Corporate

  • March 05, 2021

    Nordstrom Seeks $25M To Cover Losses From Floyd Protests

    Nordstrom Inc. sued its insurers in Washington federal court Friday in a bid to get them to cover $25 million worth of damages its stores incurred nationwide during the protests that erupted in the wake of the killing of George Floyd.

  • March 05, 2021

    Luxury NYC Hotel Cites Trump In COVID-19 Insurance Suit

    A luxury Manhattan hotel sued its insurer Friday in New York state court, arguing it was wrongfully denied coverage for pandemic-related losses and quoting former President Donald Trump, who implied insurers should pay virus claims if pandemics aren't specifically excluded from policies.

  • March 05, 2021

    Virus Bill's Private-Sector Pension Changes Spook Retirees

    The coronavirus relief package's marquee benefits provision will funnel $81.2 billion in Treasury dollars toward helping struggling union pension plans, but a part of the bill impacting nonunion pension and 401(k) plans has some retirees up in arms.

  • March 05, 2021

    Employment Authority: Acting NLRB GC Is No 'Potted Plant'

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with stories about how to respond to claims of worker mistreatment without making things worse, three tips to get the most out of Fair Labor Standards Act damages collection, and a promise from the acting National Labor Relations Board general counsel that he'll be more than just a "potted plant" at the agency.

  • March 05, 2021

    4 Ways A Gensler-Led SEC Could Toughen SPAC Scrutiny

    If Gary Gensler is confirmed as the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's next chair, regulators could delve deeper into the explosion of blank-check entities and their subsequent acquisitions to examine where investor protections can be strengthened. Here are four areas where regulators could step up scrutiny of special purpose acquisition companies.

  • March 05, 2021

    Big Tech Critic Tim Wu Joins Biden White House

    The White House said Friday that Columbia Law School professor Tim Wu, an outspoken critic of big technology companies and past antitrust enforcement trends, will serve as an adviser to the president, signaling the Biden administration will take a progressive approach to key tech and competition issues.

  • March 05, 2021

    Capital One Beats COVID-19 Airline Ticket Refund Suit

    A New Jersey federal court on Friday tossed a proposed class action accusing Capital One Bank of trying to dodge refunds for flights canceled during the COVID-19 pandemic, ruling that the case is moot since the suing cardholder was eventually reimbursed.

  • March 05, 2021

    COVID-19 Business Liability Shield Bill Passes Fla. House

    The Florida House of Representatives voted on Friday to approve a contentious bill outlining a COVID-19 liability shield that aims to protect Florida businesses from a tidal wave of virus-related claims.

  • March 05, 2021

    Dole's Win Bolsters Del. Corporations In D&O Coverage Fights

    The Delaware Supreme Court issued a landmark ruling March 3 that state law does not excuse a Dole directors and officers insurer from covering the food company's settlements of fraud-based claims, a decision that will aid other Delaware corporations in similar disputes with their D&O carriers.

  • March 05, 2021

    SEC Accuses AT&T Of Selectively Disclosing Info To Analysts

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed suit against AT&T and three of its investor relations executives Friday for allegedly making selective disclosures of nonpublic information to research analysts.

  • March 05, 2021

    7 Questions For Covington EU Privacy Chief Daniel Cooper

    Covington & Burling LLP's European data protection chief Daniel Cooper talks to Law360 about how data privacy practice has developed over the course of his career and discusses the latest litigation and enforcement trends.

  • March 05, 2021

    Health Hires: Mintz, Apria, DBV Technologies

    Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo PC has beefed up its health care bench with a hire from Nelson Hardiman LLP, while home medical equipment company Apria Inc. has named a new general counsel, headlining Law360's latest roundup of personnel moves in the health care and life sciences arena.

  • March 05, 2021

    Biden Fires EEOC General Counsel After She Declines To Quit

    President Joe Biden on Friday fired U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission general counsel Sharon Fast Gustafson, shortly after she declined the administration's request that she resign.

  • March 05, 2021

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission created a new task force to clamp down on environmental, social and governance-related disclosure violations, and Virginia became the second behind California to adopt a sweeping consumer privacy bill. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

  • March 05, 2021

    Panda Express Workers Forced To Strip At Seminar, Suit Says​​​​​​​

    Panda Express steered an employee to a seminar that resembled a "cult initiation ritual," where she was screamed at, forced to strip to her underwear and hug a nearly naked male colleague, according to a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles.

