Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • April 12, 2024

    Credit Suisse, Lloyds, Others Ink $3.5M Libor Deal

    Plaintiffs in the years-long suit alleging various big banks manipulated the London Interbank Offered Rate, or Libor, have reached a $3.45 million settlement with Credit Suisse AG, Lloyds Bank and others, bringing the total settlement recovery amount to more than $780 million.

  • April 12, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen footwear brand Dr. Martens hit online retailer Temu with a passing off claim, Welsh soccer club Swansea sue its former head coach Russell Martin, Russian diamond tycoon Dmitry Tsvetkov file a claim against his former business Equix Group Ltd., and U.S. bank Omega Financial Corporation hit African oil and gas company Tende Energy with a claim. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 12, 2024

    Abbott Loses Bid To Nix UK Whistleblowing Case On Appeal

    An appeals tribunal has rejected Abbott Laboratories' bid to escape a whistleblowing case brought by the founders of a British DNA technology business that it bought, concluding on Friday that the founders had an arguable case that U.K. judges had jurisdiction.

  • April 12, 2024

    Denmark's £1.4B Tax Fraud Trial Heads For 'Uncharted Waters'

    Denmark will open its £1.4 billion ($1.7 billion) dividend fraud case in London on Monday, beginning a yearlong trial that will have wide implications for other disputes arising out of the cum-ex trading scandal that has swept Europe.

  • April 12, 2024

    Over 800 Directors Banned For COVID Loan Fraud In 1 Yr

    A total of 831 company directors were banned in the last 12 months for defrauding the COVID loan support scheme for businesses following investigations by the Insolvency Service, the government agency said Friday.

  • April 12, 2024

    FCA Warns Motor Financing Firms To Hold Enough Capital

    Britain's financial watchdog warned lenders Friday to keep enough cash at all times for their motor financing business as the regulator continues to look into a recent increase in customer complaints.

  • April 12, 2024

    Apple Loses Bid To Toss $1B App Maker Charges Case

    The Competition Appeal Tribunal refused on Friday to toss a £785 million ($996 million) proposed class action by app developers against Apple over commission payments after finding that the claimants had a real shot at showing that the case was governed by U.K. law.

  • April 12, 2024

    Ex-MoD Official Imprisoned For Taking Secret Kickbacks

    A former Ministry of Defence official was sentenced to 2½ years in prison at a London court on Friday for receiving £70,000 ($88,000) in secret payments as part of a lucrative defense contract in Saudi Arabia.

  • April 11, 2024

    Autonomy Became Less Transparent Before Sale, Jury Told

    An ex-market analyst testifying Thursday in a California criminal trial over claims that former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch duped HP into buying the British company for $11.7 billion told jurors that the company became less forthcoming about some of its accounting a couple of years before the sale.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Sidley Partner Says CPS Did Not Disclose Prosecution Info

    A former Sidley Austin LLP partner, a former senior KPMG LLP official and a banking adviser have hit back at the Crown Prosecution Service in the men's £66 million ($82.8 million) claim over a failed tax fraud prosecution, arguing that their prosecutor hid important information from them.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Post Office Boss Denies 'Cover Up' Of IT Bugs

    A former Post Office boss has denied trying to "cover up" the fact that senior members of the organization knew the IT system used to prosecute hundreds of innocent sub-postmasters was faulty, as he gave evidence to an inquiry Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Cable Co. Says Funding For Price Fixing CPO Lacks 'Visibility'

    A major European power cable supplier questioned Thursday whether a representative seeking damages on behalf of U.K. electricity customers had allocated enough money to cover their costs during a hearing to decide whether the mass claim should be certified.

  • April 11, 2024

    Solicitor Struck Off For Misleading Client Over PI Claim

    A former Slater and Gordon personal injury lawyer who admitted that he misled a client about the status of her claim for more than 15 years was struck off by a tribunal on Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Sanctions Targets Eye EU-UK Split As Appeals Stack Up

    A court ruling on Wednesday, which upended the first round of European Union sanctions imposed on two Russian tycoons, contrasts with the approach taken by the English courts, where legal challenges to the restrictive measures have been repeatedly rebuffed.

