New York

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Says Shkreli's Picasso Can Be Sold To Pay $2.6M Debt

    A New York federal judge on Thursday authorized a receiver to sell a Picasso etching seized from imprisoned "pharma bro" Martin Shkreli to settle a $2.6 million debt the former drug firm executive owes to a Pennsylvania pharmaceutical industry consultant.

  • January 27, 2022

    DVD Pirate Must Face Over 2 Years In The Brig, Feds Say

    Federal prosecutors on Wednesday asked a New York judge to sentence a British hacker to more than two years in prison after he admitted his role in a syndicate responsible for pirating nearly every major motion picture released on disc from 2011 to early 2020.

  • January 27, 2022

    Attys Get $3M For Repping Chinese Fintech Firm's Investors

    A legal team comprising attorneys from the Rosen Law Firm PA, Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP and Scott+Scott Attorneys at Law LLP will receive a $3 million fee for representing inventors in the digital consumer finance company previously known as PPDAI Group Inc., a federal magistrate judge in New York determined.

  • January 27, 2022

    The Term: Breyer's Legacy And The Nomination To Come

    Justice Stephen Breyer on Thursday formally announced he would be retiring at the end of the Supreme Court term. Here, The Term breaks down the legacy he will leave behind and takes a look at what lies ahead for his potential successor with two special guests.

  • January 27, 2022

    Breyer Retiring As Supreme Court Lurches Right

    Justice Stephen Breyer is retiring from the U.S. Supreme Court at a time when his conservative colleagues on the bench seem intent on dismantling landmark precedents on abortion, affirmative action and the administrative state, to name a few. Can his successor preserve his liberal legacy?

  • January 27, 2022

    2nd Circ. Says Grocer Doesn't Owe $58M To Union Fund

    The Second Circuit on Thursday upheld a lower court ruling that a wholesale grocer was not responsible for a $58 million payment to a Teamsters pension fund, ruling the grocer wasn't a successor to the now-bankrupt company that operated the warehouse where the union members worked.

  • January 27, 2022

    Fireblocks Says $550M Fundraise Yielded Record Valuation

    Fireblocks said Thursday it raised a whopping $550 million in a Series E funding round valuing the company at $8 billion, which it touted as the highest valuation for a digital-asset infrastructure business.

  • January 27, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Lennar, Jubao Xie, Calmwater Capital

    Lennar Homes has reportedly dropped $22.5 million on 25.3 acres in South Florida, developer Jubao Xie is said to be seeking $187 million with the sale of the world's tallest Holiday Inn and Calmwater Capital is said to have loaned $34 million for a Queens, New York, warehouse.

  • January 27, 2022

    Injured Live Nation Worker, Atty Take $5M Fee Spat To Court

    An event worker who won a historic award from Live Nation over an accident that left him with severe brain injuries is embroiled in an acrimonious dispute over attorney fees with his lawyer, who is suing him in New York over a $5.5 million fee.

  • January 27, 2022

    Aeromexico Strikes $40M Deal With Creditors On Ch. 11 Plan

    Airline Grupo Aeromexico on Thursday began the confirmation hearing for its Chapter 11 plan by telling a New York bankruptcy judge that it had reached a $40 million settlement of objections to the plan raised by unsecured creditors.

  • January 27, 2022

    Stormy Daniels Tells Jury Avenatti Lied And Stole From Her

    Former Michael Avenatti client Stormy Daniels took the witness stand Thursday in the criminal case accusing the celebrity lawyer of defrauding the adult film actress out of hundreds of thousands of dollars from a book deal, saying Avenatti "stole from me and lied to me."

  • January 27, 2022

    Former Refinery Owner Reaches Deal In Ch. 11 Insurance Row

    The former owner of a Philadelphia oil refinery that suffered a catastrophic explosion in 2019 has reached a deal to resolve a dispute with insurers over coverage for the property damage sustained in the blast and ensuing fire.

  • January 27, 2022

    2nd Circ. Reverses Deutsche Bank Traders' Libor Convictions

    The Second Circuit on Thursday acquitted two former Deutsche Bank traders who were convicted of Libor-rigging in 2018, deeming the evidence at trial insufficient to prove that the pair made false statements to benefit the bank's derivatives positions.

  • January 27, 2022

    Real Estate Broker Hits Cannabis Co. 4Front With $19M Suit

    Real estate broker Savills Inc. sued cannabis company 4Front Ventures in New York federal court Thursday, claiming it put together a deal with over $129 million in government incentives for a new Illinois facility but 4Front hasn't paid it millions in fees they contracted for.

  • January 27, 2022

    Customer Drops Claims Uber Eats Overcharged Sales Tax

    A New York Uber Eats customer dropped a proposed class action Thursday that claimed the delivery service overcharged customers because of how it calculates sales taxes with its promotions.

  • January 27, 2022

    'Lottery Lawyer' Says Feds Have 'Pattern' Of Misconduct

    The "Lottery Lawyer" charged with bilking his clients' winnings has accused prosecutors in New York's Southern and Eastern districts of a "pattern" of misconduct, urging a judge to force them to finally turn over potentially exculpatory material. 

  • January 27, 2022

    'Street Level' Oxy Pusher Admits Tricking Ex-CEO's Company

    The Manhattan U.S. attorney's drug conspiracy case against former Rochester Drug Cooperative CEO Larry Doud inched toward completion Thursday after an opioid pusher told jurors he never met Doud and got meds from the company by lying about his pharmacy's operations.

  • January 27, 2022

    All Pa. Counties Join $26B Opioid Deal Over DAs' Objections

    All 67 Pennsylvania counties have signed on to a $26 billion, multistate settlement with three distributors and one manufacturer of opioid drugs, the state's attorney general's office announced Thursday, despite the district attorneys of its two largest counties opposing the deal.

