Texas

  • July 19, 2019

    Texas Nurses Told To Go It Alone Or Drop Antitrust Suit

    A Texas federal judge has ordered San Antonio registered nurses to either drop their proposed class action or individually pursue antitrust claims that three area hospital systems colluded to suppress staffers' salaries.

  • July 19, 2019

    Salesforce Can't Move Sex Trafficking Suit To Federal Court

    Tech giant Salesforce.com couldn't convince a federal judge in Texas that a lawsuit alleging it helped Backpage.com profit from sex trafficking should stay in federal court, despite its argument the plaintiff included hotels as defendants in the case specifically to keep the case in state court.

  • July 19, 2019

    Employment Hires: Reed Smith, Fox Rothschild

    Reed Smith LLP has lured a team of employment law pros from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP, while a former Clark Hill PLC partner has jumped back to her old firm Fox Rothschild LLP, headlining Law360's latest roundup of lateral moves in the labor and employment arena.

  • July 19, 2019

    Man With Schizophrenia Got Fair Removal Hearing: 5th Circ.

    The Fifth Circuit on Thursday let stand a deportation order against a Haitian man with schizophrenia, saying a judge had properly followed necessary safeguards during his immigration proceedings.

  • July 19, 2019

    CFTC Gets $2.9M Win Against No-Show Alleged Fraudster

    A Texas federal judge granted the Commodity Futures Trading Commission a $2.9 million final judgment on Friday against an alleged fraudster who never appeared in the case or responded to the agency’s complaint.

  • July 19, 2019

    Polsinelli Taps Ex-Akerman Atty To Head Int'l Trade Team

    Polsinelli PC has brought on a former Akerman LLP partner to chair its international trade and customs practice, while bolstering its global franchise and supply network practice with the addition of three more attorneys, the firm has announced.

  • July 19, 2019

    Rig Worker 'Engulfed In Flames' Sues Houston Equipment Co.

    A man who was seriously injured while working on an offshore oil rig platform when a flash fire ignited has filed a lawsuit against the manufacturer of the piece of equipment he believes started the blaze, seeking more than $1 million in damages.

  • July 18, 2019

    Texas Doc, Health Service Group Must Face Med Mal Suit

    A woman who sued a Texas physician and practice group for failing to diagnose a post-surgery vitamin deficiency that she claims caused her neurological problems will continue her suit after a state appeals court rejected the doctor’s appeal Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Texas Co. Says YPF Not Entitled To $1.2M In Atty Fees

    A Texas oil and gas company told a federal court on Wednesday that it has no obligation to pay nearly $1.2 million in costs and fees to YPF SA in litigation to enforce a confirmed $9.87 million arbitral award the Argentine energy giant won against the U.S. company.

  • July 18, 2019

    EOG Settles $12.5M Injury Suit Minutes Before Arguments

    Just 23 minutes before oral arguments, EOG Resources Inc. told a Texas appellate court Thursday afternoon it had reached a settlement in a workplace injury case where it was fighting to avoid a retrial after getting slapped with a $12.5 million verdict.

  • July 18, 2019

    2.2M Clinical Pathology Patients Added To AMCA Data Breach

    A Texas-based medical testing company has added itself to the list of companies swept up in debt billing collector American Medical Collection Agency's massive data breach, an incident that has already affected Quest Diagnostics Inc. and LabCorp.

  • July 18, 2019

    $1M Storm Damage Coverage Dispute Ends After Settlement

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday closed a $1 million suit launched by an apartment complex owner over the denial of an insurance claim for storm damage after the parties in the case agreed to a settlement.

  • July 18, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: AB InBev, AT&T, Axalta

    AB InBev is reportedly mulling selling off assets after the company scrapped a planned Hong Kong offering of its Asia Pacific unit, AT&T is looking at options for its Puerto Rican business, and Axalta Coating Systems is exploring a sale.

  • July 18, 2019

    Propane Industry Gets 2nd Shot At Fighting Houston Regs

    The Texas Propane Gas Association doesn’t have standing to challenge Houston city ordinances regulating the storage and use of propane, but will get a second chance to argue the city rules are preempted by state regulations, a Texas appellate court ruled Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    SEC Hits Capital Energy Execs With Suit Over Ponzi Scheme

    The two co-founders of Capital Energy Group LLC orchestrated a $3.9 million Ponzi scheme in which they promised investors high returns on an oil and gas offering, according to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suit filed in Texas federal court Wednesday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Texas Firms Aim To Dodge NJ Pelvic Mesh Malpractice Suit

    Potts Law Firm and other Texas firms accused of improperly pocketing excessive attorney fees from roughly 1,450 pelvic mesh victims have asked a New Jersey federal court to toss a proposed class action against them, arguing the plaintiff didn't actually "sustain any damages."

