Food & Beverage

  • July 19, 2019

    Attys Seek $6M Award For El Pollo Loco Stock-Drop Deal

    Lawyers have asked a California federal court to award them $6 million in attorneys’ fees after settling a suit for an investor class that claimed El Pollo Loco’s top executives concealed the source of the chicken chain's decreasing sales then sold their own shares ahead of a stock plunge.

  • July 19, 2019

    Cannabis Candy Maker Sued Over 'Stoney Patch' Gummies

    The maker of Sour Patch candies, Mondelez Canada Inc., lodged a lawsuit on Friday in California federal court alleging a company that sells cannabis-infused gummies under the name “Stoney Patch” is infringing its intellectual property.

  • July 19, 2019

    DC Circ. Affirms Corn Starch Co. Violated NLRB Rules

    The D.C. Circuit Friday affirmed the National Labor Relations Board’s finding that a multinational corn starch manufacturing company committed a slew of labor violations at an Iowa corn processing plant by denigrating its union, dealing directly with employees, and threatening job losses.

  • July 19, 2019

    Biggest Enviro Law Cases To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2019

    Here, Law360 takes a look at some of the biggest environmental cases to watch in the second half of 2019, including U.S. Supreme Court appeals based on Superfund and Clean Water Act issues and a challenge to President Donald Trump's authority to shrink national monuments designed by his predecessor.

  • July 19, 2019

    Couple Tries To Save $2B Roundup Win After Judge Slashes It

    A couple urged a California judge Friday to keep intact a $2.055 billion jury verdict against Monsanto in a trial over claims its Roundup contributed to their cancer, after the judge tentatively ruled that the award should be cut significantly.

  • July 19, 2019

    Whataburger Urges Fla. Court To Drop EEOC Bias Suit

    Whataburger has asked a Florida federal district court to toss a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit accusing the fast food chain of forcing an employee to quit after she refused to comply with a racially discriminatory directive to hire white job applicants.

  • July 19, 2019

    Chocolatier's $49M Sandy Coverage Claim Headed To Trial

    Madelaine Chocolate Novelties Inc.’s bid to force a Chubb Ltd. insurer to pay an additional $49 million for property damage and business interruption losses caused by Superstorm Sandy is bound for trial after a New York federal judge held Thursday that the scope of coverage under the chocolatier’s policy is unclear due to several conflicting terms.

  • July 19, 2019

    US, China Butt Heads Over Beef Trade Restrictions

    The U.S. government on Friday leaned on China to peel back its restrictions on American beef, accusing Beijing of being overly wary of mad cow disease even though the U.S. has been deemed a "negligible risk" for that affliction.

  • July 19, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Blackstone, Hasta Capital, Shorewood

    Blackstone is reportedly seeking to sell $1 billion or more of logistics assets that it will soon acquire, Hasta Capital is said to have picked up a Florida apartment complex for $23.2 million and Shorewood Development Group is reportedly buying four Chicago buildings from Nealey Foods.

  • July 19, 2019

    Pepsi Boosts South Africa Biz With $1.7B Pioneer Foods Buy

    PepsiCo has agreed to buy South Africa's Pioneer Foods Group in an approximately $1.7 billion deal steered by Bowmans and Webber Wentzel that will allow the company to accelerate its entry into the country, the food and beverage megabrand said Friday.

  • July 19, 2019

    AB InBev Inks $11.3B Sale Of Australian Unit To Asahi Group

    Anheuser-Busch said Friday it has inked an AU$16 billion ($11.3 billion) sale of its Australian subsidiary to Japan’s Asahi Group as the beverage giant eyes expansion into the Asian Pacific region, adding that it is still weighing an IPO of its Budweiser APAC unit.

  • July 18, 2019

    State AGs Urge FDA To Keep Exploring Cannabis Regulation

    Dozens of state attorneys general have told the U.S. Food and Drug Administration they support the agency’s recent push to regulate cannabis-derived products like cannabidiol, while asking it to ensure that the states maintain their roles as regulators as the market emerges.

  • July 18, 2019

    Seafood Co. Exec Cops To $4M Crab Label Fraud

    An executive at a Virginia seafood processor admitted in federal court Thursday to helping his father falsely label millions of dollars' worth of foreign crabmeat as “Product of USA,” according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • July 18, 2019

    EPA Won't Ban Chlorpyrifos, Legal Battle Looms

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday confirmed its decision not to ban the pesticide chlorpyrifos, though several states have banned it over its link to negative health impacts and environmental groups continue to push for limits on it.

