-related closures.

  • July 22, 2021

    NFL Says Forfeits Possible In Outbreaks Among Unvaccinated

    NFL teams with COVID-19 outbreaks stemming from unvaccinated players that cause games to be canceled may have to forfeit those games, and players on both teams will lose their game checks, the league told teams Thursday as it seeks to start the new season amid rising infection rates in parts of the country. 

  • July 22, 2021

    T-Mobile Workers Fight Uphill To Save Fair Credit Claims

    A California federal judge suggested Thursday he is likely to dismiss Fair Credit Reporting Act claims against T-Mobile in a larger proposed class action accusing the wireless network operator of improperly conducting background checks and seeking credit reports on its employees and job seekers, saying he saw no plausible arguments of any willful violations.

  • July 22, 2021

    Ga. Insurance Commissioner Guilty In $2M Embezzlement Trial

    Georgia Insurance Commissioner Jim Beck was found guilty by a Georgia federal jury Thursday on 37 charges based on allegations he embezzled more than $2 million from the state-regulated insurance association he used to run before his election to the statewide position.

  • July 22, 2021

    Investors Get SEC Whistleblower Protections Too, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge held Wednesday that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's whistleblower protection rule extends to shareholders, keeping alive the agency's claim that a sports memorabilia company illegally muzzled investors.

  • July 21, 2021

    Ga. Insurance Exec Says FBI Disrupted His American Dream

    Suspended Georgia insurance commissioner Jim C. Beck told jurors in his embezzlement trial on Wednesday that his subcontracting scheme for his former employer was his version of the American Dream until the FBI turned it into a nightmare.

  • July 21, 2021

    Iowa Appeals Court Finds CBD Oil Is A Controlled Substance

    The Iowa Court of Appeals affirmed a local police department's decision to fire an employee for using cannabidiol while on the job and upheld the state's view of CBD as a controlled substance, in an opinion issued Wednesday.

  • July 21, 2021

    2 Sue For Legal Fees In Calif. Undersea Cable Dispute

    Two businessmen caught up in California litigation over control of companies developing undersea telecommunication cable links to Pacific Rim countries have sued their former partner in Chancery Court for legal fees to cover the cost of their defense.

  • July 21, 2021

    Senate Finance Committee To Discuss Retirement Legislation

    The Senate Finance Committee will hold a meeting July 28 to discuss possible retirement legislation, according to a Wednesday announcement.

  • July 20, 2021

    5th Circ. Mulls 'Employee' Definition In $3.8M Insurance Fight

    A Fifth Circuit panel questioned Tuesday whether it could parse the meaning of "employee" under Texas' anti-indemnity statute or if it should send the question to the Texas Supreme Court, in an appeal seeking to reinstate a crane company's lawsuit over a $3.8 million litigation bill.

  • July 20, 2021

    Ga. Insurance Chief Seeks Acquittal Of Embezzlement Charge

    Georgia's suspended insurance commissioner asked a federal court to acquit him of embezzlement charges, saying prosecutors opened his trial with allegations that differed from those they leveled in their indictment.

  • July 20, 2021

    Cognizant Tells Court FCA Suit Over Worker Visas Falls Short

    Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp. on Tuesday urged a New Jersey federal court to toss a False Claims Act lawsuit alleging it defrauded the federal government's worker visa program, arguing that the complaint lacked any allegation that the government was deprived of money or property.

  • July 20, 2021

    UNC Launches First College Athlete Group Licensing Program

    The University of North Carolina said Tuesday it is partnering with marketing and licensing agency The Brandr Group in what is believed to be the first group licensing program for college athletes, allowing them to profit from their names on Tar Heels jerseys and potentially video games.

  • July 20, 2021

    Ga. Appeals Court Judge Tapped To Fill Supreme Court Slot

    Georgia Court of Appeals Judge Verda Colvin will join the Georgia Supreme Court, filling an opening left by former Chief Justice Harold D. Melton, Gov. Brian Kemp announced Tuesday.

  • July 20, 2021

    Insurer Wants Out Of Holiday Inn Owner's BIPA Violation Suit

    Aspen Specialty Insurance asked an Illinois federal judge to clear it from an underlying action accusing a Holiday Inn franchisee of improperly collecting employees' biometric data, saying the policy's exclusions bar coverage.

  • July 20, 2021

    NH Dems Say Immunity Claim Overblown In Virtual Voting Suit

    New Hampshire Democrats told the full First Circuit on Monday that the state's Republican House speaker is wrongly claiming "absolute" legislative immunity to avoid allegations he violated federal disability laws by not letting lawmakers cast votes virtually during the pandemic.

  • July 19, 2021

    Garland Urged To Bring Charges After Nassar FBI Report

    Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, has asked Attorney General Merrick Garland to consider prosecuting the former president of USA Gymnastics and FBI agents who allegedly made false statements to hide their botched investigation into team doctor Larry Nassar's pattern of sexual abuse.

  • July 19, 2021

    DaVita Indictment Draws Next-Day No-Poach Class Action

    A former senior DaVita employee has sued the dialysis giant and its two biggest outpatient medical care facility operator rivals in Illinois federal court, piggybacking on a U.S. Department of Justice "no-poach" criminal indictment against DaVita and a former CEO announced one day earlier.

  • July 19, 2021

    Ex-Execs Seek Win In Pharma Inventory Co. Trade Secret Row

    Two high-ranked former employees at a pharmacy inventory company asked a Georgia federal judge Friday to toss a poaching suit against them, arguing that depositions and reports have confirmed they didn't misuse company information or violate their employment agreements.

