Sports & Betting

  • January 27, 2022

    Netflix Can't Checkmate 'Queen's Gambit' Defamation Suit

    A California federal judge denied Netflix's attempt to dismiss a defamation suit from Georgian chess champion Nona Gaprindashvili over her portrayal in the hit show "The Queen's Gambit," ruling Thursday that while the show is fictional, the reference to Gaprindashvili could be interpreted as a true historical detail.

  • January 27, 2022

    Workers Will Tell House Of Washington NFL Team Misconduct

    Former Washington Football Team employees are going to Capitol Hill to share "firsthand accounts" of the workplace misconduct in the team's front office after few details from an investigation by the law firm Wilkinson Stekloff LLP were released publicly by the NFL last year.

  • January 27, 2022

    The Term: Breyer's Legacy And The Nomination To Come

    Justice Stephen Breyer on Thursday formally announced he would be retiring at the end of the Supreme Court term. Here, The Term breaks down the legacy he will leave behind and takes a look at what lies ahead for his potential successor with two special guests.

  • January 27, 2022

    Breyer Retiring As Supreme Court Lurches Right

    Justice Stephen Breyer is retiring from the U.S. Supreme Court at a time when his conservative colleagues on the bench seem intent on dismantling landmark precedents on abortion, affirmative action and the administrative state, to name a few. Can his successor preserve his liberal legacy?

  • January 27, 2022

    Cubs In Settlement Talks With DOJ Over Wrigley Accessibility

    The Chicago Cubs are in talks with the U.S. Department of Justice to resolve a compliance review of seating accessibility at Wrigley Field, according to Illinois federal court filings on Wednesday in a related Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuit against the team.

  • January 27, 2022

    Oakland A's Want Metal Scrapper Sanctioned In Pollution Row

    The Oakland Athletics say the owner of California's largest metal shredding facility should be sanctioned for refusing to turn over documents related to hazardous waste it allegedly spewed into the air, soil and water around West Oakland, in an ongoing battle over a future ballpark's dangerous atmosphere.

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Jackson Back In Spotlight As High Court Contender

    The upcoming vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court quickly threw the spotlight back on D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, a former clerk for Justice Stephen Breyer whose stature as a likely successor to the retiring justice was suddenly raised Wednesday.

  • January 27, 2022

    Biden At His Side, Justice Breyer Announces Retirement

    Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer joined President Joe Biden at the White House Thursday to formally announce his retirement, kicking off a rush among Democrats to confirm a new member of the court to replace the oldest serving justice.

  • January 26, 2022

    Manatt Partner, Ex-'Varsity Blues' Atty Picked For Mass. Bench

    Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker on Wednesday nominated a Manatt Phelps & Phillips partner and former government attorney involved in the "Varsity Blues" case to be an associate justice of the state's superior court, according to an announcement from the governor's office.

  • January 26, 2022

    Garanimals Brand Is Famous Enough In 'Manimal' TM Fight

    Children's clothing company Garanimals scored a victory when an Oregon federal judge ordered the cancellation of a rival's trademark registration on "Manimal," finding the Garanimals brand to be famous due to "unsolicited media attention" from shows like "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon."

  • January 26, 2022

    Nike GC Hilary Krane To Retire; CCO Tapped To Replace Her

    Nike Inc. announced Wednesday it will appoint Ann Miller, a Nike veteran with more than two decades of legal experience, to take over from longtime general counsel and chief administration officer Hilary Krane, who will retire in 2022.

  • January 26, 2022

    Democrats Plan Swift Confirmation Of Breyer Successor

    The U.S. Senate's Democratic leaders pledged Wednesday to move swiftly to confirm a successor for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, who is expected to formally announce his retirement Thursday.

  • January 26, 2022

    Retailer Fights University Of Illinois' 'Anti-Competitive' TM Suit

    Online apparel retailer Vintage Brand LLC urged a federal court in Illinois to toss a trademark infringement suit brought by the University of Illinois or to make the institution clarify its claims, arguing the company's products only use historical images that are in the public domain.

  • January 26, 2022

    Meet The Possible Nominees For Justice Breyer's Seat

    President Joe Biden has promised to nominate the first-ever Black woman to the nation's highest court. Here we look at the contenders for Justice Stephen Breyer's seat, including one notable front-runner.

  • January 26, 2022

    Minor Role In NY Gambling Ring Still Merits Prison, Feds Say

    The operator of a club linked to an illegal gambling ring in New York should spend six months to a year in prison regardless of the minor role he played in a larger racketeering case, federal prosecutors recommended Tuesday.

  • January 26, 2022

    PTAB Says 2 Peloton Patents Aren't Any Good

    A Peloton rival has convinced a Patent Trial and Appeal Board panel to rule that two Peloton patents that tried to claim a method of streaming exercise classes were no good, because they had only jammed together ideas from older home exercise patents.

  • January 26, 2022

    'Just Do Your Job': Justice Breyer's Legacy Of Pragmatism

    With the coming retirement of Justice Stephen Breyer, the U.S. Supreme Court loses not only a core member of its liberal bloc, but also a judicial thinker who cares deeply about making the law work on a practical level, those who worked with him said.

  • January 26, 2022

    Fitness Equipment Co. Joins Section 301 China Tariffs Rumble

    A home exercise equipment company has joined the thousands of importers looking to wipe out the bulk of Trump-era tariffs on China, saying the White House illegally ramped up so-called Section 301 tariffs to cover over $300 billion worth of goods.

  • January 26, 2022

    Fixer Who Smuggled Cuban Ballplayers Gets 13 Months

    A Florida federal judge sentenced a fixer in Haiti to 13 months in prison for helping a sports trainer and a baseball agent smuggle Cuban ballplayers into the U.S.

