Illinois

  • August 11, 2020

    Feds' Weakening Of Migratory Bird Protections Vacated

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's recent move to loosen restrictions on the incidental killing of migratory birds illegally departed from decades of established practice and runs counter to the intent of a law designed to protect the creatures, a New York federal judge said Tuesday.

  • August 11, 2020

    Ill. Republicans Urge 7th Circ. To Revive Bid For Large Groups

    A Seventh Circuit Judge pushed back Tuesday on Illinois Republicans' claim that they should be exempted from group-size limits like religious gatherings are under Gov. J.B. Pritzker's latest COVID-19 safety order, saying the party isn't comparing apples to apples under the First Amendment.

  • August 11, 2020

    Seyfarth Nabs Reed Smith Labor Relations Partner

    Seyfarth Shaw has expanded its team in Chicago and Los Angeles with the addition of a partner who specializes in labor relations, especially in the hospitality, health care, transportation and construction sectors.

  • August 11, 2020

    Air Ambulance Co. Beats Paramedic OT Suit

    A Missouri federal judge has thrown out a proposed class action brought by a former flight paramedic who claimed Air Evac EMS Inc. shorted him on overtime, saying he was covered by a $2.95 million settlement in Kentucky.

  • August 11, 2020

    Ex-Twin Peaks Workers Say Restaurants Run Like A 'Sex Ring'

    Dozens of former employees of Twin Peaks, a restaurant chain known for waitstaff who wear revealing clothing, filed an amended complaint in Illinois federal court claiming the business' practice of picking apart women's bodies and its scanty uniform requirements are "torn from a pimp's playbook."

  • August 11, 2020

    Ill. Cafe Workers Want $1M In Atty Fees From Privacy Deal

    A class of Illinois cafe chain employees who've settled biometric privacy claims against their employer asked a federal judge Monday to award their lawyers more than $1 million in fees and costs from their revised $3.2 million deal.

  • August 11, 2020

    Boeing Rips Southwest Flight Attendants' 737 Max Safety Suit

    Boeing told an Illinois federal judge that Southwest Airlines flight attendants suing to recover lost wages from the 737 Max's global grounding have made far-fetched claims that Boeing overhyped the jets' safety and locked Southwest, one of its most loyal airline customers, into rigid contracts.

  • August 11, 2020

    Broker Says FINRA Can't Hold Arbitration Hearing On Zoom

    An Illinois broker facing a Financial Industry Regulatory Authority arbitration sued the regulator Tuesday for alleged breach of contract, claiming that its decision to conduct the hearing via Zoom is "unworkable" due to the need for a translator in the proceeding and the complexity of the issues.

  • August 11, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Financial relief from public and private sources poured in over the past week for multiple populations impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, including Delaware and New Jersey renters, Garden State landlords and small businesses, and California small businesses.

  • August 11, 2020

    FDA Pressed To Take E-Cigs Off Market During Pandemic

    Lawmakers on Tuesday called on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to take e-cigarettes temporarily off the market during the pandemic, saying that there's scientific evidence that e-cigarette users are more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19.

  • August 11, 2020

    Congress Urged To Tackle Prison Call Rates In COVID-19 Bill

    Public advocates on Tuesday called for Congress to pass legislation as part of the next coronavirus relief package that would significantly lower the in-state phone call rates for people who are incarcerated.

  • August 10, 2020

    Del. Court Revives Part Of Caterpillar Antitrust Suit In Fla.

    A Delaware federal judge agreed Monday to transfer to Florida previously dismissed claims in a long-running antitrust suit alleging Caterpillar, Komatsu and certain equipment dealers tried to strong-arm a competitor out of the construction equipment business, but said claims against the two manufacturers would stay put.

  • August 10, 2020

    Cook County Republicans Say Ill. Gov. Inviting Voter Fraud

    Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker has enacted a mail-in ballot program that opened the state up for widespread voting fraud and could infringe some citizens' right to have their vote counted in November's general election, Cook County Republicans claimed in federal court Monday.

  • August 10, 2020

    Law Firm's 'Feeble' Efforts To Blame Over Pared-Down Suit

    A federal judge won't rethink his decision to pare down a law firm's suit against a suburban Chicago rival, blasting the firm for its "feeble prosecution" of allegations that the rival mimicked its website to confuse and steal potential clients.

