International Arbitration

  • May 13, 2021

    Injured Couple Says They Had Right To Intervene In AIG Fight

    A couple injured in a zip line accident during a Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. shore excursion told the Eleventh Circuit Thursday that they should have been allowed to intervene in a suit between the zip line company and its insurer AIG over whether the dispute should have been arbitrated.

  • May 12, 2021

    Gibson Dunn Partner Questioned On 7-Figure Donziger Bills

    A Gibson Dunn partner with a lead role in pursuing financial information from Chevron foe Steven Donziger acknowledged during cross-examination Wednesday that the oil giant was willing to spend millions to pursue an $800,000 judgment and other relief against him.

  • May 12, 2021

    Singapore Court Nixes India's 'Backdoor Appeal' In Tax Fight

    An attempt by India to obtain a court ruling that might "persuade" an international tribunal to change its mind on the confidentiality of a tax arbitration involving Vedanta Resources Ltd. was an improper "backdoor appeal"  against the tribunal's decision, a Singapore appeals court has ruled.

  • May 12, 2021

    Eni Says Del. Litigation Funder Can't Avoid Sanctions

    Italian energy company Eni SpA has pressed a Delaware federal judge to sanction a litigation funder for failing to comply with discovery orders related to an arbitration against Nigeria, claiming that the funder's misconduct has harmed the oil giant.

  • May 12, 2021

    MLS Says Player Must Return From Saudi Arabia Under CBA

    Major League Soccer filed a petition Wednesday asking a Manhattan federal judge to enforce its arbitration win against a former New York Red Bulls player whom it accused of abandoning his union-negotiated contract to play in Saudi Arabia's league.

  • May 12, 2021

    Insurers Lose Human Rights Challenge To $1B Oil Spill Suit

    A London court dismissed on Wednesday part of a challenge brought by a club of insurers against the recognition of a Spanish ruling holding it liable for up to $1 billion for a devastating oil spill, tossing the underwriters' human rights arguments.

  • May 12, 2021

    Biden Launches Labor Trade Case Against Mexican GM Plant

    The Biden administration brought a new labor case under the U.S. trade deal with Mexico on Wednesday, calling on the Mexican government to investigate "irregularities" in a recent union vote at a General Motors Co. facility in the northern city of Silao.

  • May 11, 2021

    Gibson Dunn Atty Rebuts Donziger Privacy Concerns At Trial

    A Gibson Dunn & Crutcher partner testified Tuesday in Chevron foe Steven Donziger's contempt trial that a court order mandating him to hand over his devices included privacy protections, despite Donziger's fears about delivering the entire body of his communications to the company.

  • May 11, 2021

    Judge Weighs Effect Of Sanctions In Del. Venezuela Cases

    A Delaware federal judge weighing whether to grant seizure orders for Citgo's parent company to creditors owed hundreds of millions of dollars by Venezuela indicated Tuesday that he is considering whether U.S. sanctions on Caracas preclude him from issuing such an order.

  • May 11, 2021

    Squire Patton Guides Turkmenistan In $500M Arbitration Win

    Squire Patton Boggs LLP said Tuesday it has won the dismissal of a nearly $500 million claim against Turkmenistan brought before the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes by a Turkish construction company, calling it one of the year's largest investment treaty arbitration victories.

  • May 11, 2021

    Libya Takes $22M Award Fight To Federal Court

    Libya moved a $22 million arbitration enforcement action to New York federal court on Monday, protesting the state court's default judgment and arguing for immunity under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act.

  • May 11, 2021

    Cayman Islands Court OKs Disclosure In $1.5B Award Fight

    A Cayman Islands appeals court has affirmed an order directing the principal holding company for Indian conglomerate Essar Group to disclose information and documents relating to the assets of an Essar unit that owes U.S. steel company ArcelorMittal more than $1.5 billion under a 2017 arbitral award.

  • May 11, 2021

    Jailed Billionaire Sues Rival Co. Over Alleged Corporate Raid

    A company owned by jailed Russian businessman Ziyavudin Magomedov is suing a rival firm over an alleged corporate raid at transportation giant FESCO, after the shipping company launched a $1 billion arbitration to claw back loans from Magomedov.

  • May 10, 2021

    Donziger Calls Contempt Charge Overreach As Trial Begins

    Steven Donziger, the disbarred human rights lawyer who has fought a bitter decadeslong battle with Chevron over oil pollution in Ecuador, began his criminal contempt trial Monday with a declaration that the oil giant was wrongly allowed to wage "a massive campaign of intrusive discovery" against him that led to the charge.

  • May 10, 2021

    Crystallex, Venezuela Butt Heads Over Special Master Order

    Crystallex is objecting to a position adopted by Venezuela and its state-owned oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela S.A, that the parties involved in the sale of Citgo's parent company — and perhaps even the special master overseeing it — will need a license to proceed with the transaction due to U.S. sanctions on Caracas.

  • May 10, 2021

    Norwegian Must Fork Over Lobbying Docs In Cuban Dock Row

    A Florida federal magistrate judge on Monday ordered Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. to produce its correspondences with the Cuban government and documents pertaining to its lobbying and political strategy, largely siding with a Cuban dock company in a stolen property trafficking suit.

