Sports & Betting

  • January 23, 2020

    MLB Hall Of Famer Keeps Win In Biker's Injury Suit

    An Arizona appeals court on Thursday handed a win to Major League Baseball Hall of Famer Tony La Russa in a suit alleging he was negligent for keeping a cable fence on his property that injured a bicycle rider, finding that the trial court was correct in determining the rider was trespassing on his land.

  • January 22, 2020

    Ex-Jawbone Worker Stole IP Before Joining Fitbit, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a California federal jury during openings of a trade secret trial Wednesday that Jawbone's ex-consumer experience director stole studies that were its "crown jewels" before taking a job at rival Fitbit, while her attorney argued she simply forgot she'd backed up the data onto her personal "cloud" account.

  • January 22, 2020

    Feds Can't Keep Trump, Porn Star Out Of Avenatti Nike Trial

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday refused to bar the mention of adult film actress Stormy Daniels' hush money dispute with President Donald Trump from the trial of embattled celebrity attorney Michael Avenatti over an alleged plot to extort millions of dollars from Nike Inc., and ordered the proceeding to commence on Monday.

  • January 22, 2020

    NHL's Panthers The Latest Target Of Spam Text Claims

    Two Florida residents are suing the Florida Panthers for allegedly violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by automatically enrolling them in "aggressive" text messaging marketing campaigns, marking the latest such suit against a major sports franchise in the Sunshine State.

  • January 22, 2020

    High-Stakes Sports Gambler Charged With $9.6M Fraud

    A high-stakes Chicago-area gambler was hit with fraud charges in Illinois federal court Tuesday for allegedly bilking an unnamed investor out of $9.6 million that he claimed he would use to make stock trades and bets on sporting events.

  • January 22, 2020

    Lululemon Says Toxic Work Culture Claims Fall Short

    Fitness apparel maker Lululemon Athletica Inc. told a Delaware vice chancellor Wednesday that an investor has not shown its board acted in bad faith or was grossly negligent when it approved a severance deal with a former CEO who was accused of fostering a toxic work culture.

  • January 22, 2020

    Barstool Takes Down Anti-Union Tweets In NLRB Deal

    Barstool Sports had to take down two anti-union tweets fired off by its co-founder, remove a video mocking the controversy surrounding the tweets from its website, and delete a fake Barstool Union Twitter account as part of a deal to end allegations it suppressed union organizing. 

  • January 22, 2020

    Cincinnati Reds Call Foul On Law Student's Age Bias Suit

    The Cincinnati Reds baseball team told a North Carolina federal court Wednesday that a former minor league player-turned-law student's age discrimination suit swung and missed, arguing that he failed to show how the Reds’ refusal to let him participate in tryouts for younger players was illegal misconduct.

  • January 22, 2020

    Chinese Banks Avoid $150M Fine Over Fake Nikes

    A Manhattan federal judge has rejected a move to force six Chinese banks to pay more than $150 million over claims that they enabled the sale of counterfeit Nike and Converse products, shutting down an aggressive effort to follow the money behind fakes.

  • January 22, 2020

    Nassar Accusers Want USA Gymnastics Bankruptcy Canned

    Hundreds of gymnasts suing USA Gymnastics over sexual abuse by former team doctor Larry Nassar and others have asked an Indiana bankruptcy court to dismiss the organization’s Chapter 11 case, calling it a farce intended only to protect USAG from the “true depravity” of its actions ahead of the 2020 Olympics.

  • January 21, 2020

    Attys Score $1.2M In Fees In Minn. College Athletes' Bias Suit

    Minnesota's St. Cloud State University will have to pay nearly $1.2 million in attorney fees to female student-athletes who successfully sued the school for providing much better facilities to male athletes.

  • January 21, 2020

    Avenatti Says Geragos Must Testify At Extortion Trial

    Michael Avenatti has asked a New York federal court to make high-profile criminal defense attorney Mark Geragos testify at Avenatti's upcoming trial on an alleged plot to extort Nike, saying the Fifth Amendment shouldn't exempt Geragos from talking about his own involvement.

  • January 21, 2020

    Ex-Broadcast Exec Dodges Prison In FIFA Bribery Case

    A Brazilian former broadcasting executive on Tuesday was spared any time in prison for facilitating a scheme to bribe FIFA-connected soccer officials to award media rights to various Latin American soccer tournaments, in light of his extensive cooperation with the U.S. government.

  • January 21, 2020

    4th Circ. Rules Charity Can’t Sue Broker Over Golf Prize

    A Fourth Circuit panel ruled that a charity organization can’t sue an insurance broker over a $200,000 golfing prize payout, saying the insurance policy involved clearly excludes the contest in question.

  • January 21, 2020

    Ex-NFLer Will Take Pot Decriminalization Bid To High Court

    A group of cannabis patients led by a former NFL player told the Second Circuit they will take their gambit to decriminalize marijuana to the U.S. Supreme Court, saying that fighting the drug's designation as a controlled substance through administrative means could be disastrous for patients.

  • January 21, 2020

    NFL Seeks Atty Fees Following Tossed Disability Benefits Suit

    Two NFL insurance plans want an injured player whose suit over unpaid disability benefits was recently dismissed to cough up $45,000 for their attorney fees, telling a California federal court the case was clearly frivolous and filed in bad faith.

  • January 21, 2020

    K&L Gates Boosts NY Office With Sports Atty From Loeb

    Global law firm K&L Gates LLP is bolstering its New York office with the addition of an attorney focusing on sports and entertainment from Loeb & Loeb LLP.