  • March 05, 2021

    Biden Taps Ex-DOL Official Harris As WH's Top Labor Adviser

    President Joe Biden has tapped Seth Harris, a former Dentons attorney who helped shape California's controversial independent contractor standard, as a top adviser on labor issues, the White House announced Friday.

  • March 05, 2021

    Hanes Hires Neiman Marcus CLO As New General Counsel

    Clothing brand HanesBrand Inc. announced Friday that Neiman Marcus Group Chief Legal Officer Tracy Preston has joined the company as its new general counsel.

  • March 05, 2021

    How They Won It: Freshfields Breaks FTC's Winning Streak

    It took 15 months, $640 million and a two-week trial but Evonik managed to close its purchase of fellow hydrogen peroxide producer PeroxyChem last year, days after its Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP legal team broke the Federal Trade Commission's seven-case winning streak contesting mergers in federal court.

  • March 05, 2021

    US, EU Suspend Tariffs, Aiming To End Aircraft Subsidy Fight

    The U.S. and European Union announced Friday that they will suspend tariffs on more than $11 billion worth of trade as they look to resolve a massive fight over aircraft subsidies that has dominated the transatlantic trade relationship for nearly 17 years.

  • March 05, 2021

    Firms Leveraging Climate Change Know-How To Win Clients

    Law firms are vying to establish themselves as experts on how climate change impacts an ever-expanding array of client interests, putting new spotlights on the work of environmental and energy lawyers who are teaming with disparate practice groups to deliver holistic climate advice.

  • March 04, 2021

    Judge Rips Attys For Google, Users Over Privacy Arguments

    A California federal judge criticized counsel for both parties Thursday in a putative class action accusing Google of secretly tracking users' browsing activity on third-party mobile apps, saying their arguments on Google's motion to dismiss veered outside the pleadings.

  • March 04, 2021

    Southern New Hampshire Inks $1.3M Deal In Virus Refund Suit

    Southern New Hampshire University has agreed to pay $1.25 million to settle a suit brought by students seeking tuition and fee refunds in the wake of pandemic-related closures, the students told a New Hampshire federal court Wednesday.

  • March 04, 2021

    COVID-19 Suit Against Carnival Sails Toward A 2022 Trial

    A Washington federal judge authorized a March 2022 trial date Thursday for a proposed class action against Holland America and parent company Carnival, which alleges the companies are liable for passengers' exposure to COVID-19 aboard a vessel that set sail a year ago.

  • March 04, 2021

    CFPB Eyeing Online Lender's Collection Practices, Virus Help

    Oportun, a California-based online consumer lender, disclosed Thursday that its debt collection practices and pandemic-related borrower relief efforts are under scrutiny from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

  • March 04, 2021

    DOJ's 'Troubling' Theory Gains Walmart Allies In Opioid Case

    Business groups, a pro-business think tank and a drug store advocacy group have backed Walmart's attempt to torpedo the federal government's suit claiming the retail chain helped spur the nationwide opioid epidemic by failing to scrutinize suspicious prescriptions.

Expert Analysis

  • Citibank Loan 'Blunder' Ruling Raises Appellate Issues

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court's recent ruling that Citibank could not claw back funds it mistakenly wired to Revlon lenders contains several legal issues an appellate court will likely review without deference to the lower court — and could lead to the lenders being ordered to return the payments, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Musk's Crypto Tweets Likely Didn't Violate SEC, CFTC Rules

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission will be hard-pressed to argue Tesla CEO Elon Musk's recent tweets about cryptocurrencies amounted to illegal communication of material information to investors, or constituted market manipulation, say Kenneth Breen and Phara Guberman at Paul Hastings.

  • Ethics Tips For Attorneys Telecommuting Across State Lines

    Author Photo

    Attorneys working remotely from jurisdictions in which they are not admitted should take precautionary steps to avoid engaging in unauthorized practice of law, say John Schmidt and Michael Seaman at Phillips Lytle.

