Texas

  • July 30, 2021

    House Dems Want More District Judges, Too — 203 Of Them

    A group of House Democrats on Friday unveiled a proposal to create 203 new federal judgeships, introducing legislation a day after a bipartisan pair of senators proposed adding 77 federal district court seats in the coming years.

  • July 30, 2021

    Justice Dept. Sues Texas Over Migrant Transportation Order

    The U.S. Department of Justice sued Texas and Gov. Greg Abbott on Friday to stop the state's new migrant transportation executive order on grounds that it interferes with federal immigration law, and moved for an emergency order to immediately block the policy.

  • July 30, 2021

    Investor Says Texas Music Festival Was 'Colossal Failure'

    A Dallas company that invested $3 million to bring a California music festival to the Lone Star State has sued the past owners of the Kaaboo event in Delaware federal court, alleging the Texas festival "was a colossal failure" with an embarrassingly low turnout.

  • July 30, 2021

    Allegheny County Sues Pa. AG Over $26B Opioid Deal

    The district attorney for Allegheny County on Thursday sued Pennsylvania's attorney general over the proposed $26 billion opioid settlement, following the Philadelphia district attorney's accusations a week ago that the deal with Johnson & Johnson and major distributors was a sellout.

  • July 30, 2021

    Texas Can Intervene In Fla. Challenge To CDC's Cruise Rules

    A federal judge has granted Texas' bid to intervene in Florida's challenge to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's pandemic restrictions on cruise ships, saying it can join the suit based on its claims of suffering financial injuries due to the CDC regulations.

  • July 30, 2021

    Albright: Any Case Mich. Can Try, I Can Try Faster

    U.S. District Judge Alan Albright won't transfer patent litigation against NetScout from his Texas court to the Eastern District of Michigan, saying while either venue could handle the case, he'll get it to trial significantly faster.

  • July 30, 2021

    Fed. Circuit Courts Masking Up Again As Delta Variant Surges

    New COVID-19 guidance from the federal government triggered by the surge in delta variant cases has prompted at least three federal circuit courts as of Friday to reinstate mask mandates for everyone regardless of their vaccination status to help contain the virus.

  • July 30, 2021

    5th Circ. Says Boeing Can Shield Some Docs In Max RICO Suit

    The Fifth Circuit said Thursday that Boeing cannot be forced to hand over certain documents that the aerospace giant claimed were protected by attorney-client privilege in a proposed class action accusing Boeing of colluding with Southwest Airlines to keep unsafe 737 Max 8 jets in the air.

  • July 30, 2021

    5th Circ. Told To Affirm Ax Of $36M Failed Contract Bid Suit

    A Texas engineering and construction company has asked the Fifth Circuit to uphold a district court's dismissal of breach of contract and fraud claims launched by a Bolivian company seeking about $36 million for a failed joint venture, saying the claims are based on a void agreement.

  • July 30, 2021

    Texas Pharmacist's FCA Suit Against Walgreens Thrown Out

    A Texas federal judge has dismissed a pharmacist's False Claims Act suit against Walgreens alleging the company submitted claims to Medicaid and Medicare for medications that were never prescribed, holding she failed to show the actions were fraud "rather than innocent mistake, negligence or regulatory violation."

  • July 30, 2021

    Chamberlain Hrdlicka Adds 5 New Attys In Houston

    Chamberlain Hrdlicka has added five attorneys in its Houston office in recent months, bolstering the firm's commercial litigation, securities, tax planning and transactional practice groups.

  • July 30, 2021

    5th Circ. Judge Assails Disparate Impact In Race Bias Case

    A Trump-appointed Fifth Circuit judge took aim at the idea that "neutral policies" with a disproportionate negative impact on minorities violate federal discrimination law, likening the notion to critical race theory and arguing both can engender racial bias.

  • July 30, 2021

    Smith Gambrell Guides CatchMark Venture's $498M Land Sale

    A CatchMark Timber Trust venture, advised by Smith Gambrell & Russell LLP, is selling 301,000 acres of timberlands property to a Hancock Natural Resource Group client for $498 million, according to an announcement on Friday from CatchMark Timber.

