Sports & Betting

  • August 20, 2019

    Ex-Rams Ticket Exec's 'Trash Talk' Suit Tossed, For Now

    A California federal judge on Tuesday threw out a suit brought by a former Los Angeles Rams ticket executive over the publishing of and reporting on private — and profane — "trash talk" text messages he sent a friend about New England Patriots safety Patrick Chung, an exchange that he says ultimately cost him his job.

  • August 20, 2019

    College's Actions Created Duty To Athletes, Pa. Justices Say

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that Lackawanna College left itself open to claims from two would-be football players by taking it upon itself to provide athletic trainers, who the two players claim were grossly unqualified, at the team’s tryouts.

  • August 20, 2019

    Mariners ADA Suit To Continue Over Seat Location, Sightlines

    Whether the Seattle Mariners must add more wheelchair-accessible seats and whether those seats must provide sightlines over standing spectators are questions for a jury to decide, a Washington judge has ruled, after siding with wheelchair-bound fans on some claims that T-Mobile Park is not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

  • August 20, 2019

    Under Armour Latest Company Sued Over Milk Crate Logo

    Under Armour executives discussed design collaborations with Milkcrate Athletics before ripping off its trademarked milk crate logo, the latter company said in a lawsuit brought a week after filing a similar one against Adidas and the Brooklyn Nets.

  • August 20, 2019

    Sports Stock Market Owner Faces SEC's $1.5M Fraud Suit

    The Securities and Exchange Commission has sued the man behind an experimental sports marketplace, alleging he sold nearly $1.5 million in bogus shares by promising investors for years that he would properly register them soon.

  • August 19, 2019

    US Soccer Women's Pay Equity Suit Poised For May 2020 Trial

    The U.S. Soccer Federation and its world champion women’s national team will duke it out over pay equity in a trial slated for May 2020, a spokesperson for the players said Monday.

  • August 19, 2019

    Seeger Swats Away NFL Concussion Fee Objection Again

    Seeger Weiss LLP fired back on Monday against an objection to its latest $1.7 million fee request in the NFL concussion settlement, the most recent move in a pattern that's taken on an almost ritualistic quality as it's continued to repeat itself since the deal went into effect.

  • August 19, 2019

    Under Armour Ditches Stock-Drop Suit

    Athletic apparel company Under Armour on Monday escaped a proposed securities class action accusing it of hiding a decrease in demand for its products, with a Maryland federal judge finding the company’s investors failed to convincingly plead their case.

  • August 19, 2019

    Avenatti Rips Extortion Charges, Says He Was Doing His Job

    Embattled attorney Michael Avenatti on Monday urged a New York federal court to toss a criminal indictment that alleges he sought to extort Nike Inc. for millions of dollars, arguing he was simply doing his job as a lawyer representing the interests of his client.

  • August 19, 2019

    Ex-LA Times Columnist Wins $15M In Age, Disability Suit

    Former Los Angeles Times sports columnist T.J. Simers was awarded more than $15 million by a Los Angeles jury Monday in a second trial over claims that he was discriminated against based on his age and disability.

  • August 19, 2019

    No Way Around Atty Conflict In 'Varsity Blues,' Judge Says

    A Boston federal magistrate judge on Monday warned a parent charged in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal that, by sticking with a team of attorneys that also represents a former coach connected to the case, he risks receiving conflicted advice.

  • August 19, 2019

    NCAA Asks 9th Circ. To Undo Student-Athletes' Win

    The NCAA urged the Ninth Circuit Friday to reverse a lower court decision lifting restrictions on what colleges can pay their players, arguing that the ruling would eliminate the distinction between college and professional sports.

  • August 19, 2019

    Ex-NFL Players Signed Off On Clinic's ERISA Suit, Judge Told

    Advanced Physicians SC on Friday slammed Cigna's bid to sack its suit in Texas federal court that accuses the insurer of violating the Employee Retirement Income Security Act by denying retired NFL football players' claims, arguing its claims are viable and the players authorized the clinic to sue.

  • August 19, 2019

    Lost Evidence Leaves NY Judge With Doubts Over MMA Suit

    A mixed martial arts fighter's quest to hold supplement maker Gaspari Nutrition liable for his positive drug test took a body blow Monday as a Manhattan federal judge suggested the loss of the supplement bottle at the heart of the case might mean it can't go forward.

