Corporate

  • July 19, 2019

    Judge Chides Carnival Execs To Take Lead On Pollution Fixes

    A frustrated Florida federal judge pressed Carnival Corp. leaders Friday to demonstrate their commitment to changing the company's approach after agreeing last month to pay $20 million for violating a previous settlement for illegal dumping.

  • July 19, 2019

    DC Circ. Affirms Corn Starch Co. Violated NLRB Rules

    The D.C. Circuit Friday affirmed the National Labor Relations Board’s finding that a multinational corn starch manufacturing company committed a slew of labor violations at an Iowa corn processing plant by denigrating its union, dealing directly with employees, and threatening job losses.

  • July 19, 2019

    Kids' Data Again In Spotlight As FTC Revisits Privacy Rule

    The Federal Trade Commission has called for what could be a multiyear review of its child privacy rules, a process that could upend compliance plans for website operators and app developers and bring a wider range of service providers and personal information under the law, attorneys say. 

  • July 19, 2019

    DOJ Tries To Push CVS-Aetna Deal Past Court Review

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Friday urged a D.C. federal judge to sign off on its settlement clearing CVS' purchase of Aetna, trying to rein in the scope of the court's review but facing resistance from the bench during oral arguments.

  • July 19, 2019

    Chancery Nixes Investor Bid For $5B Jarden Appraisal Bump

    A Delaware vice chancellor on Friday rejected a post-deal appraisal challenge by hedge fund investors that claimed the $13.2 billion sale of Jarden Corp. to Newell Rubbermaid Corp. in 2016 was undervalued by roughly $5 billion, citing recent Delaware Supreme Court decisions as a road map in setting the merger's fair share value.

  • July 19, 2019

    Wash. High Court Gives Special Protection To In-House Attys

    The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that in-house attorneys are allowed to sue their employers, despite attorney ethics rules that would otherwise prohibit such suits, saying that the state's ethics rules have not kept up with the modern realities of the practice of law.

  • July 19, 2019

    Polsinelli Bags Blank Rome Real Estate, Retail Litigator

    Polsinelli PC has hired a real estate and commercial litigator with experience in retail internal investigations from Blank Rome LLP in New York, part of the firm’s larger lateral hiring spree this month.

  • July 19, 2019

    Targeted Ransomware Attacks Soar, Symantec Reports

    The number of targeted ransomware attacks has skyrocketed in the past year as new attackers have increasingly emerged, cybersecurity giant Symantec Corp. said in a recent report.

  • July 19, 2019

    Trump Labor Pick Scalia Seen As Deregulatory Force

    Years spent challenging rules issued by the U.S. Department of Labor and other federal agencies have made Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP attorney and George W. Bush DOL veteran Eugene Scalia — the president’s planned pick to helm the DOL — a lean, mean, deregulating machine.

  • July 19, 2019

    Chatting With The CCO: Fidelity's Norm Ashkenas

    Norm Ashkenas helped guide Fidelity's brokerage and retirement products through the 2008 financial crisis and is one of its top compliance executives at a time when standards for financial professionals are in flux.

  • July 19, 2019

    Money Moves: Covington, Weil, Eversheds Sutherland

    Covington & Burling LLP snagged a lobbying firm's formal general counsel, Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP added to its London office and Eversheds Sutherland is building out its banking team after a record year — this is Law360's latest roundup of personnel moves in the banking arena.

  • July 19, 2019

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    The U.S. House of Representatives teed up a battle over minimum wage with the U.S. Senate, and groups of state attorneys general pushed for more federal guidance on cannabis as well as competition in labor markets. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.

  • July 19, 2019

    Engine Maker Execs Inflated Revenues By $25M, Feds Say

    An Illinois-based alternative-energy engine maker’s former executives got hit with criminal and civil securities fraud charges Friday over claims they engaged in an accounting fraud scheme that inflated company revenues by $25 million.

  • July 19, 2019

    Law Firms Are Getting Less Of The Corporate Legal Pie

    Corporations are moving more work in-house and have increased their reliance on alternative legal service providers, and that trend is expected to continue, according to the results of a survey released Thursday.

  • July 19, 2019

    Ex-Merck Workers Get Green Light For $6.2M Sex Bias Deal

    A New Jersey federal judge signed off Friday on a $6.2 million settlement in a proposed class action against Merck & Co. Inc. over gender discrimination claims from female former sales representatives, saying the agreement is set to benefit roughly 3,000 class members.

  • July 19, 2019

    Crypto 'IEOs' Grow Globally Despite US Legal Obstacles

    Initial exchange offerings, a fast-rising global phenomenon where cryptocurrency exchanges administer token sales on behalf of blockchain startups, stand little chance of taking off in the U.S. because of legal risks tied to this novel form of capital raising, lawyers say.

  • July 19, 2019

    Federal Tax Policy To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2019

    Congress will have little time to pursue tax-related legislation during the second half of 2019, with an August recess and the looming 2020 election season vying for lawmakers’ attention. Here, Law360 previews the most pressing federal tax legislation to watch for during the rest of the year.

