We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Life Sciences

  • January 15, 2019

    Purdue Brass Pinned Opioid Crisis On Addicts, Mass. AG Says

    A court filing by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey on Tuesday revealed new information about the inner workings of Purdue Pharma and its controlling Sackler family as they marketed OxyContin over the past two decades, including harsh statements by executives that point to a strategy of blaming drug users for addiction to the painkiller.

  • January 15, 2019

    Greatbatch Gets $22M In Redo Of Pacemaker Patent Trial

    Medical device maker Greatbatch Ltd. received a $22 million damages award Monday following a six-day trial in Delaware federal court over three pacemaker technology patents infringed by AVX Corp., replacing a 2016 jury decision that awarded it $37.5 million.

  • January 15, 2019

    Insurer Wants Out Of Covering Depomed In Opioid Litigation

    Navigators Specialty Insurance Co. has asked a California federal court to affirm that it doesn't have to defend or indemnify Depomed Inc.'s successor in more than three dozen suits over the drugmaker's role in the opioid crisis, saying the policies don't cover opioid-related injuries and "allegedly intentional wrongdoing."

  • January 15, 2019

    Gottlieb Says 400 FDA Staff Back On Inspections

    The head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday said on Twitter that 400 agency staff members are being called back from furlough to carry out high-risk inspections for food, drugs and medical devices.

  • January 15, 2019

    Chancery Trims Fee Award In Miramar Class Merger Challenge

    A Delaware Chancery Court judge reduced an award of attorneys' fees requested by plaintiffs' counsel Tuesday in a shareholder merger suit alleging conflict of interest against the directors of medical technology company Miramar Labs Inc. before approving a $410,000 cash settlement.

  • January 15, 2019

    2 Companies Join IPO Pipeline With Filings Totaling $47M

    An Israeli medical device company and a California-based maker of animated television commercials joined the pipeline for initial public offerings Monday with filings totaling $47 million, despite a lengthening government shutdown that makes it uncertain when the deals will price.

  • January 15, 2019

    Akorn Wants Derivative Suit Related To Failed Merger Axed

    Akorn Inc. told an Illinois federal judge on Monday that a shareholder’s consolidated derivative suit claiming the pharmaceutical company’s falsified regulatory submissions sunk a multibillion-dollar merger and tanked Akorn’s share price doesn’t offer allegations to support a securities claim and must be tossed.

  • January 15, 2019

    Barr Walks Back Anti-False Claims Act Whistleblower Views

    U.S. attorney general nominee William Barr on Tuesday walked back previous comments about the False Claims Act's whistleblower provisions' being an "abomination" and unconstitutional, saying he would "diligently enforce" the law if confirmed to lead the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • January 15, 2019

    Lewis Brisbois Lands Segal McCambridge Team In Philly

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP is significantly beefing up the ranks of its Philadelphia-area office with a team of eight attorneys, including a new co-chair and co-vice chair for its life sciences practice, brought on board from Segal McCambridge Singer & Mahoney Ltd.

  • January 15, 2019

    Life Sciences Group Of The Year: Latham & Watkins

    Latham & Watkins LLP was able to block Nevada from using Alvogen Inc.'s drug in a lethal injection, secured orphan drug exclusivity for Eagle Pharmaceuticals Inc. after a large fight with the FDA and advised a key generic-drug industry merger, earning the firm a spot among Law360's Life Sciences Groups of the Year.

  • January 15, 2019

    Edwards Pays Boston Scientific $180M, Ending All IP Fights

    Edwards Lifesciences Corp. has agreed to pay Boston Scientific Corp. $180 million to settle all patent litigation worldwide tied to coronary repair devices, the companies announced Tuesday.

  • January 14, 2019

    Skip Md.'s Bid To Revive Price-Gouging Law, Justices Urged

    The generic-drug industry on Monday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to turn down Maryland's attempt to revive a state law targeting price gouging, arguing that Maryland is attempting to skirt a "bedrock principle of federalism" by regulating what happens in other states.

  • January 14, 2019

    Robitussin Buyer Seeks Cert. In Label Suit Against Pfizer

    A consumer who claims Pfizer Inc. was deceitful about the "maximum strength" of its cough medicine Robitussin has asked an Illinois federal judge to certify a nationwide class of buyers who allegedly paid more for a weaker product.

  • January 14, 2019

    Allergan's Attack On Drug Compounding Falls Flat

    A California federal judge has rejected Allergan Inc.’s high-stakes effort to make many drug compounding activities unlawful, saying he will defer to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s decision to allow the activities.

  • January 14, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Generics Win In Colitis Patent Suit

    The Federal Circuit on Monday upheld a lower court ruling that cleared Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and Alvogen Pine Brook LLC of patent infringement in a lawsuit over the companies’ generic versions of the colitis medication Uceris.

