Government Contracts

  • April 09, 2020

    GAO Finds Tech Co. Wasn’t Left Out Of Navy Contract

    A California technology company lost its attempt to protest the U.S. Navy’s solicitation for help with construction services when the U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled there was nothing to stop the company from applying for the contract.

  • April 09, 2020

    Senate Panel Postpones 'Paper Hearings' For Defense Bill

    The Senate Armed Services Committee said Thursday that it would be forced to push back "paper" hearings related to the massive annual defense policy bill due to the Pentagon's current focus on COVID-19, possibly delaying the introduction of the legislation.

  • April 09, 2020

    NJ Panel Kills Enviro Business’ Award In Asbestos Job Suit

    A New Jersey appeals court on Thursday reversed an environmental service company’s $54,000 win in a contract breach suit, finding that a contractor was empowered to scale back a subcontractor’s work removing asbestos from a school district. 

  • April 09, 2020

    Claims Over News Release OK'd In Taronis Investor Suit

    Energy technology company Taronis Technologies Inc. can't end some of the claims in a proposed shareholder class action in Arizona federal court accusing the company of lying about having a contract with the city of San Diego.

  • April 09, 2020

    Civil Rights Groups Pan Virus Relief Waiver For Contractors

    More than 50 civil rights organizations have urged the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs not to temporarily exempt federal contractors providing coronavirus relief from certain affirmative action obligations, noting that people of color and other marginalized communities have been hit hardest by the pandemic.

  • April 09, 2020

    Dems Want Border Wall Halted Over COVID-19 Concerns

    Four Democratic lawmakers wrote to the Trump administration Wednesday demanding an end to border wall construction amid the COVID-19 pandemic, saying the continued work is threatening the health of small border and indigenous communities.

  • April 09, 2020

    Troutman Sanders Fights For Partial Fee Award In FCA Suit

    Troutman Sanders LLP is hitting back against HealthSouth Corp.'s attempt to ax $200,000 in fees the firm was awarded for work it did before it was disqualified from representing a whistleblower in a suit alleging HealthSouth falsified patient records, arguing that the award was appropriate.

  • April 09, 2020

    Mass. Judge Says Virus-Prone Detainees Meet Class Criteria

    A Massachusetts federal judge has certified a class of immigrant detainees seeking to be released from a county jail that allegedly lacks adequate protections against the coronavirus, saying that we are now in "a world brought to its knees by the pandemic."

  • April 08, 2020

    GAO Says Software Co. Too Late To Protest IRS Contract

    A Virginia-based software company can't protest the IRS' decision to choose a competitor for a database management contract after the U.S. Government Accountability Office said it had missed its deadline to do so.

  • April 08, 2020

    South Korea Co. Will Pay $2M Under DOJ Antitrust Deal

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced a civil settlement Wednesday with Seoul-based Jier Shin Korea Co. Ltd., the last of several with South Korean companies who were accused of rigging bids and fixing prices on U.S. military fuel supply contracts in the country.

  • April 08, 2020

    Pa. Accused Of Failing To Protect Detained Migrant Kids

    Pennsylvania’s child welfare agency has left immigrant families detained at the Berks County Residential Center “sitting ducks” for the coronavirus pandemic, attorneys for the families told the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania on Wednesday in a petition to have the detainees released.

  • April 08, 2020

    DOD Ties Progress Payments To Contract Performance

    The U.S. Department of Defense has issued a rule tying fixed-price contract payments to performance, including several tweaks intended to make it easier for contractors to receive those performance-based payments.

  • April 08, 2020

    Bid Rigging Harmed Business Deal, $44M Suit Claims

    Sussman Sales Co. says it is owed $44 million after a business partner broke their contract when the partner was confronted about allegedly rigging bids for contracts within the New York City school system. 

  • April 08, 2020

    GM, Philips Getting $1.1B For Coronavirus Ventilators

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Wednesday announced $1.1 billion in contracts under a wartime production law for GM and Philips to build more than 70,000 ventilators, a vital medical device for the most seriously ill coronavirus patients.

