Government Contracts

  • September 22, 2020

    House Passes Stopgap Extending Gov't Funding To Dec. 11

    The House of Representatives passed a bill Tuesday to fund the federal government beyond September, the end of fiscal year 2020, giving lawmakers until Dec. 11 to negotiate full-year spending bills while avoiding a federal shutdown.

  • September 22, 2020

    House Sends Tribal Gov't Contracting Bill To Trump's Desk

    The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would give Native American tribes more power to shape their self-governance contracts with the federal government, sending the legislation to the president to sign after earlier approval by the Senate.

  • September 22, 2020

    Indian Oil Co. Says NY Fed Must Turn Over Yemen Bank Docs

    An Indian state-owned oil company is enlisting a New York court's help in tracking down assets to collect a five-year-old $3.8 million arbitral award against Yemen, saying the Federal Reserve Bank of New York needs to turn over information on accounts held by the country's central bank.

  • September 22, 2020

    GAO Finds Defense Printing Software Deal Properly Awarded

    A Defense Department agency reasonably found that a Maryland company's software met the technical requirements for a nearly $58 million printing contract, according to a U.S. Government Accountability Office decision released Tuesday, which rejected a challenge to the deal.

  • September 22, 2020

    House Dems Slam Pentagon's Pursuit Of Spectrum Sharing

    A pair of House Democrats on Monday criticized the U.S. Department of Defense for floating a trial balloon to push the creation of a government-run next-generation wireless network, saying it would hobble U.S. competitiveness in the global race to deploy 5G.

  • September 22, 2020

    Watchdog Says Nuclear Cleanup Masks Improperly Maintained

    The U.S. Department of Energy isn't properly maintaining respiratory protection equipment for workers at a nuclear cleanup site in Hanford, Washington, according to a watchdog report containing recommendations for bringing the department into compliance with federal work safety standards.

  • September 22, 2020

    Calif. ICE Detainees Get Class Cert. In COVID-19 Safety Suit

    A California federal judge certified a class of detainees in a suit challenging COVID-19 safety conditions at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Adelanto, California, detention center, ruling Tuesday that all the members share a Fifth Amendment substantive due process claim.

  • September 22, 2020

    Feds Slam Regeneron's Attempt To Duck Kickback Suit

    The federal government has urged a Massachusetts federal judge not to toss its suit accusing Regeneron Pharmaceuticals of paying illegal kickbacks to get doctors to prescribe its injectable eye disease drug, arguing that the biotechnology company is using a "legally irrelevant" argument.

  • September 22, 2020

    Senate Confirms Kirkland Alum To Claims Court

    A Maryland-based former Kirkland & Ellis LLP associate will become a judge of the Court of Federal Claims for a 15-year term, after the U.S. Senate on Tuesday confirmed him by a 66-27 vote.

  • September 21, 2020

    Justice Ginsburg: Who She Was, How She Shaped The Law

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday at age 87. Here, Law360 looks at the feminist icon's legacy and the battle brewing over her seat.

  • September 21, 2020

    Law360's The Term: The Life And Legacy Of Justice Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is among the few on the U.S. Supreme Court to have etched her name into legal history long before donning a robe. In a special episode this week, Law360's The Term dives into her legacy as a pioneering women's rights advocate with two guests who worked by her side. 

  • September 21, 2020

    Budding Textualist Star Barbara Lagoa Eyed For High Court

    Known as a budding superstar in Florida conservative legal circles, committed textualist Judge Barbara Lagoa could continue her lightning-quick ascent through the appellate ranks if President Donald Trump taps her for the now-vacant U.S. Supreme Court seat, where she would become the first Cuban-American, and first Floridian, to sit on the high court.

  • September 21, 2020

    Navy Contractor Targeted In Latest Virtual Asbestos Trial

    A former Navy sailor's counsel told a California jury during openings of a virtual trial Monday that his client is dying from cancer caused by asbestos in insulation supplied by Metalclad, which was installed on a Navy aircraft carrier, while Metalclad blamed the Navy for not protecting servicemen.

