New York

  • July 03, 2020

    Trump's Niece Claims She Was Duped By President's Fraud

    President Donald Trump's niece, who is fighting to release her purportedly damning tell-all book about her family, said Thursday that the president and his siblings fraudulently induced her to enter a nondisclosure agreement based on their bogus estimates of her stake in the Trump empire.

  • July 02, 2020

    NY Appeals Manafort Fraud Suit Axed As Double Jeopardy

    The Manhattan district attorney urged a New York appellate court Thursday to revive a state criminal mortgage fraud case against the president's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, arguing that the state charges are distinct from federal charges he's currently serving time for and aren't grounds for double jeopardy.

  • July 02, 2020

    US Atty In EDNY To Depart For Main Justice Role

    Richard Donoghue is leaving his post as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York to take a job at the U.S. Department of Justice headquarters, a development that comes on the heels of the messy recent ouster of Donoghue's Manhattan-based colleague Geoffrey Berman.

  • July 02, 2020

    SDNY Trial Of Banker Tied To Manafort Is Delayed

    A New York federal judge on Thursday delayed at least until December the trial of a banker accused of attempting to bribe Trump campaign boss Paul Manafort with $16 million in loans in exchange for a shot at working in the administration.

  • July 02, 2020

    NY Judge Axes Standard Chartered FCA Suit At Feds' Request

    A New York federal judge has dismissed a whistleblower suit accusing Standard Chartered Bank of lying to U.S. authorities to shave billions of dollars from what it allegedly should have paid for violations of Iran sanctions, granting a government request that he said he had "no difficulty" deeming well-founded.

  • July 02, 2020

    Alcoa Says Contract Fight With AB InBev Must Be Litigated

    Aluminum giant Alcoa is urging a New York federal court not to force it to arbitrate a patent dispute relating to a type of aluminum used in Anheuser-Busch InBev bottles, arguing that the brewer is targeting the wrong company due to a 2016 corporate restructuring.

  • July 02, 2020

    Platinum Receiver Settles With Insurers For $14M

    The receiver for defunct hedge fund Platinum Partners agreed to pay around $14 million to settle with insurers that say Platinum owed them more than $44 million, a move the receiver said eliminated one of the biggest obstacles to investors finally recouping some of their losses.

  • July 02, 2020

    Netflix Can't 'Hide' Behind Dramatization, Ex-Prosecutor Says

    The creators of a docudrama about the Central Park jogger rape case deliberately cast the then-head of the Manhattan district attorney's sex crimes unit as an "unmistakable villain," lawyers for the former official told a Florida federal judge Wednesday.

  • July 02, 2020

    Judge Pans NY Defenses In Uber Drivers' Fight For Benefits

    The Brooklyn federal judge handling Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers' legal battle for New York unemployment benefits appeared to take the drivers' side during a case hearing Thursday morning, as she repeatedly laid into the Empire State's arguments against immediate court intervention.

  • July 02, 2020

    5 Sports & Betting Cases To Watch: Midyear Report

    Attorneys are set to tackle a number of lingering legal issues in the second half of the year, such as a reexamination of NCAA rules prohibiting college athletes from earning money and novel, pandemic-created disputes including fans demanding refunds for canceled games.

  • July 02, 2020

    Latham-Led AI Insurance Site Prices Upsized $319M IPO

    Renters and home insurance provider Lemonade's shares traded Thursday in an upsized $319 million initial public offering with shares peaking 144% above the offering price, in a deal advised on by Latham & Watkins LLP and White & Case LLP.

  • July 02, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Grocery delivery service Instacart is suing to block a Seattle ordinance requiring coronavirus hazard pay for gig delivery workers, New York police officers and Las Vegas resort workers claim they haven't been provided with adequate protections during the pandemic, and the ACLU says California courts can't block public access to trials, despite the virus. 

  • July 02, 2020

    Entrepreneur Who Gave Tips On Dad's Pharma Co. Gets Year

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced entrepreneur Telemaque Lavidas on Thursday to a year and a day in prison for insider trading, after a jury convicted him of passing secrets to a trader friend about Ariad Pharmaceuticals, where his father sat on the board.