  • January 27, 2022

    New NY Rule Forces Settlement Talks Before Trial

    With a rule approved this month, New York courts now require parties in commercial disputes to attend a court-ordered settlement conference after discovery has concluded and before the beginning of a trial. The aim is to avoid parties' reluctance to request a settlement hearing.

  • January 27, 2022

    $23M Fuel Arbitration Award Confirmed Against Haitian Gov't

    A New York federal judge has confirmed a $23 million arbitral award against the Republic of Haiti for failing to pay for fuel deliveries, after determining that the Caribbean nation had opportunities to present its case but decided against doing so.

  • January 27, 2022

    NY Seeks Additional $1.6B From Feds For Rent Aid Program

    New York Gov. Kathy Hochul said Thursday that she has asked the U.S. Treasury Department for $1.6 billion to fulfill pending applications for pandemic rental assistance, after the federal government issued just a fraction of her November request for extra funds.

  • January 27, 2022

    AGs Ask OSHA For Climate Change Heat Standards

    A coalition of six states has asked the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to establish national standards that consider occupational exposure to extreme heat to protect outdoor and indoor workers from the effects of rising temperatures due to climate change.

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Jackson Back In Spotlight As High Court Contender

    The upcoming vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court quickly threw the spotlight back on D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, a former clerk for Justice Stephen Breyer whose stature as a likely successor to the retiring justice was suddenly raised Wednesday.

  • January 27, 2022

    Biden At His Side, Justice Breyer Announces Retirement

    Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer joined President Joe Biden at the White House Thursday to formally announce his retirement, kicking off a rush among Democrats to confirm a new member of the court to replace the oldest serving justice.

  • January 26, 2022

    Democrats Plan Swift Confirmation Of Breyer Successor

    The U.S. Senate's Democratic leaders pledged Wednesday to move swiftly to confirm a successor for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, who is expected to formally announce his retirement Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: 2021 MDLs In Review

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    The most notable trend in multidistrict litigation in 2021 was a 25% decrease in the number of new petitions for MDL proceedings — but a deeper dive into the numbers suggests that, on the whole, MDLs are thriving, and continuing to have a major impact, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • What Starbucks Union Efforts May Mean For Service Industry

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    Collective bargaining agreements that result from growing unionization drives at Starbucks cafes across the country could change how and what customers can order — and foreshadow broader shifts in the service and restaurant industries as COVID-19 and attendant labor shortages put pressure on employers, say David Pryzbylski and Colleen Naumovich at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Ky. BIPA Copycat Bill Could Usher In Class Action Tsunami

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    A new Kentucky bill replicating Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act may trigger a wave of class actions, and momentum for similar legislation in other states, but companies can get ahead of it by taking several proactive compliance measures, says David Oberly at Blank Rome.

  • How AI Can Transform Crisis Management In Litigation

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    Attorneys should understand how to use rapidly advancing artificial intelligence technology to help clients prepare for potential catastrophic events and the inevitable litigation arising from them, from predicting crises before they occur to testing legal theories once they arise, say Stratton Horres at Wilson Elser and David Steiger.

  • Supervisor Relationships Are Key To Beating Atty Burnout

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    In order to combat record attorney turnover and high levels of burnout, law firm partners and leaders must build engaging relationships with supervisees, fostering autonomy and control, enabling expression of values, and building a sense of community and belonging, says Anne Brafford at the Institute for Well-Being in Law.

  • What To Do As PFAS Food Packaging Phaseouts Approach

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    Attorneys at Hogan Lovells offer tips on compliance with the transition timeline for the federal phaseout of the chemicals known as PFAS from food packaging, the coming bans in California, New York, Maine, Vermont, Washington, Connecticut and Minnesota, and the states' differing definitions of packaging terms.

  • Opinion

    Electricity Market Competition Helps Consumers And Climate

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    Lawmakers looking to combat climate change and increase consumer choice should encourage and expand competitive electricity supply markets, to free customers from inefficient and often corrupt vertically integrated monopoly utilities, says Todd Snitchler at the Electric Power Supply Association.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

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    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • 3 Cybersecurity Imperatives For Financial Cos. This Year

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    With cyberattacks and regulatory scrutiny both expected to increase in 2022, financial services companies should consider important compliance strategies to protect against cyber risks and enforcement actions, says Shardul Desai at Holland & Knight.

  • 2008 Crisis Offers Lessons For Oncoming Foreclosure Wave

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    Following the recent lifting of New York's pandemic-era foreclosure moratorium, courts will likely face a substantial influx of foreclosure filings — but the 2008 financial crisis can serve as a guide for both courts and practitioners on streamlining cases, says Christopher Gorman at Abrams Fensterman.

  • New Whistleblower Rights Heighten Risk For NY Employers

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    Amendments to New York's anti-retaliation law that go into effect next week will drastically expand whistleblower protections, leaving employers to mitigate the increased risk of claim exposure while also considering how COVID-19 mandates might complicate compliance, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • Takeaways From White Collar Criminal Enforcement In 2021

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    White collar criminal prosecutions were up in 2021, with recent high-profile fraud trials, the Biden administration's enforcement priorities and the continuing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic potentially reversing the previous trend of slumping white collar prosecutions, say attorneys at Keker Van Nest.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

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    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • Ruling Confirms Causation Is Key Under NY Anti-SLAPP Law

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    New York's anti-SLAPP statute gives defendants a powerful tool against speech suppression, but the New York Supreme Court's recent decision in RSR v. LEG Q shows that the law requires clear proof of a connection between protected speech and an allegedly retaliatory SLAPP suit, says William Brewer at Brewer Attorneys & Counselors.

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