Aerospace & Defense

  • December 02, 2019

    Navy Probing Contractor Over Waste Dumping Allegations

    The Naval Criminal Investigative Service is investigating whether a U.S. Navy contractor broke the law in its handling of wastewater at Japanese bases, it confirmed Monday.

  • December 02, 2019

    House Can't See Mueller Grand Jury Docs, DOJ Tells DC Circ.

    The Trump administration told the D.C. Circuit on Monday that Congress isn't entitled to secret grand jury materials related to former special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation because an impeachment inquiry isn't a judicial proceeding.

  • December 02, 2019

    OIG Says DOD Reimbursed $219M Without Justification

    U.S. Department of Defense contracting officers reimbursed without proper explanation $219 million in contractor costs that had been questioned by auditors, meaning they may have paid out on unallowable claims, a Pentagon watchdog said in a report released Monday.

  • December 02, 2019

    Serco Lands $95M Contract For Veteran Transition Services

    Business management provider Serco Inc. announced Monday that it has received a $95 million contract from the U.S. Department of Labor to provide veterans with employment counseling and placement services to give them a smooth transition into the civilian workforce.

  • December 02, 2019

    US Considering Tariff Hike As WTO Faults EU Plane Subsidies

    The European Union's bid to undo U.S. tariffs on $7.5 billion worth of its goods fell short Monday as a World Trade Organization panel ruled that Brussels has failed to withdraw illegal subsidies to plane maker Airbus, prompting the U.S. to consider hiking its retaliatory duties.

  • December 02, 2019

    China Suspends US Military Craft Visits After HK Bills Pass

    China on Monday suspended visits of U.S. military ships and aircraft to Hong Kong and imposed sanctions against several U.S. non-governmental organizations after President Donald Trump signed a bill supporting pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong.

  • December 02, 2019

    Boustani Acquitted In $2B Mozambique Loan Fraud Case

    A New York federal jury cleared Privinvest Group executive Jean Boustani on Monday of conspiracy charges brought over an alleged fraud and kickback scheme involving $2 billion in Mozambican government-backed loans for maritime projects.

  • December 02, 2019

    Trump Will Impose Metal Tariffs Against Argentina, Brazil

    President Donald Trump said he would set national security-driven steel and aluminum tariffs against Brazil and Argentina on Monday, accusing both countries of lowering the value of their currencies to gain an unfair trading edge.

  • November 27, 2019

    Trump Signs Hong Kong Support Bills, Defying China

    President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed two bipartisan bills supporting Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protesters and threatening trade sanctions against Hong Kong, despite threats from China that it would retaliate should the legislation become law.

  • November 27, 2019

    Prof. Calls Qualcomm 5G National Security Fears Baseless

    The national security concerns blocking a sweeping injunction covering Qualcomm’s licensing practices aren’t based on reality, a law professor at the University of Utah has told the Ninth Circuit, urging it to instead block the company’s monopoly on the modem chip market.

  • November 27, 2019

    Flynn's Sentencing Delayed Again Pending FBI Russia Report

    A D.C. federal judge agreed Wednesday to delay the December sentencing of Michael Flynn, a day after prosecutors and attorneys for President Donald Trump's former national security adviser asked the court to put it off until the release of the U.S. Department of Justice inspector general's report on the FBI's handling of the Russia investigation.

  • November 27, 2019

    Joint Chiefs Vice Chair Sued Over Sex Assault Claims

    The Pentagon's second-highest-ranking officer has been hit with a lawsuit by a former subordinate in California federal court, accusing him of subjecting her to unwanted sexual acts and retaliating when she sought to distance herself from him.

  • November 27, 2019

    Law360's Tort Report: Georgia Damages Cap Faces Challenge

    A looming constitutional challenge of Georgia's cap on punitive damages and a Nevada water park's $49 million settlement over a boy's catastrophic injuries lead Law360’s Weekly Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • November 27, 2019

    Why The FBI's Former Top Lawyer Now Embraces Encryption

    Jim Baker, the legal architect behind the FBI's headline-grabbing demand for Apple to unlock the iPhone of a dead suspect in the San Bernardino terrorist attack, tells Law360 why he now believes encryption is essential to protect Americans' cybersecurity.

