New York

  • January 17, 2020

    Tech Giants Join Fight Against Trump 'Public Charge' Policy

    More than 100 businesses and trade associations, including tech giants LinkedIn, Twitter and Microsoft, have thrown their support behind a lawsuit challenging a policy that would penalize low-income green card applicants, arguing that the new restrictions will hurt U.S. employers.

  • January 17, 2020

    Sidley, Goldberg Weprin Steer $79M Brooklyn Loan

    Sidley Austin LLP represented M&T Bank in connection with its $78.75 million loan to Goldberg Weprin-counseled Two Trees Management for three properties in New York where the developer is seeking to build a residential project, according to records made public on Friday.

  • January 17, 2020

    Owner of Bankrupt Golf Co. Held In Contempt In Patent Suit

    A New York federal judge on Friday held the owner of defunct golf company King Par Corp. in contempt for failing to answer a discovery request after a rival company won an $8.9 million verdict on allegations that King Par had stolen the rival's design for a golf bag.

  • January 17, 2020

    Crypto Market Maker Sues Fr8 Token Issuer For $1.8M

    A global cryptocurrency market maker and an investor filed a $1.8 million lawsuit in New York federal court accusing Fr8 Network Inc. and two principals of fleecing them with a fraudulent token offering.

  • January 17, 2020

    Dechert Nabs 2 Real Estate Attys From Sullivan & Worcester

    Dechert LLP has hired a pair of lawyers from Sullivan & Worcester LLP in a move that bolsters the firm's real estate financing capabilities in New York, Dechert announced this month.

  • January 17, 2020

    University Worker Seeks Class Status In TIAA Benefits Beef

    A Washington University employee has asked a New York federal judge for class certification in her suit claiming the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America flouted federal benefits law by not paying back the full interest on loans she took out against her retirement account.

  • January 17, 2020

    Honeywell Covers Retirees' Health Care To End Benefits Suit

    Honeywell Inc. has agreed to pick up the tab for lifetime health care and pay six-figure damages to retirees who worked at a Connecticut plant, following an August Second Circuit ruling that barred the company from shutting off those workers' benefits. 

  • January 16, 2020

    Charter Told Windstream Ad Ruling Isn't An Appealable Order

    A New York bankruptcy judge Thursday found an appeal filed of his ruling on false ad claims made by bankrupt telecom company Windstream Holdings against a rival doesn't preclude him from further rulings in the case because no order exists to be appealed.

  • January 16, 2020

    Telegram, SEC Seek Quick Result In $1.7B Crypto Case

    Telegram and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission have filed dueling motions for summary judgment in a case where the agency alleges that the messaging company's $1.7 billion offering of digital tokens constituted the sale of unregistered securities.

  • January 16, 2020

    Exxon Says Mass. AG Timed Climate Suit With NY Trial

    ExxonMobil on Thursday suggested Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey timed the launch of her lawsuit accusing the oil giant of deceiving investors and consumers about business risks from climate change to coincide with a landmark climate fraud trial in New York. 

  • January 16, 2020

    Ex-Barbados Official Convicted Of Money Laundering Charges

    A New York federal jury on Thursday convicted a former minister for the government of Barbados on money laundering charges for purportedly funneling bribes he took from an insurance company through U.S. banks.

  • January 16, 2020

    Ariana Grande Sings 'I Want It, I Got It,' But Did She Steal It?

    Ariana Grande might write her own checks, but she doesn’t write what she sings, a New York hip hop artist alleges in a lawsuit filed Thursday in Manhattan federal court accusing the pop singer of stealing the hook and chorus of her 2019 song “7 Rings.”

  • January 16, 2020

    Duane Morris, Satterlee Stephens Set To Combine

    Duane Morris LLP and Satterlee Stephens LLP are on course to combine into an 850-attorney law firm after partners at both firms backed the merger, firm leaders confirmed Thursday.