  • July 18, 2019

    DOJ Probing Waste Management's $4.9B Disposal Biz Buy

    The U.S. Department of Justice is scrutinizing Waste Management's planned $4.9 billion enterprise value purchase of solid waste collection and disposal company Advanced Disposal Services, the companies disclosed Thursday.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hear Justice Stevens In 5 Memorable Moments On The Bench

    Justice John Paul Stevens was known for being collegial and kind, but he also wasn’t one to mince words. Listen to a few of the justice’s most memorable words from the bench, in majority opinions, sharply worded dissents and at oral argument.

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' High Court Legacy In 4 Charts

    In this data deep-dive, Law360 examines retired Justice John Paul Stevens’ long tenure, his relatively breezy confirmation, his transformation from a run-of-the-mill Republican appointee to runaway liberal, and the legacy that lives on in his clerks.

  • July 17, 2019

    Chancery OKs Fees For Quantlab Co-Founder In Control Suit

    A high-speed trading firm's majority partner who overcame a control dispute in Delaware’s Chancery Court won attorney fee eligibility Wednesday, after beating claims that an initial failure to seek arbitration ruled out any fee recovery.

  • July 17, 2019

    Texas Court Upholds Award For Land Taken For Pipeline

    A Texas appellate court on Wednesday wouldn't increase the compensation for landowners whose property was taken for a gas pipeline, saying a trial court's reduced award for the value of the property was supported by enough evidence.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    A Look At How States Are Experimenting With Health Care

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    The fate of the Affordable Care Act is currently pending in federal court, but states are proceeding on the premise that the law will survive its latest legal challenge as they consider competing Democratic and Republican visions of health care, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Opinion

    Time To Heed Justice Stevens' Criticism Of Gun Decision

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    Justice John Paul Stevens was right that the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 gun rights decision in Heller desperately needs to be overruled, but while he viewed revision or repeal of the Second Amendment as the easier course for correction, only the court can clean up the mess it made, says Robert Ludwig​ of the American Enlightenment Project.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • A Guide To Prepping For Dallas Paid Sick Leave Requirements

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    Dallas' paid sick leave law — set to take effect in August — leaves many employer questions unanswered. But with the compliance deadline approaching quickly, employers shouldn't wait for the city to sort out details, say Felix Digilov and Amy Strauss at Fisher Phillips.

  • Keeping Conventional Power Going Until Renewables Mature

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    The U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and state regulators have a handful of tools to compel generators to delay the retirement of nuclear, coal and gas plants until greener options are more reliable, but their scope has not yet been tested in court, says Gordon Coffee at Winston & Strawn.

  • Community Solar Needs Clear, Flexible State Regulations

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    As states adopt and expand third-party solar development programs, regulators should streamline rules and avoid prescriptive requirements for developers, say Elliot Hinds and Diana Jeschke at Crowell & Moring.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • State Net

    Local Governments Push To Regulate Public Surveillance

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    San Francisco's Board of Supervisors recently approved an ordinance banning the use of facial recognition technology by all city departments. The law is part of a growing movement among localities and states to increase oversight of the use of surveillance technologies by government entities, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Revenge Porn Can Be Outlawed Under The First Amendment

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    To date, 46 states and the District of Columbia have passed needed legislation penalizing nonconsensual distribution of pornographic images of another person, but constitutionally outlawing this phenomenon is tricky and some statutes will likely be struck down, says Nicole Ligon, supervising attorney of the First Amendment Clinic at Duke Law.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • State Net

    Why States, Cities Are Requiring Merchants To Accept Cash

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    New technology is broadening the ways people can pay without having to carry paper money and coins, possibly hastening the decline of cash. But some state and local lawmakers are pushing back, and retail businesses are taking note, says Dave Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Art Of The 'Science And Expert Team' In Mass Torts

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    Science is at the foundation of mass tort lawsuits involving drugs or medical devices. Critical to a virtual law team in these cases, the "science and expert team" does more than get into the weeds of scientific issues and retain experts, say attorneys at FaegreBD, Peabody & Arnold and Shook Hardy.