Sports & Betting

  • October 19, 2020

    Preparing The Next Generation Of Female Trial Lawyers

    To build the ranks of female trial attorneys, law firms must integrate them into every aspect of a case — from witness preparation to courtroom arguments — instead of relegating them to small roles, says Kalpana Srinivasan, co-managing partner at Susman Godfrey.

  • October 19, 2020

    Mentorship Is Key To Fixing Drop-Off Of Women In Law

    It falls to senior male attorneys to recognize the crisis female attorneys face as the pandemic amplifies an already unequal system and to offer their knowledge, experience and counsel to build a better future for women in law, says James Meadows at Culhane Meadows.

  • October 19, 2020

    What BigLaw Can Do To Actually Retain Female Attorneys

    Even as BigLaw firms are recruiting women into their ranks in larger numbers, their presence in leadership and equity partnerships remains stubbornly low. Here’s a look at why this is happening — and what firms can do.

  • October 19, 2020

    Female Attorneys Gain Ground In Battle For Clerkships​

    More female attorneys are landing highly sought-after U.S. Supreme Court clerkships, and the experience can turbocharge their careers.

  • October 19, 2020

    These Firms Have The Most Women In Equity Partnerships

    At most U.S. law firms, equity partnerships are still overwhelmingly male, but women at some firms are starting to shake up that reality and smash the glass ceiling that has prevented them from advancing to the uppermost ranks. Here are this year’s Ceiling Smashers — the firms that are outpacing their peers as the legal industry works toward closing the gender gap in its top ranks.

  • October 19, 2020

    Wearing Natural Hair In BigLaw

    In this video, four Black women share their thoughts about wearing natural hair as BigLaw attorneys. In order of appearance, the attorneys are: Rukayatu Tijani, founder of Firm for the Culture and a former BigLaw associate; Delilah Clay, legislative & regulatory advisor at Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP; Rachel Boyce, associate at Cooley LLP; and Crystal Nwaneri, associate at Fenwick & West LLP.

  • October 19, 2020

    DOJ Again Backs Raiders In 9th Circ. Oakland Antitrust Row

    The U.S. Department of Justice continues to back the Raiders in the City of Oakland's antitrust suit against the team and the NFL, this time with a Ninth Circuit amicus brief urging the appellate court to agree that lost tax revenue is not "cognizable" as an antitrust injury.

  • October 19, 2020

    Role In Sports Gambling Ring Gets Ill. Man Home Detention

    An 85-year-old Illinois man was sentenced Monday to three months of home detention and a year of probation for his role in an illegal gambling ring that allegedly was spearheaded by his son and involved the brother of Hall of Fame Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher.

  • October 19, 2020

    Memorabilia Biz Accuses Debevoise Of Fraud Amid SEC Probe

    A memorabilia auction company sued Debevoise & Plimpton LLP on Saturday, saying the firm's attorneys "abysmally failed" their duties and "annihilated" the company's market value by trying to cover up their own mishandling of an SEC investigation into potential fraud.

  • October 19, 2020

    6 Russian Officers Indicted Over Massive Cyberattack

    A Pennsylvania grand jury has indicted six Russian military officers for cyberattacks, including the destructive 2017 NotPetya malware attack, from the same intelligence unit accused of interfering with the 2016 presidential election, the U.S. Department of Justice said Monday.

  • October 19, 2020

    Thomas Decries Okla. 'Uncertainty' As Tribal Tax Case Denied

    Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday blasted the U.S. Supreme Court for failing to dispel "uncertainty" left by its July ruling on federal, state and tribal jurisdiction in McGirt v. Oklahoma, dissenting sharply from the court's refusal to take up a petition over a state tax on gaming equipment leased to a tribal casino.

  • October 16, 2020

    In Their Own Words: Being A Woman In BigLaw

    Firms are recruiting more women than previously to their ranks, but still have trouble retaining them at the same rate as men. Law360 asked three female attorneys who left BigLaw about how firms could better serve the women who work there. Here's what they have to say.

  • October 16, 2020

    Law360's Glass Ceiling Report: What You Need To Know

    While law firms continue to tout efforts to close the gender gap in their ranks, parity is still a distant goal, our annual survey shows.