  • Applying OECD Guidance On COVID-19 Transfer Pricing

    Author Photo

    In light of the recently released Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's guidance on the transfer pricing implications of the pandemic, taxpayers should be prepared to explain and defend their transfer pricing decisions for fiscal year 2020 for contemporaneous documentation and in future tax audits, say Susan Fickling and TJ Michaelson at Duff & Phelps.

  • Opinion

    Abusive M&A Litigation Highlights Need For Securities Reform

    Author Photo

    In-court M&A challenges that benefit plaintiffs counsel more than shareholders continue unabated, demonstrating the need for federal securities law reform to prevent what amounts to a deal tax on companies forced to pay mootness fee settlements and higher directors and officers insurance premiums, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • NY Rulings Show State Court Aversion To Securities Act Suits

    Author Photo

    In a welcome development for defendants, a New York state court's back-to-back rejections of Securities Act class claims in Sundial Growers and Lyu v. Ruhnn Holdings signal a growing judicial backlash against the flood of similar litigation following the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2018 decision in Cyan, say Israel Dahan and Alexander Noble at King & Spalding.

  • 6 Ways Legal Employers Can Help Pandemic-Weary Parents

    Author Photo

    Parenting during the pandemic has introduced a series of competing personal and professional obligations for attorneys and professional staff, and even organizations that are supportive of their parent employees can take steps to do better, says Meredith Kahan at Saul Ewing.

  • How Cos. Can Weather Growing DOJ Labor Antitrust Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    In light of of the U.S. Department of Justice's increasing antitrust scrutiny of labor markets and President Joe Biden's vow to eliminate most noncompetes, companies should customize their compliance plans and review employee agreements to mitigate risk, say Eric Grannon and Adam Acosta at White & Case.

  • Opinion

    It's Time To Fix The Patent System's Gender Problem

    Author Photo

    Recent attention from the U.S. Senate to the gender gap in patent law shows that it's time to rethink qualifying for the patent bar, as well as the educational and business systems that perpetuate outdated stereotypes, say Julie Reed and Marie Weiskopf at Miller Nash.

  • A Cautionary Tale On Duplicative Noncompetes

    Author Photo

    Duplicative or overlapping noncompete provisions in employment contracts can hinder enforcement of choice of forum and other restrictive covenants, the Delaware Chancery Court recently showed in AG Resource Holdings LLC v. Terral, and could mean preclusive judgments and duplicative litigation costs for companies, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Charitable Fund Dispute Opens Doors For Litigation Wave

    Author Photo

    Although a California federal court recently ruled a donor-advised fund sponsor did not breach prudent investor standards in Fairbairn v. Fidelity Charitable, the case shows that disgruntled donors may initiate claims against charities over nonbinding advisory privileges, and could introduce a wave of litigation over alleged investment mismanagement, says Karl Mill at Adler & Colvin.

  • Remote Working Tips For Lawyer Trainees And Their Firms

    Author Photo

    The prospect of joining a law firm during the pandemic can cause added pressure, but with a few good practices — and a little help from their firms and supervising attorneys — lawyer trainees can get ahead of the curve while working remotely, say William Morris and Ted Landray at King & Spalding.

  • Mitigate Key FCPA Risks With Tailor-Made Compliance

    Author Photo

    Multinational companies should take a pragmatic approach to Foreign Corrupt Practices Act compliance by being aware of key risk areas — such as inappropriate gift-giving, liability for third-party actions, and countries with recurring corruption issues — and implementing custom-designed procedures that evolve with their operations, says Howard Weissman at Miller Canfield.

  • Employer-Friendly Changes May Revive H-1B Visa Program

    Author Photo

    Recent H-1B visa program improvements that are favorable to employers — such as e-registration and more predictability in U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services decision making — may lead companies to reconsider this visa category as a resource for adding foreign-national talent to their workforce, says Matthew Minor at Hammond Neal., says Matthew Minor at Hammond Neal.

  • Compliance Lessons From Newest Fla. Privacy Class Actions

    Author Photo

    To prepare for a new slate of privacy class actions, brought under Florida’s wiretapping statute against retailers using tracking software, companies should be assessing the placement, display and content of their technology disclosures and user agreements, say Ian Ross and Jorge Perez Santiago at Stumphauzer Foslid.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!