New York

  • July 19, 2019

    Ex-Credit Suisse Director Cops To Role In $2B Loan Fraud

    A former Credit Suisse managing director on Friday admitted to his role in a bribery and investor fraud scheme involving $2 billion in loans to state-backed companies in Mozambique, telling a New York federal judge he conspired to defraud those who invested in the debt.

  • July 19, 2019

    Cancer Center Ch. 11 Reopened, But Not For Antitrust Fight

    A New York bankruptcy judge told cancer treatment center chain 21st Century Oncology he won’t reopen its Chapter 11 case for the purpose of quashing the antitrust claims of a group of its former doctors and the indemnification claims of its ex-CEO.

  • July 19, 2019

    DNC Wants Mueller Report Kept Out Of Election Hack Suit

    The Democratic National Committee told a Manhattan federal judge Friday there is no need to take judicial notice of the Mueller report in considering the plausibility of its complaint claiming the party was harmed by email hacking in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

  • July 19, 2019

    Judge Won't Let HSBC Hong Kong Kill Discovery In Ponzi Suit

    A New York federal judge on Friday said he would not reconsider his decision to order jurisdictional discovery for claims that HSBC's Hong Kong affiliate aided a Ponzi scheme that pulled $37 million from investors' pockets.

  • July 19, 2019

    Polsinelli Bags Blank Rome Real Estate, Retail Litigator

    Polsinelli PC has hired a real estate and commercial litigator with experience in retail internal investigations from Blank Rome LLP in New York, part of the firm’s larger lateral hiring spree this month.

  • July 19, 2019

    Real Housewife Settles Pay-Seizure Suit With Vineyard Vines

    "Real Housewives of New Jersey" star Margaret Josephs has settled a New York state court lawsuit over clothier Vineyard Vines’ bid to intercept her Bravo pay to help satisfy a $610,000 federal copyright infringement judgment, a lawyer for the reality star said Friday.

  • July 19, 2019

    Advocates Seek Info On Deportation Program For Convicts

    Immigrant advocates announced Friday that they had filed suit in New York federal court seeking records relating to a Trump administration program that allegedly allows immigration judges to conduct removal proceedings for noncitizens while they are serving criminal sentences.

  • July 19, 2019

    Model Gigi Hadid Escapes Copyright Suit Over Instagram Pic

    Supermodel Gigi Hadid has escaped a copyright suit against her for posting a paparazzi photo of herself on Instagram, after a New York federal judge on Thursday found that the company that owns the photo failed to obtain a registered copyright for the photo before bringing the suit.

  • July 19, 2019

    Goodwin Guides Radiology Biz To $4B Valuation

    Venture capital-backed Radiology Partners, guided by Goodwin, said Friday it reached a $4 billion valuation following an investment from Starr Investment Holdings.

  • July 19, 2019

    SC Utility Customers Tell 2nd Circ. To Revive Nuke Plant Suit

    Two South Carolina utility customers on Friday asked the Second Circuit to revive a suit against Westinghouse Electric Co. to recover payments made for an abandoned nuclear project, saying their claims arise from Westinghouse’s post-Chapter 11 acts.

  • July 19, 2019

    Wells Fargo Says Tribe Must Pay In $250M Loan Dispute

    Wells Fargo has sued the Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians of California in New York state court, accusing the tribe and its economic development authority of participating in a scheme to avoid making payments owed as part of a $250 million loan agreement.

  • July 19, 2019

    2nd Circ. Revives NYC Taxi Drivers' Unfair Suspension Suits

    The Second Circuit ruled Friday that New York City's practice of summarily suspending licenses for taxi drivers who've been arrested but not yet convicted deprives them of due process by denying them meaningful opportunities to challenge their suspensions.

  • July 19, 2019

    4 Arrested Over $10M Medicaid Fraud Via NYC Pharmacy

    A New York City pharmacy owner and three of her managers were arrested over a multifaceted scheme that included bribing customers to have their HIV drug prescriptions filled there and over $10 million in Medicaid fraud, the New York attorney general announced Friday.

  • July 19, 2019

    Chocolatier's $49M Sandy Coverage Claim Headed To Trial

    Madelaine Chocolate Novelties Inc.’s bid to force a Chubb Ltd. insurer to pay an additional $49 million for property damage and business interruption losses caused by Superstorm Sandy is bound for trial after a New York federal judge held Thursday that the scope of coverage under the chocolatier’s policy is unclear due to several conflicting terms.

  • July 19, 2019

    SFX Directors, CEO To Pay $7.5M To End Shareholder Suit

    The directors of dance music festival promoter SFX Entertainment Inc. and its CEO have agreed to pay $7.5 million to settle an investor suit alleging they tried to fraudulently bolster the company's stock price before declaring bankruptcy in February 2016.

  • July 19, 2019

    NY Court OKs Hospital's Trial Win In Patient Death Suit

    A New York state appellate court has upheld a jury verdict in favor of a Hudson Valley hospital in a suit brought by the family of a deceased hip replacement patient, saying the trial came down to a battle of experts and the verdict was reasonable.

  • July 18, 2019

    State AGs Urge FDA To Keep Exploring Cannabis Regulation

    Dozens of state attorneys general have told the U.S. Food and Drug Administration they support the agency’s recent push to regulate cannabis-derived products like cannabidiol, while asking it to ensure that the states maintain their roles as regulators as the market emerges.