  • July 30, 2021

    5th Circ. Nixes Suit Against Railway Co. Over Severed Fingers

    The Fifth Circuit has thrown out claims by a railroad worker against Norfolk Southern Railway Co. over an accident in which he lost three fingers while working at a Norfolk facility, saying he hasn't shown that the company was his employer.

  • July 29, 2021

    ​​​​​Garland Tears Into 'Unlawful' Texas Migrant Transport Order

    Attorney General Merrick Garland signaled Thursday that the government is prepared to sue Texas after the state's Gov. Greg Abbott issued an "unlawful" executive order restricting transportation of migrants at the southern border as COVID-19 cases begin to soar.

  • July 29, 2021

    Judge Says Zoom Formal Attire Optional, But Clothing A Must

    A Texas federal magistrate judge on Wednesday told attorneys representing parties in litigation over the Keystone XL Pipeline that they're not required to wear formal attire when they appear before him in an upcoming virtual hearing on Zoom, but offered a friendly reminder that some form of clothing is required.

  • July 29, 2021

    Bipartisan Sens. Propose 77 New Fed. Judgeships Nationwide

    A bipartisan pair of senators on Thursday proposed adding 77 federal district court seats across the country, matching the judiciary's recommendations — except for omitted appellate seats — and splitting the new judgeships between 2025 and 2029 to sidestep partisan concerns.

  • July 29, 2021

    Law360's Tort Report: Missouri's Med Mal Cap Stays Put

    A $74 million jury verdict in a suit over a Kentucky motorist's death and a Missouri Supreme Court decision to keep intact the state's cap on certain medical malpractice damages lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • July 29, 2021

    MDL Objections In Big Tech Ad Monopoly Suits Perplex Judge

    A member of the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation on Thursday rebuked publishers and advertisers objecting to centralizing a Texas-led antitrust suit against Google with a slew of private actions accusing the company of monopolizing the display advertising market, saying their protest "is a little perplexing."

  • July 29, 2021

    Sens. Tell USPTO To Revive Small Patent Claims Court Talks

    Several senators have asked the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to commission a study looking at whether a small claims court for patent litigation should be created, reopening an issue that's lain dormant for nearly a decade.

  • July 29, 2021

    Samsung, LG Settle DivX Patent Fights Over Smart TVs

    DivX on Thursday said it has reached settlements with LG and Samsung, resolving international litigation claiming they infringe the video software company's streaming patents with their smart televisions.

  • July 29, 2021

    Gilstrap Told Samsung Abuse In $25M IP Case Warrants Fees

    After securing a $25 million jury win against Samsung in May over semiconductor patents, Acorn Semi LLC has said Samsung should be on the hook for $6.7 million in fees because of its "monstrous" conduct in the case.

  • July 29, 2021

    Full Fed. Circ. Asked To Rethink 'Venue Manipulation' Ruling

    A patentee whose strategy to keep lawsuits against Samsung and LG in the Western District of Texas was deemed "venue manipulation" by the Federal Circuit is petitioning for full court review, saying on Thursday that a panel wrongly overrode venue law because "it does not like the facts."

  • July 29, 2021

    Texas Court Denies Atty New Trial Over $6M Litigation Loan

    A Texas appellate court on Thursday agreed with a trial court that a lawyer trying to undo a $6 million default judgment in favor of his litigation funder is not entitled to a new trial.

  • July 29, 2021

    Senators Back Drug Conviction Expungement Expansion

    A bipartisan group of U.S. senators have thrown their support behind legislation that would expand the eligibility for some defendants to seek the expungement of certain nonviolent, first-time simple federal drug possession offenses from their criminal records.

Expert Analysis

  • White House Vision For Carbon Capture Faces Obstacles

    Author Photo

    A recent White House Council on Environmental Quality report suggests policies that could bolster carbon capture and storage projects in the U.S., but federal and state regulators and the private sector will face red tape, environmental justice concerns and other challenges in expanding CCS infrastructure, say Ethan Shenkman and Sarah Grey at Arnold & Porter.