  • April 11, 2024

    £500K Injury Fraudster Sentenced After TV Appearance

    A woman who sought to claim almost £500,000 ($627,000) for injuries that she said left her unable to walk unaided has been sentenced for fraud after being spotted on a daytime reality TV talk show.

  • April 11, 2024

    FCA Finds Failings By Administrator Of Woodford Funds

    The Financial Conduct Authority said Thursday it has found that Link Fund Solutions failed to act with "due skill, care and diligence" when it was the authorized manager of the failed £3.7 billion ($4.6 billion) flagship fund managed by Neil Woodford.

  • April 10, 2024

    No Merit To Autonomy Whistleblower Claims, Auditor Says

    A Deloitte partner testifying in a California criminal trial over claims that former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch and finance director Stephen Chamberlain duped HP into buying the British tech company for $11.7 billion said Wednesday that auditors concluded that whistleblower allegations by a finance department executive were meritless.

  • April 10, 2024

    Former Judge Says Post Office Prosecutions Made No Sense

    A former senior judge who oversaw a mediation scheme between the Post Office and people it wrongly prosecuted based on faulty IT data said the organization's case "didn't make sense," as he gave evidence to the inquiry into the scandal on Wednesday.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty In OneCoin Scam A Flight Risk, Feds Say

    A former Locke Lord LLP partner who was convicted of laundering proceeds from the OneCoin cryptocurrency scam has "every incentive" to flee the country, prosecutors told a New York federal judge, arguing he shouldn't be allowed to stay out on bail while his appeal is pending.

  • April 10, 2024

    PCAOB Fines KPMG, Deloitte Units $27M For Cheating Claims

    KPMG Netherlands and two Deloitte units will pay a combined $27 million to settle allegations from the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board of widespread answer sharing in their internal training programs, with KPMG's $25 million penalty marking the largest fine PCAOB has ever imposed.

  • April 10, 2024

    UK Reports £612M Lost To Investment Fraud Last Year

    Cryptocurrency scams accounted for the bulk of investment fraud cases that cost U.K. investors more than £612 million ($771 million) in 2023, according to crime data service Action Fraud.

  • April 10, 2024

    Swiss To Beef Up Banking Rules After Credit Suisse Rescue

    The Swiss government said Wednesday that it plans to beef up rules for its largest domestic lenders, including giving its financial watchdog an expanded toolkit after the near-collapse of Credit Suisse revealed holes in the current regime.

  • April 10, 2024

    Fraudsters Behind £50M Benefits Scam Get Sentencing Date

    Five Bulgarians who pleaded guilty to fraud and money laundering have been convicted at a London criminal court, the European Agency for Criminal Justice Cooperation said Wednesday, a crime the agency described as the largest benefits fraud to have hit the U.K.

  • April 10, 2024

    Lifeboat Fund Opens Probe Into British Steel Pension Adviser

    The compensation program for financial services said it has opened an investigation into an advice firm in connection with the British Steel Pension Scheme scandal.

  • April 10, 2024

    Russian Tycoons Win Initial Fight Over EU Sanctions

    Russian businessmen Mikhail Fridman and Petr Aven have beaten the initial European sanctions imposed against them as a European Union court ruled Wednesday that they were unjustifiable, although their assets will continue to be restrained under newer measures.

Expert Analysis

  • Traversing The Web Of Nonjudicial Grievance Mechanisms

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    Attorneys at Covington provide an overview of how companies can best align their environmental and human rights compliance with "hard-law" requirements like the EU's recently approved Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive while also navigating the complex global network of existing nonjudicial grievance mechanisms.

  • Opinion

    FCA Greenwashing Rules Need To Be Stronger To Be Effective

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    The Financial Conduct Authority's forthcoming anti-greenwashing measures, aimed at ensuring the veracity of regulated entities’ statements about sustainability credentials, need external scrutiny and an effective definition of "corporate social responsibility" to give them bite, says Jingchen Zhao at Nottingham Trent University.

