Government Contracts

  • January 17, 2020

    Bradley Arant Nabs Former Assistant US Atty In NC

    A former assistant U.S. attorney has joined Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP as a partner in the firm's government enforcement and investigations practice group.

  • January 17, 2020

    House Bill Would Nix Reverse Auctions For Construction Work

    Federal agencies could no longer use reverse auctions during bidding for federal construction contracts under a bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • January 16, 2020

    Former Navy Officer Censured Over 'Fat Leonard' Bribes

    The U.S. Navy has censured a former senior noncommissioned officer for taking gifts from a contractor to look the other way on overpriced invoices, it announced on Thursday, adding to the dozens of current and former Navy officers embroiled in the "Fat Leonard" bribery scandal. 

  • January 16, 2020

    FBI Will Now Alert State Officials If Election System Breached

    The FBI said Thursday that, in a change of policy, it will now notify state election officials when malicious actors are believed to have breached local election systems, in an effort to improve communication about security threats as the 2020 election season approaches.

  • January 16, 2020

    Army Nixes Major Vehicle Deal After Poor Industry Response

    The U.S. Army has canceled a solicitation for its next-generation combat vehicle, saying Thursday that the industry response to the multibillion-dollar program had prompted it to go back to the drawing board on its requirements and acquisition strategy.

  • January 16, 2020

    Mexico Must Share Quinn Emanuel Probe Info In $700M Case

    Mexico must disclose whether it's investigating alleged improprieties committed by Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP stemming from its representation of U.S. investors seeking at least $700 million from the country in arbitration over terminated oil rig lease agreements, an international tribunal has ruled.

  • January 16, 2020

    Feds Beef Up Claims Against Kansas Prof Over China Program

    Prosecutors on Thursday unveiled a new, more detailed indictment against a University of Kansas researcher accused of hiding his ties to a Chinese university.

  • January 16, 2020

    Feds Fight To Keep $122M Suit Against Texas Hospital

    The federal government has urged a judge in Texas to keep alive its $122 million fraud lawsuit alleging an Austin-area hospital and a group of executives lied to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in order to get a loan to build the hospital, arguing the allegations are not vague “shotgun pleadings.”

  • January 16, 2020

    US Says Cos. Have 90 Days To Comply With Iran Sanctions

    The U.S. Treasury Department said Thursday that it would give companies 90 days to wind down their business operations in Iran’s metals, mining and construction sectors before they faced punishment under new sanctions issued last week.

  • January 16, 2020

    Ex-Air Force Staffer, Contractor Indicted Over Bribery Scheme

    Defense training contractor QuantaDyn and a former U.S. Air Force employee have been indicted in Texas federal court over an alleged bribery scheme to steer more than $100 million in federal contracts to the company, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • January 15, 2020

    ResMed Settles FCA Suits Over Referral Fraud For $39.5M

    A California-based medical equipment manufacturer will pay $39.5 million to resolve five False Claims Act lawsuits claiming it paid suppliers, sleep labs and health providers illegal kickbacks to sell more of its products for sleep disorders, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

  • January 15, 2020

    Contract Clash Ruling Leaves Fraught Dispute To Congress

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent refusal to review a decision allowing Veterans Affairs to prioritize veteran-owned businesses over companies that employ the blind and disabled places pressure on Congress to determine if either group should have an advantage in scoring federal contracts.

  • January 15, 2020

    Ex-Attys Can't DQ New Counsel In $350M Shire Deal

    The attorneys who used to represent a whistleblower failed Tuesday to get a Florida federal judge to disqualify the whistleblower’s new attorneys in their fight over a cut of the attorney fee award in a $350 million deal with biotech company Shire Pharmaceuticals PLC.

  • January 15, 2020

    Del. Justices Weigh If Partnership Change Kills Standing

    A partnership formed to file a drug-marketing whistleblower complaint in 2011 urged Delaware's Supreme Court Wednesday to reject drug company arguments that the replacement of one member dissolved its standing in the case, during arguments on a Third Circuit inquiry about state partnership law.

  • January 15, 2020

    Claims Court Won't Toss Raytheon's Army Rights Dispute

    The Court of Federal Claims has refused to dismiss Raytheon's suit disputing an Army directive to remove proprietary markings from documents submitted as part of an engineering contract, saying the case is within its jurisdiction even if no money is involved.

  • January 15, 2020

    Dems Vow Another Vote To End Trump's Border Emergency

    A group of top Senate Democrats vowed Wednesday to hold another vote to terminate President Donald Trump's national emergency declaration amid reports that he plans to divert another $7.2 billion in defense funds toward the construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • January 15, 2020

    Global Cartel Enforcers Shift Attention To Local Conspiracies

    Despite a rebound in penalties issued by U.S. and European enforcers last year, a report released Wednesday found that global criminal cartel fines are down over the past decade. But the downward trend may say more about where enforcers are focusing than it does about their level of activity.

  • January 15, 2020

    Gov't Watchdog Finds Lack Of Reliability In DOD Programs

    The U.S. Department of Defense risks ballooning project costs by failing to enact measures to ensure that weapons systems, including the costly F-35 fighter jet program, will work reliably, a government watchdog said Wednesday.