  • May 10, 2021

    Forfeiture Suits Over PrivatBank Loan Scheme Paused

    A Florida federal judge paused litigation on Monday filed by the U.S. government looking to seize properties in Texas and Ohio allegedly connected to a Ukrainian money laundering scheme, while leaving for another day whether to toss parallel litigation targeting a 31-story skyscraper in Kentucky.

  • May 10, 2021

    Soros Says Steinmetz Must Appear For $10B Mining Suit

    Billionaire investor George Soros urged a New York federal judge to force Israeli billionaire Beny Steinmetz to appear in court for a deposition related to a $10 billion lawsuit over a contract to mine valuable iron ore deposits in Guinea.

  • May 10, 2021

    Unions Test New Labor Rules In North American Trade Deal

    The AFL-CIO and two other unions alleged a slew of labor violations at Mexican auto-parts factories on Monday, pressing the Biden administration to use brand new enforcement tools in the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement to remedy the situation.

  • May 07, 2021

    Devas Threatens New Arbitration In Indian $1.3B Award Fight

    India has been threatened with a treaty claim by the Mauritius-based shareholders of satellite company Devas Multimedia Pvt. Ltd. over New Delhi's alleged attempts to avoid paying a nearly $1.3 billion arbitral award against a division of the country's space agency.

  • May 07, 2021

    With US On Board, COVID IP Waiver Still Faces Long Road

    While the Biden administration has backed a temporary waiver on intellectual property protections for COVID-19 vaccines, experts now foresee heated World Trade Organization negotiations about the scope of any deal, which could keep the proposal in limbo for some time.

  • May 07, 2021

    Energy Trade Group Takes Aim At Mexican Law Amendments

    A trade group representing the U.S. energy industry has sounded the alarm on amendments to Mexico's electrical industry and hydrocarbon laws that allegedly discriminate against foreign investors, urging the Biden administration to ensure that Mexico lives up to its treaty obligations.

  • May 07, 2021

    Reed Smith Hires Stephenson Harwood Int'l Arbitration Pro

    Reed Smith LLP has hired a new partner for its Singapore office, saying the former Stephenson Harwood LLP international arbitration attorney will focus his practice on resolving commercial disputes related to energy, infrastructure and projects, and construction and engineering.

  • May 07, 2021

    UK's Lugano Exit Could Leave Consumers Facing Headwinds

    Britain's courts won't hurt for commercial cases if the U.K. is barred from rejoining an international pact settling jurisdiction disputes, but consumers could be left out in the cold if businesses seek home turf advantage in their legal battles, attorneys say.

  • May 07, 2021

    From Ecuador To SDNY, Donziger's Path To A Criminal Trial

    When Chevron foe Steven Donziger goes on trial for criminal contempt starting Monday, it will mark a milestone in a bitter feud that has been raging for nearly three decades since the now-disbarred human rights lawyer helped indigenous Ecuadorians sue the oil giant over pollution in the Amazon rainforest.

Expert Analysis

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

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    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • Rethinking Investment Treaties As Latin America Goes Green

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    As Latin America pivots toward renewable energy, governments should reshape bilateral investment treaties to allow incentives for new technologies and improve dispute settlement mechanisms, while also providing both new and established energy companies with certainty and fair treatment, say attorneys at GST.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • What OECD Scrutiny Means For Anti-Corruption In Brazil

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    Attorneys at Paul Hastings examine how an unprecedented standing subgroup recently created by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to monitor Brazil's anti-corruption efforts reflects significant uncertainty regarding the country's commitment to enforcement, and what companies can do to address foreign bribery risk and strengthen compliance programs.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Economic Sanctions And Export Controls: A Q1 Update

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    Attorneys at Kirkland discuss first-quarter developments in U.S. export controls and economic sanctions and what they may indicate about the Biden administration's national security and foreign policy agenda. 

  • Fla. Ruling Muddles Question Of Who Decides Arbitrability

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    A Florida state appellate court's recent decision in Fallang Family v. PrivCap — that the incorporation of arbitration rules by reference into an arbitration agreement does not grant arbitrators the sole power to decide arbitrability — leaves parties without express delegation clauses with few good options if they are dragged into court over arbitration, says Brian Briz at Holland & Knight.

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

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    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

  • ICDR Update May Help Arbitration Parties Avoid Litigation

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    The International Centre for Dispute Resolution's recently updated rules reinforce its authority to decide jurisdiction without court involvement, helping parties to arbitration agreements with clear delegation clauses minimize the risk of litigation, say attorneys at Fox Rothschild.

  • Thought Leadership's Critical Role In Law Firm Diversity

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    Minority attorneys are often underrepresented in conferences, media interviews and other law firm thought leadership campaigns, which affects their visibility with potential clients and their ability to advance at their firms, says John Hellerman at Hellerman Communications.

  • UK Ruling Shows Tool For Taming Multijurisdictional Disputes

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    In PJSC National Bank Trust v. Mints, the U.K. High Court imposed costs on the prevailing party for failure to notify the court of related proceedings, demonstrating an approach that judges may use to mitigate the risk of discordant outcomes in multijurisdictional litigation, say Thomas Grant at Cambridge University and Scott Kieff at George Washington Law School.

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