More Employment Coverage

  • January 18, 2022

    Delivery Driver's Mom Sues Amazon Over Ill. Facility Collapse

    The parents of an Amazon.com Inc. delivery driver who died when a tornado struck a St. Louis-area fulfillment center sued the e-commerce company, claiming it knowingly placed workers in "imminent danger," according to a lawsuit filed Monday in Illinois state court.

  • January 18, 2022

    Marsh McLennan Employee Data Breach Suit Gets Tossed

    Two former Marsh McLennan employees aren't entitled to relief for the professional services firm's alleged failure to protect their personal information in a data breach, a New York federal judge ruled, saying the workers failed to show how they were harmed.

  • January 18, 2022

    Judge Grills DHS Over Trump-Era Asylum Work Permit Reg

    A Maryland federal judge appeared unconvinced Tuesday by the Biden administration's justification for reinstating a Trump-era regulation that made it harder for asylum-seekers to get permission to work in the U.S. while waiting for their applications to be processed.

  • January 18, 2022

    Ex-Herbalife Exec Accused Of Cutting Bogus $20M Dell Deal

    Dietary supplement company Herbalife International of America Inc. hit a former Herbalife executive and a computer equipment reseller with a breach of contract suit in California federal court Monday, accusing the ex-executive of cutting an unauthorized $20 million deal to buy used Dell equipment and forging order documents.

  • January 18, 2022

    Gov't Urges 11th Circ. To Lift Contractor Vax Mandate Block

    The federal government urged the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday to overturn an injunction blocking its COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal contractors from going into effect, saying the mandate was a legitimate use of the president's delegated authority over procurement issues.

  • January 18, 2022

    Ill. Atty Can't Collect Comp. Claim, Appeals Court Confirms

    An Illinois appellate panel on Friday affirmed a lower court's judgment against an attorney seeking to collect on his workers' compensation claim against a now-defunct funeral financing company, saying he couldn't show a fraudulent transfer occurred when one of its creditors seized the assets and formed a new company.

  • January 18, 2022

    Chancery Judge Says Tesla CEO's Pay Docs Can Stay Sealed

    A Delaware Chancery Court vice chancellor denied a third party's bid to unredact documents at issue in a derivative shareholder lawsuit over Tesla CEO Elon Musk's pay package, finding Musk and Tesla board members had demonstrated good cause to keep the information private.

  • January 14, 2022

    Law360 Names Practice Groups Of The Year

    Law360 would like to congratulate the winners of its 2021 Practice Groups of the Year awards, which honor the attorney teams behind litigation wins and major deals that resonated throughout the legal industry this past year.

  • January 14, 2022

    The Firms That Dominated In 2021

    Nine law firms have earned spots as Law360's Firms of the Year, with 52 Practice Group of the Year awards among them, having steered complex deals and won high-profile victories including at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • January 14, 2022

    401(k) Plan Trustees Get Class Cert. In Foreign Tax Credit Row

    A Florida federal judge certified a class of employee retirement plan administrators Friday in a suit accusing a life insurance company of improperly benefiting from $100 million in foreign tax credits and failing to pass along the funds.

  • January 14, 2022

    Linkedin Divvied Up Market With Facebook, Suit Says

    LinkedIn has been working to monopolize the professional social networking space for years, starting with a secret agreement with Facebook not to encroach upon each other's territory, according to a new proposed class action.

  • January 14, 2022

    Pa. Worker's Off-Site Sandwich Run Didn't Take Him Off Clock

    A Pennsylvania man was still on the clock when he crossed the street to buy a sandwich, and therefore was eligible for workers' compensation when he slipped and was injured during the outing, a Commonwealth Court panel ruled Friday.

  • January 14, 2022

    Chinese Cos. Seek Immunity In Dupont IP Criminal Case

    Chinese steel companies urged a California federal judge Friday to throw out criminal espionage charges they stole DuPont trade secrets for creating titanium dioxide after the Ninth Circuit refused to toss the allegations, arguing that the companies are shielded under the sovereign immunity doctrine and they never waived their defense.

  • January 14, 2022

    11th Circ. Told Booze Sales IP Damages Can't Be Retooled

    An alcohol sales software provider has told the Eleventh Circuit that a panel erred by remanding a jury's $2.7 million damages award in favor of a competitor for certain costs to be deducted, arguing the need for a tweak means the award lacks evidentiary support and should be tossed entirely.

  • January 14, 2022

    Dems Push Probe of Dominican Republic's Sugar Workers

    Democratic members of a House trade subcommittee pushed the Biden administration to investigate allegations of forced labor and exploitation in the Dominican Republic's sugar industry, citing recent reports that belied a decade of efforts to redress labor exploitation.

  • January 13, 2022

    Pret A Manger Would Pay $677K To End Fingerprint Suit

    A Pret a Manger employee asked an Illinois federal judge Wednesday to give the first blessing to a $677,000 settlement that would end litigation over accusations that the international sandwich shop unlawfully collected, stored and used employees' fingerprints for timekeeping purposes.

  • January 13, 2022

    Texas Justices Mull Next Steps In Whataburger Arbitration Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court on Thursday doubted it could rule on the merits of a Whataburger employee's personal injury lawsuit, saying it may have to return the 9-year-old case to a lower appellate court a second time to decide whether the restaurant chain has a valid and enforceable arbitration agreement.

  • January 13, 2022

    Pot Hiring Platform Vangst Raises $19M In Latest Financing

    Cannabis industry hiring platform Vangst announced Thursday that it has completed a $19 million Series B financing round led by venture capital firm Level One Fund and steered by Venable LLP.

