Government Contracts

  • September 23, 2019

    Seattle Tech Co. Chef To Stop Working With ICE, CBP

    Software company Chef announced Monday it will not renew its contracts with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, citing opposition to the Trump administration's hard-line immigration policies and employee backlash over the deals.

  • September 23, 2019

    9th Circ. Revives Cerner Unit's Bid To Enforce $63M Award

    The Ninth Circuit has revived a Cerner Corp. unit's bid to enforce a $63 million arbitral award it won in a contract dispute with a United Arab Emirates businessman and found that a related suit should be remanded to state court.

  • September 23, 2019

    Boeing Urges Fed Circ. To Overturn Contract Waiver Ruling

    Boeing told the Federal Circuit that the U.S. Court of Federal Claims created a new burden on federal contractors when it found that the company had waived its claims over a cost accounting regulation by not objecting to it before signing a defense contract.

  • September 23, 2019

    Law Firm Rates Can Be Sealed In Claims Court Army Dispute

    A property owner can file under seal a comparison of law firm billing rates meant to help determine its attorney fees after winning a takings claim against the Army, as that comparison is a commercial document not based on public data, the Court of Federal Claims has ruled.

  • September 23, 2019

    Northrop Unit Snags $1.1B Missile Defense Agency Contract

    A Northrop Grumman Corp. unit was awarded a $1.1 billion contract with the U.S. Department of Defense for missile defense targets, beating out a competitor, according to a Friday announcement.

  • September 23, 2019

    Mortgage Cos. Ask Full 5th Circ. To Revisit $298M FCA Verdict

    Two mortgage loan companies want the full Fifth Circuit to rehear their appeal of a nearly $300 million judgment arising from alleged federal loan insurance fraud during the mortgage crisis, saying the original appeals panel twisted a causation standard.

  • September 23, 2019

    DOJ Goes After Philly Pharmacy For $1M In Bogus Billing

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Monday sued a Philadelphia-based pharmacy in Pennsylvania federal court, alleging that its owner and pharmacist billed Medicare for prescriptions that it never purchased or dispensed to patients to pad their pockets with at least $1 million.

  • September 20, 2019

    Whitefish Power Co. Objects To PR Utility Restructuring Deal

    A power company whose contract to restore hurricane-damaged electric lines in Puerto Rico was canceled amid controversy in 2017 said Friday the island's utility can't restructure until it explains how it's going to pay the $126 million the company says it's owed.

  • September 20, 2019

    GAO OKs SBA Responsibility Ruling On $95M Army Contract

    The Small Business Administration acted properly when it ruled that NavQSys met responsibility requirements, allowing the company to be reinstated to a $94.6 million Army contract rescinded over a security clearance issue, the U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled in a decision released Friday.

  • September 20, 2019

    Fed. Contract Rule Would Set 2% Excise Tax On Foreign Cos.

    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council proposed a federal contracting rule Friday involving a 2% excise tax on certain foreign companies and an exemption from local Afghan taxes on contractors in Afghanistan.

  • September 20, 2019

    Gov't Must Revisit $1.4B Food Contract For Troops Overseas

    The Defense Logistics Agency cannot proceed with a contract worth up to $1.38 billion to supply food to overseas troops after the U.S. Court of Federal Claims ruled that it wrongly credited a Kuwaiti company for owning a warehouse.

  • September 20, 2019

    Brewer Asks 7th Circ. To Revive Rest Of Ontario Beer Case

    A Wisconsin brewery has asked the Seventh Circuit for a rehearing after the court refused to revive pieces of its suit claiming Anheuser-Busch InBev and Molson Coors Brewing Co. conspired to restrict the flow of American beer exports to Ontario, Canada.

  • September 20, 2019

    Baltimore Orioles, Fans Settle Wheelchair Seating Suit

    The Baltimore Orioles and three fans agreed Friday to settle a federal lawsuit that claims the MLB team's stadium features poorly positioned wheelchair-accessible seating and a lift that frequently breaks.

