International Arbitration

  • February 21, 2020

    Insurers Win Bid To Arbitrate Hurricane Harvey Coverage Suit

    A group of foreign insurers including underwriters at Lloyd’s of London won a bid to force into arbitration a property owner's suit seeking coverage for Hurricane Harvey damage after a Texas federal court decided the insureds had failed to adequately show why their policy’s arbitration clause shouldn’t stand.

  • February 21, 2020

    Russia Can't Escape Ukraine Claims Over Crimea Annexation

    An international tribunal on Friday rejected many of Russia's jurisdictional objections to Ukraine's allegations that Moscow has stolen its energy and fisheries resources in the waters surrounding Crimea following the larger nation's 2014 annexation of the disputed peninsula.

  • February 21, 2020

    DC Circ. Nixes Racketeering Suit In $506M Award Fight

    Kazakhstan was unable Friday to convince the D.C. Circuit to revive its lawsuit accusing a pair of Moldovan energy investors of violating U.S. racketeering law by fraudulently obtaining and trying to enforce a half-billion-dollar award against the country.

  • February 21, 2020

    Mongolia Hit With Arbitration Over Copper Mine Taxes

    Mongolia has been hit with international arbitration over a $155 million tax bill imposed on a company developing a mine that holds one of the world's largest undeveloped copper reserves, international mining group Rio Tinto said Friday.

  • February 21, 2020

    EU Commission Pushes Tougher Climate Change Disclosures

    The European Commission has launched a public consultation on its proposal to beef up rules forcing companies to give investors detailed information about their environmental practices, as part of the bloc’s latest bid to combat climate change.

  • February 20, 2020

    Attys For INTL FCStone Units Nab $65K In Fees In Award Fight

    Subsidiaries of financial services company INTL FCStone Inc. were awarded more than $65,000 in attorney fees for securing confirmation of $5 million in arbitration awards against a fuel distributor, after a New York federal judge ruled Wednesday that the amount was reasonable.

  • February 20, 2020

    Japan Electronics Co. Says Price-Fix Suit Must Be Arbitrated

    A Japanese electrical manufacturing company has urged a California federal court to force Flextronics International USA Inc. to arbitrate in Hong Kong its suit over an alleged price-fixing scheme related to inductors, an electrical component often used in radios.

  • February 20, 2020

    Nigeria Says $1B Award Over Oilfield Can't Be Enforced In NY

    Nigeria's state-owned oil company is calling for the dismissal of litigation to enforce a nixed $1.1 billion arbitral award stemming from an offshore oilfield dispute, arguing the suit improperly invites a New York federal court to sit as a "de facto" appeals court for Nigeria's judiciary.

  • February 20, 2020

    Wash. Floats Pausing Lower Aerospace Tax Amid EU Row

    Washington state would suspend a lower business tax rate for aerospace manufacturing under two bills introduced Thursday, a suspension proposed by Boeing to avoid international tariffs as the U.S. and European Union remain embroiled in a dispute over illegal subsidies.

  • February 20, 2020

    Brexit Spurs On EU Capital Markets Union Plans

    The European Commission said the departure of the U.K. and London's financial hub from the bloc creates an “unprecedented sense of urgency” in further integrating capital markets among the remaining member states.

  • February 19, 2020

    3 Takeaways From $50B Yukos Oil Decision

    A Dutch appeals court has revived $50 billion in arbitral awards issued to former Yukos Oil Co. shareholders who accused Russia of dismantling the company to crush a political rival of President Vladimir Putin. Here are three takeaways from the blockbuster decision.

  • February 19, 2020

    Resort Investors Can't Build On Mauritius Slavery Site

    The island nation of Mauritius has won its challenge against U.K. investors that wanted to build a luxury resort on a UNESCO World Heritage site commemorating escaped slaves' fight for freedom, with an international tribunal finding that the investors have no right to develop the property.