  • August 10, 2020

    Little Caesars Can't Duck Ill. Workers' Biometric Privacy Suit

    An Illinois federal judge won't let Little Caesars escape a suit by two former employees alleging the company violated the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act by collecting their fingerprint data without consent, saying documents proffered by the company cannot be recognized as evidence at this stage.

  • August 10, 2020

    Tech Giants, AGs Say Trump's Visa Bans Hurt US Economy

    Dozens of states and technology giants, including Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp., have backed lawsuits challenging President Donald Trump's recent visa suspensions, arguing the president's orders will hinder the U.S.' economic recovery.

  • August 10, 2020

    ComEd, Ill. Speaker Hit With $450M Rico Suit Over Bribery Plot

    A group of Commonwealth Edison customers hit the utility, several company personnel and Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan with a $450 million civil racketeering suit Monday following the company's recent admission that certain employees bribed the speaker's associates in exchange for favorable legislation.

  • August 10, 2020

    McDonald's Sues Ex-CEO Over Alleged Workplace Affairs

    Fast-food giant McDonald's Corp. sued former Chief Executive Officer Steve Easterbrook in Delaware's Chancery Court for damages or clawed-back compensation Monday alleging that he fraudulently obtained a "without cause" firing and severance deal last year by lying about workplace sexual transgressions.

  • August 07, 2020

    Macy's Hit With Ill. Privacy Suit For Using Clearview Database

    Macy's Retail Holdings Inc. is facing a proposed class action in Illinois federal court accusing it of violating the state's biometric privacy law by partnering with embattled tech company Clearview AI to use facial recognition software to identify shoppers on the retailer's security cameras.

  • August 07, 2020

    White Castle Can't Dodge Manager's Biometric Privacy Claims

    White Castle lost another bid to dodge a manager's proposed class action alleging the fast-food giant repeatedly violated Illinois' biometric privacy laws when an Illinois federal judge ruled Friday that the claims were not time-barred.

  • August 07, 2020

    Ill. Mayor Charged With Bribery Plot, Filing False Tax Returns

    Federal prosecutors lobbed bribery charges Friday against the mayor of a Chicago suburb who they say requested and accepted cash, campaign contributions and other benefits from a red-light camera company that had been serving the municipality.

  • August 07, 2020

    COVID-19 IP Catch-Up: Remdesivir Drama & Jury Trial Regret

    In this round of intellectual property updates tied to the ongoing pandemic, attorneys general put pressure on the federal government to make COVID-19 drugs more accessible, patent trials in Texas remain in the air, and one attorney expresses guilt for proceeding with an in-person jury trial.

  • August 07, 2020

    Surgical Device Co. Says J&J Shouldn't Have Seized Products

    A company that a Johnson & Johnson unit has accused of selling purportedly counterfeit versions of surgical devices told an Illinois federal court Friday that a seizure order of 1.27 million of its products should not have been granted, saying the subsidiary has shown "little, if any, evidence of the ballyhooed pervasive counterfeiting scheme."

  • August 07, 2020

    Ulta Beats Certification Bid In Shoppers' Used-Makeup Suit

    An Illinois federal judge has refused to certify 15 statewide classes over accusations that Ulta Beauty Inc. unlawfully sold used, repackaged products, saying managers implemented the company's damaged goods reduction policy too differently to create a common question over their claims.

  • August 07, 2020

    Hard-Up Hotel Sues Insurer Over COVID-19 Claim Denials

    An Illinois hotel told a federal court Thursday that its insurer unreasonably denied coverage for its business losses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, rebutting the company's assertion that a virus can't cause "physical loss" to a property.

Expert Analysis

  • BIPA Suits Against 3rd-Party Vendors Face Numerous Hurdles

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    Two recent Illinois federal court opinions concerning Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act claims against third-party vendors raise questions about the statute’s jurisdictional reach outside the state and whether disclosing biometric data to a vendor constitutes actual injury, say Karen Borg and Al Fowerbaugh at Porter Wright.

