Government Contracts

  • May 14, 2024

    Judge Trims More From Prison Phone Co.'s Antitrust Suit

    Prison telephone service provider Global Tel Link and a Pennsylvania county now have one fewer claim to face in a lawsuit accusing them of sinking a rival company's chance at winning a contract with the county, after a federal court trimmed away yet another claim.

  • May 14, 2024

    Feds Dodge Salt Lake City's Suit Over $1B Gondola Plan

    A Utah federal judge on Tuesday dismissed the federal government from a Salt Lake City lawsuit challenging federal approvals of a $1 billion plan to address traffic congestion by building the world's longest gondola.

  • May 14, 2024

    NY Court System Immune To Spanish-Speaker's Bias Case

    The New York Unified Court System can't be sued in federal court by a Spanish speaker whose limited English language skills allegedly barred him from a program that could have reduced a drug offense's severity, the New York federal court has ruled.

  • May 14, 2024

    Keep It Short, And Other Advice From Fed. Circ. Judges

    Six Federal Circuit judges counseled a packed room of attorneys on Tuesday about the most common ways to ruin their own cases, such as talking too much at oral argument, adding additional citations and attacking judges or opposing counsel.

  • May 14, 2024

    Pa. Justices Vexed By DA Funding In Kleinbard Bill Dispute

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court seemed to want more information Tuesday about the source of the former Lancaster County district attorney's "program funds" before wading into whether the DA had the discretion to spend those funds on Kleinbard LLC's legal fees rather than asking his county commissioners for approval.

  • May 13, 2024

    Kabbage Inks 2 FCA Deals With Feds Totaling $120M

    Bankrupt online lender Kabbage Inc. has agreed to pay $120 million in two separate deals to resolve allegations it submitted thousands of false claims for loan forgiveness and operated without adequate fraud controls in place, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Monday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Wall Fraud Conviction Affirmed Despite Juror-Prosecutor Tie

    The Second Circuit on Monday affirmed the conviction of a Colorado man found to have siphoned online donations meant to fund a Southern border wall, saying the fact that a federal prosecutor had mentored a juror's daughter didn't warrant vacating the conviction.

  • May 13, 2024

    Construction Co. Says Guatemala Can't Exit $31M Award Suit

    A construction and engineering firm has asked a D.C. federal court not to toss its litigation to enforce $31 million in arbitral awards against Guatemala that arose from unpaid public works contracts, saying local courts already denied the country's claim the awards violate domestic law.

  • May 13, 2024

    Watchdog Nixes Bidder's Protest To Low $159M Air Force Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office said an aviation company couldn't question the feasibility of a rival's $159 million U.S. Air Force flight training contract, when the service branch never indicated it would check if bidders' prices were realistic.

  • May 13, 2024

    E-Rate Requests Aren't FCA Claims, Law Group Tells Justices

    The Washington Legal Foundation urged the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether reimbursement requests for the Federal Communications Commission's E-Rate program are "claims" under the False Claims Act, arguing that a Seventh Circuit ruling that answered in the affirmative threatens wide-ranging consequences beyond the E-Rate program.

  • May 13, 2024

    Co. Says Typo Wrongly Cost It Shot At $10B Army IT Deal

    An information technology firm has urged the Court of Federal Claims to restore its eligibility for a pending $10 billion U.S. Army IT hardware procurement, saying the Army wrongly excluded the company for one missing word in its proposal.

  • May 13, 2024

    Pa. Supreme Court Snapshot: Kleinbard Bill Battle Starts May

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania will weigh the spending powers of district attorneys in a Kleinbard LLC bill battle and whether an appeals court overstepped by greenlighting a hospital closure when the May argument lineup begins Tuesday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Texas, Mo. Say Border Contractors Lack Interests To Defend

    Texas and Missouri have slammed contractors' attempts to defend the Biden administration's plans to use border wall construction funds to remediate existing barriers, telling a Texas federal court that the group lacks a direct interest in the case's outcome.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ex-Pa. City Housing Head Gets 3 Years In Prison For Fraud

    The former head of an economically distressed Pennsylvania city's public housing authority was sentenced Monday to over three years in prison for bilking the agency out of $545,000 through a yearslong scheme of submitting inflated contracting bills for housing repairs to line his own pockets.

  • May 10, 2024

    Navy Defends Retaining Contractor Facing Labor Unrest

    The U.S. Navy on Friday rebutted a Federal Circuit judge's suggestion that it might have turned "a blind eye" to a contractor's alleged labor law violations, saying it followed its obligations under procurement law to assess both performance and ethics.

  • May 10, 2024

    GAO Says DHS Unfairly Assessed Bids On $17M Support Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has backed a protest over a $17.2 million U.S. Department of Homeland Security support services order, saying the agency failed to show its assessment of proposals was reasonable.

  • May 10, 2024

    Biz Claims Foreign Bribe Needed To Meet Energy Deal's Terms

    An aviation fuel company protested the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency's latest effort to supply fuel to military bases in Djibouti, accusing the agency of requiring interested contractors to obtain a license that can, allegedly, only be received through bribery.

