Native American

  • October 19, 2020

    Tribes Say Dakota Access Pipeline Must Halt For NEPA Review

    Four Native American tribes have urged a D.C. federal judge to shut down the Dakota Access pipeline during a court-ordered environmental review, saying the judge can either clarify an earlier ruling or issue a permanent injunction to do so.

  • October 19, 2020

    Montana Judge Sets Aside Acting Land Bureau Head's Acts

    Land management plans approved by William Perry Pendley while he unlawfully served as the acting director of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management were vacated on Friday by a Montana federal judge who sided with the state's governor on the question.

  • October 19, 2020

    Preparing The Next Generation Of Female Trial Lawyers

    To build the ranks of female trial attorneys, law firms must integrate them into every aspect of a case — from witness preparation to courtroom arguments — instead of relegating them to small roles, says Kalpana Srinivasan, co-managing partner at Susman Godfrey.

  • October 19, 2020

    Mentorship Is Key To Fixing Drop-Off Of Women In Law

    It falls to senior male attorneys to recognize the crisis female attorneys face as the pandemic amplifies an already unequal system and to offer their knowledge, experience and counsel to build a better future for women in law, says James Meadows at Culhane Meadows.

  • October 19, 2020

    What BigLaw Can Do To Actually Retain Female Attorneys

    Even as BigLaw firms are recruiting women into their ranks in larger numbers, their presence in leadership and equity partnerships remains stubbornly low. Here’s a look at why this is happening — and what firms can do.

  • October 19, 2020

    Female Attorneys Gain Ground In Battle For Clerkships​

    More female attorneys are landing highly sought-after U.S. Supreme Court clerkships, and the experience can turbocharge their careers.

  • October 19, 2020

    These Firms Have The Most Women In Equity Partnerships

    At most U.S. law firms, equity partnerships are still overwhelmingly male, but women at some firms are starting to shake up that reality and smash the glass ceiling that has prevented them from advancing to the uppermost ranks. Here are this year’s Ceiling Smashers — the firms that are outpacing their peers as the legal industry works toward closing the gender gap in its top ranks.

  • October 19, 2020

    Wearing Natural Hair In BigLaw

    In this video, four Black women share their thoughts about wearing natural hair as BigLaw attorneys. In order of appearance, the attorneys are: Rukayatu Tijani, founder of Firm for the Culture and a former BigLaw associate; Delilah Clay, legislative & regulatory advisor at Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP; Rachel Boyce, associate at Cooley LLP; and Crystal Nwaneri, associate at Fenwick & West LLP.

  • October 19, 2020

    Tribes Denied In Bid To Block Keystone Pipeline Construction

    A Montana federal judge has rejected tribes' efforts to stop construction on the Keystone XL pipeline, saying they "blurred" key distinctions between a small cross-border segment and the controversial pipeline's full length in the United States.

  • October 19, 2020

    Biden-Trump Contest Has Fate Of Green Regs At Stake

    The 2020 presidential election will determine whether the country gets four more years of environmental deregulation or a concerted effort to tighten existing pollution controls and be part of global efforts to curb climate change.

  • October 19, 2020

    Thomas Decries Okla. 'Uncertainty' As Tribal Tax Case Denied

    Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday blasted the U.S. Supreme Court for failing to dispel "uncertainty" left by its July ruling on federal, state and tribal jurisdiction in McGirt v. Oklahoma, dissenting sharply from the court's refusal to take up a petition over a state tax on gaming equipment leased to a tribal casino.

  • October 19, 2020

    Justices Will Review Wall Funding, 'Remain In Mexico' Policy

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to take up challenges to the Trump administration's decision to divert funds to finance the president's long-promised border wall and its policy forcing asylum-seekers to wait out their immigration court proceedings in Mexico.

  • October 16, 2020

    In Their Own Words: Being A Woman In BigLaw

    Firms are recruiting more women than previously to their ranks, but still have trouble retaining them at the same rate as men. Law360 asked three female attorneys who left BigLaw about how firms could better serve the women who work there. Here's what they have to say.