  • August 19, 2019

    NBA Star Drops Trademark Case Over 'Greek Freak' Nickname

    NBA star Giannis Antetokounmpo has reached a settlement to end a trademark lawsuit he filed last month in New York federal court over a line of unauthorized merchandise featuring his “Greek Freak” nickname.

  • August 19, 2019

    15 Minutes With The Charlotte Hornets' General Counsel

    As sports betting legislation makes its way through states across the country, Charlotte Hornets general counsel Joe Pierce has addressed the legalization of the activity through presentations to the team's players, doctors and even part-time ticket takers. Here, he also discusses the leadership qualities he gained as a college track athlete and his experience working for Michael Jordan, who owns the franchise.

  • August 16, 2019

    Minor Leaguers Notch 9th Circ. Win On Cert. In MLB Pay Suit

    Minor League Baseball players suing over starvation wages in the farm system scored a home run on Friday as the Ninth Circuit upheld a lower court's decision to certify a national Fair Labor Standards Act collective and California class, and said it should have certified classes in Arizona and Florida, too.

  • August 16, 2019

    Celebrity Chef Says NFL Star Stiffed Him On $39K Bill

    A chef who cooks at private events for NFL players has hit Oakland Raiders wide receiver Antonio Brown with a suit in Florida state court, saying the football star refused to pay him and his staff nearly $39,000 for a Pro Bowl Weekend gig after throwing them out of his house.

  • August 16, 2019

    DOJ Takes Wire Act Reinterpretation Issue To 1st Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Friday appealed a federal court decision that rejected its opinion the Wire Act prohibits interstate gambling beyond sports betting, prolonging a closely watched legal fight over the reinterpretation that opponents say will hamper the growing online lottery and gambling industries.

  • August 16, 2019

    Alibaba Co-Founder Buys Barclays Center, Brooklyn Nets

    Russian billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov, guided by Hogan Lovells, has agreed to sell the Barclays Center and his controlling stake in the Brooklyn Nets basketball team to Alibaba Group co-founder and Executive Vice Chairman Joe Tsai, reportedly for about $3.5 billion, the arena’s operator BSE Global said Friday.

  • August 16, 2019

    Billy Casper Golf Co. Suit Seeks To Recoup Management Fee

    Billy Casper Golf LLC sued the owners of a Pennsylvania golf course and country club Friday, saying the course owes it nearly $125,000 after failing to pay Billy Casper Golf for managing the course.

  • August 16, 2019

    Golf Bag Maker Taking Home $12M After Drama-Filled IP Saga

    Shuttered golf company King Par Golf Inc. owes its former rival Izzo Golf Inc. more than $12 million for infringing its bag patent, a New York federal judge has ruled, almost 10 years after King Par’s owner stashed the company’s money in a personal bank account and declared bankruptcy.

  • August 15, 2019

    Avenatti Says Nike Agreed To Pay Zion Williamson $35K

    Embattled attorney Michael Avenatti referenced alleged texts between Nike executives discussing an illicit $35,000 payment to eventual NBA No. 1 draft pick Zion Williamson before he committed to Duke University, in a motion filed late Wednesday seeking to escape federal criminal charges alleging he attempted to extort the shoe company.

  • August 15, 2019

    Hope Solo Can't Gate-Crash Pay Gap Talks With US Soccer

    A California federal judge said Thursday he can't force the U.S. Soccer Federation and the World Cup-champion Women's National Team to include former team goalie Hope Solo in their mediation talks over equal pay, telling her "they're having a party, and you're not invited."

  • August 15, 2019

    LA School's Football Players Paid To Cut Class, Teacher Says

    A former high school teacher has filed suit against the Los Angeles Unified School District, claiming he was punished for complaining about his school's practice of boosting its football players’ grades, letting them bribe their way out of class and covering up their “rampant violence, gambling and drug use.”

Expert Analysis

  • Crisis Messaging To Protect Law Firm Brand And Bottom Line

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    When crises occur, such as data security incidents or gender bias suits, a well-prepared law firm has a thoroughly tested communications plan at the ready, which ensures the firm is the most proactive news source, prevents the crisis from escalating and notifies stakeholders about mitigation efforts, says Zach Olsen at Infinite Global.

