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Food & Beverage

  • March 21, 2019

    Bar's Tent Collapse Settlement Fight Heads To State Court

    A Missouri federal judge has remanded a St. Louis bar’s suit that alleges its liability insurer and the attorney it hired improperly passed up a favorable settlement in an underlying case over a deadly tent accident, saying Thursday that the claims against the attorney were valid and could be heard in state court.

  • March 21, 2019

    What To Know About New FDA Commissioner Sharpless

    Career scientist and physician Dr. Norman Sharpless will leave his post as the head of the National Cancer Institute to take over the U.S. Food and Drug Administration when Scott Gottlieb steps down in April. Here’s what you should know about the new interim commissioner.

  • March 21, 2019

    9th Circ. Backs Anheuser-Busch In Suit Over Stolen Recipes

    A former Anheuser-Busch employee cannot escape the brewer’s trade secret suit accusing him of stealing beer recipes and passing them on to class action attorneys looking to sue the company over allegedly watered-down beer, the Ninth Circuit ruled Wednesday.

  • March 21, 2019

    Kraft Execs Knew Stock Due For A Fall, ERISA Suit Claims

    Kraft Heinz Food Co. executives knew the company’s stock was overvalued before revelations of a $15.4 billion writedown and a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission probe caused the stock to plummet, retirement plan participants have claimed in an Employee Retirement Income Securities Act suit.

  • March 21, 2019

    Chicken Of The Sea, Target Reach Deal Over Tuna Price-Fixing

    Target Corp. and two food distributors on Thursday cut loose Chicken of the Sea from sprawling multidistrict litigation in California federal court, agreeing to resolve allegations that the packaged seafood producer fixed prices for canned tuna.

  • March 21, 2019

    MillerCoors Sues Bud Light Over Super Bowl 'Corn Syrup' Ad

    MillerCoors is suing rival Anheuser-Busch over a Super Bowl ad for Bud Light that claimed Miller Lite and Coors Light contained corn syrup, calling it false advertising “designed to frighten consumers.”

  • March 20, 2019

    Sara Lee's $14.5M Price-Fix Deal With Distributors Nears OK

    A California judge Wednesday said she's ready to grant preliminary approval to Sara Lee's $14.5 million settlement ending claims that it illegally fixed the prices independent distributors could charge for its baked goods but said fees owed to a former attorney for the distributors need to be resolved first.

  • March 20, 2019

    What’s In A Judgeship? More Than Meets The Eye

    Figuring out what constitutes a manageable workload for the nation’s district judges is no simple task. Getting the judiciary the resources it needs is even harder.

  • March 20, 2019

    Swamped: How Magistrate Judges Salvaged Louisiana's Judicial Crisis

    The Western District of Louisiana is supposed to have seven district judges. But for a year, most of the courthouses were operating without a single Article III judge. As usual, magistrate judges picked up the slack.

  • March 20, 2019

    Tootsie Roll Escapes Slack-Fill Suit Over Junior Mints Boxes

    Tootsie Roll dodged claims that, while its Junior Mints are chocolate, peppermint and delicious, they’re packaged in deceptively large boxes, when an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday that consumers would need to show how the candy they received was worth less than they paid.

  • March 20, 2019

    Fired Waiter Blasts Trump Critic Restaurateur's 'Glass House'

    A waiter cut loose from the Waverly Inn tossed a stone at the "glass house" of Graydon Carter, slamming the New York City restaurant's co-owner for criticizing President Donald Trump while purportedly mistreating his own workers, according to a proposed class action filed Wednesday in New York federal court.

  • March 20, 2019

    Disaronno Claims Rival Liqueur Maker Copied Cap

    Liqueur maker Illva Saronno SpA slapped a competitor with a trademark infringement lawsuit Wednesday in New Jersey federal court claiming one of its packaging designs looks too much like the distinctive cap on Disaronno beverages, causing confusion in the marketplace.

  • March 20, 2019

    Burger King Franchisee Skirts Ill. Biometric Law, Worker Says

    The nation’s second-largest Burger King franchisee and its Illinois subsidiary got hit Tuesday with a lawsuit claiming its employees in the state were required to scan their fingerprints for timekeeping purposes in violation of the state’s Biometric Information Privacy Act.