  • November 27, 2019

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: IT, Satellite And Engine Deals

    In this Thanksgiving weekend edition of Government Contracts of the Month, Law360 lays out a spread of some of November's top deals, including a $3.3 billion contract for satellite support services, $5.7 billion to airlift defense officials and cargo and $1.3 billion for helicopter engines.

  • November 26, 2019

    DOD Finalizes Fixed-Price Contract Preference In New Rules

    The U.S. Department of Defense released a handful of new acquisition rules Tuesday, most prominently a final rule formally implementing a preference for fixed-price contracts, including in foreign military sales.

  • November 26, 2019

    Breaking Down Elon Musk's 'Pedo Guy' Defamation Trial

    Billionaire Elon Musk wants to take mankind to Mars, but next week, he'll be headed into court to defend calling one man a pedophile in a trial that will pit a veteran defamation lawyer against a younger hotshot who counts celebrity rappers and sports stars as clients.

  • November 26, 2019

    Claims Court Won't Revisit Ruling In Air Force Crypto Dispute

    A Court of Federal Claims judge refused Tuesday to issue a written decision in a dispute over the U.S. Air Force's move to award a cryptography contract to a federal research center instead of industry, saying any opinion would be academic after a bench ruling.

  • November 26, 2019

    Commerce Tees Up Rules For Trump's Network Security Order

    The U.S. Department of Commerce on Tuesday floated its plan for implementing President Donald Trump's executive order on network security, saying it will evaluate transactions affecting U.S. networks through a fact-specific, case-by-case method.

  • November 26, 2019

    Finjan Wants Fed. Circ. To Reverse Cisco Cybersecurity IP Win

    Cybersecurity firm Finjan is asking the Federal Circuit to overturn a Patent Trial and Appeal Board decision invalidating parts of its malware detection patent challenged by Cisco, notably arguing that the board was inconsistent in its analysis of “similarly situated claims.”

  • November 25, 2019

    Wigdor Says Fox Guest's Defamation Suit Lacks Ties To Texas

    A former Fox News guest commentator who accused Wigdor LLP founder Douglas H. Wigdor of orchestrating a campaign suggesting the pundit pushed a bogus murder conspiracy story on the cable news network has failed to show why his suit should be heard in Texas federal court, the attorney said Monday.

  • November 25, 2019

    Roger Stone's Bid To Shake Guilty Verdicts Falls Flat

    Former Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone can't escape guilty verdicts on the seven felony charges against him because he made no argument that the evidence used to convict him was lacking in any way, a D.C. federal judge explained Monday.

  • November 25, 2019

    US Sues Contractor Over 'Sham Office' Used To Earn $52M

    The U.S. government has accused an Idaho-based company of fraudulently obtaining more than $52 million in federal contracts by allegedly creating a sham office with no-show employees to qualify for benefits intended to help small businesses in economically depressed areas.

  • November 25, 2019

    GAO Issues Full Ruling Backing Blue Origin Air Force Protest

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office fully explained its decision to sustain Blue Origin’s protest over the U.S. Air Force’s pending space launch contract, saying bidders lacked a fair chance to win the deal on their own merits.

  • November 25, 2019

    Feds Say DC Court Can't Review Vets' Citizenship Denial

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services urged a D.C. federal court to toss a lawsuit from four U.S. Army veterans who were denied citizenship, saying the court lacks the authority to review their claims.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Courts Keep Rejecting Litigation Funding Discovery Campaign

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    As shown by recent case law, including a New Jersey federal court holding last month in Valsartan Products Liability Litigation, there is no "shifting tide" in favor of disclosing litigation funding arrangements, say Matthew Harrison and Stephanie Southwick of Bentham IMF.