  • July 19, 2021

    DaVita Indictment, Biden Order Ramp Up No-Poach Pressure

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Biden White House are making it abundantly clear to expect more criminal antitrust prosecutions against employers that agree to control wages or avoid recruiting from one another.

  • July 19, 2021

    Hacking Suit Against NFL Settlement Firm Sent To Pa.

    A Florida suit claiming NFL concussion settlement auditors hacked a law firm's email is being sent by the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation to the Pennsylvania federal judge overseeing the settlement, despite arguments from the firm that the case belongs in the Sunshine State.

  • July 16, 2021

    BNY Mellon Reaches Settlement With Fired Former Exec

    A former executive of a Bank of New York Mellon Corp. investment unit who had alleged he was fired in retaliation for blowing the whistle on possibly unlawful business activities has settled his dispute with the bank, per a Friday order discontinuing the case.

  • July 16, 2021

    JPMorgan Wins Halt To Ex-Adviser's Alleged Client Poaching

    An Illinois federal judge on Friday granted a bid by JPMorgan to block a former private client adviser from soliciting the bank's clients to move their accounts over to him at Morgan Stanley after alleging he's already poached more than a dozen clients with a collective $18 million in assets.

  • July 16, 2021

    Mechanic Defends $2.2M Award In Offshore Rig Burn Suit

    A mechanic who suffered chemical burns while working to repair an offshore drilling vessel told a Texas appellate court it should uphold the $2.2 million judgment he won after a jury said the shipowner's parent company bore the majority of the blame for his injuries.

Expert Analysis

  • FCA Relator Pursuit Of DOJ's Declined Cases Is Vital

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    While a recent Law360 guest article suggests that the U.S. Department of Justice consider dismissing all False Claims Act cases it declines, that policy would undermine the FCA's broad remedial purpose of empowering private citizens to combat fraud against the government, say Jacklyn DeMar at Taxpayers Against Fraud Education Fund and Renée Brooker at Tycko & Zavareei.

  • Revamping Law Firm Marketing Lists — With Partner Buy-In

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    Jackson Lewis’ Paige Bowser shares lessons from the firm's recent overhaul of an outdated email marketing database, including tips for getting partners on board, ensuring compliance with privacy laws and augmenting outreach strategies.

  • Recent High Court Decisions Signify 1st Amendment Direction

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recently concluded term saw a flurry of First Amendment cases, providing lessons for how the court, with its 6-3 conservative split, may rule next term on issues of free speech, religious freedom, association rights and more, as questions regarding social media and technological advances loom, says Samuel Mitchell at Michael Best.

  • The Murky World Of Legal Rankings Gets Some Clarity In NJ

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    New Jersey's new, stringent approach to legal rankings will make accolade advertising more transparent, benefiting both attorneys and clients and offering legal marketers a new set of best practices amid evolving standards, say Penny Paul at Lowenstein Sandler and Susan Peters at Greybridge.

  • Embracing ESG: Cigna Counsel Talks Employee Wellness

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    Building employee well-being into corporate environmental, social and governance priorities required our legal team to focus more closely on cross-functional collaboration within the company and increased communication with our board of directors and shareholders, says Julia Brncic at Cigna.

  • Courts' Clashing Standards For Evidence At Class Cert.: Part 2

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    While federal circuits continue to split on whether to approach fact and expert evidence differently at class certification, and there is no sign of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling to resolve the issue, applying an admissibility standard to one and not the other appears illogical, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • Hybrid Work Models Are Key To Gender Parity In Law Firms

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    To curb the historically high rates of attrition among female lawyers, Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks suggest firms must normalize hybrid work schedules, and they recommend best practices to promote engagement among all attorneys, regardless of where they work.

  • Baltimore Bill Is Most Draconian Facial Recognition Ban Yet

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    Because Baltimore's recently passed bill banning use of facial recognition by private entities goes even further than Portland's ban by imposing criminal penalties and may encourage lawmakers in other jurisdictions, companies need to institute flexible, adaptable biometric privacy compliance frameworks, says David Oberly at Blank Rome.

  • Courts' Clashing Standards For Evidence At Class Cert.: Part 1

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent ruling in Lyngaas v. Ag highlights an ongoing circuit split on whether plaintiffs moving to certify a class must use admissible evidence and whether fact and expert evidence should be treated equivalently in this regard, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • How Law Firms Can Market To Growing Hispanic Community

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    Hispanics constitute one of the fastest growing minority populations in the U.S., and with a young median age and broad technology use, forward-looking firms should consider digital marketing strategies to build a loyal client base, say Natalie Fragkouli and Liel Levy at Nanato Media.

  • Keys To Efficient And Accurate Doc Review For E-Discovery

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    Attorneys involved in e-discovery can review information accurately and cost-effectively by understanding the data in a document collection and identifying its key pitfalls, drafting comprehensive review guidelines, and preparing ahead, says John Wertelet at Eckert Seamans.

  • The Changing Pennsylvania Tax Landscape For Remote Work

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    Businesses with employees in Pennsylvania should be prepared to adapt to a post-COVID-19 world now that temporary guidance regarding remote work has expired and pre-pandemic rules regarding employment tax withholding and nexus have been applied, say Wendi Kotzen and Christopher Jones at Ballard Spahr.

  • Mass. Ruling A Cautionary Tale For Attorneys Changing Firms

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    The Massachusetts high court's recent ruling in Governo v. Bergeron, that lawyers could be held liable for unfair competition with a former firm, highlights important considerations for departing attorneys soliciting clients to come with them, say Mariana Korsunsky and Gary Ronan at Goulston & Storrs.