Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • May 13, 2021

    Imperva Hires Infor Atty As Data Privacy Officer, Deputy GC

    Imperva Inc. announced Thursday that it has hired Kate Barecchia as its global data privacy officer and deputy general counsel.

  • May 12, 2021

    Gibson Dunn Partner Questioned On 7-Figure Donziger Bills

    A Gibson Dunn partner with a lead role in pursuing financial information from Chevron foe Steven Donziger acknowledged during cross-examination Wednesday that the oil giant was willing to spend millions to pursue an $800,000 judgment and other relief against him.

  • May 12, 2021

    House Dems Urge Facebook To Ax WhatsApp Privacy Update

    A group of U.S. House Democrats on Tuesday became the latest to put heat on Facebook to scrap plans to require WhatsApp users to consent to policy changes that would expand the sharing of data between the companies, arguing that the move violates Facebook's past privacy promises and would be particularly detrimental to the messaging service's large population of Hispanic users. 

  • May 12, 2021

    SEC Fines Broker $1.5M For Failure To Report Cybercrimes

    A broker-dealer of Empower Retirement must pay $1.5 million to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for failing to file hundreds of suspicious-activity reports despite knowing that bad actors were hacking, or attempting to hack, customer accounts, the agency announced Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Senate Panel Greenlights TikTok Ban For Federal Devices

    The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee unanimously passed a bill that aims to prevent federal employees from downloading the controversial app TikTok onto government devices, according to a Wednesday statement from Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., a sponsor of the bill.

  • May 12, 2021

    Sens. Seek To Tighten Online Privacy Protections For Kids

    A new bipartisan bill aims to update privacy protections for children by expanding existing law to include some teenagers and further restrict companies' collection of minors' personal information.

  • May 12, 2021

    Goodwin, Latham Rep Cybersecurity Biz's $90M Funding

    Goodwin-led cybersecurity business NetSPI said Wednesday it closed on $90 million in funding with help from Latham clients KKR and Ten Eleven Ventures.

  • May 12, 2021

    Wawa Gets Employee Pay Claims Trimmed In Data Breach Suit

    Convenience store chain Wawa Inc. can't duck employees' claims that their payment and personal information were stolen in a data breach, but claims the company also shorted them on overtime and made them work off-the-clock were tossed by a Pennsylvania federal judge Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    American Airlines Tries Again To Shake Biometric Class Suit

    American Airlines has told an Illinois federal judge that courts lack jurisdiction over biometric privacy complaints against a unionized airline, saying all state law claims are preempted by collective bargaining agreements under the Railway Labor Act.

  • May 12, 2021

    Biden Orders IT Gov't Contractors To Report Data Breaches

    President Joe Biden created a new national review board for major cyberattacks and ordered IT sector government contractors to report data breaches as part of an executive order issued Wednesday after hacks on a major U.S. pipeline company and federal agencies.

  • May 12, 2021

    FTC Says 9th Circ. Can't Revive Robocall 'Soundboard' Suit

    A call center operator's attempt to revive a challenge to the Federal Trade Commission's interpretation of "soundboard" telemarketing technology falls flat because the operator's legal challenge was riddled with fatal errors, the agency has told the Ninth Circuit.

  • May 12, 2021

    Big Tech Critic Lina Khan Clears Senate Panel For FTC Seat

    A U.S. Senate panel on Wednesday approved the nomination of progressive academic and Big Tech adversary Lina Khan to the Federal Trade Commission, bringing the agency one step closer to a Democratic majority.

  • May 12, 2021

    House Reps Renew Bipartisan Pipeline Cybersecurity Push

    In the wake of a ransomware attack that temporarily forced the nation's largest fuel pipeline system offline, a bipartisan group of House lawmakers reintroduced multiple bills aimed at staving off similar attacks on critical energy infrastructure in the future.

  • May 11, 2021

    German Regulator Bars Facebook From Using WhatsApp Data

    A German data protection regulator blocked Facebook from using personal information obtained from its WhatsApp subsidiary Tuesday, just days before a deadline for WhatsApp users to agree to privacy policy changes that the regulator claims will unlawfully expand the sharing of data between the companies. 

  • May 11, 2021

    6th Circ. Affirms Toss Of Burger King Credit Card Receipt Suit

    While a Burger King operator did technically violate the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act by including 10 credit card digits on a customer's receipt, the customer did not properly allege that she was harmed, the Sixth Circuit ruled Tuesday, upholding a lower court's dismissal of her putative class action.

  • May 11, 2021

    Gibson Dunn Atty Rebuts Donziger Privacy Concerns At Trial

    A Gibson Dunn & Crutcher partner testified Tuesday in Chevron foe Steven Donziger's contempt trial that a court order mandating him to hand over his devices included privacy protections, despite Donziger's fears about delivering the entire body of his communications to the company.

  • May 11, 2021

    FTC To Lean On State AGs After High Court Ruling, Head Says

    The Federal Trade Commission is planning to partner "more frequently and more enthusiastically" with state attorneys general to press consumer protection and privacy enforcement actions in the wake of a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that slashed the FTC's ability to pursue monetary relief from lawbreakers, the agency's acting chair said Tuesday. 

  • May 11, 2021

    Gov't May Lean On Private Sector To Stop Next Critical Hack

    Convincing private businesses to open up to the government about cybercrime could be key in preventing future hacks of U.S. critical infrastructure, a risk underscored by a ransomware attack that has shuttered one of the nation's largest fuel pipelines.