  • January 14, 2019

    Baker Botts Defeats Takeda’s DQ Bid In Heartburn Drug Fight

    Baker Botts LLP can continue representing Zydus Pharmaceuticals as it pursues antitrust claims against Takeda over a heartburn medication, despite the law firm’s prior representation of Takeda’s ally in patent litigation over the same drug, a New Jersey federal judge said in a ruling made public Friday.

  • January 14, 2019

    Biologist Found J&J Talc In Dying Woman's Tissue, Jury Hears

    A cell biologist took the stand Monday in a California jury trial over allegations that Johnson & Johnson talcum-made baby powder contained asbestos that caused a dying woman’s cancer, testifying that the woman's lung tissue contains talc, which he believes came from J&J's products.

  • January 14, 2019

    J&J Faces Retrial After $151M Hip Implant Loss Reversed

    Johnson & Johnson will face off this week in Texas federal court against five plaintiffs who claimed they received defective hip implants and whose $151 million award in the first trial was tossed over misleading expert witness testimony.

  • January 14, 2019

    Mylan Fights To Put Consumer On Stand In Celgene Clash

    Mylan told a New Jersey federal court Friday that a consumer witness should be allowed to testify in its suit accusing Celgene of stifling generic competition for two cancer drugs because Celgene already has most of the information it needs from him.

  • January 14, 2019

    Teva Tries To Nix Investors' 'Defective' Price-Hike Suit

    Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and its executives doubled down on their efforts to toss securities claims from investors, who say the drugmaker engaged in a price-hike scheme and misled them about its resulting profit growth, arguing in Connecticut federal court Friday they presented no evidence.

Expert Analysis

  • Why AFAs Are Key To The Future Of Legal Practice

    Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul

    Alternative fee agreements can help align law firm and client interests, increase efficiency and eliminate corporate extortion, among other benefits. They are the best thing to happen to the practice of law in decades, says Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP.

  • What Conn. Opioid Ruling Means For Liability Insurers

    Patrick Bedell

    In New Haven v. Purdue, a Connecticut state judge ruled last week that opioid manufacturers are not liable for cities' emergency and social services costs. This decision protects liability insurance from being transformed into a funding mechanism for social problems that it was not designed to cover, say Patrick Bedell and Kevin Harris of BatesCarey LLP.

  • How A No-Deal Brexit Would Affect Life Sciences Cos.

    Frances Stocks Allen

    Under a no-deal Brexit scenario, all provisions of EU law will no longer apply to the U.K., with potentially chaotic results for the life sciences industry. In particular, the impact on marketing authorizations could be highly disruptive, say attorneys at Latham & Watkins LLP.

  • Circuits Left To Develop FCA Discovery Case Law

    Andy Liu

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in two major False Claims Act cases, both involving the government’s knowledge or suspicion of violations allegedly resulting in knowingly false claims. Nichols Liu LLP attorneys consider the implications for the materiality standard and FCA cases going forward.

  • The Trump Administration's Latest Drug Pricing Initiatives

    Tom Bulleit

    In 2018, the Trump administration took few concrete steps that will significantly impact drug prices in the near future. The most consequential ideas lack political support, while the more feasible ideas are unlikely to change much, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Barron Reviews 'The Clamor Of Lawyers'

    Judge David Barron

    Can lawyers lead a revolution? According to "The Clamor of Lawyers: The American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession" — a slim but elegant volume by Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer — they can and they did, says First Circuit Judge David Barron.

  • Cannabis S Corps Should Reconsider Restructuring

    Justin Hobson

    The U.S. Tax Court recently expanded the application of Internal Revenue Code Section 280E, disallowing certain deductions, to include an S corporation acting as a dispensary's “management” company. In response, cannabis companies may want to weigh the tax risks and potential benefits of alternate planning strategies, says Justin Hobson at Lane Powell PC.

  • Handling Corporate Congressional Probes In The Trump Era

    John Hellerman

    President Donald Trump’s approach to crisis communications has changed the game enough to demand companies' consideration of a whole new set of options. John Hellerman of Hellerman Communications and Bill Pittard of KaiserDillon PLLC discuss whether corporations can successfully use similar tactics.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 2

    Peter Jarvis

    Lawyer-directed nonrecourse litigation funding is more likely to protect a lawyer's exercise of independent professional judgment than traditional means of litigation finance, and furthermore enables worthwhile cases that otherwise could not be funded, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 1

    Peter Jarvis

    Contrary to what the New York City Bar Association concluded in an ethics opinion last year, lawyer-directed nonrecourse commercial litigation funding does not violate New York rules on sharing fees with nonlawyers, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.