  • March 20, 2019

    Monsanto Jury Told $63B Co. Should Pay Up Over Roundup

    Monsanto should pay a California man for failing to warn about its weedkiller Roundup's cancer risks, his attorney told a federal jury during opening statements in the trial's second phase, declining to put a number on punitive damages but noting that Bayer recently acquired Monsanto for $63 billion.

  • March 20, 2019

    Koch Foods Can't Beat 'Fifty Shades' Harassment Suit

    An Alabama magistrate judge refused Wednesday to toss a suit accusing Koch Foods of not doing enough to rein in a poultry inspector who allegedly waged a harassment campaign that included a graphic threat against a female worker who was slow to return his copy of "Fifty Shades of Grey."

  • March 20, 2019

    Kellogg Dodges Cook County Suit Over $2M Heating Bill

    Kellogg Co. is off the hook for $2 million in heating bills after an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday that a 1973 agreement requires Cook County to provide a Chicago facility owned by the company's subsidiary with steam heat free of charge.

  • March 20, 2019

    Breeder Says Pig Co. Didn't 'Make It Easy' To Get Boar Semen

    An Iowa pig breeder thought it was working with high-quality, pure semen from three, in-demand show boars — one of which is named Make It Easy and described as a "freak" — but later discovered an Illinois show pig company had been delivering subpar semen, according to a new suit.

  • March 20, 2019

    Panera Combats IRS Ruling That Foundation Isn't Tax-Exempt

    A foundation run by the Panera restaurant chain was a tax-exempt organization despite operating several cafes that the Internal Revenue Service said were run like profitable businesses, Panera said in a new U.S. Tax Court petition.

  • March 20, 2019

    Restaurant Franchise Giant Names Ex-Jones Day Atty As GC

    Flynn Restaurant Group LP, the largest franchise operator in the country and owner of Applebee's, Arby's, Taco Bell and Panera Bread Co. restaurants, has promoted an in-house attorney who previously worked at Jones Day to be its new general counsel.

  • March 20, 2019

    Jury Awards $6.5M To Family Of Baby Burned At Resort

    A Michigan family whose baby was burned by hot coffee at a California resort suffered $6.48 million in damages, a San Diego federal jury has found, attributing most of the fault to the resort and a small portion to the family's nanny.

Expert Analysis

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Trial Counsel's Role On A Mass Tort Virtual Law Team

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    Trial counsel’s contribution to the virtual law team throughout the life cycle of a mass tort litigation rests in the key skill of viewing the case through the eyes of the ultimate audience for the defense, the jury, say attorneys at Covington & Burling LLP and Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • Is 'Manifest Disregard' Defense Only Mostly Dead In Texas?

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    While Texas state courts have barred use of the "manifest disregard of the law" defense in international arbitration matters, recent cases in the Fifth Circuit describe the doctrine alternatively as “alive but not well,” “dead,” or “triumphantly ‘back from the dead,” say James Rogers and Clarissa Medrano of Akerman LLP.

  • Illinois Has Raised Liability Risk For Nonmanufacturer Cos.

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    In Cassidy v. China Vitamins, the Illinois Supreme Court overturned previous interpretations of Illinois law that shielded nonmanufacturer defendants in strict product liability cases. Distributors and retailers may now find it useful to take a hard look at the value of their relationships with lawsuit-prone foreign manufacturers, says Symone Shinton of Greenberg Traurig LLP.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • How China's Version Of CFIUS Will Expand Security Reviews

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    China's foreign investment security review regime shares many characteristics with the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. And as tensions rise between the two countries, China, like the U.S., is set to scrutinize more deals, says Guogang Li of the Tahota Law Firm.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Debating DOJ And Wash. Attorney General No-Poach Briefs

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    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Washington state Attorney General’s Office have filed amicus briefs in three class actions challenging several fast-food restaurant chains' "no-poach" agreements. Jon Jacobs and Thomas Boeder of Perkins Coie LLP, alumni of these two organizations, explain the extent to which the two briefs conflict.