  • September 21, 2020

    House Floats Stopgap To Extend Gov't Funding Into December

    House Democrats introduced a bill Monday to fund the federal government through Dec. 11, which would provide special funding for the U.S. Navy's Columbia-class submarine program and extend a program to reimburse federal contractors for COVID-19-related sick leave.

  • September 21, 2020

    McConnell Defends Election-Year Plan To Replace Ginsburg

    The Senate majority leader on Monday defended his plan to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg this year, while the House speaker said the late jurist will become the first woman to lie in state at the Capitol.

  • September 21, 2020

    3 Key Developments As US Coronavirus Deaths Near 200,000

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention withdrew guidance on COVID-19 spread, the Trump administration's blueprint for distributing the coronavirus vaccine faced swift criticism, and litigation related to the pandemic continued to mount just as the number of confirmed U.S. virus-linked deaths neared 200,000. Here are three key developments to know.

  • September 21, 2020

    Claims Court Ends Protest Over VA Health Distribution Deal

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims has tossed allegations that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs was maintaining a noncompetitive "status quo" by offering bridge contracts for expired agreements that gave four distributors control of the VA's medical and surgical supplies.

  • September 21, 2020

    House Committee Report Blasts ICE's Detainee Neglect

    Oversight failures have led to ongoing patterns of substandard medical care, abuse of segregated housing and inadequate access to legal resources for migrants detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, according to a report released Monday.

  • September 21, 2020

    Budget Office Says Virus Stimulus May Dull Economic Output

    Various federal laws meant to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic will likely cause about $2.9 trillion collectively to be added to the federal deficit this year and in 2021, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

  • September 21, 2020

    Downing Venture Capital Head Cops To $8M Ponzi Scheme

    The head of purported Boston venture capital firm Downing Partners LLC pled guilty on Monday to securities and wire fraud charges in connection with what prosecutors called a "Ponzi-like" scheme to bilk dozens of Downing employee investors out of millions of dollars.

  • September 21, 2020

    Navient Takes New Tack To Shave Pa. AG's Student Loan Suit

    Student loan servicer Navient Corp. challenged the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's delegation of enforcement power to Pennsylvania's attorney general late Friday, taking a new tack in its district court battle with the commonwealth after losing a related Third Circuit appeal.

  • September 21, 2020

    Angola Says Energy Co. Must Arbitrate $1.1B Forgery Suit

    An Angolan energy company's accusations that the country relied on forged documents to cancel a $1.1 billion partnership and seize four energy turbines belong in arbitration, the Angolan government told a New York federal court.

  • September 21, 2020

    Feds Tell 1st Circ. Poor Defense Shouldn't Undo FCPA Verdict

    A defense attorney's allegedly shoddy performance in his first trial did not warrant throwing out the convictions of a retired Army colonel and lawyer based on "overwhelming" evidence they tried to bribe government officials in Haiti in exchange for approvals on an $84 million port project, U.S. prosecutors told the First Circuit Monday.

  • September 21, 2020

    Nuke Contractor Says $6.4M FCA Suit Is Double-Dip Attempt

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing contractor CB&I Areva MOX Services has urged a federal court to toss the majority of the claims from a $6.4 million False Claims Act suit alleging fraudulent billing, arguing the government already got the money it seeks through other avenues.

  • September 21, 2020

    New ICE Complaints Show Need To Save Records, Groups Say

    Nonprofits challenging U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's plans for destroying detainee records pounced on recent allegations of systematic sexual assault and medical malpractice in their response to the agency's push for summary judgment.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    The Case For A Nonpolitical Federal Judiciary

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    For the last 20 years, at the insistence of both parties, U.S. Supreme Court nominations have been fierce ideological battles — which is bad for the country and bad for the public's perception of the legitimacy of the court, say Judge Eric Moyé, Judge Craig Smith and Winston & Strawn partner Tom Melsheimer.