  • HUD's Disparate Impact Proposal Shows New Gov't Priorities

    Author Photo

    A recent U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development proposal to streamline the disparate impacts test for assessing Fair Housing Act discrimination is indicative of the government's increasing focus on consumer rights and equal treatment under the law, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Law Firms, Know Who's Responsible For Your Cloud Security

    Author Photo

    Lawyers generally know that files go into the cloud and that the files are then secured and protected, but it's necessary for firms to take a closer look at their cloud supply chain and then come up with a responsibility matrix that helps mitigate any potential risks or weaknesses, says Martin Ward at iManage.

  • Texas Power Crisis Suits Bring Market Price Questions

    Author Photo

    As lawsuits mount centering on Texas' February power crisis, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas operating reserve demand curve will be critical in pinning down what prices would have been absent the Texas Public Utility Commission's interference and how much the generators now owe the suppliers for the shortfall, say Todd Aagaard at Villanova University Law School and Andrew Kleit at Penn State University.

  • Benefits For Law Firms Venturing Into New Services

    Author Photo

    By offering more services, law firms can deepen and strengthen their client relationships and truly become an extension of their clients' teams while generating new revenue streams, and while there are risks associated with expanding into consulting, they may be worth it, says Lou Ramos at Major Lindsey.

  • The Texas Legal Battle That Absent Legislators Could Face

    Author Photo

    As the Texas governor plans to arrest the more than 50 Democratic members of the Texas House of Representatives who left the state to deny Republicans a quorum to pass new voting rules, there is the potential for a constitutional stalemate between the Legislature's authority to compel a quorum and the courts' habeas powers, say Matt Hennessy and David Gerger at Gerger Hennessy.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Exelon GC Talks Diversity Initiatives

    Author Photo

    Executing a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion programming, through recruitment, inclusive legal pipelines and community empowerment via pro bono efforts, can ensure a strong environmental, social and governance proposition, says Gayle Littleton at Exelon.

  • Revamping Law Firm Marketing Lists — With Partner Buy-In

    Author Photo

    Jackson Lewis’ Paige Bowser shares lessons from the firm's recent overhaul of an outdated email marketing database, including tips for getting partners on board, ensuring compliance with privacy laws and augmenting outreach strategies.

  • Recent High Court Decisions Signify 1st Amendment Direction

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recently concluded term saw a flurry of First Amendment cases, providing lessons for how the court, with its 6-3 conservative split, may rule next term on issues of free speech, religious freedom, association rights and more, as questions regarding social media and technological advances loom, says Samuel Mitchell at Michael Best.

  • The Murky World Of Legal Rankings Gets Some Clarity In NJ

    Author Photo

    New Jersey's new, stringent approach to legal rankings will make accolade advertising more transparent, benefiting both attorneys and clients and offering legal marketers a new set of best practices amid evolving standards, say Penny Paul at Lowenstein Sandler and Susan Peters at Greybridge.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Cigna Counsel Talks Employee Wellness

    Author Photo

    Building employee well-being into corporate environmental, social and governance priorities required our legal team to focus more closely on cross-functional collaboration within the company and increased communication with our board of directors and shareholders, says Julia Brncic at Cigna.

  • Courts' Clashing Standards For Evidence At Class Cert.: Part 2

    Author Photo

    While federal circuits continue to split on whether to approach fact and expert evidence differently at class certification, and there is no sign of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling to resolve the issue, applying an admissibility standard to one and not the other appears illogical, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • Hybrid Work Models Are Key To Gender Parity In Law Firms

    Author Photo

    To curb the historically high rates of attrition among female lawyers, Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks suggest firms must normalize hybrid work schedules, and they recommend best practices to promote engagement among all attorneys, regardless of where they work.

  • Courts' Clashing Standards For Evidence At Class Cert.: Part 1

    Author Photo

    The Sixth Circuit's recent ruling in Lyngaas v. Ag highlights an ongoing circuit split on whether plaintiffs moving to certify a class must use admissible evidence and whether fact and expert evidence should be treated equivalently in this regard, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • 3 Roadblocks Facing Electric Vehicle Adoption In US

    Author Photo

    While a flurry of auto manufacturers recently committed to all-electric fleets in the coming decades, widespread electric vehicle adoption in the U.S. faces critical challenges, and addressing these issues will require both political will and funding at the federal level — neither of which is guaranteed, says Kevin Chen at Foley Hoag.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!