  • April 08, 2020

    Miss. Choctaws Claim Immunity In $1.4M Car Crash Suit

    The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians is immune to a negligence claim stemming from allegations that one of its former Parks and Wildlife staffers crashed into a man's vehicle and caused $1.4 million in damages, the tribe said in a motion to dismiss.

  • April 08, 2020

    Judge Says It's Unclear If ICE Detainees Are Employees

    A prison contractor for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement can’t escape class allegations that it paid detainees below minimum wage in a work program after a Washington federal judge said it was unclear whether the detainees meet the definition of employees.

  • April 08, 2020

    Fed. Agencies Lagging On Telecom Contract Swap, GAO Says

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office said most federal agencies it surveyed are behind schedule on a transition to a new, likely lower rate telecom program, risking the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars in potential savings.

  • April 07, 2020

    Can Cannabis Survive the Virus? Hemp Has A Leg Up

    Before the coronavirus struck, the hemp industry was already wary about 2020 as oversupply problems and bankruptcies hit businesses in the new sector early in the year.

  • April 07, 2020

    Cahill Gordon Suspends 2020 Summer Associate Program

    Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP has decided to suspend its summer associate program for 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the firm announced Tuesday though it says it will pay the associates who had been selected and will offer them full-time positions after graduation.

  • April 07, 2020

    House Dems Urge DHS To Free Detainees Over COVID-19 Risk

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security should release nonviolent detainees, especially those who have preexisting medical conditions, to help prevent the coronavirus from spreading through immigration detention centers, two Democratic House leaders said in a letter Tuesday.

  • April 07, 2020

    Gov't Says Army Tourniquet Suit Doesn't Belong In Va. Court

    The U.S. Department of Defense hit back at a company's lawsuit challenging a mandate for U.S. Army personnel to buy tourniquets from a single source, saying procurement disputes don't belong in a Virginia federal court.

  • April 07, 2020

    Puerto Rico Board Says COVID-19 Test Kit Orders Broke Law

    Puerto Rico's financial oversight board is saying the island's government broke the law guiding the territory’s restructuring when it made now-canceled deals for 1 million COVID-19 test kits without board permission.

  • April 07, 2020

    Turkmenistan Beats $76M Industrial Projects Contract Claim

    Turkmenistan has fended off a €70 million ($76.28 million) claim asserted by a Turkish engineering and construction firm over several soured industrial project contracts with Turkmenistan state entities when an international tribunal concluded the claims were "manifestly without legal merit."

  • April 07, 2020

    $2T Relief Bill Carries Big Fraud Risks, White Collar Attys Say

    White collar and government investigations attorneys expect the more than $2 trillion in COVID-19 relief funds to lead to unprecedented fraud, and are urging businesses seeking funds to protect themselves from future risk in what they expect to be a new decade of government investigations.

  • April 07, 2020

    Energy Transfer, Investors Want Pipeline Bribery Suits Joined

    Energy Transfer LP and two sets of investors have asked a Texas federal court to join a pair of nearly identical shareholder lawsuits alleging the pipeline company may have bribed Pennsylvania officials to score key environmental permits.

Expert Analysis

  • High Court Inaction Paves Way For Increasing FCA Dismissals

    Author Photo

    Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court denial of certiorari in U.S. v. JPMorgan Chase has implications for False Claims Act litigants because it maintains important precedent allowing the U.S. Department of Justice to dismiss whistleblower cases without being subject to probing judicial review, say Brandon Moss and Michelle Bradshaw at Wiley Rein.

  • Coronavirus Stimulus Fraud May Be A Target For State AGs

    Author Photo

    Emboldened by their 2009 financial recovery enforcement experiences, state attorneys general are expected to play a large role in rooting out fraud, waste and abuse related to Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act funds, says Jeff Tsai at DLA Piper.

  • Don't Forget Firm Culture When Adapting To Remote Work

    Author Photo

    While law firms suddenly pivoting to remote work due to coronavirus restrictions are busy dealing with logistical challenges, an equally pressing and perhaps more difficult task may be adjusting a long-standing brick-and-mortar culture to working remotely for the first time, say Heather Clauson Haughian and Grant Walsh at Culhane Meadows.