  • January 14, 2020

    Ex-Raydon Worker Pushes For Sanctions In ERISA Suit

    A former Raydon employee urged a Florida federal judge Tuesday to throw out testimony from two accountants in a proposed class action over a $60.5 million employee stock ownership plan transaction, saying the company failed to disclose the witnesses before using them to bolster its opposition to class certification.

  • January 14, 2020

    NJ Lawmakers Approve Blacklisting Cos. Violating Tax Law

    New Jersey employers that violate state wage, benefit and tax laws would be blacklisted from obtaining government contracts under a package of bills the state Legislature recently approved to crack down on worker misclassification.

  • January 14, 2020

    Watchdog Urges DOD To Seek $43M In Penalties Against Cos.

    A government watchdog released a report Tuesday recommending that the U.S. Department of Defense consider hitting contractors with $43 million in penalties for claiming unpermitted costs, saying that DOD officers didn’t sufficiently explain why they dropped the fines.

  • January 14, 2020

    White Worker's Race Bias Suit Falls Flat At 3rd Circ.

    The Third Circuit on Tuesday refused to revive a former Philadelphia code inspector's race discrimination suit claiming the city fired him because he is Caucasian, finding the city offered legitimate reasons to axe him for falsifying inspections and breaking a policy on how to start the workday.

  • January 14, 2020

    Amazon Will Seek To Block DOD's $10B JEDI Deal

    Amazon told the Court of Federal Claims it will seek to block the Pentagon from moving forward with the disputed $10 billion JEDI contract while its protest plays out.

  • January 14, 2020

    Ohio Co. Says Ex-Partner Used Excuse To Reap $100M Profit

    An Ohio-based company is opposing an engineering firm’s bid to toss a $100 million dispute over a broken partnership for a defense contract, saying the firm used a flimsy excuse to cut it loose from the project in violation of their joint venture agreement.

  • January 14, 2020

    Dems Call For Pause On Detention Center Bid Solicitation

    A group of House Democrats has asked the Trump administration to suspend its call for bids for immigration detention centers in Texas until it turns over information about the deals, saying the solicitation violates federal procurement laws.

Expert Analysis

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: 2019's Most Noteworthy Decisions

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo highlights two December decisions from the U.S. Government Accountability Office, looks back at five of the most interesting bid protests of 2019 and provides a few takeaways from the GAO's fiscal year 2019 report.

  • FIRREA Remains Potent Civil Fraud Enforcement Tool

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    Last year, three court decisions addressing the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act's civil monetary penalties provision — two at the final judgment stage and one at the pleadings stage — expanded FIRREA jurisprudence and remind us why this statute cannot be ignored, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • Gov't Contractor Suspension And Debarment: 2019 In Review

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    Attorneys at Covington look back at last year's policy trends and developments, legislative and rulemaking activity, and notable federal district court rulings related to the exclusion of contractors from doing business with the federal government.

  • OFAC's New Iran Sanctions May Not Signal Seismic Change

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    While President Donald Trump’s recent executive order expands the ability of the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control to sanction non-U.S. entities doing business with Iran, it remains to be seen whether OFAC will pursue aggressive enforcement of its strengthened secondary sanctions authority, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • 2019 Trends In DOJ Civil Health Care Fraud Cases

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    Last year, the U.S. Department of Justice maintained aggressive enforcement efforts in the health care industry, again relying heavily on the False Claims Act, but the agency is also taking steps to guide those efforts toward fairness and consistency, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • 2019 Trends In DOJ Health Care Enforcement

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    Last year, opioid-related enforcement was the U.S. Department of Justice's top priority, in addition to a sustained focus on the prosecution of private individuals and data-driven identification of health care fraud, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Defense Contracting Law Developments From 2019

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    Creation of the U.S. Space Force, initiatives to improve U.S. cybersecurity, and near record-high spending on government contracting were just a few of the most notable developments in U.S. Department of Defense contracting last year, says Joseph Berger of Thompson Hine.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

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    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 7 Ethics Tips For Lawyers' Pretrial Social Media Use

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    As ethical constraints on pretrial social media use evolve, the American Bar Association's Model Rules and several court opinions provide guidance on avoiding violations when collecting evidence, researching jurors and friending judges, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Mark Davis at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Opinion

    States Should Not Follow ABA On Attorney Conduct Rules

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    Because the American Bar Association's new rule on diversity continues to use the Model Rules of Professional Conduct as a cultural bludgeon, states should create independent codes limited to constitutionally valid purposes of attorney regulation, says Bradley Abramson of Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • Opinion

    DOL Suits Won't Fix Silicon Valley Diversity Issues

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    A Silicon Valley workforce that does not represent the U.S. as a whole raises questions of equality and social justice that cannot be solved by the U.S. Department of Labor’s opaque deliberations and adversarial lawsuits, says researcher and former public affairs consultant Pratik Chougule.

  • How Courts And Litigants Can Benefit From Special Masters

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    As we approach the first anniversary of the American Bar Association's adoption of guidelines for the appointment and use of special masters in civil litigation, retired U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin, now at Stroock, explains how special masters can help parties and courts with faster decision-making and subject matter expertise.