  • January 16, 2020

    Would-Be Weinstein Juror Faces Jail For Profiteering Tweet

    A New York state trial court judge threatened a prospective juror in the Harvey Weinstein rape trial with contempt for tweeting about jury service in violation of a court order barring anyone in the jury pool from discussing the case.

  • January 16, 2020

    2 States Accuse EPA Of Inaction Over Upwind Pollution

    New York and Connecticut told a federal court Thursday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had ignored its obligation to impose ozone emissions reductions on certain states whose pollution makes it harder for areas that lie downwind to comply with the Clean Air Act.

  • January 16, 2020

    States Sue Trump Administration Over Food Stamp Rollbacks

    More than a dozen states filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration Thursday alleging the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food stamp rollbacks violate federal law.

  • January 16, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Firmspace, GDF, Systra

    Firmspace has reportedly leased nearly 35,000 square feet in Chicago, GDF Properties is said to have paid $6.3 million for two Florida industrial buildings and Systra is reportedly leasing 14,295 square feet in New York.

  • January 16, 2020

    Zeichner Ellman Wants $150M Malpractice Suit Tossed In NY

     A New York federal court should toss a legal malpractice suit that contends a law firm schemed to wrongfully divert more than $150 million from the assignee of a trust fund, as the assignee fails to substantiate its claim, the firm has contended.

  • January 16, 2020

    Copyright Atty Should Be Disbarred, Not Fined, Judge Told

    With a Manhattan federal judge weighing more sanctions against Richard Liebowitz, an opposing attorney is asking for stiff penalties against the litigious copyright lawyer that “go well beyond monetary sanctions,” including disbarment or sending him to the U.S. attorney’s office.

  • January 16, 2020

    Cassin & Cassin Grows NY Real Estate Presence With 4 Attys

    Cassin & Cassin LLP has hired four real estate associates in two separate offices in New York State, expanding its commercial mortgage-backed securities practice in the process, the firm announced on Thursday.

  • January 16, 2020

    Ex-REIT Exec Tells Wary 2nd Circ. Witness Hid Payment Offer

    The Second Circuit looked tempted Thursday to erase the conviction of ex-real estate investment trust chief financial officer Brian Block, after his lawyer accused a key trial witness of hiding an offer of financial support that came from a friend who filed a whistleblower complaint against Block's former company.

  • January 16, 2020

    Outspoken SEC Commissioner Jackson To Leave Agency

    U.S. Securities and Exchange Commissioner Robert Jackson, who has vigorously opposed many of the agency's deregulatory moves that he considered a threat to investor protection, said Thursday he will leave office on Feb. 14 to teach at New York University School of Law.

  • January 16, 2020

    Gov't To Pay $1M To End Suit Over Patient's Fatal Cancer

    A New York federal judge on Thursday approved a $995,000 settlement to resolve a suit accusing a federally funded health clinic in Brooklyn of failing to timely diagnose a man's stomach cancer that caused his death.

  • January 16, 2020

    Weinstein Can't Halt Rape Trial But May Be Able To Move It

    A New York state appeals court on Thursday denied Harvey Weinstein's bid to halt his rape trial — now in the middle of voir dire — but the court will consider his bid to move the trial to Suffolk or Albany County, ruling before the trial's opening arguments next week.

  • January 16, 2020

    Moonves Must Face Trimmed Investor Suit Over Harassment

    Former CBS CEO Les Moonves couldn’t fully shake securities fraud claims Wednesday in a shareholder suit over the sexual harassment allegations against him, even as a New York federal judge trimmed claims against more than a dozen other executives and directors from the suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Climate Law Brings Challenges For NYC Co-Ops And Condos

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    New York City's Climate Mobilization Act leaves several unanswered questions for co-ops and condos, such as what will happen to buildings with rent-regulated units, how buildings will pay for compliance costs, and how building owners will divide CMA responsibilities with tenants, says William McCracken of Ganfer Shore.