  • Trump's Drug Pricing Order Is More Bark Than Bite

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    President Donald Trump's new executive order addressing pricing for drugs covered by Medicare Parts B and D glosses over enormous difficulties in restructuring Medicare operations and is unlikely to lead to any imminent changes, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • The Keys To A Better Privilege Logging Paradigm

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    Current privilege logging practices to identify what information is being withheld from discovery often lead to costly disputes, so practitioners should adopt a system based on trust and good faith, similar to the presumptions embedded in the business judgment rule for corporate directors and officers, say Kevin Brady at Volkswagen and Charles Ragan and Ted Hiser at Redgrave.

  • White House Due Process Memo Could Reform Enforcement

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    A little-noticed memo recently issued by the Trump administration in response to the pandemic, directing federal agencies to provide greater due process to individuals and companies under regulatory investigation, represents a long-overdue sea change in the way justice is carried out in enforcement proceedings, say Joan Meyer and Norman Bloch at Thompson Hine.

  • Law Firm Hiring Considerations In A COVID-19 Economy

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    Financially robust law firms are entering the recruiting market aggressively knowing that dislocations like the COVID-19 crisis present rare competitive opportunities, and firms that remain on the sidelines when it comes to strategic hiring will be especially vulnerable to having their best talent poached, says Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey.

  • Defense Supply Chain Compliance For Midsize Contractors

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    While no formal certification process exists under the International Traffic In Arms Regulations export controls, there are several important steps midsize, second- and third-tier defense contractors can take to achieve supply chain compliance and document readiness to primary contractors concerned about secondary liability, says Thomas McVey at Williams Mullen.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Act To Preserve Democracy This Election

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    COVID-19 concerns and glaring gaps in registration threaten to dampen voter turnout in the 2020 election, so attorneys should take on the problem by leveraging their knowledge and resources in seven ways, says Laura Brill at Kendall Brill.

  • How To Effectively Defend Witnesses In Remote Depositions

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    When a witness is isolated from the defending lawyer during a remote deposition, carefully planning the logistics and building witness confidence are critical to avoiding damaging admissions, say Jessica Staiger at Archer Daniels and Alec Solotorovsky at Eimer Stahl.

  • Whether And How To Compel Remote Arbitration

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    As the pandemic delays in-person arbitration hearings, mediator and arbitrator Theodore Cheng provides arbitrators with a checklist to examine the rationale and authority for compelling parties to participate in remote hearings.

  • The Unique Challenges Of Protecting A Law Firm Brand

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    Recent law firm trademark disputes highlight how the tension between legal ethics rules and trademark law can make it difficult for firms to select brands that are distinctive and entitled to protection, say Kimberly Maynard and Tyler Maulsby at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Takeaways From DOJ Civil Division's Inability-To-Pay Memo

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    Guidance issued last week at the U.S. Department of Justice is helpful insofar as it clarifies the Civil Division's inability-to-pay process and criteria, but many open questions remain, say Matthew Miner and Amanda Robinson at Morgan Lewis.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Conflicts, Timeliness, USPTO Rules

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Locke Bell at MoFo looks at three recent Government Accountability Office decisions considering potential organizational conflicts of interest in the government’s acquisition process, the timeliness of a sole-source award protest, and the exclusion of parties as potential bidders under the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s unique rules.

  • China's Talent Recruiting Plans Pose New Risks For Academia

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    Although recent U.S. Department of Justice enforcement related to China's Thousand Talents Plan has, thus far, focused on individuals, it is not unforeseeable that the DOJ could pursue universities for criminal or civil liability for violations associated with federal research grants, say Ivan Boatner and William Beasley at Baker Donelson.

  • What To Know When Making Dispositive Motions In Arbitration

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    As practitioners increasingly turn to dispositive motion practice within arbitration, they should be aware of the underlying authority for these motions and consider practical guidance for their use, says arbitrator and mediator Janice Sperow.

  • 4 Ways Amicus Briefs Can Support An Overall Legal Strategy

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    The strategic use of amicus briefs can help an appellate court think about a case in a new way and lift an organization's own cause or reputation for legal thought, say Mark Chopko and Karl Myers at Stradley Ronon.

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