  • October 16, 2020

    Law360's Glass Ceiling Report: What You Need To Know

    While law firms continue to tout efforts to close the gender gap in their ranks, parity is still a distant goal, our annual survey shows.

  • October 16, 2020

    Glass Ceiling Report: How Does Your Firm Measure Up?

    Law firms have long struggled to clear the barriers women face in the legal industry, particularly when it comes to accessing the top ranks. Law360's 2020 Glass Ceiling Report looks to shed light on the progress firms have made and where they aim to be.

  • October 16, 2020

    CVS, Walgreens Tapped To Dispense COVID-19 Vaccine

    The Trump administration is partnering with CVS and Walgreens to distribute COVID-19 vaccines to long-term care facilities across the country through an opt-in process, a development that senior health officials said Friday signals how close the U.S. is to getting a safe vaccine.

  • October 16, 2020

    DC Circ. Says Facts 'A Wreck' In $1.1M Tribal Funding Fight

    D.C. Circuit judges struggled Friday to wrap their minds around the details of a fight over $1.1 million in tribal health care funding in which "the facts are just a wreck," according to one judge.

  • October 16, 2020

    9th Circ. Says Navajos Lack Standing For Ariz. Vote Suit

    The Ninth Circuit has upheld a lower-court decision not to allow Navajo Nation members living on the tribe's reservation in Arizona more time to submit their ballots for the upcoming election, saying the members had not shown that a court order could solve any mailing delays they may face.

  • October 16, 2020

    Feds Say There's 'Nothing Unlawful' In Parks Leader's Status

    Federal agencies have told a D.C. federal court that there was "nothing unlawful" about the delegation of duties to the current head of the National Park Service after environmental groups claimed she had been appointed illegally without first being confirmed.

  • October 16, 2020

    Energy, Climate Policy Chasm Divides Trump And Biden

    The energy policy divide underpinning next month's presidential election couldn't be more stark, with President Donald Trump's commitment to fossil fuels and deregulation pitted against former Vice President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar vow to combat climate change.

  • October 16, 2020

    Enviros Say Feds Failed To Justify Clean Water Act Change

    Environmental groups from across the U.S. are seeking a win in their challenge to a new federal rule they claim kneecaps the Clean Water Act for certain waterways, saying federal agencies have failed to provide a rational explanation for the change.

  • October 16, 2020

    Sierra Club Asks 9th Circ. For Emergency Halt Of Border Wall

    The Sierra Club has urged the Ninth Circuit to issue an emergency ruling immediately stopping the Trump administration from building several southern border wall segments, saying the government isn't complying with a related injunction and is causing irreversible damage.

  • October 15, 2020

    Borrowers Reject AG's Atty Fee Critique In $141M Lender Deal

    Borrowers looking to clinch a $141 million settlement of illegal lending claims against online lender American Web Loan urged a Virginia federal judge on Wednesday to press ahead with final approval of the deal, defending their request for $32.4 million in attorney fees against criticism from the state's attorney general.

  • October 15, 2020

    Ex-Tribe Members Say DOI Can't Dodge Disenrollment Fight

    Disenrolled members of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan have asked a D.C. federal court to restore their status in the tribe, alleging U.S. Department of the Interior officials violated federal law by refusing to step in to protect their rights.

  • October 15, 2020

    Kansas Looks To Block DOI Decision On Tribal Land

    Kansas has asked a federal court for a preliminary injunction to block the U.S. Department of the Interior's decision to take land into trust for gambling for the Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma, saying the agency ignored its own regulations when relying on a previous court ruling.

Expert Analysis

  • Guest Feature

    5 Ways Firms Can Avoid Female Atty Exodus During Pandemic

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    The pandemic's disproportionate impact on women presents law firms with a unique opportunity to devise innovative policies that will address the increasing home life demands female lawyers face and help retain them long after COVID-19 is over, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

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    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

  • Why Online Mediation May Be Here To Stay

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    Videoconferenced mediation offers several advantages and helps cases settle faster and more cordially, making it hard to imagine going back to logistically difficult in-person dispute resolution after COVID-19 restrictions are gone, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC.

