Food & Beverage

  • January 24, 2020

    Calif. Appeals Court Remands $4.3M Atty Fee Dispute

    A California appellate court has ruled that a fee-splitting arrangement between attorneys handling a wage and hour class action is invalid because one of the attorneys failed to inform the client that he did not have malpractice insurance, as required by California ethics rules.

  • January 24, 2020

    Workers Hit SC Beachside Grill With Wage-And-Tipping Suit

    Two ex-employees of a popular beachside bar and grill have lodged a wage suit in South Carolina federal court against the restaurant and its owner, claiming they made tipped workers share their gratuities then illegally took a "tip credit" under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • January 24, 2020

    Roundup Deal Talks Stop St. Louis Trial Before It Starts

    A Missouri state court trial over allegations Monsanto’s weedkiller Roundup causes non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma was put on hold hours after it was set to begin in St. Louis Friday, as the company sought to buy some time to resolve thousands of similar claims in federal court.

  • January 24, 2020

    US Sugar Co. Wants Revised US-Mexico Sugar Deal Scrapped

    A domestic sugar producer has again sued the federal government in the U.S. Court of International Trade to void the latest revisions the U.S. and Mexico have made to their sugar trade agreement, a day after it was finalized.

  • January 24, 2020

    MLB Accused Of Singling Out Health Food Co.

    A former Major League Baseball pitcher turned health supplement maker is suing MLB yet again, claiming the league blackballed him because his products contain elk antler extract, but it endorses products like Gatorade protein bars and Muscle Milk shakes that contain the same active substance.

  • January 24, 2020

    Molson Coors Tries To Slip Investor Suit Over Tax Reporting

    Molson Coors Beverage Co. urged a Colorado federal court on Thursday to let it out of a suit accusing the beer company of underreporting its taxes, arguing the investors failed to show that it intentionally or recklessly misrepresented its financial situation.

  • January 24, 2020

    17 WTO Members Agree To Set Up Interim Appeals System

    A group of 17 World Trade Organization members led by the European Union, Canada and China agreed Friday to set up a temporary system for appealing trade disputes, offering a makeshift fix for an impasse that hobbled Geneva's legal wing last year.

  • January 24, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen two luxury car lenders drive a contract dispute into court, the liquidators of a Saudi billionaire's offshore holding company set its sights on a hedge fund, and a financial services company target the families behind a maritime engineering business. 

  • January 23, 2020

    Fight For $15 Convinces NLRB Judge Not To Toss McD's Case

    A National Labor Relations Board judge decided Thursday to keep alive the Fight for $15 effort to find McDonald's jointly responsible for franchisees' labor violations until the board rules on a motion to consider new evidence.

  • January 23, 2020

    Nude Dancer Hits Fla. Club With Wage Suit

    A nude dancer has slapped a strip club with a Fair Labor Standards Act suit in Florida federal court, claiming it willfully misclassified her and other dancers as independent contractors, instead of as employees, and then avoided paying them wages by telling them they had to work for tips.

  • January 23, 2020

    Borden Reaches Truce With Lenders Over Ch. 11 Cash Use

    Bankrupt milk supplier Borden Dairy reached an agreement with its secured lenders Thursday in Delaware to extend its use of the lenders' cash to fund its Chapter 11 case after a bankruptcy judge said a dispute over liens on a cash reserve account needed more evidence before it could be decided.

  • January 23, 2020

    Gov't Scrutiny On Tap For Anheuser's $321M Craft Brew Deal

    Anheuser-Busch and a craft beer company it plans to acquire have refiled merger paperwork with the Federal Trade Commission, a procedural move that extends the government’s merger review period and signals that the companies may want the extra time to convince antitrust enforcers there's no need for a longer, in-depth merger review.

  • January 23, 2020

    'Old Bay' Spice Maker Settles TM Dispute With 'New Bae' Rival

    McCormick & Co. Inc., the spice maker known for Old Bay seasoning, has reached a deal to drop a trademark lawsuit over a competitor's "New Bae" seasoning, according to court filings.

  • January 23, 2020

    4 Takeaways From Roundup Jury Selection In St. Louis

    Monsanto and the four people alleging its Roundup weedkiller gave them cancer seated 16 jurors Wednesday. They'll hear the first trial outside California, where the agricultural giant has lost three verdicts. Law360 looks into what can be gleaned from two days of voir dire.

  • January 23, 2020

    Bumble Bee Foods Cleared For $926M Ch. 11 Sale To FCF Co.

    Bumble Bee Foods LLC won a Delaware bankruptcy judge's conditional go-ahead to sell its business to Taiwan-based global tuna trader FCF Co. Ltd. on Thursday, in a $925.6 million deal driven largely by rising burdens from antitrust sanctions and consumer lawsuits.

  • January 23, 2020

    Raley's Inks $2.8M Deal To End Pregnancy Bias Suit

    The Raley's supermarket chain has agreed to pony up $2.8 million to settle a California state court suit that claimed the company forced workers into taking unpaid absences after becoming pregnant.

  • January 23, 2020

    Buyers Claim Coke's Tea Not Honest About Sugar Content

    A proposed class of tea drinkers sued The Coca-Cola Co. in New York federal court Thursday, alleging it misleads customers into thinking its “Honest” brand of teas are low in sugar by claiming they're “just a tad sweet.”

  • January 23, 2020

    EPA Narrows Federal Oversight Of Water Pollution

    The Trump administration on Thursday officially narrowed the federal government's permitting authority under the Clean Water Act, in a final rewrite of a rule that replaces a controversial and broader Obama-era policy the president already rescinded.

  • January 23, 2020

    Fairway Files Ch. 11 With $70M Bid From Village Super Market

    Supermarket chain Fairway Markets filed for Chapter 11 protection in New York on Thursday with $227 million in debt and a sale plan backed by its lenders that includes a $70 million bid from Village Super Market Inc. for up to five New York City stores.