  • February 19, 2020

    US Rips Into European Trade Barriers At WTO

    Tensions between the U.S. and the European Union bubbled over at the World Trade Organization on Tuesday as the Trump administration called out Brussels for a litany of trade irritants that have come to dominate a fractious commercial relationship.

  • February 19, 2020

    EU Watchdog Warns Of Cyberattack Risk To Financial System

    A well-planned cyberattack on a major financial institution could trigger a liquidity crisis that may then spiral into a global financial crisis, a European regulator warned in a report Wednesday.

  • February 19, 2020

    UK Top Court Lets Investors Pursue $323M Romanian Award

    The U.K.'s top court on Wednesday allowed two Swedish food investors to resume their efforts to enforce a $323.6 million arbitral award against Romania, concluding a lower court exceeded its power when it paused the litigation while a European court considers whether the award is illegal.

  • February 18, 2020

    Spain Must Pay €42M Award, Energy Investor Says

    A Luxembourg renewable energy investor has urged a D.C. federal court to enforce a €41.8 million ($46.56 million) arbitral award against Spain over revoked economic incentives, saying it's "undisputed" that Spain consented to arbitration by signing an underlying treaty.

  • February 18, 2020

    Orrick Snags DLA Piper Trial, Oil Pro In Houston

    Orrick has picked up an expert litigator with a specialty in the oil and gas industry from DLA Piper for its Houston office, the new partner confirmed Tuesday.

  • February 18, 2020

    Moldova Tells DC Circ. To Reject $58M Energy Award

    Moldova is urging the D.C. Circuit not to enforce a $58 million arbitral award issued to a Ukrainian energy company following a dispute over an energy supply agreement, arguing that the order was premature because the award is likely to be set aside by Europe's highest court.

  • February 18, 2020

    Freshfields Adds Litigation Team In Brussels

    London-headquartered international law firm Freshfields has hired a team of litigators from White & Case for its Brussels office to expand its global dispute resolution practice.

  • February 18, 2020

    $50B Yukos Awards Against Russia Revived By Dutch Court

    A Dutch appeals court on Tuesday revived the record-breaking $50 billion in arbitral awards issued to former shareholders of Yukos Oil Co. that stemmed from Russia’s dismantling of the oil giant, overturning a 2016 decision finding that Russia had never consented to the arbitration.

  • February 17, 2020

    Albion Wins Bid For Final $13M Slice Of Heritage Oil Buy

    A judge handed U.K.-based Albion Energy Ltd. a $13 million win in litigation against an ex-Qatari prime minister’s company that purchased its stake in an oil exploration company, rejecting the investor's claim that the dispute should be arbitrated.

  • February 14, 2020

    US Hikes Tariffs On EU Planes In Airbus Tussle

    The Trump administration on Friday said it would raise its retaliatory tariff on European Union aircraft from 10% to 15% in the long-running World Trade Organization battle over illegal subsidies granted to Airbus.

  • February 14, 2020

    New Ransomware Ring Aims To Publicly Shame Its Victims

    A ransomware ring that claims to have hacked into five law firms has turned up the heat on targets by stealing and threatening to post their sensitive data, adding a new wrinkle to the already nightmarish scenario victims face.

  • February 14, 2020

    Gun Co. Says Distributor Wrongly Litigating Pistol Fight

    The German arm of European weapons company RUAG is asking a federal court to force a Nevada weapons distributor to arbitrate its multimillion-dollar lawsuit stemming from a failed business venture involving a type of sport pistol, arguing that the dispute belongs in Munich.

  • February 14, 2020

    Manchester City Hit With 2-Year Ban From Champions League

    European soccer's governing body has hit Manchester City, the reigning champion of England's Premier League and one of the world's most valuable soccer clubs, with a $32 million fine and a two-year ban from the pan-European Champions League for allegedly violating financial fair play rules.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    AI Can't Accurately Predict Case Length And Cost — Yet

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    A recent Law360 guest article argued that artificial intelligence can precisely estimate the length and cost of a new case, but several limitations will likely delay truly accurate predictions for years to come, says Andrew Russell at Shaw Keller.