  • Clients Have The Power To Promote Wellness At Law Firms

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    Law firm clients can play a role in lowering mental distress in the legal profession by seeking lawyer wellness data from firms and factoring those responses into outside counsel hiring decisions, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Courts Should Welcome Well-Crafted Amicus Briefs

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    A Seventh Circuit judge's recent order granting leave for three organizations to file amicus curiae briefs in Prairie Rivers Network v. Dynegy Midwest Generation is a reminder that relevant, nonduplicative amicus briefs can provide courts with helpful perspective, important facts and legal arguments, says Lawrence Ebner at Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Alaska Enviro Suit Shows Gov't Is A Tough Tort Defendant

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Nanouk v. U.S. concerning environmental contamination near an Alaska military installation highlights the fact that discretionary government action that yields an unfortunate result does not necessarily give rise to a tort claim, says Brandon Matsnev at Manko Gold.

  • What Hiring Law Firms Should Consider Instead Of Grades

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    With law schools forgoing traditional grading due to the pandemic, hiring firms that have heavily weighted first-year grades during the on-campus interview process should turn to metrics that allow a more holistic view of a candidate, says Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Schroeder Reviews 'Collegiality'

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    Mark Barringer's new book, "Collegiality and the Constitution," is an engaging, vibrant work of judicial history in Texas' Eastern District, and reveals an atmosphere of civility and respect among all those involved in the business of the court, says U.S. District Judge Robert W. Schroeder III.

  • Overcoming The Pandemic's Hurdles To Pro Bono Work

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    Sarah McLean at Shearman & Sterling looks at how attorneys and law firms can partner with nonprofits to leverage their collective resources, sharpen their legal skills and beat the unique pandemic-induced challenges to providing free legal services to low-income individuals.

  • Best Practices For Presenting Exhibits In A Remote Deposition

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    In this era of fully remote depositions, attorneys must carefully consider whether they want to deliver exhibits to opposing counsel in advance or on the day of the deposition, and think creatively about the technological resources available to them, say Helene Wasserman and Nathaniel Jenkins at Littler.

  • What We Know About How Judicial Bias Can Influence Rulings

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    The struggle to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg raises the question whether U.S. Supreme Court justices and federal judges are able to separate their political beliefs and world views from their judicial opinions, with studies in political science and social psychology providing clear answers, says Drury Sherrod at Mattson and Sherrod.

  • Law Firm Social Responsibility Strategies In The New Normal

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    Law firm leaders and marketers should consider several fundamental questions as they develop their corporate social responsibility programs amid the pandemic with reduced available time, money and personnel, including identifying a realistic charitable spending budget and seeking input from firm lawyers, clients and nonprofit partners, says Tina van der Ven at NewStar Media.

  • What To Expect On Key Civil Procedure Issues From Barrett

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    Judge Amy Coney Barrett's prolific opinion writing on the Seventh Circuit reveals a clear picture of what we can expect from this jurist on issues such as state court personal jurisdiction over out-of-state defendants, Article III standing and the application of federal law in diversity actions, says James Wagstaffe at Wagstaffe von Loewenfeldt Busch.

  • A Likely Tipping Point For Nonlawyer Ownership Of Law Firms

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    The Arizona Supreme Court's recent decision to eliminate prohibitions on nonlawyer ownership of law firms may show that the organized bar's long-standing rhetoric that such rules are essential to protecting the legal profession's core values is overblown, say Anthony Sebok at Cardozo School of Law and Bradley Wendel at Cornell Law School.

  • A Road Map For Drafting Persuasive Discovery Motions

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    Best practices that can help litigators write convincing discovery motions include thinking about the audience, addressing a few key questions, and leaving out boilerplate from supporting briefs, says Tom Connally at Hogan Lovells.

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