  • FIRREA Remains Potent Civil Fraud Enforcement Tool

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    Last year, three court decisions addressing the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act's civil monetary penalties provision — two at the final judgment stage and one at the pleadings stage — expanded FIRREA jurisprudence and remind us why this statute cannot be ignored, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Bias Case Gives Justices Chance To Rethink Title VII

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    If the U.S. Supreme Court decides to hear Peterson v. Linear Controls, its decision could resolve a circuit split and redefine the scope of Title VII's discrimination protections, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Top 10 Employment Law Developments Of The Decade: Part 2

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    In the final part of this article, Barbara Roth and Tyler Hendry at Herbert Smith look back on the most significant labor and employment law updates from the second half of the decade, and reveal their choice for the most important change of the 2010s.

  • NY State Flexes Muscles With Energy Service Co. Restrictions

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    The New York State Public Service Commission's new regulations for energy service companies — imposing enhanced eligibility criteria, price caps, and limitations on products and services — raise concerns about how the commission might impose similar restrictions in the broader distributed energy resource markets, say Thomas Puchner and Kevin Blake of Phillips Lytle.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • Tribune Ruling Charts Course For Bankruptcy Safe Harbor

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    In upholding the dismissal of fraudulent conveyance claims against former shareholders of the bankrupt Tribune Company, the Second Circuit may have laid out a path for parties looking to stay within a crucial Bankruptcy Code safe harbor provision, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • High Court May Lean Away From 2nd Circ. In 'Lucky' TM Case

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    The justices at Monday's U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in the trademark case Lucky v. Marcel appeared skeptical of the Second Circuit’s new four-part test for defense preclusion and seemed to favor the application of existing legal precedent over the creation of a new one, say Robert Potter and Forrest Flemming of Kilpatrick.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Could Lower Bar For Insider Trading Charges

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    ​​​​​​​The Second Circuit’s recent decision in U.S. v. Blaszczak potentially makes it easier to prosecute insider trading cases by ruling the government doesn't need to prove an insider received any personal benefit in exchange for sharing material, nonpublic information, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • Top 10 Employment Law Developments Of The Decade: Part 1

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    In the first of two articles, Barbara Roth and Tyler Hendry at Herbert Smith highlight the decade's most significant labor and employment law changes, including the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2011 decision in Dukes to raise the class certification threshold, and the spread of state and local paid sick leave laws.

  • Gov't Contractor Suspension And Debarment: 2019 In Review

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    Attorneys at Covington look back at last year's policy trends and developments, legislative and rulemaking activity, and notable federal district court rulings related to the exclusion of contractors from doing business with the federal government.

  • NY Sex Abuse Insurance Suit Showcases Possible Arguments

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    Continental Insurance's complaint against the Diocese of Buffalo in a New York state court raises almost every possible defense an insurer may have against providing coverage to a policyholder accused of sex abuse under the New York Child Victims Act, say Robert Chesler and Pamela Hans of Anderson Kill.

  • The Shortcomings Of DOL's Fluctuating Workweek Proposal

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    While clarifications in the U.S. Department of Labor's recently proposed rule on fluctuating workweek bonus pay calculations are encouraging, silence on the standard for fluctuating hours will continue to create uncertainty for employers and employees, says Sarabeth Hall at Fisher Phillips.

  • White House NEPA Overhaul Likely To Face Legal Challenges

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    The White House Council on Environmental Quality's recently proposed revisions to regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act are virtually certain to be challenged in the courts — especially a proposal to eliminate evaluations of projects' cumulative environmental impacts, say attorneys with Perkins Coie.

  • Bankruptcy Ruling Signals Lenience For Student Debtors

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    A New York bankruptcy court's recent ruling in Rosenberg v. N.Y. State Higher Education Services, discharging over $200,000 of a law school grad's student loan debt, could portend a tidal change toward a more pragmatic interpretation of the Bankruptcy Code, and lead to more education loan bankruptcy filings, say attorneys at Rivkin Radler.