  • Lesser-Known Litigation Funding Best Practices For Attorneys

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    Following the American Bar Association's recent publication of third-party litigation funding guidance, Jiamie Chen and Dai Wai Chin Feman at Parabellum Capital outline some additional considerations, including the ethical limitations on single-case funding and the futility of economic prenegotiations between attorneys and their clients.

  • Copyright Law Issues Plague Sherlock Holmes Suit

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    The Arthur Conan Doyle estate's recent lawsuit in a New Mexico federal court against Netflix over a Sherlock Holmes movie faces significant challenges to its copyright infringement argument, including a Seventh Circuit ruling that Sherlock Holmes characters who appeared in public domain and copyright-protected stories can exist in different forms, says Stephen Lee at Benesch Friedlander.

  • Opinion

    ADA Protects Lawyers With Disabilities, But We Must Do More

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    As an attorney with cerebral palsy, Danielle Liebl at Reed Smith says that while the 30-year-old Americans with Disabilities Act has protected her against discrimination, the legal industry must do more to accommodate lawyers with disabilities and make them more comfortable in self-identifying.

  • Perspectives

    Legal Deserts Threaten Justice In Rural America

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    Many small towns and rural counties have few lawyers or none at all, which threatens the notion of justice for all Americans and demands creative solutions from legislators, bar associations and law schools, says Patricia Refo, president of the American Bar Association.

  • Timing IPRs To Avoid Discretionary Denial Or Damages

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    For patent defendants determining how long they can wait to file parallel inter partes reviews to avoid discretionary denial under the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's recent Apple v. Fintiv ruling, a data-driven approach using recent district court and U.S. International Trade Commission timelines can provide guidance, say Syed Fareed and John Williams at Baker Botts.

  • 1st Circ. Ruling Complicates Gig Worker Arbitration Pacts

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    The First Circuit’s recent ruling that Amazon delivery drivers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act opens the door to patchwork state enforcement, and will likely force gig economy employers to reevaluate arbitration agreements and class action waivers, say Christopher Feudo and Christian Garcia at Foley Hoag.

  • Foreign Discovery Ruling May Provide New Defense Tool

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    Motransa, a recent first-of-its-kind Florida federal court decision moving a foreign discovery proceeding to arbitration, may provide a new defensive option for U.S. targets of Section 1782 discovery demands, say Alexander Lawrence and David Hambrick at MoFo.

  • Analyzing Upward And Downward Trends In Legal Tech

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    Advances in legal technology are often accompanied by bombastic overstatements, but it is important to separate the wheat from the chaff by looking at where various technologies stand on the hype curve, says Lance Eliot at Stanford Law School.

  • Opinion

    ABA's New Guidance On Litigation Funding Misses The Mark

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    The American Bar Association should revise its recently approved best practices on third-party litigation funding as they do not reflect how legal finance actually works and could create confusion among lawyers, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Cos. Should Track Microplastic Research And Regulations

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    Microscopic plastic particles in the environment are a major emerging concern for regulators in the U.S. and internationally — and with the regulatory framework evolving concurrently with scientific research on health and environmental impacts, companies must monitor developments closely, say Tara Paul and Willis Hon at Nossaman.

  • What Firms Should Ask Before Hiring Attorneys From Gov't

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    In the final year of any presidential administration, there is an undeniable appetite on the part of large law firms for government-savvy legal talent, but firms need to first consider how they will actually utilize their new star hire, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • The Ethics Of Using Chatbots For Legal Services

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    Delegating legal work to robots involves several risks, including running afoul of statutes dictating unauthorized practice of law, but with the right precautions, law firms can lawfully employ artificially intelligent chatbots that can imitate human conversations, say attorneys at Haynes and Boone.

  • Key Tax Considerations For Cos. With Remote Employees

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    As remote work continues due to COVID-19, businesses navigating complex tax jurisdiction questions should diligently maintain employee location records for nexus and apportionment purposes, and make sure to account for differing state withholding and sourcing rules, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Avoiding Workplace Violence When Customers Refuse Masks

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    Terri Solomon and Elizabeth Barrera at Littler address how businesses can avert violent situations when patrons refuse state and local face mask mandates by using signage, incident response plans and law enforcement assistance to meet federal workplace safety requirements.

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