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New Jersey

  • May 17, 2019

    Trump’s Border Wall Faces Skeptical Calif. Judge

    A California federal judge appeared open Friday to blocking the Trump administration from repurposing defense funds to build a wall along the southern border, saying he doesn't know if it is right to let the government build the wall before legal challenges to it are resolved.

  • May 17, 2019

    NJ Judge Won't Toss Domino's Wage Suit Without Seeing Deal

    A New Jersey federal judge on Friday rejected separate bids to toss a proposed class action against a company that operates Domino’s Pizza franchises, saying the business must turn over a purported settlement agreement for the court’s approval or swear that there is no deal to resolve claims of Fair Labor Standards Act violations.

  • May 17, 2019

    Symrise Accused Of Raiding Refresco To Develop New Drink

    Dutch soft-drink company Refresco Beverages U.S. Inc. has sued flavoring and fragrance maker Symrise Inc. in New Jersey federal court, alleging it is conspiring with former Refresco executives and researchers to develop a new soft drink for a competitor using its resources and trade secrets.

  • May 17, 2019

    Top NJ Federal Judge Bemoans Court's Workload Upon Exit

    New Jersey's federal court system outpaced all other district courts in civil case filings over the past year, further burdening a short-staffed bench that’s riddled with six vacancies, U.S. District Judge Jose L. Linares said Friday in announcing his departure for private practice.

  • May 17, 2019

    NJ District Chief Judge Joins McCarter & English

    McCarter & English LLP on Friday welcomed retired U.S. District Judge Jose L. Linares, the former chief of New Jersey’s federal court, as a partner who will lead the firm’s alternative dispute resolution practice in its Newark, New Jersey, headquarters.

  • May 17, 2019

    Prosecutors Evade Cop's Released Expunged Records Suit

    An internal affairs police officer at a New Jersey military base cannot sue a county prosecutor's office for releasing his expunged criminal records to a patrolman he had investigated because he did not file a tort claim notice within the requisite time frame, a state appeals court said Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Drinker Biddle Adds Kelley Drye Atty To Class Action Group

    Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP has added the former co-chair of Kelley Drye & Warren LLP’s class action practice to its class action team.

  • May 16, 2019

    Feds Urge High Court To Pass On 'Bridgegate' Appeal

    Federal prosecutors on Wednesday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a bid from a former appointee of ex-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to review her "Bridgegate" conviction for orchestrating a politically motivated traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge, saying it's backed by sufficient evidence.

  • May 16, 2019

    Insurer Must Face Suit Over Tree Crush Death, 3rd Circ. Says

    A homeowner whose husband was crushed by a downed tree that "uprighted" may have viable claims against an insurer over the Superstorm Sandy-related accident, the Third Circuit ruled Wednesday, reviving the suit on the grounds that it's not clear the accident was "unforeseeable."

  • May 16, 2019

    NJ's 'Environmental Justice' Effort Targets Vulnerable Towns

    The Garden State’s renewed focus on environmental protection has regulators getting involved with poor communities facing the highest levels of air, soil and water contamination, Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal told lawyers gathered in Atlantic City for the state bar association’s annual convention.

  • May 16, 2019

    Disbarred Atty Can't Beat Prison Term Over 'Confused' Judge

    The Third Circuit on Thursday nixed a disbarred attorney’s bid to toss his revised 41-month prison term for his role in bogus investment schemes, rejecting his claims that a New Jersey federal judge was “confused” about its prior rulings and “unprepared” to conduct the resentencing hearing.

  • May 16, 2019

    NY Denies Water Permit For $926M Williams Cos. Pipeline

    A New York regulator has denied a water permit needed for the construction of a Williams Cos. unit's $926 million gas pipeline upgrade project aimed at providing more heat for the New York metropolitan area, deciding it could cause mercury and copper levels to rise too high.

  • May 16, 2019

    NJ Hospital Ducks Suit From Ex-Worker Who Slept On Job

    A former hospital employee who was fired for sleeping on the job has fallen short in an attempt to revive her whistleblower suit against the facility after a New Jersey state appeals court said Thursday that the medical center had stated a legitimate reason for her termination.