  • January 17, 2020

    Bat Buyers Swing For Cert. In Rawlings False Ad Suit

    A group of baseball bat buyers on Friday asked a California federal judge to grant class certification in a suit alleging that Rawlings Sporting Goods Co. Inc. mislabeled the weight of its non-wood baseball bats, selling them at a heavier weight than advertised.

  • January 17, 2020

    NCAA May OK More Training Expenses For Olympic Athletes

    Elite Olympic and Paralympic athletes will be able to have “additional training expenses” paid without jeopardizing their NCAA eligibility under a rule change to be voted on next week as the NCAA takes the first steps toward reforming its rules to let athletes benefit from their names, images, and likenesses.

  • January 17, 2020

    Taxation With Representation: Skadden, Simpson, White

    In this week’s Taxation with Representation, Visa acquires fintech company Plaid for $5.3 billion, a Blackstone real estate trust makes a $4.6 billion play for two Vegas hotels, and Saudi Aramco’s IPO raises another $3.8 billion.

  • January 17, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Parents Could Be Headed For 3 Trials This Year

    The case against Lori Loughlin and other parents charged in the college admissions scandal known as “Varsity Blues” could be headed for as many as three trials later this year, a Massachusetts federal judge said in court Friday.

  • January 17, 2020

    Tribes Can't Fight $3M Ruling In Tribal Court, Builder Says

    The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes are wrongly trying to keep a construction contract dispute in tribal court after an arbitration panel awarded the construction company close to $3 million, the builder told an Idaho federal court.

  • January 17, 2020

    Owner of Bankrupt Golf Co. Held In Contempt In Patent Suit

    A New York federal judge on Friday held the owner of defunct golf company King Par Corp. in contempt for failing to answer a discovery request after a rival company won an $8.9 million verdict on allegations that King Par had stolen the rival's design for a golf bag.

  • January 17, 2020

    Riddell Can't Dodge High School Football Player's Death Suit

    A Texas federal judge said helmet maker Riddell Inc. must face a lawsuit alleging that its football helmets were defective and led to the death by suicide of a former high school football player, rejecting the company's arguments that the player's mother filed the suit too late. 

  • January 16, 2020

    Miss. Casinos Sue Churchill Downs Over Seat License Change

    A partnership of Mississippi casinos hit Churchill Downs, the home of the Kentucky Derby horse race, with a lawsuit in Kentucky federal court Wednesday alleging the track jacked up the price of its seats in the "Millionaires Row" section by 500% and demanded it pay or face the termination of 30-year personal seat licenses the partnership had purchased.

Expert Analysis

  • Recent Developments Show Importance Of Int'l Sport Court

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    Ian Blackshaw, a member of the Court of Arbitration for Sport, provides an overview of the court and analyzes recent changes and cases, including a hearing on the Russian athletes' ban by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

  • Legal Lessons From Esports Sponsorship Deals

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    Riot Games’ recent global partnerships with Louis Vuitton, OPPO and Red Bull may provide a potential template for other companies, leagues and players seeking to form similar agreements, and they should serve as a reminder of how carefully constructed such deals will need to be, say James Chang at Pillsbury and Sean Gilbert and Neil Thakur at Teknos Associates.

  • Nissan Ex-CEO Illustrates Do's And Don'ts Of Image Repair

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    Lawyers can draw a number of useful lessons about reputation management from the efforts of former Nissan executive Carlos Ghosn — who recently escaped house arrest in Tokyo — to restore his sullied reputation, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • Opinion

    MLB Must Punish Houston Astros Players To Restore Integrity

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    In his report on the Houston Astros sign-stealing scandal, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred acknowledged that the cheating was driven by players, yet he did not punish any of them — for reasons that seem fatuous at best, says Ronald Katz of GCA Law Partners.

  • Baseball Scandal Highlights Compliance Lessons For Banks

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    The MLB's recent disciplinary action against the Houston Astros for stealing other teams' hand signals underscores compliance lessons for banks and other financial institutions, whose regulators are similarly focused on insufficient institutional controls, say Mitchel Kider and Michael Kieval at Weiner Brodsky.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • A Wide Range Of Legal Priorities For Tribes In 2020

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    This year, Indian Country faces a number of critical policy and legal issues that must be addressed to protect tribal sovereignty, with key developments to watch for in all three branches of government, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

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    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Opinion

    States Should Not Follow ABA On Attorney Conduct Rules

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    Because the American Bar Association's new rule on diversity continues to use the Model Rules of Professional Conduct as a cultural bludgeon, states should create independent codes limited to constitutionally valid purposes of attorney regulation, says Bradley Abramson of Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • How Courts And Litigants Can Benefit From Special Masters

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    As we approach the first anniversary of the American Bar Association's adoption of guidelines for the appointment and use of special masters in civil litigation, retired U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin, now at Stroock, explains how special masters can help parties and courts with faster decision-making and subject matter expertise.

  • Uber Policy Calls For Refresher On ABA Confidentiality Rules

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    Uber's recent policy update allowing drivers to audio-record passenger rides is a reminder for lawyers to observe the highest standard of care in protecting client information under the American Bar Association's confidentiality model rule, says Paul Boehm at Williams & Connolly.

  • Misuse Of Inverse Ratio Copyright Rule Continues In 9th Circ.

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    While the Ninth Circuit rightly neutered the inverse ratio rule for determining copyright infringement in its recent Skidmore v. Zeppelin decision, vestiges of the rule’s improper application still linger in recent district court decisions, say Ethan Wong and Andrew Thomas of Jenner & Block.

  • 5 Advertising Law Trends To Watch In 2020

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    This year, advertisers face a world increasingly sensitive to privacy and data use, consumers who have grown savvy to influencer marketing and product placement, new social media challenges, and regulators’ increased focus on cannabis marketing, say Jason Gordon and Casey Perrino of Reed Smith.