  • July 02, 2020

    Union Says CUNY Axed 2,800 Profs After Taking Virus Relief

    The City University of New York illegally laid off thousands of adjunct faculty members despite getting over $251 million in federal funds to protect against the coronavirus pandemic's economic fallout, according to a lawsuit filed by a union representing the university's professional staff.

  • July 02, 2020

    Angelo Gordon Raises $1.5B For European RE Fund

    New York-based investment firm Angelo Gordon & Co. LP said Thursday that its latest real estate fund raised $1.5 billion that will be used to target all types of property in the U.K., the Nordic countries and Western Europe.

  • July 02, 2020

    Epstein Ex Ghislaine Maxwell Charged With Sex Crimes

    British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell has been charged with conspiring with deceased financier Jeffrey Epstein to entice minors to travel to engage in illegal sex acts, according to an indictment made public Thursday by the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office.

  • July 01, 2020

    Novartis To Pay $729M To End 2 FCA Kickback Accusations

    Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. has agreed to pay more than $729 million to end two separate sets of allegations from the U.S. Department of Justice that it violated the False Claims Act through companywide kickback schemes to pump up prescriptions, the agency said Wednesday.

  • July 01, 2020

    Simon & Schuster Beats Bid To Block Mary Trump Tell-All

    Simon & Schuster can move forward with publishing the purportedly damning tell-all book penned by President Donald Trump's niece, a New York appellate court ruled Wednesday, partially reversing a lower court's temporary restraining order issued one day earlier.

  • July 01, 2020

    NY Court Cops Sue Over Inadequate COVID-19 Protections

    The union representing more than 1,500 New York state court officers hit Chief Judge Janet DiFiore and the Office of Court Administration with a putative class action in federal court for allegedly not providing enough protective measures against COVID-19 and threatening to discipline the union's president for raising the issue.

  • July 01, 2020

    SEC Says Broker Can't Attack Its Investigation In Bribe Trial

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission asked a Manhattan federal court to keep an analyst's upcoming bribery trial limited to his alleged cover-up of an $11,000 ski trip, saying the court should block an anticipated defense centered on the SEC's investigation and the misdeeds of co-conspirators.

  • July 01, 2020

    Former Obama Deputy WH Counsel Joins Latham in NYC

    Latham & Watkins LLP has tapped former deputy White House counsel and MacAndrews & Forbes deputy general counsel Michael Bosworth to join its New York office as a partner in the litigation and trial department and a member of the white collar defense & investigations practice, the firm said Wednesday.

  • July 01, 2020

    Shearman & Sterling Wants IT Manager's Age Bias Suit Booted

    Shearman & Sterling LLP urged a judge Wednesday to throw out an age bias case brought by a former IT manager who said the firm fired him amid COVID-19 belt-tightening, arguing the worker had no business suing in Manhattan federal court.

  • July 01, 2020

    Judge May Allow Suit Over 'Troubling' McClatchy Debt Rework

    The New York bankruptcy judge overseeing newspaper chain McClatchy Co.'s bankruptcy said he would decide by the end of the week whether to give unsecured creditors permission to sue over what he called "troubling" aspects of a 2018 debt restructuring.

  • July 01, 2020

    Feds Drop Bail Fight For Attys Accused In Molotov Attack

    The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York has relented for now in its crusade to have two attorneys jailed without bail while they face charges of carrying out a Molotov cocktail attack on a New York City Police Department vehicle during recent protests over police brutality.

  • July 01, 2020

    Cybersecurity Co. Accused Of Misleading Investors In IPO

    Israeli cybersecurity software company Tufin overstated its business prospects in North America in the lead-up to its $108 million initial public offering, teeing up a drop in its stock price when the company underperformed, an investor told a New York state court Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • COVID-19 Orders Unlikely To Constitute Temporary Takings

    Author Photo

    Although public agencies have issued a broad range of orders intended to slow the spread of COVID-19, they are likely safe from temporary takings claims due to the high hurdles for such claims and the expanded police powers granted to governments during public health emergencies, say Gene Tanaka and Emily Chaidez at Best Best.

  • Opinion

    Time To Consider Percentage Rental Agreements For Lawyers

    Author Photo

    It has long been the law that attorneys cannot use percentage rental agreements because doing so would constitute an impermissible sharing of fees with nonlawyers, but such arrangements can help lawyers match expenses with revenues in lean times like now, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson at Holland & Knight.