  • May 16, 2019

    Sportsbooks Face Black-Market Competition, NJ Attys Told

    New Jersey's nascent sports betting industry has fetched $2.6 billion in wagers in just one year, but that success is tempered by illegal gambling websites that are cutting into the state's jackpot, regulators, attorneys and sportsbook operators said during the state bar association's annual meeting.

  • May 15, 2019

    AGs Jeer Proposed Changes To Consumer Contract Guide

    The attorneys general of 23 states and Washington, D.C., have urged the American Law Institute to reject proposed changes to the guidelines set by the organization to help courts deal with consumer contract cases, arguing that consumers would be harmed by what the officials perceive as a loosening of standards.

  • May 15, 2019

    NJ Docs Must Face New Trial Over Botched Achilles Surgery

    A New Jersey appeals court on Wednesday revived a state trooper's suit accusing two podiatrists of botching his Achilles tendon repair surgery, ruling the trial court made several mistakes, including allowing a friend of the doctors to testify as an expert on the standard of care.

  • May 15, 2019

    NJ Justices To Mull Workers’ Comp Time Limit For Doctors

    The New Jersey Supreme Court has taken up a case in which a lower court found medical providers have six years to seek payment for treating patients in workers’ compensation cases rather than the two years that injured workers have to pursue related claims.

  • May 15, 2019

    Insurers Flag Special Counsel In Imerys Ch. 11

    A group of insurers told the Delaware bankruptcy court Wednesday it should reject the law firm proposed to serve as special insurance counsel to the official committee of tort claimants in Johnson & Johnson talc supplier Imerys’ Chapter 11 because the firm has ties with other firms representing parties with interests in the bankruptcy proceedings.

  • May 15, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Kills 2 Patents On Horizon Pain Drug Vimovo

    The Federal Circuit ruled Wednesday that two patents on Horizon Pharma's pain reliever Vimovo are invalid, backing generics makers and reversing a lower court decision that upheld the patents on a drug that has been in the news for its dramatic price increase.

  • May 15, 2019

    Blank Rome Partner Confirmed To NJ's State Bench

    Blank Rome LLP partner Eric G. Fikry is taking his commercial litigation, gambling and employment law expertise to the New Jersey Superior Court bench, the firm announced Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    Why States And Cities Are Concerned About Census Accuracy

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    The 2020 census will impact every state, city and county in the United States, because population is a major factor in how the federal government distributes funds. Despite apprehensions about an undercount, there are reasons for optimism about the accuracy of the census, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • NJ Tax Stop: New Millionaires' Tax May Spur High Earners' Exit

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    In light of the governor's proposal to lower the threshold for the 10.75% millionaires' tax from an income of $5 million to $1 million, coupled with federal tax law changes, it is no surprise that, now more than ever, wealthy New Jersey taxpayers are contemplating moving to more tax-friendly states, say attorneys at Cole Schotz.

  • 4 Steps For New Jersey Equal Pay Act Compliance

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    As New Jersey's Equal Pay Act approaches its one-year anniversary, partners at Deloitte and members at Epstein Becker discuss what employers should do now to reduce exposure to claims brought under the expansive pay equity law.

  • Don't Let License Rules Snuff Out Your Fire Expert

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    Lawsuits involving property damage due to fire often require the retention of an expert to investigate the fire, but testimony can be excluded if the expert lacks the required licenses. Attorneys at Tucker Ellis break down the different licensing requirements for fire scene inspection in all 50 states.

  • New Questions Over Corporate Officers' Legal Duties

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    Recent litigation between Hertz and its former executives raises novel questions about whether corporate leaders have a legally cognizable responsibility to set the right “tone at the top,” and the consequences if they fail to do so, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • State Net

    State Lawmakers Stepping Up Fight Against Insurance Fraud

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    Insurance fraud costs insurers and their policyholders tens of billions of dollars a year. With insurance fraud-related bills introduced in 40 states and enacted in 14 so far this year, state lawmakers seem to agree with the industry that fraud is a major problem, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Maritime Opinion Offers Hope For 'Bare Metal' Defense

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    In Air and Liquid Systems v. DeVries, the U.S. Supreme Court recently cast doubt on the "bare metal" defense against manufacturer liability in a maritime tort context. But both the majority and dissenting opinions provide a road map to using this defense in other situations, say John Vales and Stephen Turner of Dentons.