  • May 11, 2021

    DC NFL Team Backs Ex-GC's Secrecy Bid In Wilkinson Suit

    The Washington Football Team backed its former general counsel's bid to seal arguments made in Virginia federal court litigation over a sexual harassment probe into the team, noting that, as a nonparty, the team never had a chance to consider some key documents in question.

  • May 10, 2021

    Colonial Hack Sets Stage For Pipeline Cybersecurity Push

    A major ransomware attack that has shuttered the largest refined petroleum products pipeline system in the country has the industry on alert over potential liability from future hacks and bracing for new requirements from federal regulators and lawmakers.

  • May 10, 2021

    FBI Outs Ransomware Cartel Behind Colonial Pipeline Hack

    The FBI on Monday pinned a ransomware attack that closed one of the country's largest pipelines on a criminal hacking group that has operated in Russia, while White House officials mulled how to boost cybersecurity at privately held critical infrastructure companies.

  • May 10, 2021

    44 AGs Urge Facebook To Scrap Plan For 'Instagram Kids'

    A bipartisan coalition of attorneys general from more than three dozen states and territories including New York, California and Texas on Monday urged Facebook to shut down potential plans to roll out a version of Instagram for children under 13, slamming the social media giant for "historically failing" to protect the privacy and safety of kids online. 

  • May 10, 2021

    Trucker Slams Union Pacific's Bid To Delay Ill. Biometric Suit

    A truck driver has urged an Illinois federal judge not to pause his biometric privacy claims against Union Pacific while appellate courts weigh in on three pending cases, arguing a stay would lengthen already significant discovery delays in his suit.

  • May 10, 2021

    Jury Convicts Parts Buyer Of Violating Iran Trade Embargo

    A Texas federal jury has convicted an Iranian national on a slew of counts, including violating a trade embargo with Iran, for obtaining, or attempting to obtain, $2.6 million worth of parts that federal prosecutors have deemed "military sensitive," the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • May 10, 2021

    Chase Wins $20M In Landry's Data Breach Suit

    Landry's must repay $20 million in penalties that Visa and Mastercard levied against JPMorgan Chase Bank NA following a breach of the hospitality company's data, a Texas federal judge has ruled, saying Landry's broke its merchant agreement.

Expert Analysis

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

    Author Photo

    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Bracing For The Next Wave Of Health Care Enforcement

    Author Photo

    Health companies should take proactive steps against a coming wave of federal enforcement, in light of massive new health funding, agencies' desire to protect COVID-19 relief funds, increased use of data analytics and a likely rise in qui tam suits, say attorneys at Foley & Lardner.

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

    Author Photo

    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • How Biden's First 100 Days Will Affect Gov't Contractors

    Author Photo

    Joseph Berger and Thomas Mason at Thompson Hine examine the significant opportunities for government contractors arising from actions during the first 100 days of the Biden administration, which set the stage for unprecedented investment in national infrastructure, domestic manufacturing, research and development, clean energy, pandemic response and economic recovery.

  • Avoiding Biometric Privacy Class Actions After Md., NY Bills

    Author Photo

    Pending biometric privacy laws in Maryland and New York, if passed, could trigger other jurisdictions to follow suit, so businesses should start implementing compliance practices now to stave off a wave of class actions, says David Oberly at Blank Rome.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

    Author Photo

    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • Series

    Winner's Playbook: Behind The Scenes Of Lamps Plus

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court issued a major decision on class arbitration in Lamps Plus v. Varela two years ago. Now, attorneys at Lewis Brisbois and Mayer Brown explain how their work for Lamps Plus developed the law on interpreting arbitration agreements that exclude language expressly addressing class arbitration.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Scope, Evaluation Criterion, Privity

    Author Photo

    In this month's bid protest roundup, Sandeep Nandivada and Markus Speidel at MoFo look at April U.S. Government Accountability Office and U.S. Court of Federal Claims decisions concerning proposed labor categories outside the scope of vendor schedule contracts, use of unstated evaluation criterion, and whether co-prime contractor privity supports standing to protest.

  • CFPB's First 100 Days Lay Foundation To Maximize Authority

    Author Photo

    Former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau general counsel Quyen Truong, now at Stroock, analyzes how developments in the first 100 days under new CFPB leadership reclaim the agency's activist mission and authority, redirect resources toward forceful action, and open the door to change the regulatory framework.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

    Author Photo

    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • D&O Insurance Implications From Tesla's Stock Drop Suit

    Author Photo

    A recent shareholder stock drop lawsuit against Tesla showcases the legal perils that can follow companies' social media missteps, and highlights the importance of directors and officers liability insurance in the current age of political polarization, says Tae Andrews at Miller Friel.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

    Author Photo

    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • How Justices' AMG Ruling Affects Privacy And Cybersecurity

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in AMG Capital Management v. Federal Trade Commission removes the regulator's ability to seek monetary damages that discouraged privacy and cybersecurity breaches, and as a result, companies should reassess their exposure in these areas, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • Opinion

    Justices Should Clarify Securities Fraud Loss Causation

    Author Photo

    At its May conference, the U.S. Supreme Court should agree to review BofI Securities Litigation, to clear up a circuit split on how to assess loss causation in securities fraud cases, as shareholder class actions increasingly focus on external events that led to a stock drop, says Lyle Roberts at Shearman & Sterling.

  • FDCPA Ruling Has Privacy Implications For Financial Services

    Author Photo

    In Hunstein v. Preferred Collection, the Eleventh Circuit’s recent decision to allow claims against a debt collector who shared customer information with a vendor is concerning for financial services companies in its potential to broaden the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and other consumer protection laws to include privacy rights, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!