Sports & Betting

  • June 28, 2022

    Sens. Ask Minor Leaguers About MLB Antitrust Exemption

    A bipartisan group of senators have sent a letter to an advocacy organization for minor league baseball players asking about how Major League Baseball's century-old exemption from antitrust law has impacted ballplayers in the game's lower professional ranks.

  • June 28, 2022

    Nationals Call Ex-Scout's Suit Over Vax Mandate 'Deficient'

    The Washington Nationals urged a D.C. federal court to dismiss the bulk of a complaint from a fired team scout who refused the COVID-19 vaccine, arguing on Tuesday that the employee's claims of retaliation and disability discrimination are unsupported by facts.

  • June 28, 2022

    DraftKings' Site Inaccessible To Visually Impaired, Suit Says

    DraftKings Inc. was hit with a lawsuit Tuesday alleging the sports betting giant is violating the Americans with Disabilities Act because its website is inaccessible to blind individuals.

  • June 28, 2022

    NFL Coaches In Race Bias Suit Want Contracts Mostly Public

    Former Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores and two other Black coaches suing the NFL and several teams for alleged race discrimination say their employment contracts should not be fully redacted in filings, arguing the public's interest in having open proceedings is "paramount."

  • June 28, 2022

    Calif. Couple, Coach Avoid Prison For 'Varsity Blues' Bribes

    A California couple and a former soccer coach who were among the first to plead guilty in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case all avoided prison time Tuesday after cooperating with prosecutors, even as a judge said the parents' remorse "doesn't wipe the slate clean."

  • June 27, 2022

    3rd Circ. Urged To Allow Ammo Maker's Tort Claims

    Ammunitions broker Battle Born Munitions Inc. asked the Third Circuit to overturn a lower court's finding that it can't bring tort claims against its vendor Dick's Sporting Goods Inc., saying that Dick's knew it would not accept delivery of store-branded bullets when it said it would.

  • June 27, 2022

    Google Fights App Users' Class Cert. Bid In Antitrust Row

    A month after announcing a settlement to resolve app developers' antitrust claims, Google wants to escape allegations that its policies inflate the cost of apps on its Play Store, accusing a group of consumers seeking class certification of "misconstruing evidence and brushing aside competitive realities."

  • June 27, 2022

    Nautilus' $7M Class Deal Over Treadmill Speeds Gets Final OK

    An Ohio federal judge on Monday gave the final OK to a class-action settlement worth $7 million – which includes a seven-figure attorneys' fee award – against fitness equipment maker Nautilus Inc. over claims the company sold treadmills with weaker-than-advertised horsepower.

  • June 27, 2022

    LA Chiropractor Cops To NBA Health Plan Fraud Scheme

    A Los Angeles-based chiropractor has pled guilty to his role in a multimillion-dollar scheme to defraud the NBA's health benefits plan, admitting he created fake invoices for players to be reimbursed for services they never received.

  • June 27, 2022

    Tennessee Titans Settle Ex-Worker's COVID-19 Leave Suit

    The Tennessee Titans and a former field worker have reached a settlement to end his suit alleging the organization violated federal law when it fired him after he contracted COVID-19.

  • June 27, 2022

    High Court Backs Praying Coach In Religious Rights Battle

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that a public school district violated the First Amendment by suspending a football coach who insisted on praying at midfield right after games.

  • June 24, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Feds Seek 4 Years For Ex-Georgetown Coach

    Prosecutors in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case asked a federal judge on Friday to send the former head tennis coach at Georgetown University to prison for four years for accepting more than $3.5 million in bribes as part of the wide-ranging scheme.

  • June 24, 2022

    NJ Panel Reverses Casino's Virus Coverage Suit Victory

    A New Jersey state appeals panel ruled that an Atlantic City casino and resort operator's suit for pandemic coverage should have been dismissed by a lower court that found the casino plausibly alleged it sustained the kind of direct damage required for coverage.

  • June 24, 2022

    7th Circ. Won't Revive Class Fraud Claims In Sex Abuse Suit

    The Seventh Circuit has affirmed former USA Volleyball coach Rick Butler's defeat of consumer fraud claims stemming from his alleged concealment of sexual abuse accusations against him, agreeing that the lead plaintiff in the case knew about an Illinois agency and USA Volleyball's findings about his alleged sexual abuse and enrolled her children in his club's programs anyway.