  • Perspectives

    What You Should Know About Courtroom Closures

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    At attorney Greg Craig’s trial in D.C. federal court this week, the courtroom was cleared so prospective jurors could answer sensitive questions. Even seasoned litigators were left wondering about the nature of this subtle, yet significant, issue involving Sixth Amendment public trial rights, says Luke Cass at Quarles & Brady.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Seaweed Scientist's Odyssey

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    In the early 1980s, I was working on my Ph.D. in marine biology and ecology. As part of an international team of scientists studying oil spill impacts on marine ecosystems, I saw a niche opportunity to combine science and law, says Andrew Davis of Shipman & Goodwin.

  • How To Counter Jury Reliance On Plaintiff's Damages Ask

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    Years of interviewing jurors and observing deliberation show that the amount juries award in damages is almost always influenced by the amount of the plaintiff's demand, but there are three ways defense counsel can combat this anchoring effect, says Christina Marinakis at Litigation Insights.

  • 5th Amendment Strategy For Parallel Civil, Criminal Litigation

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    Whenever there is any prospect of criminal liability in civil litigation — as in the recent cases against Harvey Weinstein and former Theranos executives — it is important for both sides to understand the consequences of a party or key witness choosing to assert Fifth Amendment privilege, says Joshua Robbins at Greenberg Gross.

  • Opinion

    Clients Benefit From Law Firm Expense Growth

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    Although there continue to be corporate clients who are seduced by the idea that cheapest is always best when it comes to outside counsel, there are many negative implications on service delivery that result from myopically focusing only on cost reduction at the expense of quality and innovation, says Keith Maziarek at Katten Muchin.

  • Opinion

    Changing Ethics Rules Is Key To Law Firm Innovation

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    As demonstrated by the California bar proposal to allow nonlawyers to invest in law firms, we can change the legal ethics rules in a way that protects clients while permitting firms to innovate and serve clients better, say Todd Richheimer of ​​​​​​​Lawfty and Peter Joy of Washington University Law School.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Castillo Reviews 'Raising The Bar'

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    A timely new book, “Raising the Bar: Diversifying Big Law," is one of the first honest assessments of the challenging battleground for people of color at large law firms, and I hope that firm management committee members read it, says U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo of the Northern District of Illinois.

  • Debunking 3 Myths About Contract Attorneys

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    Although contract attorneys represent a quality source of legal work, inaccurate assumptions cause many legal departments and law firms to hesitate when considering them, say Matthew Weaver and Shannon Murphy of Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    #MeToo Defendant Bankruptcies Can Delay, Not Deny, Justice

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    Institutional defendants facing sexual abuse claims are increasingly using bankruptcy filings to freeze litigation, and those representing survivors need to be aware of the different rules, deadlines and discovery procedures in the new venue to ensure their clients' claims are not lost, says Michelle Tuegel of Seeger Weiss.

  • Compliance Imperatives For Defensible Data Disposal

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    Companies in a host of industries have recently faced steep compliance fines for data breaches from domestic and international regulators. Defensible disposal of corporate data presents an excellent opportunity to mitigate the impact of these data-driven risks, says Julia Brickell of H5.

  • Key Defense Strategies For Sports Head Trauma Lawsuits

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    Athletes who claim sports caused brain trauma are increasingly suing teams, leagues, schools and equipment manufacturers — sometimes years after leaving the playing field. And plaintiffs’ lawsuits are making it past dispositive motions, requiring defendants to mount creative defenses against these claims, say Jason Meyer and Robert Olson of Gordon Rees.

  • A Litigator’s Reflections From The Arbitrator’s Chair

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's opinions this term in Henry Schein and Lamps Plus remind us of the fundamental difference between arbitration and litigation. Yet, as a commercial litigator who serves as a neutral arbitrator, I have observed that experienced litigators often fail to adapt their approach in arbitration, says Paula Litt at Honigman.

  • The Latest Fed. Circ. Move On Patent Eligibility

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    The Federal Circuit had never conclusively stated that a presumption of validity applies to a patent challenged on Section 101 grounds until its recent Cellspin v. Fitbit decision, which invokes and responds to two earlier decisions, Berkheimer and Aatrix, says Anthony Fuga of Holland & Knight.

  • 5 Hard Phrases Lawyers Should Master

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    While Kelly Corrigan's popular book, "Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say," focuses on simple words or phrases that individuals can use to improve their personal lives, attorneys can utilize Corrigan's advice for professional benefit, says Karen Ross of Tucker Ellis.