  • October 16, 2020

    Glass Ceiling Report: How Does Your Firm Measure Up?

    Law firms have long struggled to clear the barriers women face in the legal industry, particularly when it comes to accessing the top ranks. Law360's 2020 Glass Ceiling Report looks to shed light on the progress firms have made and where they aim to be.

  • October 16, 2020

    Casino Sued For Bias After Telling Worker To 'Deal With It'

    A former dealer at Boyd Gaming's Valley Forge Casino Resort in Pennsylvania slapped the gambling chain with a sex discrimination lawsuit alleging she faced four years of rude comments and acts, but was told by her boss to "deal with it," according to a complaint filed Friday in federal court.

  • October 16, 2020

    Former Angels Staffer Indicted Over Pitcher's Overdose Death

    A Texas grand jury has indicted a former communications director for the Los Angeles Angels for his alleged role in the death of pitcher Tyler Skaggs, who prosecutors say died of a fentanyl overdose last year.

  • October 16, 2020

    Undrafted Football Star Sues Sports Agency, Agent For $1M

    Former University of Georgia football standout J.R. Reed sued NFL player sports agency Sportstars Inc. and one of its agents in California federal court for $1 million after he went undrafted earlier this year, alleging they failed to alleviate NFL teams' concerns over a knee injury Reed suffered in high school.

  • October 16, 2020

    EU Extends Deadline To Review Google's $2B Fitbit Deal

    European enforcers on Friday pushed the deadline back for a review of Google's planned $2.1 billion purchase of fitness tracking device maker Fitbit until early next year as they investigate concerns about the amount of data the search giant is set to acquire.

  • October 16, 2020

    Brand Battles: Beckham Aims To Block Bedding Co.'s TM

    In Law360's latest roundup of new actions at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, soccer legend David Beckham is seeking to cancel a trademark registration for a "Beckham Hotel Collection" bedding line on the basis that it'll affect his and his wife Victoria Beckham's "elite global advertising brand" — plus three other TTAB cases you need to know.

  • October 16, 2020

    Peloton Recalls 54K Pedals After Reported Breakage, Injuries

    Peloton Interactive Inc. is recalling pedals from 27,000 of its first-generation exercise bikes, or more than 54,000 pedals, over a risk that their axles could break during use and cut riders' legs, after receiving 120 reports of broken pedals.

  • October 16, 2020

    Daily Fantasy Sports Dues Count As Wagers, IRS Says

    Money that individuals pay to participate in daily fantasy sports leagues qualify as wagering transactions and can therefore be subject to write-offs provided by the tax code, the Internal Revenue Service said in a memorandum released Friday. 

  • October 16, 2020

    MVP: Winston & Strawn's Jeffrey Kessler

    Jeffrey Kessler of Winston & Strawn LLP continued battering down the legal ramparts of the NCAA's "amateurism" rules with a major victory in the Ninth Circuit this year, while helping the NFL, MLB and NBA player unions navigate the COVID-19 pandemic, securing his spot as one of Law360's 2020 Sports & Betting MVPs.

  • October 15, 2020

    NordicTrack Maker Says Peloton's New Bike Infringes IP

    Icon Health & Fitness lodged a patent infringement suit in Delaware federal court Thursday, accusing Peloton of copying its technology with its new Bike+ product and continuing a "pattern of infringing."

  • October 15, 2020

    Kansas Looks To Block DOI Decision On Tribal Land

    Kansas has asked a federal court for a preliminary injunction to block the U.S. Department of the Interior's decision to take land into trust for gambling for the Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma, saying the agency ignored its own regulations when relying on a previous court ruling.

  • October 15, 2020

    Minor Leaguers Fight Insurers' Bid To Toss Ariz. Virus Suit

    A group of Minor League Baseball teams is pushing back against a bid by three units of Nationwide to throw out their suit over losses stemming from their canceled season, saying the insurers' focus on a virus exclusion ignores the other causes of loss they pled in the suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Kentucky Tax Talk: What Appeals Board Reinstatement Means

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    While local customs and precedent set by the Kentucky Board of Tax Appeals prior to 2016 will likely be back upon the board's pending reinstatement, taxpayers and practitioners should be aware of several important practice and structural changes, say attorneys at Frost Brown.