  • June 24, 2022

    Ex-High School Athlete Takes Football Injury Suit To Justices

    A former high school football player is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to revive his civil rights lawsuit against a Texas school district over multiple concussions he suffered during practices, in a bid to overturn the Fifth Circuit's rejection of the "state-created danger" doctrine.

  • June 24, 2022

    Ex-XFL Commissioner, League Founder Drop Termination Suit

    Former XFL Commissioner Oliver Luck and the football league founder and World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. CEO Vince McMahon have mutually agreed to drop a lawsuit over Luck's pay after his firing in 2020.

  • June 24, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This week in London has seen promoter Boxxer accused of punching below the belt in a defamation case from competitor Probellum, pharmaceutical company Amgen back in the ring in a patent claim from rival Pfizer, and a former Cambridge Analytica boss on the ropes in a claim from an SPV set up by the consultancy firm's former directors. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 24, 2022

    Supreme Court Overturns Roe v. Wade

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday upheld a Mississippi abortion ban and overturned the constitutional abortion right established nearly 50 years ago in Roe v. Wade, setting the stage for a widespread rollback of abortion rights in many statehouses around the country.

  • June 23, 2022

    Insurer Wants Out Of Gaming Co.'s Equity Dispute Settlement

    An RSUI unit doesn't have to cover Rush Street Gaming's settlement with an executive who said he was denied an equity stake after the casino company went public, the insurer told an Illinois federal court, saying a liability policy excludes coverage for claims related to compensation and employment agreements.

  • June 23, 2022

    Ex-Crypto Exec Denied Wire Fraud Retrial

    A New York federal judge denied a suspended securities broker's request Thursday for an acquittal or retrial after a jury found him guilty of wire fraud in a scam involving a failed digital currency launch, ruling the broker "understates" the evidence against him.

  • June 23, 2022

    OSU Gets 'The' Trademark From USPTO

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has decided to let Ohio State University register the word "The" as a trademark, about three years after it shot down an initial attempt.

  • June 23, 2022

    Casino Mogul Must Give Deposition In $63M Bartlit Beck Row

    A billionaire casino tycoon who owes more than $63 million in a fee dispute with Bartlit Beck LLP must give a deposition and finish responding to discovery requests the firm sent in its collection efforts, an Illinois federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • June 23, 2022

    Under Armour Wants Proof Antitrust Litigant Is A Competitor

    Athletic clothing maker Under Armour told a Pennsylvania federal court that a company suing it over alleged anti-competitive behavior in the bioceramic "recovery enhancing" apparel market must produce evidence that the plaintiff actually makes the clothing in question, not just one component of the fabric.

  • June 23, 2022

    Women's Soccer Seeks OK For Pay Deal 6 Years In Making

    The landmark $24 million equal-pay settlement the U.S. women's national soccer team reached in February happened after six years of continued negotiations and thousands of hours reviewing discovery before trial, according to a filing seeking preliminary approval for the deal.

  • June 23, 2022

    3rd Circ. Upholds Tossing Of Rutgers Sex Assault Case

    The Third Circuit has upheld Rutgers University's win in a lawsuit brought against it over two of its football players allegedly sexually assaulting a college freshman.

Expert Analysis

  • What 'The' OSU Trademark Win Means For Businesses

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    Ohio State University's successful argument to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that the word "The" is essential to its brand gives OSU the opportunity to assert its mark, and college administrators and small T-shirt business owners seeking to establish a brand or business name would do well to utilize a number of tools available to help avoid conflicts, says David Newman at Mahamedi IP.

  • Opinion

    Now's The Time To Address Archaic Law School Curricula

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    With law school enrollments jumping significantly ahead of a potential recession and more students graduating than the market can absorb, law schools should turn to creative solutions to teach students how to negotiate, work with clients, specialize and use technology to practice their craft more efficiently, says University of Colorado adjunct professor Jason Mendelson.