  • September 20, 2019

    Ex-NJ Political Boss Disbarred Over Corruption Convictions

    The New Jersey Supreme Court has disbarred a former Democratic power broker despite his tearful plea to keep his law license following his 2015 federal convictions for accepting kickbacks to help a software developer secure municipal business.

  • September 20, 2019

    Split DC Circ. Revives Howard U. Veterinarian's Firing Suit

    A divided D.C. Circuit panel on Friday revived a former Howard University veterinarian's suit alleging she was fired for alerting the National Institutes of Health to inhumane lab conditions, saying the trial court took "too narrow a view" of the False Claims Act, which protects workers who report fraud in government contracts.

  • September 19, 2019

    Man Gets 4½ Years For Defrauding US In Afghan Mine Scheme

    A D.C. federal judge sentenced the former owner of a now-defunct marble mining company in Afghanistan to roughly 4½ years in prison Thursday for defrauding the U.S. government on a $15.8 million loan, on which he later defaulted.

  • September 19, 2019

    US Withdraws $160M In Afghan Aid Over Corruption Claims

    The U.S. Department of State said in a scathing statement Thursday that it will pull back $160 million in procurement and energy infrastructure assistance intended for Afghanistan’s government, citing corruption, financial mismanagement and a lack of transparency in spending decisions.

  • September 19, 2019

    Chicago Wins Block On Anti-Sanctuary Rules For DOJ Grants

    A Chicago federal judge on Thursday blocked the U.S. Department of Justice from putting certain conditions on public safety funds in an attempt to force so-called sanctuary cities to comply with federal immigration policies, though the judge limited the effect of his order to the Windy City.

  • September 19, 2019

    Pharmacy, PE Fund Ink $21M Deal To End FCA Kickback Suit

    A compounding pharmacy and its private equity fund owner have reached a $21.4 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice to resolve claims they orchestrated a $70 million kickback scheme to recruit beneficiaries of Tricare for medically unnecessary prescriptions.

  • September 19, 2019

    Split 9th Circ. Revives Gitmo Detainee’s Torture Info Bid

    A split Ninth Circuit panel reversed a ruling that quashed a Guantanamo Bay detainee's subpoena for information on his torture in U.S. custody, ruling that a lower court should have removed sensitive national security details from that information.

  • September 19, 2019

    TridentUSA's $9.5M Medicare Scheme Settlement Gets OK

    A New York bankruptcy judge has approved a $9.5 million settlement between health care provider TridentUSA and the U.S. government to end whistleblower suits claiming the company engaged in an illegal Medicare referral scheme.

  • September 19, 2019

    Ex-Pharmacy Head Gets 33 Months In Misdosed Drugs Case

    An Indiana federal judge handed down a 33-month sentence and $25,000 fine to the former owner of an Indiana specialty pharmacy after he was found guilty of knowingly selling mislabeled drugs, resulting in some drugs that were almost 25 times stronger than indicated being given to infants.

  • September 19, 2019

    Commodities Co. Gets OK To Seize Venezuelan Funds

    A New York federal judge has granted a British Virgin Islands company’s request to have nearly $8 million drawn from a Venezuelan state-owned mining company's bank account to help satisfy an arbitral award in a contract dispute.

  • September 18, 2019

    9th Circ. Won't Revive Suit Over Army's Youth Diabetes Care

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday upheld a lower court's dismissal of an American Diabetes Association lawsuit over diabetes care in the U.S. Army's Child, Youth and School Services programs, finding it is moot because the policy was updated and lacks standing because the organization did not show any injury. 

  • September 18, 2019

    Senate Dems Block Gov't Funding Bill Amid Border Wall Fight

    Senate Democrats on Wednesday derailed a Republican attempt to take up a government spending package as the fight over funding for President Donald Trump’s long-promised border wall continues on Capitol Hill.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Steps Toward A Supportive Firm Culture

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    As an early advocate of the American Bar Association's year-old well-being pledge, we launched an integrated program to create and sustain a supportive workplace culture with initiatives focused on raising mental health awareness, embracing creativity and giving back to the community, says Casey Ryan at Reed Smith.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Mental Health Education As A Firm Priority