  • How Emotionally Intelligent AI Could Assist With E-Discovery

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    While artificial intelligence has already revolutionized the e-discovery field, the development of emotionally intelligent AI promises to explore data in an even more nuanced and human way, thereby further reducing the burden on legal teams, say Lisa Prowse and Brian Schrader at e-discovery services provider BIA.

  • Chinese Acquisitions Even More Uncertain In New CFIUS Era

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    While hostility toward Chinese-led investment in U.S. companies is not new, the proposal expanding the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States' authority to scrutinize such deals casts further doubt over how many inbound Chinese investments in the U.S. will actually close, says Jing Zhao at Saul Ewing.

  • Preventable Risks Your Law Firm May Be Overlooking

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    Although most lawyers are well-prepared to defend or justify the value of an insurance claim for clients, often law firms have not clearly identified their own potential liabilities, planned for adequate insurance or established prudent internal risk management practices, says Victor Sordillo at Sompo International.

  • 6 Ethics Tips For Attorneys Making Lateral Transfers

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    With lateral transfers between law firms on the rise, it is more important than ever for partners to understand the steps they must take to adhere to ethics rules and other requirements when making a transition, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Fed. Circ. GE Case Reveals IPR Appellants' Standing Burden

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    In light of the recent Federal Circuit decision in General Electric v. United Technologies, which illustrates the Federal Circuit's demanding standard for demonstrating Article III standing in appeals of inter partes reviews, counsel for appellants are well advised to focus carefully on injury in fact, says Richard Stark of Cravath.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Task-Order Value, Discretion, OCIs

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Sandeep Nandivada of Morrison & Foerster looks at two September decisions from the U.S. Government Accountability Office, covering task-order jurisdiction and agency discretion to implement corrective action, and one from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims on standards for organizational conflicts of interest.

  • 10 Tips For Operating Under A Status-Of-Forces Agreement

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    Status-of-forces agreements establish which laws of a foreign country apply to U.S. military personnel and government contractors working there, but they can be complicated and difficult to navigate, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • Consider The Power Of Tactical Empathy

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    By employing tactical empathy techniques to understand the interests behind the positions taken by others, attorneys can gain the upper hand in deal negotiations and litigation while still promoting and preserving long-term relationships with opponents, judges and others, say Shermin Kruse of TEDxYouth@Wrigleyville and Ursula Taylor of Strategic Health.

  • DOD May Clarify Sole-Source Production Contracting Rules

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    Proposed rulemaking by the U.S. Department of Defense is an opportunity for the agency to clarify the extent to which it agrees with a recent decision by the U.S. Government Accountability Office that seems to allow the DOD to sidestep statutory preconditions for awarding sole-source follow-on production contracts, says Nathaniel Castellano at Arnold & Porter.

  • The Problem — And Opportunity — Of Implicit Bias In The Bar

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    Law firms are beginning to recognize implicit bias as a problem. But too few recognize that it is also an opportunity to broaden our thinking and become better legal problem solvers, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Thapar Reviews Gorsuch's 'A Republic'

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's new book "A Republic, If You Can Keep It" offers hope for our constitutional system through stories of American greatness, and sheds much-needed light on originalism for skeptics, says Sixth Circuit Judge Amul Thapar.

  • Another Rollback In US-Cuba Financial Relations

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    The new amendments to Cuban sanctions, together with an August executive order blocking Venezuelan government property, illustrate the Trump administration’s approach of restricting these countries' general access to the U.S. financial system while carving out permissible transactions with the private sectors in those countries, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Opinion

    True Wellness Requires A Deeper Look At Atty Profession

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    While I applaud all of the law firms that have signed the American Bar Association's campaign to improve attorney well-being, to achieve a truly holistic solution we must ask difficult questions about what we do, how we do it and the expectations we have set for ourselves and our clients, says Edward Shapiro at Much Shelist.

  • Claims Court Lowers Bar For Proposal Misrepresentation

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    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims' recent decision in NetCentrics is a departure from prior decisions in that it holds that intent is not a necessary element of material proposal misrepresentation, says Aron Beezley at Bradley Arant.

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