  • Handling Employee Vacation Requests During COVID-19

    Author Photo

    While there is little precedent for dealing with employee vacation requests during a pandemic, companies can protect workers by carefully asking about travel plans, and following public health agency and local guidelines when advising employees to self-isolate, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • How Force Majeure Provisions Are Being Tested In New York

    Author Photo

    The Southern District of New York's recent rulings in E2W v. KidZania and Latino v. Clay, together with prior precedent, are illustrative of New York state and federal courts' attitude toward force majeure and whether such provisions might excuse contract performance during the pandemic, say Stephanie Denker and Christie McGuinness at Saul Ewing.

  • Corporate Investigation Lessons From EBay Stalking Scandal

    Author Photo

    The recent eBay criminal cyberstalking scandal reminds companies and law firms that investigative activities, even if undertaken solely using online research tools, could easily risk criminal or civil legal liability and violations of attorney ethics rules, says Joseph DeMarco at DeVore & DeMarco.

  • High Unemployment May Threaten Restrictive Covenants

    Author Photo

    Restrictive covenants in employment agreements will face greater scrutiny from courts if high unemployment persists, but the analysis will depend on whether the company aims to protect trade secrets, client relationships or its interest in unique employees, says Reid Skibell at Harris St. Laurent.

  • A Midyear Look At Key US Sanctions Developments

    Author Photo

    During an active first half of 2020, the Office of Foreign Assets Control strengthened its sanctions programs, issued new guidance documents and announced several enforcement actions, underscoring that even during a pandemic, sanctions compliance is indispensable, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Reinsurance Implications Of COVID-19 Biz Interruption Laws

    Author Photo

    In light of legislative and public pressure in the U.S. and U.K. on insurers to cover business interruption losses related to COVID-19, reinsurers will face new questions regarding their obligation to cover claim payments, say Robin Dusek at Saul Ewing and Susie Wakefield at Shoosmiths.

  • What You Say In Online Mediation May Be Discoverable

    Author Photo

    Mediation conducted online with participants in different states makes it harder to determine where communications were made, increasing the risk that courts will apply laws of a state that does not protect mediation confidentiality, say mediators Jeff Kichaven and Teresa Frisbie and law student Tyler Codina.

  • Key Defense Approaches To 'Other Similar Incident' Evidence

    Author Photo

    A New York state court's recent ruling in Marshall v. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey shows that, while product liability plaintiffs seek to use so-called other similar incident evidence to argue that manufacturers know their products are unsafe, defense counsel can successfully challenge such evidence, says Timothy Freeman at Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Arbitration Pact Rulings Show Signature Snags For Employers

    Author Photo

    Two recent appellate opinions highlight the challenges in proving specific employees signed arbitration agreements, but employers can take certain steps to defend such claims and ensure enforcement, say Ryan Glasgow and Tyler Laughinghouse at Hunton.

  • Cert. Denial In Televisa May Embroil 3rd-Party Asset Managers

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court's recent refusal to grant class certification to investors in Grupo Televisa in a FIFA scandal stock-drop case may lead to additional discovery burdens for asset managers performing third-party management services for pooled investment vehicles, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • EPA Limits On States' Project Reviews Likely To Face Lawsuits

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recently announced rule limiting the scope of states' reviews of planned energy infrastructure projects will likely mean more litigation between states and the federal government — and more uncertainty for businesses and other stakeholders, says Philip Sholtz at Goldberg Segalla.

  • A Legal Guide To What Happens Next In US Atty Berman Saga

    Author Photo

    Although the next moves following the dramatic ouster of Geoffrey Berman as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, and the status of Audrey Strauss as acting U.S. attorney, are largely circumscribed by the Federal Vacancies Reform Act, open questions remain, says Daniel Levy at McKool Smith.

  • Mass. Court Deadline Tolling Will Cause Problems For Years

    Author Photo

    While Massachusetts' 106-day tolling period for all civil statutes of limitations ends Tuesday, the pandemic-related pause will complicate calculation of limitations periods and have ripple effects in many jurisdictions for years to come, says Christian Stephens at Eckert Seamans.

Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!