  • January 13, 2022

    5th Circ. Partially Revives Asbestos Suit Against Boeing

    The Fifth Circuit has reversed an early win given to The Boeing Co. in a lawsuit seeking to hold the aerospace corporation liable for the mesothelioma diagnosis of a NASA mechanical engineer, but the appellate court tossed wrongful death claims filed by the man's children.

  • January 13, 2022

    Ex-Prof Must Face Charges He Lied To NASA About China Ties

    A former Texas A&M University professor can't rely on the specifics of congressional funding restrictions to escape criminal charges that he lied to NASA about his affiliation with a Chinese university, a Houston federal judge said Wednesday.

  • January 13, 2022

    Worker Says Wells Fargo Scared Her Out Of COBRA Coverage

    An ex-worker slapped Wells Fargo with a proposed class action in Florida federal court accusing the bank of discouraging employees from seeking continuing health coverage by telling them that filling out forms incorrectly could be seen as fraud.

  • January 13, 2022

    Sens. Move Forward Nominees For FDA Chief, Labor Dept.

    A U.S. Senate committee on Thursday voted to confirm the White House's nomination of cardiologist Dr. Richard Califf to head the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the second time, while also advancing nominees to the U.S. Department of Labor.

  • January 12, 2022

    10th Circ. Won't Revisit Ruling In Ex-Employee's Ute Dispute

    The Tenth Circuit tersely denied en banc rehearing of its August decision to toss a nine-year-old employment contract case brought by a former land division manager for the Ute Indian Tribe.

  • January 12, 2022

    Engineers Accuse Raytheon, Other Firms Of No-Poach Deal

    Raytheon and a handful of other aerospace firms have been hit with another proposed class action by engineers who say their careers were stifled by the companies' nearly decadelong scheme to suppress wages by agreeing not to poach each other's employees.

  • January 12, 2022

    NJ Chief Justice Dragged Into Ex-Judge's Back-Pay Suit

    A federal court on Wednesday allowed a former state court jurist to add New Jersey Supreme Court Chief Justice Stuart J. Rabner as a defendant in her lawsuit seeking back pay for the period of time she was suspended pending now-dismissed criminal charges alleging she helped her fugitive ex-boyfriend evade police.

Expert Analysis

  • New Whistleblower Rights Heighten Risk For NY Employers

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    Amendments to New York's anti-retaliation law that go into effect next week will drastically expand whistleblower protections, leaving employers to mitigate the increased risk of claim exposure while also considering how COVID-19 mandates might complicate compliance, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

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    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • US Should Broaden Visa Interview Waivers Amid Pandemic

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    To help ease processing delays, the U.S Department of State and Biden administration should encourage consular posts to implement recently expanded in-person interview waivers for nonimmigrant visa applicants, and extend the policy to include certain immigrant visa applications, says Dominique Pando Bucci​ at Kurzban Kurzban.

  • Top 10 Whistleblowing And Retaliation Events Of 2021

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    Last year's most important whistleblower developments will likely reverberate into 2022 and beyond, with key court rulings and legislative advancements poised to expand protections, and a record-breaking amount of awards issued by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission likely to incentivize more information sharing, say Steven Pearlman and Pinchos Goldberg at Proskauer.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonpublic Info, Brand Names, Prejudice

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Roke Iko at MoFo discusses three decisions from the U.S. Government Accountability Office and the Federal Circuit, which shed light on the risks of involving former government employees with nonpublic information in the proposal process, requirements for brand-name justification, and when a presumption of prejudice exists.

  • Mitigating Risks In Virtual Work Immigration Programs

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    As the pandemic accelerates a global shift in immigration policy objectives from boosting tourism toward long-term economic growth, to the benefit of remote workers, employers must implement solid risk mitigation tactics that track evolving requirements that already varied from country to country, says Nofisatu Mojidi at Fragomen.

  • A Tale Of Two Cases: Lessons In No-Poach Litigation

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    Attorneys at Hunton compare two recent no-poach cases, Aya Healthcare v. AMN Healthcare and Pittsburgh Logistics Systems v. Beemac Trucking, which dealt with seemingly similar provisions but reached different results, offering guidance to avoid or combat these crucial antitrust issues.

  • Top 5 Drug And Medical Device Legal Issues Of 2021

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    Two years into the pandemic, COVID-19 continues to drive significant legal developments for drug and device companies, but opioid, personal jurisdiction and litigation funding trends are noteworthy as well, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Navy Vaccine Religious Exemption Ruling Warrants Scrutiny

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    A Texas federal court’s recent order, relying on the Religious Freedom Restoration Act to enjoin the Navy from disciplining service members who refused the COVID-19 vaccination on religious grounds, ignores U.S. Supreme Court precedent and raises serious questions about the scope of the First Amendment's free exercise clause, says George Chuzi at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • Workers' Comp Considerations As Ga. Cannabis Laws Evolve

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    With medical marijuana legislation in Georgia expected to implicate workers’ compensation claims, to address potential issues related to cannabis prescribed for work-related injuries, employers should implement zero-tolerance drug policies and strong screening methods, and keep apprised of the ever-changing policy and litigation landscapes, says Joanna Hair at Swift Currie.

  • How To Navigate The Coming Antitrust Policy Tests

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    Attorneys at Proskauer explain how to steer the course in antitrust law this year as 2021's policy changes are tested in court challenges, and play out not only in Congress, but also in the political mainstream.

  • Associate Hiring Outlook At Law Firms Is Bright For 2022

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    After a year of extraordinary signing bonuses, nearly instantaneous offers and flexible work arrangements, strong demand for talented law firm associates will continue into 2022 — with some differences between East and West Coast markets — and junior attorneys should take steps to capitalize on the opportunity, say Ru Bhatt and Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.