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    Our firm drives a holistic concept of well-being through educational opportunities, such as a series of expert-led workshops intended to address mental health and substance abuse issues that we vowed to fight when we signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge one year ago, says Krista Logelin at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: A Firm's Work With Mental Health Experts

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    Signing the American Bar Association's well-being pledge last year was a natural progression of our firm's commitment to employee wellness, which has included developing partnerships with professionals in the mental health space to provide customized programming to firm attorneys and staff, say Annette Sciallo and Mark Goldberg at Latham.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: When A Firm Brings Counseling On Site

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    One year ago, our firm signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge and embraced a commitment to providing on-site behavioral health resources, which has since become a key aspect of our well-being program, say Meg Meserole and Kimberly Merkel at Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Inside A Firm Meditation Program

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    After our firm signed the American Bar Association’s well-being pledge one year ago, we launched two key programs that included weekly meditation sessions and monthly on-site chair massages to help people address both the mental and physical aspects of working at a law firm, says Marci Eisenstein at Schiff Hardin.

  • Early Sampling Of Electronic Info Is Underutilized In Discovery

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    The early and prompt provision of samples from all electronically stored information sources as a part of ESI protocol search methodology is consistent with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and may allow for significant cost savings during discovery, says Zachary Caplan at Berger Montague.

  • Opinion

    California, Follow NY's Lead And Pass An FCA Tax Bill

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    Legislation poised to expand California’s False Claims Act to include tax cases recently stalled, but in New York similar legislation provided whistleblowers with incentive to come forward and earned the state revenue, says Justin Wagner, a former assistant attorney general in New York's Taxpayer Protection Bureau.

  • The Factors Courts Consider In Deposition Location Disputes

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    In the absence of a federal rule governing deposition location, federal courts are frequently called on to resolve objections to out-of-state deposition notices. Recent decisions reveal what information is crucial to courts in making the determination, says Kevin O’Brien at Porter Wright.

  • Audit Shows Where DOD Cyber Enforcement Is Headed Next

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    Contractors can expect the U.S. Department of Defense to ramp up its oversight and enforcement efforts to protect controlled unclassified information on contractor-owned networks and systems, in order to address common noncompliance deficiencies revealed in a recent government audit, say Todd Overman and Roee Talmor at Bass Berry.

  • Gov't Win In AseraCare FCA Case Benefits Both Sides

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    While Monday’s Eleventh Circuit decision in United States v. AseraCare provides the government the opportunity to continue litigating its claims, False Claims Act defendants will undoubtedly take refuge in the less plaintiff-friendly falsity standard articulated by the court, say Derek Adams at Feldesman Tucker and Erica Blachman Hitchings at the Whistleblower Law Collaborative.

  • What To Consider Before Filing For A Rule 57 Speedy Hearing

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    Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 57 and its state counterparts provide a method for expediting claims for declaratory judgment that warrants closer attention than it has historically received from litigants and courts, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Expanding The Meaning Of Diversity

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    My conservative, Catholic parents never skipped a beat when accepting that I was gay, and encouraged me to follow my dreams wherever they might lead. But I did not expect they would lead to the law, until I met an inspiring college professor, says James Holmes of Clyde & Co.

  • Adapting To Gov't Contractor Rules Banning Chinese Telecom

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    The U.S. government's revised Federal Acquisition Regulation, which prohibits federal agencies from acquiring telecommunications equipment and services produced by certain Chinese companies, applies across a strikingly broad range of contract values and types, say David Fletcher and Julia Fox at Perkins Coie.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Critical Info, Timeliness, Classification

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Alissandra Young of Morrison & Foerster looks at three August U.S. Government Accountability rulings — covering agency decisions to withhold proprietary data from prospective offerors, the GAO's strict timeliness rules regarding challenges to improprieties of solicitations, and agency classification of a procurement.

  • How The Wayback Machine Can Strengthen Your Case

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    The Wayback Machine, which archives screenshots of websites at particular points in time, can be an invaluable tool in litigation, but attorneys need to follow a few simple steps early in the discovery process to increase the odds of being able to use materials obtained from the archive, says Timothy Freeman of Tanenbaum Keale.