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Native American

  • May 17, 2019

    Gov't Must Provide Info In Challenge To 2-For-1 Rule Order

    The D.C. federal judge presiding over public interest groups' challenge to President Donald Trump's executive order requiring that for every new regulation, two rules must be eliminated, said Friday that federal agencies must do a better job complying with discovery.

  • May 17, 2019

    Revised Opportunity Zones Offer Tribes New Tool To Spur Biz

    The federal government's recently proposed regulations on opportunity zones provide much-needed guidance to help Native American tribes find ways to use the program to attract investment, but tribes' success will likely depend on how well they can parlay the zones with other sources of federal funding.

  • May 17, 2019

    Ute Tribe Seeks OK Of Tribal Water Theft Ruling

    The Ute Indian Tribe has urged a Utah federal judge to recognize and enforce a nearly $150,000 tribal court judgment stemming from the alleged theft of tribal water, saying the U.S. court should respect the tribal body's decision. 

  • May 17, 2019

    Tribe Blames DOI For 'Political' Holdup Over Casino Land

    The Timbisha Shoshone Tribe has hit the U.S. Department of the Interior with a suit in D.C. federal court, alleging that the DOI illegally failed to take land into trust for the tribe’s casino project while waiting for House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., to weigh in on the plan.

  • May 17, 2019

    Consumers Push For Sanctions In Tribe-Linked Usury Case

    Consumers accusing a tribe-linked online lender of issuing loans at unreasonably high interest rates urged a Virginia federal court Thursday to sanction the founder of a company connected to the lender, saying he has failed to comply with an order to turn over counsel documents.

  • May 16, 2019

    NY Tribe, Town Look To Avoid Trial In Gambling Dispute

    The Cayuga Nation and the New York village of Union Springs told a federal judge Wednesday they don't want a bench trial in the tribe's suit challenging the village's anti-gambling ordinance, saying pleadings should be finished so the court can rule on the legal issues at the case’s core.

  • May 16, 2019

    Dems Unveil Infrastructure Plan With Broadband Focus

    Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee want to put $40 billion toward expanding internet access across the country as part of a $120 billion-plus infrastructure bill they've proposed.

  • May 16, 2019

    Tribes And Enviros Seek Halt On Copper Mine Construction

    Tribes and environmental groups suing the Army Corps of Engineers for issuing a key permit for a planned copper mine told an Arizona federal court that a preliminary injunction is needed to halt construction and prevent the destruction of cultural sites and water sources.

  • May 16, 2019

    Tribal Bills Win House Passage Despite Trump Tweet

    The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday passed a pair of tribal bills favoring Native American land rights, including legislation reaffirming the Mashpee Wampanoag reservation as trust land in Massachusetts, after the bills were delayed last week when a tweet from President Donald Trump sparked Republican opposition.

  • May 16, 2019

    5 More States Target Purdue Pharma Over Opioid Marketing

    Five states slammed Purdue Pharma LP and its owners with new lawsuits Thursday accusing the pharmaceutical giant of fueling the opioid crisis by deceptively marketing its drugs, adding to a host of lawsuits the company is facing over its purported role in the epidemic.

  • May 15, 2019

    DOI Head Defends Delay Of Offshore Drilling Plans

    U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on Wednesday said it makes sense to pause plans to open up more offshore areas to drilling after a court recently ruled President Donald Trump can't rescind his predecessor's indefinite ban on drilling in large swaths of the Arctic and Atlantic oceans.

  • May 15, 2019

    North Dakota To Appeal Dismissal Of Purdue Opioid Suit

    The North Dakota attorney general on Tuesday said that the state will appeal a judge's dismissal of its suit alleging that Purdue Pharma fueled the opioid crisis by misrepresenting the risks of opioids, the first decision to ax a state attorney's suit over the crisis.

  • May 15, 2019

    Calif., Enviros Sue Water District To Block Dam Project

    The state of California and several environmental and fishing groups are suing an agricultural water district over its efforts to help the federal government raise the height of the state’s largest reservoir, saying the project poses significant risks to the McCloud River and its wild trout fishery.

  • May 15, 2019

    Saving Education Spectrum Will Boost Profits, Says Study

    A nonprofit organization that has been fighting to keep the Federal Communications Commission from repurposing a swath of the spectrum reserved for educational institutions rolled out a study Wednesday that says preserving the space for educators will not only help keep kids in school, but also boost the U.S. economy.

  • May 15, 2019

    IHS Hires Law Consultant On Heels Of Sexual Abuse Scandal

    The Indian Health Service has tapped an independent security and law enforcement consultant to conduct a medical quality assurance review to better protect its patients following the conviction of an IHS doctor for sexually abusing Native boys.

  • May 15, 2019

    Oil And Gas Groups Say Walrus ESA Suit Should Fail

    Oil and gas industry groups told an Alaska federal court that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reasonably decided not to protect the Pacific walrus even though its sea ice habitat is likely to decline, arguing that the Endangered Species Act wasn't meant to combat climate change.

  • May 14, 2019

    Prospective Candidate Renews Bid To Halt Cherokee Election

    A woman challenging a Cherokee Nation determination that she is ineligible to run for office renewed her fight over the upcoming election on Tuesday after a D.C. federal judge tossed her initial case on procedural grounds the same day.

  • May 14, 2019

    Mohegan's Bid To Nix Wynn License Meets Skeptical Judge

    A state court judge in Boston's Business Litigation Session said Tuesday that Mohegan Sun's request to nullify a casino license awarded to Wynn Resorts based on violations of public meeting laws was "extraordinary" and likely unwarranted, given that Wynn's casino has already been built and could open in June. 

  • May 14, 2019

    Dilworth Paxson Dodges ERISA Suit Over Tribal Bond Scam

    A South Carolina federal judge let Dilworth Paxson LLP exit a suit claiming it played a role in a scheme to steal over $8 million from an employee retirement plan through a tribal bond fraud, saying the firm didn't have to face an Employee Retirement Income Security Act claim or a state law claim.

  • May 14, 2019

    Seminole Tribe Halts $350M Annual Casino Payments To Fla.

    The Seminole Tribe of Florida informed Florida's governor in a hand-delivered letter Tuesday that it will stop making its annual casino revenue sharing payments of about $350 million, pointing to ongoing infringement of their gambling compact but expressing a readiness to negotiate a resolution.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    IRS Should Use Tax Law To Combat The Opioid Epidemic

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    The IRS, which enforces anti-trafficking tax laws against state-regulated cannabis businesses, should be fair and apply the same policy against pharmaceutical companies that illegally market their opioids, says Kat Allen at Wykowski Law.

  • State Net

    Why States And Cities Are Concerned About Census Accuracy

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    The 2020 census will impact every state, city and county in the United States, because population is a major factor in how the federal government distributes funds. Despite apprehensions about an undercount, there are reasons for optimism about the accuracy of the census, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • Opinion

    NY Should Think Twice Before Legalizing Sports Betting

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    Instead of rushing to compete in sports betting with other states, New York state legislators should consider problems that have occurred in states that have legalized it, says Ronald Katz of GCA Law Partners.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • 4 Ways State AGs Are Targeting Energy Sector

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    State attorneys general are playing an increasingly prominent role in regulating energy and environmental activity within their states. Energy sector participants should note AG priorities and take a proactive approach, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

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    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

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    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.