  • Opinion

    CMS Coronavirus Stark Law Waivers Need Corrections

    Author Photo

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services must cover service payments above fair market value and address several other shortcomings in its blanket waivers for Stark Law sanctions in order to adequately protect providers that are expanding their physician workforces, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Guide To Excusable, Compensable Delay

    Author Photo

    Government contractors likely to experience contract performance delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic should be prepared to mitigate the financial impact by establishing that such delays are compensable as well as excusable under the applicable contract principles, say Aron Beezley and Sarah Osborne at Bradley Arant.

  • Conducting Court Hearings Remotely: 12 Considerations

    Author Photo

    As more courts begin to explore remote hearings during the COVID-19 crisis, attorneys and courts should be aware of some of the common concerns accompanying video- and teleconferencing technology and make allowances to avoid these issues, say Attison Barnes III and Krystal Swendsboe at Wiley Rein.

  • 7 Ways COVID-19 Product Makers Can Mitigate IP Infringement

    Author Photo

    When a manufacturer retools its facilities to produce products needed to combat COVID-19, the risk of patent infringement liability — including the possibility of enhanced damages due to willful infringement — can be mitigated through a variety of strategies, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • The Era Of Video Mediation Is Here — Or Is It?

    Author Photo

    Mediator Jeff Kichaven has heard from several first-chair trial lawyers and senior claims executives that they are reluctant to adopt online video mediation even during the COVID-19 crisis, and says this reluctance is grounded in reality.

  • COVID-19 Highlights BigLaw Need For Emotional Intelligence

    Author Photo

    The formula for making decisions at BigLaw firms has historically been rooted in IQ-based factors, but with the ongoing pandemic, lawyers and firm leaders are increasingly dealing with issues that require emotional intelligence — from establishing effective virtual offices to retaining firm morale and client confidence, say Jolie Balido and Tina van der Ven at NewStar Media.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Availability, Disparate Treatment, Codes

    Author Photo

    In this month's bid protest roundup, James Tucker and Markus Speidel at MoFo look at three March decisions: The Government Accountability Office considered alleged unavailability of key personnel, the Federal Circuit set precedent for establishing disparate treatment, and the Court of Federal Claims adopted a test to review North American Industry Classification System code designations.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Shaming Of Attys Is Troubling Even During Pandemic

    Author Photo

    Judges have recently rebuked attorneys for wasting judicial resources to resolve minor issues during the COVID-19 crisis, including in a trademark lawsuit over unicorn drawings. But it is unfair to publicly flog lawyers for doing what they are trained to do, says Ronald Minkoff, chairman of Frankfurt Kurnit's professional responsibility group.

  • 2nd Circ. Dismissal Affirms The Limits Of Civil RICO Claims

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit's recent decision in Halvorssen v. Simpson makes clear that, while courts have permitted the use of civil Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act suits in disputes involving legitimate businesses rather than crime syndicates, there are real limits to these claims, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Don't Be Social Media Distancing: LinkedIn Tips For Lawyers

    Author Photo

    While we need to be physically apart at this time, lawyers and firms should be leaning into social media to reinforce and build relationships, and help guide clients through the coronavirus crisis, says marketing consultant Stefanie Marrone.

  • CMS Emergency Waivers Give Health Care Needed Flexibility

    Author Photo

    On Monday, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services issued over 60 waivers of Stark Law and other Medicare requirements, appearing to recognize the need to refocus health care providers’ time and effort into patient care during the pandemic, say Jeffrey Mittleman and Andrew Namkung at Holland & Knight.

  • Emergency Laws Protect Cos. Enlisted In COVID-19 Fight

    Author Photo

    The Defense Production Act and the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act, recently invoked by the Trump administration to aid in fighting COVID-19, can provide special legal defenses to businesses producing essential supplies — which could protect companies against future tort liability, says Kelly Belnick at Tanenbaum Keale.

Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!