Government Contracts

  • July 19, 2019

    Ex-Credit Suisse Director Cops To Role In $2B Loan Fraud

    A former Credit Suisse managing director on Friday admitted to his role in a bribery and investor fraud scheme involving $2 billion in loans to state-backed companies in Mozambique, telling a New York federal judge he conspired to defraud those who invested in the debt.

  • July 19, 2019

    'Everybody In The Crosshairs' As DOJ Opioid Blitz Gets Real

    The U.S. Department of Justice's newest indictment of a painkiller distributor and its executives strongly suggests that the agency has embarked on a calculated criminal crackdown after years of civil enforcement failed to ease the opioid epidemic.

  • July 19, 2019

    Ex-NSA Contractor Gets 9 Years For Classified Doc Theft

    A former National Security Agency contractor was sentenced to nine years in prison on Friday after amassing a hoard of top-secret and other classified documents over the course of roughly two decades, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • July 19, 2019

    Oakland Faces Skeptical Judge In NFL Suit Over Raiders Move

    A California federal judge struggled to see how an antitrust injury resulted from the National Football League allowing the Raiders team to move from Oakland to Las Vegas, but nonetheless granted on Friday the City of Oakland an opportunity to amend its complaint.

  • July 19, 2019

    Fraud Ring Posing As Gov't Officials, DHS Watchdog Warns

    The Department of Homeland Security’s watchdog has issued an alert about a scheme by an Atlanta-based transnational fraud ring that poses as government procurement officials to steal electronics from unsuspecting contractors.

  • July 19, 2019

    4 Arrested Over $10M Medicaid Fraud Via NYC Pharmacy

    A New York City pharmacy owner and three of her managers were arrested over a multifaceted scheme that included bribing customers to have their HIV drug prescriptions filled there and over $10 million in Medicaid fraud, the New York attorney general announced Friday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Trump Wants Review Of $10B JEDI Defense Cloud Deal

    President Donald Trump has ordered a review of the U.S. Department of Defense's contentious $10 billion Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure cloud computing procurement, he said Thursday, claiming he had received "tremendous complaints" about the way the department has handled the pending deal.

  • July 18, 2019

    GAO Rejects Protests Over $13.4B Air Force IT Deal

    The Government Accountability Office has denied two companies’ protests over a $13.4 billion multi-award information technology deal, ruling that the Air Force fairly assessed their bids before rejecting them.

  • July 18, 2019

    DOL Contract Watchdog Gets $6.6M Bias Win Over Enterprise

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge ordered Enterprise Rent-a-Car's Baltimore unit to pay $6.6 million to a class of black applicants he found were unfairly denied jobs based on their race, and blocked the car rental service from getting government contracts until it cleans up its act.

  • July 18, 2019

    Jury Convicts Doctor, Nurse For $7.8M Health Care Fraud

    An Alabama federal jury convicted a doctor and nurse on numerous charges stemming from health care fraud valued at $7.8 million and their operation of a Birmingham clinic that served as a pill mill, federal prosecutors announced this week.

  • July 18, 2019

    Acacia Units Will Pause Mining Arbitration Against Tanzania

    Gold miner Acacia Mining PLC said that two of its subsidiaries are asking to pause their international arbitration proceedings against the Tanzanian government over mineral development agreements to allow its majority shareholder to finish negotiating a settlement.

  • July 18, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Revives Army Corps Contracting Row

    The Federal Circuit has breathed new life into a contractor's dispute with the Army Corps of Engineers over $4.1 million the firm says it is owed, finding that an armed services appeals board made a mistake in concluding it didn't have jurisdiction.

  • July 18, 2019

    DOJ Indicts Opioid Distributor, Execs Over Painkiller Sales

    Drug distributor Miami-Luken Inc. flooded rural towns with painkillers to profit off an epidemic of opioid addiction, the U.S. Department of Justice said in an indictment unsealed Thursday that targets the company and two of its executives.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hear Justice Stevens In 5 Memorable Moments On The Bench

    Justice John Paul Stevens was known for being collegial and kind, but he also wasn’t one to mince words. Listen to a few of the justice’s most memorable words from the bench, in majority opinions, sharply worded dissents and at oral argument.

  • July 17, 2019

    Kuwaiti Contractor Seeks Fed Circ. Reversal Of $17.2M Offset

    A Kuwait-based logistics contractor urged the Federal Circuit on Tuesday to find that the federal government wrongly withheld roughly $17.2 million from the company to offset purported overpayments under a previous contract, saying a lower court’s contrary decision “imperils the rule of law.”

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' High Court Legacy In 4 Charts

    In this data deep-dive, Law360 examines retired Justice John Paul Stevens’ long tenure, his relatively breezy confirmation, his transformation from a run-of-the-mill Republican appointee to runaway liberal, and the legacy that lives on in his clerks.