  • January 22, 2020

    7th Circ. Sets Fee Penalty For Atty Who Filed 'Monstrosity'

    The Seventh Circuit on Wednesday set the legal fees that an attorney must shell out to his adversaries as punishment for allowing a client to compose a "monstrosity of an appellate brief" on the lawyer's behalf.

  • January 22, 2020

    Ex-Domino's Driver Asks 6th Circ. To Revive No-Poach Suit

    A former driver for Domino's Pizza Inc. has told the Sixth Circuit that the lower court was wrong to force his case targeting no-poach provisions in the chain's franchise agreements into arbitration.

  • January 22, 2020

    Borden Dairy Defends Use Of Cash Reserves In Ch. 11 Case

    Bankrupt milk supplier Borden Dairy Co. defended its proposed use of cash reserves Wednesday, telling a Delaware bankruptcy judge that lenders' claims that they have liens on the cash are unfounded and not supported by the loan documents governing the secured debt.

  • January 22, 2020

    Mondelez Tracks Down Cos. Behind 'Stoney Patch' Pot Candy

    The maker of Sour Patch Kids gummies claims to have tracked down an elusive ring of companies that are packaging illicit THC candies in similar bags, part of what the firm said is a reckless trademark infringement scheme that has tarnished its brand and gotten scores of kids high.

  • January 22, 2020

    NLRB Says Leaked Doc Can't Revive McDonald's Fight

    The National Labor Relations Board’s general counsel has opposed an attempt by Fight for $15 to reopen a settled case that sought to hold McDonald’s jointly responsible for franchisees' labor violations, saying an unauthenticated document regarding recusal of one of the board's members who approved the settlement can’t be included.

  • January 22, 2020

    Lab-Grown Meat Co. Closes On $161M Funding Round

    A company that artificially grows animal meat has closed on $161 million in funding from a wide range of investors, including SoftBank Group Corp., Tyson Foods Inc. and Singapore’s state-backed Temasek Holdings Pte. Ltd.

Expert Analysis

  • ABA Rules For Departing Attys Set Unprecedented Limits

    Author Photo

    Groundbreaking rules from the American Bar Association impose new standards on how law firms can govern departing lawyers’ contact with clients, placing major restrictions on this ubiquitous practice, say Amy Richardson and Hilary Gerzhoy at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Pro-Employer NLRB Rulings May Prompt Handbook Reviews

    Author Photo

    Three new National Labor Relations Board rulings that overturn Obama-era pro-worker precedents may indicate that now is a good time for employers to strengthen their workplace policies on nonbusiness email use, investigation confidentiality and union dues, say Charles Caulkins and Garrett Kamen at Fisher Phillips.

  • Navigating Criminal Antitrust Inability-To-Pay Claims With DOJ

    Author Photo

    Due to the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division's silence following recent guidance from the Criminal Division on inability-to-pay claims, counsel defending these claims should evaluate the Antitrust Division's historical approach in crediting cooperation, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • Legal Lessons From Esports Sponsorship Deals

    Author Photo

    Riot Games’ recent global partnerships with Louis Vuitton, OPPO and Red Bull may provide a potential template for other companies, leagues and players seeking to form similar agreements, and they should serve as a reminder of how carefully constructed such deals will need to be, say James Chang at Pillsbury and Sean Gilbert and Neil Thakur at Teknos Associates.

  • Nissan Ex-CEO Illustrates Do's And Don'ts Of Image Repair

    Author Photo

    Lawyers can draw a number of useful lessons about reputation management from the efforts of former Nissan executive Carlos Ghosn — who recently escaped house arrest in Tokyo — to restore his sullied reputation, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • 3 Federal Court Rulings Highlight Key Privilege Lessons

    Author Photo

    Recent decisions from federal courts in Illinois, Delaware and New York illustrate the importance of proactively thinking about attorney-client privilege issues such as proper procedures for conducting a review, how common interest privilege can be invoked and when public relations firm communications are protected, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Courts' Deference To DOL Joint Employer Rule Is Up In The Air

    Author Photo

    Employers should use the U.S. Department of Labor’s narrowed standard for determining joint employer status under the Fair Labor Standards Act as a guidepost until federal courts weigh in on whether and to what extent they will defer to the new rule, say Alexander Passantino and Kevin Young at Seyfarth.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

    Author Photo

    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • The New Class Action Frontier Under Illinois Privacy Law

    Author Photo

    One year after a pivotal Illinois Supreme Court ruling broadened liability under the Biometric Information Privacy Act, companies in a wide variety of industries need to be vigilant of a rise in potentially financially ruinous class action filings, and there are several steps they can take to protect themselves from BIPA liability, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • The Evolving Legality Of Lesser-Known Cannabis Compounds

    Author Photo

    As products using cannabigerol and cannabinol — cannabis compounds that are less well-known than THC and CBD — become more popular, understanding the legal differences under existing food and drug laws is crucial for companies marketing such products, says Ian Stewart of Wilson Elser.

  • 2nd Circ. Pension Liability Ruling Is A Big Win For Employers

    Author Photo

    In National Retirement Fund v. Metz Culinary Management, the Second Circuit recently held that the pension’s lower interest rate violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act's withdrawal liability standards, which will benefit employers in an area of law that tends to favor funds, say Robert Perry and Todd Girshon of Jackson Lewis.

  • How International Trade May Play Out In 2020

    Author Photo

    Despite the tumult the Trump administration's actions have created in international trade, the president's attempt at long-term disruption of global markets is unlikely to be successful, says Peter Quinter at GrayRobinson.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

    Author Photo

    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

    Author Photo

    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

    Author Photo

    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.