  • High Court's Tribal Ruling May Enable More Gambling In Texas

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Texas v. Ysleta, finding that Texas cannot regulate a tribe's electronic bingo, paves the way for Native American tribes in Texas to upscale their gaming operations, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • Lessons From Lawyer Fee-Sharing Agreements Gone Wrong

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    The recent fee-sharing dispute between Edelson and Girardi Keese is a reminder that lawyers who do not strictly follow the applicable rules may risk a disciplinary complaint, lose their share of the fee, or wind up in costly litigation with co-counsel, says David Grossbaum at Hinshaw.

  • LeClairRyan Bankruptcy Highlights Pass-Through Tax Issue

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    A Virginia bankruptcy court's recent ruling in the case of defunct law firm LeClairRyan shows there may be serious tax consequences for pass-through entity partners who give up their ownership interest without following operating agreement exit provisions and updating bankruptcy court filings, say Edward Schnitzer and Hannah Travaglini at Montgomery McCracken.

  • Counting Down To New Year's Day Sports Betting In Ohio

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    While Ohio's first legal sports bets can't be placed until Jan. 1, 2023, a key factor making its extended preparation period more palatable is H.B. 29's scope — broader than many states' laws — covering all commercial access points to betting, and permits betting on esports, Olympic, college and professional events, says Jake Nicholson at Roetzel & Andress.

  • 8 Steps To Creating A Legal Ops Technology Road Map

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    Legal departments struggling to find and implement the right technologies for their operations should consider creating a road map that summarizes their approach to technology changes, provides clearly defined metrics for success, and serves as the single source of truth for stakeholders, says Melanie Shafer at SimpleLegal.

  • The Importance Of Data And Data Analysis In Litigation

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    Understanding, analyzing and effectively presenting large data sets is an increasingly important skill in litigation as it allows plaintiffs to dramatically scale up the scope of cases and is often critical to defeating motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment, says David Burnett at Motley Rice.

  • US Immigration Should Clarify Status Of Esports Athletes

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    As the U.S. hosts a growing number of esports leagues and competitions, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services should make it easier for international professional gamers to compete in stateside tournaments by issuing guidance that expressly addresses esports or clarifies the definition of athlete in the visa context, says Gabriel Castro at Berry Appleman.

  • Steps Companies Can Take To Mitigate Privilege Labeling Risk

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    Although Google prevailed on a recent privilege labeling sanctions motion, an important takeaway from the decision is that companies should assess their in-house procedures and employee training programs regarding privileged communications to mitigate risks of the potential appearance of bad faith privilege claims, say Gareth Evans at Redgrave and e-discovery attorney James Hertsch.

  • What Litigation Funding Disclosure In Delaware May Look Like

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    A standing order issued by Delaware's chief federal judge requiring litigants to disclose whether their cases or defenses are being financed by third parties is unlikely to have onerous effects but may raise questions regarding potential conflicts of interest and access to justice, say Cayse Llorens and Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

  • Key Privacy Issues To Consider Before Launching An NFT

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    There are five steps brands follow when launching NFT collections, and each should involve additional considerations to ensure privacy and data protection, such as evaluating obligations under privacy law and being aware of tactics used by bad actors to gain access to digital wallets, say Daniel Goldberg and Zachary Lewis at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • How In-House Legal Leaders Can Drive Corporate Growth

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    Today, more executives are seeking legal leaders who are strategic, adaptable thinkers, making it essential that in-house counsel get out of their comfort zone of legal advice and take several steps to contribute toward revenue growth and raise their profile, says Tim Parilla at LinkSquares.

  • Attorneys Should Tread Carefully On Job Counteroffers

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    Promises of more compensation to keep attorneys from leaving their jobs have become commonplace in today's hot job market, but lawyers should weigh their options carefully as accepting a counteroffer can negatively affect their reputation, says Leeron Molloy at VOYlegal.

  • Series

    The Future Of Legal Ops: Time To Get Serious About Data

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    Most corporate legal departments collect surface-level data around their operations, such as costs and time to resolution, but legal leaders should explore more in-depth data gathering to assess how effective an attorney was, how efficiently legal work was performed, and more, says Andy Krebs at Intel.

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