  • Lawyers Can Build Trust Through The Spoken Word

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    As attorneys, we may prefer the precision of written communication, but a phone call or an in-person conversation builds trust by letting others see and hear our authentic selves, rather than something constructed or scripted, says mediator Sidney Kanazawa of ARC.

  • Opinion

    Legal Prediction Is Demanding But Not Impossible

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent decision in Balducci v. Cige incorrectly concluded that predicting the length and cost of a case is nearly impossible, and overlooked artificial intelligence's ability to do so, says Joseph Avery with Claudius Legal Intelligence.

  • Malpractice Landscape Is Becoming Riskier For BigLaw

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    A recent survey of lawyers’ professional liability insurers revealed an increase in malpractice claims against law firms, suggesting clients will demand more accountability in the coming decade, say Gerald Klein and Amy Nguyen at Klein & Wilson.

  • Perspectives

    Book Review: A Lawyer Reflects On Defending Guilty People

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    In her new book, "Guilty People," Abbe Smith successfully conveys that seeing ourselves in people who commit crime may be the first step to exacting change in our justice system, says U.S. District Judge Diane Humetewa of the District of Arizona.

  • How Peru Embraced Transparency In Arbitration

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    Peru's recent amendments to its law governing arbitration where the state is a party reflect a growing international trend toward arbitral transparency and prohibiting individuals from playing conflicting roles in multiple simultaneous proceedings, says Orlando Cabrera at Hogan Lovells.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Following A Serendipitous Path

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    I went to law school intending to pursue a career in politics, inspired by Ted Sorensen and Gary Hart — but learning to solve problems in a new and exciting way drew me to litigation, says David Goodman of Goodman Law Group Chicago.

  • 7 Ethics Questions To Ask Before Marketing Your Law Firm

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    While ethics rules for attorney advertising vary by state and are frequently updated, there are several basic principles that all firms should understand, says Michelle King at Reputation Ink.

  • Opinion

    Most Lawyers Do Not Understand How AI Works

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    Clearview AI's problematic attempt to defend its facial recognition and artificial intelligence technology provides a potent case study in potential pitfalls for lawyers working on AI issues, say Albert Fox Cahn and John Veiszlemlein at the Urban Justice Center's Surveillance Technology Oversight Project.

  • 4 Considerations When Moving To A New Law Firm

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    When contemplating a lateral move to a new law firm, lawyers should carefully review questions concerning firm structure, benefits, compensation and binding documents in order to identify obligations and potential red flags, say Amy Richardson and Lauren Snyder at Harris Wiltshire.

  • A Modest Plan To Streamline Civil Cases In LA Superior Court

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    The California Legislature's recent effort to simplify civil litigation is laudable, but working with the Los Angeles Superior Court to make efficient litigation stipulations mandatory, rather than voluntary, would improve the process further, say professor Gary Craig and students Jasmine Gomez and Kennedy Myers at Loyola Law School.

  • What Courts Are Saying About Litigation Finance Disclosure

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    Four recent federal court decisions concerning commercial litigation finance disclosure are largely consistent with a broader trend of rejecting or limiting discovery based on relevance and the attorney work product doctrine, say Stephanie Spangler at Norris McLaughlin and Dai Wai Chin Feman at Parabellum Capital.

  • Surefire Marketing Methods To Build Your Legal Practice

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    Attorneys who take the time and the risk to showcase their talents through speaking, writing and teaching will find that opportunities will begin building upon themselves, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Setting Boundaries: An Essential Skill For Lawyers

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    While lawyers may often view boundaries as a restraint on their potential or a sign of weakness, failing to establish good boundaries can have negative consequences for their health, behaviors, relationships and careers, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • ABA Rules For Departing Attys Set Unprecedented Limits

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    Groundbreaking rules from the American Bar Association impose new standards on how law firms can govern departing lawyers’ contact with clients, placing major restrictions on this ubiquitous practice, say Amy Richardson and Hilary Gerzhoy at Harris Wiltshire.

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