  • Companies House False Filings Raise Issues Of Integrity

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    A recent spate of unauthorized company filings with Companies House raises specific concerns for secured lenders, but also highlights the potential for false filings to be used to facilitate fraudulent schemes, says Daniel Sullivan at Charles Russell.

  • Gov't Probe Highlights Computer-Based Evidence Issues

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    A recently launched U.K. Home Office probe, following the alleged use of faulty data in criminal cases, illuminates the need for scrutiny on the presumed reliability of evidence from computer-based systems, says Jessica Sobey at Stokoe Partnership.

  • UK Courts Continue To Struggle With Crypto-Asset Cases

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    Although the common law has proved capable of applying established principles to crypto-assets, recent cases highlight persistent challenges in identifying defendants, locating assets and determining jurisdiction, suggesting that any meaningful development will likely come from legislative or regulatory change, say Emily Saunderson and Sam Mitchell at Quadrant Chambers.

  • Why Computer Evidence Is Not Always Reliable In Court

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    Recent challenges to the admissibility of encrypted communication from the messaging tool EncroChat highlight the flawed presumption in the U.K. common law framework that computer evidence is always accurate, and why a nuanced assessment of such evidence is needed, say Sam De Silva and Josie Welland at CMS Legal.

  • Comparing The UK And EU Approaches To AI Regulation

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    While there are significant points of convergence between the recently published U.K. approach to artificial intelligence regulation and the EU AI Act, there is also notable divergence between them, and it appears that the U.K. will remain a less regulatory environment for AI in the foreseeable future, say lawyers at Steptoe.

  • Lessons On Using 3rd-Party Disclosure Orders In Fraud Cases

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    The expansion of the gateway for service out of jurisdiction regarding third-party information orders has proven to be an effective tool against fraud since it was introduced in 2022, and recent case law offers practical tips on what applicants should be aware of when submitting such orders, says Rosie Wild at Cooke Young.

  • Compliance Points To Know About The EU Digital Services Act

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    Online service providers in the European Union should prioritize understanding the scope of the recently implemented Digital Services Act, their specific legal obligations under it and the practical steps they must take to comply with the new law while obeying a raft of overlapping EU digital reforms, say Leo Moore and Róisín Culligan at William Fry.

  • Independent Regulator Could Chip Away At FIFA Autonomy

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    After the U.K.'s recent proposal for an independent football regulator, FIFA's commitment to safeguarding football association autonomy remains unwavering, despite a history of complexities arising from controversies in the bidding and hosting of major tournaments, say Yasin Patel at Church Court Chambers and Caitlin Haberlin-Chambers at SLAM Global.

  • A Look At The Latest EU Alternative Investment Regulation

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    Recent amendments to the EU Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive governing a range of alternative investment funds reflect a growing regulatory focus on nonbanking financial institutions, which expand credit to support economic growth but carry a commensurate risk, say Juliette Mills and Alix Prentice at Cadwalader.

  • Unpacking The Law Commission's Digital Assets Consultation

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    The Law Commission recently published a consultation on recognizing a third personal property category to accommodate the development of digital assets, highlighting difficulties with current models of property rights and the potential consequences of considering digital assets as personal property, say Andrew Tsang and Tom Bacon at BCLP.

  • Unpacking The FCA's Approach To AML Compliance Failures

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    In light of the upward trend of skilled-person reviews by the Financial Conduct Authority, including the latest investigation into Lloyds' anti-money laundering controls, financial firms should familiarize themselves with the mechanisms of FCA supervision and enforcement investigations, says Kathryn Westmore at RUSI.

  • New Russia Sanctions Reveal Int'l Enforcement Capabilities

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    Significant new U.K., U.S. and EU sanctions imposed on Russia notably target Europe-based individuals and entities accused of sanctions evasion, and with an apparent political will to enhance capabilities, the rhetoric is translating into international enforcement activity, say lawyers at Cadwalader.

  • Legal Sector Will Benefit From New Data Security Standard

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    The U.K. Information Commissioner's Office-approved new privacy certification scheme for the legal profession will inevitably become the default for law firms, chambers and vendors to prove their U.K. General Data Protection Regulation compliance, says Orlagh Kelly at Briefed.

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