  • July 17, 2019

    Huntington Ingalls Says $129M Award Holds

    Huntington Ingalls fired back Wednesday at the Venezuelan Ministry of Defense’s argument that a $128.9 million award issued to the shipbuilder can’t be enforced because the tribunal didn’t comply with the terms of the arbitration agreement when it moved the proceedings to Brazil, saying the argument “conveniently ignores the facts of this case.”

  • July 17, 2019

    Paint Makers To Pay $305M To End 19-Year Calif. Lead Case

    Sherwin-Williams, ConAgra and a third paint maker have agreed to pay $305 million to clear up a suit brought nearly two decades ago by 10 California counties and cities blaming the companies for the negative impacts of the widespread use of lead paint in the Golden State.

  • July 17, 2019

    Tiversa Slams LabMD Exec's 'Late' Jury Trial Bid In FCA Suit

    LabMD's CEO waited too long to request a jury trial in his False Claims Act suit accusing cybersecurity firm Tiversa of fabricating data breaches to win government contracts, Tiversa said, urging a New York federal court to deny his bid.

  • July 17, 2019

    Nursing Home Mogul Esformes To Face Sentencing In Sept.

    A Florida federal judge on Wednesday set a September sentencing date for Miami nursing home mogul Philip Esformes, who was convicted on charges of kickbacks, money laundering, bribery and obstruction of justice related to an alleged $450 million health care fraud scheme.

  • July 16, 2019

    A Look Back At Justice Stevens' Most Important Opinions

    Justice John Paul Stevens wrote over 1,000 opinions in his 34 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, leaving a footprint in the court’s jurisprudence still visible today. Here, Law360 looks back at his most important decisions, from landmark First Amendment cases to those involving the separation of powers.

Expert Analysis

  • Fed. Circ. Limits Gov't Contractors' Litigation Cost Claims

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    The Federal Circuit's July 16 decision in Bechtel National v. United States upholds the precedent set in Geren v. Tecom, making it harder for contractors to argue government agencies indicated their willingness to reimburse them for third-party litigation expenses through contract terms, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • The Latest Executive Order On Buying American Has Teeth

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    Earlier executive orders aimed at strengthening compliance with the Buy American Act were essentially position statements. Monday’s executive order differs, however, because it proposes a textual change to the Federal Acquisition Regulation, one that would have wide-ranging, potentially disruptive effects on government contractors, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Inside A Closely Watched FCA And FIRREA Decision

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    Last week’s district court decision in Luce v. U.S. interprets a stricter standard of causation for False Claims Act cases and, significantly, makes a helpful contribution to a dearth of case law interpreting the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act’s penalty provisions, says Derek Adams of Feldesman Tucker.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • How High Court FOIA Ruling Will Help Gov't Contractors

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent Food Marketing Institute v. Argus decision will make it easier for government contractors to protect financial information from Freedom of Information Act requests even though the new standard for obtaining a FOIA exemption is somewhat unclear, say James Boland and Christopher Griesedieck of Venable.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Timing, RFP Criteria, Award Calculation

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    In his monthly bid protest roundup, Charles Capito of Morrison & Foerster discusses three June decisions — a U.S. Court of Federal Claims opinion evaluating a highly unusual procedural posture, a U.S. Government Accountability Office finding regarding criteria used to distinguish identical offerors, and a GAO finding about the incorporation of prime contractor fees in award percentages.

  • High Court FOIA Ruling Has Trade Secrets Implications

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    Recently, in Food Marketing Institute v. Argus, the U.S. Supreme Court interpreted the meaning of the term "confidential" in Exemption 4 of the Freedom of Information Act in a manner that will impose many costs on the federal government, including more criminal responsibility under the Trade Secrets Act, says Sharon Sandeen of Mitchell Hamline School of Law.

  • Rethinking The Tech-First Approach To Law Firm Solutions

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    When a lawyer complains about some workflow inefficiency they are having, the knee-jerk reaction of many firms is to look for a technology-based workaround. This overlooks the importance of human psychology and behavior, which may be the root of the problem, says Ryan Steadman of Zero.

  • Limits Of DOJ's Qui Tam Dismissal Authority Are Unsettled

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    The 2018 Granston memo led to a significant increase in U.S. Department of Justice dismissals of nonintervened qui tam suits, but last month’s Illinois federal court ruling in CIMZNHCA v. UCB is an important reminder that the DOJ’s decision to file a motion to dismiss is not a fait accompli, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Defeating A State Tax False Claims Act Case

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    State-level False Claims Act tax lawsuits are on the rise, but two crucial distinctions between these suits and traditional tax administration give taxpayers a significant advantage in beating the FCA claims, say Marc Simonetti and Nicole Boutros of Pillsbury.