  • July 18, 2019

    Schumer Wants FaceApp's Data Usage, Russian Ties Probed

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is asking the FBI and Federal Trade Commission to look into privacy and national security concerns posed by the rapid rise of the photo-altering FaceApp app, which is run by a Russian tech company and has scooped up personal data from millions of Americans.  

  • July 18, 2019

    Investors Push For Class Cert. In Oil Co. Stock Fraud Row

    A proposed class of investors in Dakota Plains Holdings Inc. on Thursday urged a New York federal judge to certify a class action against the bosses of the defunct oil transloading company over a purported stock manipulation scheme, citing the commonality of investor claims.

  • July 18, 2019

    Warren Buffett-Backed Insurer To Pay $3M To End NY Probe

    A workers' compensation insurer owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway has agreed to pay $3 million to end an investigation by New York's Department of Financial Services into the alleged sale of unauthorized insurance products, the agency announced Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Suit Against Downey Brand Over $150M REIT Sale Dismissed

    A New York federal judge has dismissed a suit against California firm Downey Brand LLP over the $150 million sale of a real estate investment trust that the firm handled, with the judge saying that the suit was too similar to another suit that was dismissed in 2018.

  • July 18, 2019

    Simpson Thacher Guides $14B Blackstone Infrastructure Fund

    Blackstone's infrastructure fund raised $14 billion in the final close of its inaugural fundraising round, putting the Simpson Thacher-guided vehicle among the world's three largest infrastructure funds, Blackstone said Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    NY Strip Clubs Mostly Escape Models' TM Claims

    Two New York City strip clubs are largely off the hook in a lawsuit over their use of images of models on social media, after a federal judge ruled most of the women who brought the case weren't famous enough to have trademark rights over their pictures.

  • July 18, 2019

    Sports Photogs' Claims Against Last Memorabilia Co. Tossed

    A lawsuit launched by a pair of sports photographers against nearly two dozen companies and individuals accused of illegally reprinting and selling their photos has come to an end after a New York federal judge on Thursday dismissed claims against the last remaining defendant for lack of jurisdiction.

  • July 18, 2019

    Trump Affair Hush Money Probe Over, Feds Tell Judge

    Manhattan federal prosecutors have "effectively concluded" their probe into campaign finance violations tied to two campaign season payments to silence women who had alleged affairs with President Donald Trump, according to a Thursday filing.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    A Look At How States Are Experimenting With Health Care

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    The fate of the Affordable Care Act is currently pending in federal court, but states are proceeding on the premise that the law will survive its latest legal challenge as they consider competing Democratic and Republican visions of health care, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Opinion

    Time To Heed Justice Stevens' Criticism Of Gun Decision

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    Justice John Paul Stevens was right that the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 gun rights decision in Heller desperately needs to be overruled, but while he viewed revision or repeal of the Second Amendment as the easier course for correction, only the court can clean up the mess it made, says Robert Ludwig​ of the American Enlightenment Project.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • Opinion

    NY Credit Card Securitization Class Action Misuses Madden

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    In Cohen v. Capital One Funding in New York federal court, the plaintiffs' argument — that special purpose trusts charged and collected interest rates in excess of New York's usury limits — relies on a flawed understanding of the Second Circuit's decision in Madden v. Midland Funding, which was itself erroneous and harmful to credit markets, says Walter Zalenski of Buckley.

  • Keeping Conventional Power Going Until Renewables Mature

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    The U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and state regulators have a handful of tools to compel generators to delay the retirement of nuclear, coal and gas plants until greener options are more reliable, but their scope has not yet been tested in court, says Gordon Coffee at Winston & Strawn.

  • Community Solar Needs Clear, Flexible State Regulations

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    As states adopt and expand third-party solar development programs, regulators should streamline rules and avoid prescriptive requirements for developers, say Elliot Hinds and Diana Jeschke at Crowell & Moring.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Perspectives

    Looted-Art Heirs May Find A Sympathetic Forum In NY Courts

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    The New York Appellate Division decision last week in Reif v. Nagy — in favor of the heirs in a Holocaust looted-art claim — is noteworthy because of the manner in which it rejected the defendant’s claim of laches, just a few weeks after the Second Circuit had dismissed a Holocaust looted-art claim on those very grounds, says Martin Bienstock of Bienstock.

  • NY Laws May Prompt Uptick In Pay Equity Claims

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    New York recently signed into law a statewide prohibition on salary history inquiries and amended its equal pay law. Attorneys at Morgan Lewis explain the laws’ key provisions and discuss the important takeaways for employers.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • State Net

    Local Governments Push To Regulate Public Surveillance

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    San Francisco's Board of Supervisors recently approved an ordinance banning the use of facial recognition technology by all city departments. The law is part of a growing movement among localities and states to increase oversight of the use of surveillance technologies by government entities, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Patchwork Of Broker Conduct Regs Complicates Compliance

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    Until challenges to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's newly adopted Regulation Best Interest play out in court, broker-dealers can reconcile conflicting state and federal standards of conduct by complying with the most restrictive applicable regulatory requirements, say Ghillaine Reid and Kurt Wolfe of Troutman Sanders.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Revenge Porn Can Be Outlawed Under The First Amendment

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    To date, 46 states and the District of Columbia have passed needed legislation penalizing nonconsensual distribution of pornographic images of another person, but constitutionally outlawing this phenomenon is tricky and some statutes will likely be struck down, says Nicole Ligon, supervising attorney of the First Amendment Clinic at Duke Law.