  • July 19, 2019

    Why Some Straddle The Line Between Law Firm And GC Gigs

    Some lawyers take the rare step of simultaneously holding roles at law firms and corporate legal departments. It can mean balancing time commitments and watching out for conflicts, but also richer portfolios of experience for those lawyers — and cost-effective options for companies.

  • July 19, 2019

    Credit Suisse Loses £239M Banker Bonus Tax Row

    Credit Suisse AG lost its attempt on Friday to claw back £239 million ($300 million) it paid on bankers' bonuses in the wake of the financial crisis after a London court ruled that Britain levied the tax fairly.

  • July 18, 2019

    State AGs Urge FDA To Keep Exploring Cannabis Regulation

    Dozens of state attorneys general have told the U.S. Food and Drug Administration they support the agency’s recent push to regulate cannabis-derived products like cannabidiol, while asking it to ensure that the states maintain their roles as regulators as the market emerges.

  • July 18, 2019

    Honeywell Faces FCPA Probe Related To Petrobras

    Honeywell International Inc. announced Thursday that it is under investigation by U.S. and Brazillian authorities for possible violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in relation to former third party workers from its Brazilian oil business and to Petróleo Brasileiro SA.

  • July 18, 2019

    2.2M Clinical Pathology Patients Added To AMCA Data Breach

    A Texas-based medical testing company has added itself to the list of companies swept up in debt billing collector American Medical Collection Agency's massive data breach, an incident that has already affected Quest Diagnostics Inc. and LabCorp.

  • July 18, 2019

    Bradley Arant Launches Cannabis Practice Group

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has become the latest large law firm to set up a practice group dedicated to handling legal issues related to the cannabis industry, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Linklaters Hires Blockchain Wonk As 1st US Fintech Leader

    London-based legal mammoth Linklaters LLP has hired a noted blockchain lawyer to lead its financial technology work in the United States, the firm announced Thursday on the heels of heated U.S. congressional hearings on Facebook Inc.'s potential foray into cryptocurrency.

  • July 18, 2019

    Trump To Nominate Gibson Dunn's Scalia For Labor Secretary

    President Donald Trump said Thursday he plans to tap Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP partner Eugene Scalia to be secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor, replacing the outgoing Labor chief Alexander Acosta.

Expert Analysis

  • Corporate Compliance Through The Lens Of Calif. Privacy Law

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    While businesses are preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act they can pull from the U.S. Department of Justice's recent guidance on compliance programs to establish controls that not only protect consumer information, but also enhance overarching corporate compliance, say Robb Adkins and Shawn Obi at Winston & Strawn and Stephanie Douglas at Guidepost Solutions.

  • The Potential Effects Of Calif. Contractor Reclassification Bill

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    If enacted, California’s Assembly Bill 5 would codify the so-called ABC test for independent contractors established in the California Supreme Court's Dynamex decision. Notably, the bill goes beyond the scope of Dynamex and could have an extraordinary impact on the state's economy, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • 8 Key Elements Of An Effective Antitrust Compliance Program

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    Based on our reading of last week’s antitrust compliance guidance from the U.S. Department of Justice, there are several important factors that organizations should consider as they assess whether their current program is up to snuff, say Herbert Allen and Alexa DiCunzolo at Polsinelli.

  • 5 Takeaways From DOJ Focus On Chinese Trade Secret Theft

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    Since its official announcement of the China Initiative eight months ago, the U.S. Department of Justice has publicized the initiation of six new cases that include references to both trade secrets and China. These shed some light on DOJ and U.S. business priorities, says Sara O’Connell at Pillsbury.

  • The DOJ's Changing Expectations For Antitrust Compliance

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    Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice reversed its long-standing policy of insisting on guilty pleas for criminal violations of the antitrust laws from companies that do not otherwise qualify for leniency. This shift opens a new path to deferred prosecution agreements for companies with "effective" antitrust compliance programs, say Renata Hesse, Benjamin Walker and Nicholas Menillo at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • NY Laws May Prompt Uptick In Pay Equity Claims

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    New York recently signed into law a statewide prohibition on salary history inquiries and amended its equal pay law. Attorneys at Morgan Lewis explain the laws’ key provisions and discuss the important takeaways for employers.

  • How The SEC Could Expand Access To Private Offerings

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is seeking public comment on whether the definition of an "accredited investor" should be expanded to increase access to private securities placements. The move may be a response to growing complaints that small investors are being shut out of these higher-return offerings, says David Stockton of Kilpatrick Townsend.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • Defense Of Copyright Claims: Don’t Let Your Proof Go Poof

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    The recent proliferation of communications platforms in which content literally disappears after a short period of time has increased the risk of companies losing out on important evidence that would be crucial in copyright litigation, says Evynne Grover of QBE North America.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Opinion

    Pa. Court Muddies Privilege And Work-Product Waters

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    With respect to attorney-client privilege and the work-product doctrine in Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania Superior Court's recent decision in Newsuan v. Republic Services is significantly flawed and will contribute to confusion, uncertainty and risks, says Kevin Allen of Eckert Seamans.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.