  • Guest Feature

    5 Ways Firms Can Avoid Female Atty Exodus During Pandemic

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    The pandemic's disproportionate impact on women presents law firms with a unique opportunity to devise innovative policies that will address the increasing home life demands female lawyers face and help retain them long after COVID-19 is over, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • How The State And Local Regulatory Landscape Is Expanding

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    States and localities are employing creative methods to emerge as key players in regulatory enforcement traditionally dominated by the federal government, including False Claims Act investigations, unfair and deceptive acts and practices claims, and pharmaceutical sector regulation, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

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    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

  • Why Online Mediation May Be Here To Stay

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    Videoconferenced mediation offers several advantages and helps cases settle faster and more cordially, making it hard to imagine going back to logistically difficult in-person dispute resolution after COVID-19 restrictions are gone, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC.

  • Clients Have The Power To Promote Wellness At Law Firms

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    Law firm clients can play a role in lowering mental distress in the legal profession by seeking lawyer wellness data from firms and factoring those responses into outside counsel hiring decisions, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Courts Should Welcome Well-Crafted Amicus Briefs

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    A Seventh Circuit judge's recent order granting leave for three organizations to file amicus curiae briefs in Prairie Rivers Network v. Dynegy Midwest Generation is a reminder that relevant, nonduplicative amicus briefs can provide courts with helpful perspective, important facts and legal arguments, says Lawrence Ebner at Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • University Sportsbook Deal Raises Compliance Concerns

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    Because state and gaming industry regulations and possible NCAA guidance could limit the viability of novel partnerships like the University of Colorado's corporate sponsorship agreement with PointsBet, athletic departments need to establish clear protocols to ensure integrity and adherence to sports-betting rules, say Christopher Conniff and Nicholas Macri at Ropes & Gray.

  • What Hiring Law Firms Should Consider Instead Of Grades

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    With law schools forgoing traditional grading due to the pandemic, hiring firms that have heavily weighted first-year grades during the on-campus interview process should turn to metrics that allow a more holistic view of a candidate, says Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Schroeder Reviews 'Collegiality'

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    Mark Barringer's new book, "Collegiality and the Constitution," is an engaging, vibrant work of judicial history in Texas' Eastern District, and reveals an atmosphere of civility and respect among all those involved in the business of the court, says U.S. District Judge Robert W. Schroeder III.

  • Now Is The Time To Go Digital With Compliance Training

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    To properly meet the U.S. Department of Justice's latest corporate compliance expectations and adapt to the current remote working environment, consider collaborating with a client on an e-learning solution tailored to its employees, says Alexander Holtan at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Overcoming The Pandemic's Hurdles To Pro Bono Work

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    Sarah McLean at Shearman & Sterling looks at how attorneys and law firms can partner with nonprofits to leverage their collective resources, sharpen their legal skills and beat the unique pandemic-induced challenges to providing free legal services to low-income individuals.

  • Best Practices For Presenting Exhibits In A Remote Deposition

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    In this era of fully remote depositions, attorneys must carefully consider whether they want to deliver exhibits to opposing counsel in advance or on the day of the deposition, and think creatively about the technological resources available to them, say Helene Wasserman and Nathaniel Jenkins at Littler.

  • What We Know About How Judicial Bias Can Influence Rulings

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    The struggle to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg raises the question whether U.S. Supreme Court justices and federal judges are able to separate their political beliefs and world views from their judicial opinions, with studies in political science and social psychology providing clear answers, says Drury Sherrod at Mattson and Sherrod.

  • Celebrity Disinformation Victims Have Panoply Of Remedies

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    Celebrities such as LeBron James, whose likeness was recently used without his permission as part of a voter suppression disinformation campaign, can avail themselves of several causes of action successfully used in recent cases — ranging from copyright to torts — to protect their likenesses and reputations, say Matthew Ferraro and Louis Tompros at WilmerHale.

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