  • May 10, 2024

    UPMC Inks $38M Deal To End Neurosurgery FCA Suit

    The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has agreed to pay $38 million to put an end to a False Claims Act suit brought by three medical workers from its neurological surgery department who said the medical center fraudulently billed federal healthcare programs.

  • May 10, 2024

    No 'Piecemeal' Fees For Infant Data Win Amid 6th Circ. Appeal

    A federal judge said Friday that he wouldn't award attorney fees to children who challenged Michigan's handling of blood samples collected in an infant health screening program until the state's Sixth Circuit appeal is resolved.

  • May 09, 2024

    3 Engineering Firms Sued Over Pittsburgh Bridge Collapse

    Three engineering firms share responsibility with the city of Pittsburgh for the collapse of the Fern Hollow Bridge in 2022, a new lawsuit alleges, claiming the engineers failed to flag how dangerous and deteriorated the bridge was for years before it fell.

  • May 09, 2024

    3M, Dupont Want Conn. AG's PFAS Suit To Stay In Fed. Court

    Stressing their work for the military, 3M Co. and several entities tied to what was once E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. have opposed a motion by the Connecticut Attorney General's Office to send a PFAS forever chemicals environmental pollution case back to state court.

  • May 09, 2024

    11th Circ. Urged To Reconsider Ruling In Cancer Cluster Case

    A group of Florida families asked the Eleventh Circuit on Thursday to reconsider its decision affirming a jury verdict that found defense contractor Pratt & Whitney was not liable for a cancer cluster near the company's former rocket testing site, arguing that the panel affirmed a legally deficient verdict form.

  • May 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Judge 'Baffled' By Gov't Args In Boeing Costs Case

    An exasperated Federal Circuit judge on Thursday tore into the government's contention that a disputed cost accounting regulation has no bearing on Boeing's claim that the defense contractor was wrongly barred from offsetting multiple simultaneous accounting changes against each other.

  • May 09, 2024

    Justices Asked To Weigh In On $1.3B India Award Fight

    Shareholders of an Indian satellite communications company are pressing the U.S. Supreme Court to clarify the analysis of a highly technical jurisdictional question as they look to revive their bid to enforce a $1.3 billion arbitral award against a state-owned division of India's space agency.

  • May 09, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Northrop Retirees' Putative Class Action

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday once again resurrected a proposed class action accusing Northrop Grumman of misinforming retirees about their pension benefits, ruling that the retirees have plausibly alleged that they received inaccurate benefit statements.

Expert Analysis

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • How Export Controls Are Evolving To Address Tech Security

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    Recently proposed export control regulations from the U.S. Department of Commerce are an opportunity for stakeholders to help pioneer compliance for the increasing reliance on the use of outsourced technology service providers, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Opinion

    New Mexico Fire Victims Deserve Justice From Federal Gov't

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    Two years after the largest fire in New Mexico's history — a disaster caused by the U.S. government's mismanagement of prescribed burns — the Federal Emergency Management Agency must remedy its grossly inadequate relief efforts and flawed legal interpretations that have left victims of the fire still waiting for justice, says former New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Lessons For Nursing Facilities From DOJ Fraud Settlement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent settlement with the owner of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities in Florida provides a cautionary tale of potential fraud risks, and lessons on how facilities can mitigate government enforcement actions, say Callan Stein and Rebecca Younker at Troutman Pepper.

  • 5 Takeaways From SAP's Foreign Bribery Resolutions

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    German software company SAP’s recent settlements with the U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, resolving allegations of foreign bribery, provide insights into government enforcement priorities, and how corporations should structure their compliance programs to reduce liability, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonprecedential, Unreasonable, Scope

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    James Tucker at MoFo examines three recent decisions showing that while the results of past competitions may inform bid strategy, they are not determinative; that an agency's award may be deemed unreasonable if it ignores available information; and that a protester may be right about an awardee's noncompliance but still lose.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Preparing For Possible Calif. Criminal Antitrust Enforcement

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    Though a recent announcement that the California Attorney General's Office will resume criminal prosecutions in support of its antitrust enforcement may be mere saber-rattling, companies and their counsel should nevertheless be prepared for interactions with the California AG's Antitrust Section that are not limited to civil liability issues, say Dylan Ballard and Lillian Sun at V&E.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Direct Claims Ruling May Alter Gov't Ties To Software Firms

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    A recent Federal Circuit decision allowing a software developer to pursue legal action under the Contract Disputes Act could change the government's relationship with commercial software providers by permitting direct claims, even in third-party purchase situations, say Dan Ramish and Zach Prince at Haynes Boone.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Facts Differ But Same Rules Apply

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    Zachary Jacobson and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine two decisions illustrating that reliance on a technicality may not save an otherwise untimely appeal, and that enforcement of commercial terms and conditions under a federal supply schedule contract may be possible.

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