  • January 26, 2022

    Dolphins Coach Says Self-Infringement Dooms IP Suit

    A Miami Dolphins coach said Tuesday he can't be sued by a sports psychologist for tweeting a copyrighted motivational passage because the excerpt is itself an infringement on an earlier protected work from the same person.

  • January 26, 2022

    5 Breyer Opinions You Need To Know

    Justice Stephen Breyer, who was confirmed Wednesday to be stepping down from the court after 27 years, was a pragmatist who thought about the real-world implications of the high court’s decisions. Here, Law360 looks at some of the cases that epitomize his career.

  • January 26, 2022

    Justice Breyer To Retire From High Court

    Justice Stephen Breyer, one of the longest-serving liberal members of the U.S. Supreme Court, will resign his post after more than 27 years on the bench.

  • January 25, 2022

    9th Circ. Lets Univ. Of Arizona Keep Win In Title IX Suit

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday affirmed the dismissal of a student's Title IX suit alleging the University of Arizona failed to protect her from being assaulted by her then-boyfriend, a football player, saying the school's failure to address the player's previous assaults did not impact the context in which she was assaulted.

  • January 25, 2022

    Ex-NFLers, Wives Back Race-Norming Deal, But With Caveats

    A group of roughly 75 former NFL players and spouses joined a letter urging the federal judge overseeing the NFL concussion settlement to approve an agreement to end the controversial use of race-norming to assess settlement payouts, while saying many players felt "burned" by the issue and that "deep concerns remain."

  • January 25, 2022

    NCAA Can't Get 2nd Shot To Toss 'Employee' Suit, Court Told

    College athletes seeking minimum wage in a potential landmark putative collective action urged a federal judge on Monday to reject the NCAA's "unorthodox" and "extraordinary" bid to get the case tossed after its request for a rapid-fire appeal was denied.

Expert Analysis

  • How AI Can Transform Crisis Management In Litigation

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    Attorneys should understand how to use rapidly advancing artificial intelligence technology to help clients prepare for potential catastrophic events and the inevitable litigation arising from them, from predicting crises before they occur to testing legal theories once they arise, say Stratton Horres at Wilson Elser and David Steiger.

  • Supervisor Relationships Are Key To Beating Atty Burnout

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    In order to combat record attorney turnover and high levels of burnout, law firm partners and leaders must build engaging relationships with supervisees, fostering autonomy and control, enabling expression of values, and building a sense of community and belonging, says Anne Brafford at the Institute for Well-Being in Law.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

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    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • Biden's Antitrust Shift May Play Out On The Golf Course

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    The Biden administration's tougher stance on antitrust enforcement could bring about changes in professional golf, particularly restrictions on non-PGA tournaments and broadcasts, says Tad Lipsky at George Mason University.

  • Evaluating Director Protections After Del. Bankruptcy Ruling

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    The Delaware Bankruptcy Court's recent decision in Friedman v. Wellspring Capital, outlining the conditions under which an alleged duty of loyalty breach can survive a motion to dismiss, may undermine corporate decision makers' ability to negotiate for what are customary and necessary protections as they manage distressed entity transactions, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Takeaways From White Collar Criminal Enforcement In 2021

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    White collar criminal prosecutions were up in 2021, with recent high-profile fraud trials, the Biden administration's enforcement priorities and the continuing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic potentially reversing the previous trend of slumping white collar prosecutions, say attorneys at Keker Van Nest.

  • 5 Advertising Law Trends To Watch

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    For the world of advertising, 2022 will bring new compliance challenges and considerations shaped by legal developments in everything from nonfungible-token commerce in the metaverse to the ever-growing impact of social media on young users, say Jason Gordon and Deborah Bessner at Reed Smith.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

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    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • Opportunities And Legal Implications In The Metaverse

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    Attorneys at Ropes & Gray explore the underlying technologies of Web3, discuss the concept of the metaverse and its commercial opportunities, and examine associated legal considerations, from trademark protection to the application of existing securities laws in decentralized, blockchain-based systems.

  • Recent Bias Suits Against Law Firms And Lessons For 2022

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    2021 employment discrimination case filings and developments show that law firms big and small are not immune from claims, and should serve as a reminder that the start of a new year is a good time to review and update salary, promotion and leave policies to mitigate litigation risks, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • Economic Analysis May Play Larger Role In SEC Enforcement

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent emphasis on climate risk disclosure may prompt future investigations and litigation to include economic analysis of how corporations benefited from misstatements, making it important for companies to understand the changing risks as enforcement gains traction in this area, says Mark Kaplan at Monument Economics Group.

  • Associate Hiring Outlook At Law Firms Is Bright For 2022

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    After a year of extraordinary signing bonuses, nearly instantaneous offers and flexible work arrangements, strong demand for talented law firm associates will continue into 2022 — with some differences between East and West Coast markets — and junior attorneys should take steps to capitalize on the opportunity, say Ru Bhatt and Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Roundup

    The Most-Read Legal Industry Guest Articles Of 2021

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    Popular legal industry guest articles this year included commentary on the admissibility of video depositions, an unusual U.S. Supreme Court citation, the perils of lawyer perfectionism, and more.

  • A Law Firm Leader's Guide To Seeking Effective Feedback

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    Law firm leaders often claim to have their fingers on the pulse of the people in their firms, but perspectives can be heavily weighted toward certain partners, so leaders should take certain steps to ensure they receive well-rounded feedback that helps them make more informed decisions, says Jennifer Johnson at Calibrate Legal.

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