  • July 18, 2019

    Bradley Arant Launches Cannabis Practice Group

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has become the latest large law firm to set up a practice group dedicated to handling legal issues related to the cannabis industry, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: AB InBev, AT&T, Axalta

    AB InBev is reportedly mulling selling off assets after the company scrapped a planned Hong Kong offering of its Asia Pacific unit, AT&T is looking at options for its Puerto Rican business, and Axalta Coating Systems is exploring a sale.

  • July 18, 2019

    Kirkland Leads Stonegate's £1.27B Deal For Pub Owner Ei

    Private equity-backed pub operator Stonegate, led by Kirkland, will snap up Ei Group for £1.27 billion ($1.42 billion) in cash, in a deal that stands to add the U.K.’s largest pub owners to Stonegate’s portfolio, according to a Thursday announcement.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hear Justice Stevens In 5 Memorable Moments On The Bench

    Justice John Paul Stevens was known for being collegial and kind, but he also wasn’t one to mince words. Listen to a few of the justice’s most memorable words from the bench, in majority opinions, sharply worded dissents and at oral argument.

  • July 17, 2019

    Enviros Win Order Curbing Controversial Ranchers' Grazing

    Three environmental groups have convinced a federal judge to stop Oregon ranchers, who were convicted of illegally setting federal land on fire and later pardoned by President Donald Trump, from grazing on certain properties and to limit their access to another.

  • July 17, 2019

    Cannabis Biz Sues Farming Co. Over 'Millions' In Lost Hemp

    Canadian cannabis company Canopy Growth has accused a California-based farming corporation of allegedly misusing a $1.6 million deposit and killing "millions of dollars" worth of hemp plants, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' High Court Legacy In 4 Charts

    In this data deep-dive, Law360 examines retired Justice John Paul Stevens’ long tenure, his relatively breezy confirmation, his transformation from a run-of-the-mill Republican appointee to runaway liberal, and the legacy that lives on in his clerks.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Things FTC Competition Bureau Looks For In White Papers

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    Most written advocacy to the Bureau of Competition is of an extremely high quality, but sometimes we notice that there’s some room for improvement, says Daniel Francis, an associate director at the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Competition.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • NJ Tax Stop: Private, For-Profit Property May Be Tax-Exempt

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    Although an appeal to the New Jersey Supreme Court is pending, if the New Jersey Appellate Division's recent decision in Gourmet Dining v. Union Township stands, it may prove to be a watershed moment for property tax jurisprudence in the state by broadening the definition of "public purpose" to potentially include private, for-profit use of property, says Carl Rizzo of Cole Schotz.

  • Opinion

    TTB Label Regulations Infringe Brewers’ Civil Liberties

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    While the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau is easing some of its alcohol labeling restrictions — including those related to patriotic imagery — the reforms will continue to restrict brewers’, vintners’ and distillers’ freedom of speech, says Michael DeGrandis of the New Civil Liberties Alliance.

  • What High Court's Kisor Ruling Means For FDA Decisions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Kisor v. Wilkie, weakening Auer deference, gives courts more authority to challenge agency decisions — even those concerning very technical regulations, as many of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's do, say attorneys at Axinn.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • Del. Justices Highlight Directors' Risk Oversight Duties

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    The Delaware Supreme Court's recent decision in Marchand v. Barnhill reaffirms directors' responsibility for instituting board-level reporting systems related to compliance risks for an organization. Practically, management and boards should focus on those risks that pose an existential threat to a business, say Kevin Logue and Rick Horvath of Paul Hastings.

  • State Net

    Why States, Cities Are Requiring Merchants To Accept Cash

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    New technology is broadening the ways people can pay without having to carry paper money and coins, possibly hastening the decline of cash. But some state and local lawmakers are pushing back, and retail businesses are taking note, says Dave Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Art Of The 'Science And Expert Team' In Mass Torts

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    Science is at the foundation of mass tort lawsuits involving drugs or medical devices. Critical to a virtual law team in these cases, the "science and expert team" does more than get into the weeds of scientific issues and retain experts, say attorneys at FaegreBD, Peabody & Arnold and Shook Hardy.

  • NY Tax Minutes: Final SALT Regs And 2 Post-Budget Changes

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    The notable New York tax developments in June include the final IRS regulations regarding the state and local tax deduction cap, two post-budget changes to state tax law and a New York State Court of Appeals decision described by one concurring judge as, "the taxpayer always loses,” say Timothy Noonan and Craig Reilly of Hodgson Russ.

  • Misconceptions In The Debate About Noncompetes

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    The scope of noncompete abuses needs to be put in context, so policymakers can understand how widespread the problem actually is and how to properly tailor any legislation, says Russell Beck of Beck Reed.