We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Illinois

  • May 17, 2019

    Trump’s Border Wall Faces Skeptical Calif. Judge

    A California federal judge appeared open Friday to blocking the Trump administration from repurposing defense funds to build a wall along the southern border, saying he doesn't know if it is right to let the government build the wall before legal challenges to it are resolved.

  • May 17, 2019

    7th Circ. Weighs Helicopter, Gun Use In Wis. Recreation Area

    The Seventh Circuit wrestled Friday over whether the federal government should have allowed off-road motorcycle riding, dog training with guns and military helicopter training in a Wisconsin recreational area, questioning if the activities would fall under the recreational uses the state initially intended for the area.

  • May 17, 2019

    Ill. Gov. Offers New, Hiked Taxes In $41.5B Infrastructure Plan

    Illinois would double its gas tax and create taxes on streaming services and ride sharing, among other services, to pay for a $41.5 billion infrastructure plan the governor circulated Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Arizona Fintech Sandbox Doubles With 3 New Participants

    A startup that aims to deliver financial services to the unbanked, an income-sharing agreement provider that's seeking to distinguish itself from consumer lenders, and a company that's testing a tool to evaluate potential renewable energy investments are the latest inductees into Arizona's fintech sandbox.

  • May 17, 2019

    Conrad Black Prosecutors Irked By Bypass Of Pardon Process

    Three of the former prosecutors who tried former media mogul Lord Conrad Black are upset about his pardon — not because it happened, but because President Donald Trump appears to have bypassed the U.S. Department of Justice's traditional role in the process.

  • May 16, 2019

    Skechers Light-Up Shoes Burn Kids, Mother's Suit Says

    Popular light-up children's shoes made by Skechers USA Inc. contain a dangerous defect that can cause skin burns, an Illinois mother claimed in a proposed class action filed Thursday.

  • May 16, 2019

    Ill. Court Kills Shunt Patent Suit That Targeted Hundreds

    An Illinois federal judge tossed a patent infringement suit brought by two Illinois surgeons against hundreds of doctors and hospitals after the surgeons' "continued disregard" for the law and warnings from the court, sanctioning them for "groundless" positions on the service and venue of their complaints.

  • May 16, 2019

    7th Circ. Won't Revive Rail Co.'s $10M Cleanup Coverage Row

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday rebuffed rail supply company Varlen Corp.'s bid for more than $10 million in coverage from Liberty Mutual over costs of remediating groundwater contamination at two industrial sites, saying a lower court properly barred expert testimony that would have defeated a pollution exclusion in Varlen's policies.

  • May 16, 2019

    Geico Not Liable For Tax, Fees That Insureds Don't Incur

    An Illinois man can't retrieve sales taxes and fees from Geico Corp. to replace a damaged vehicle after a federal judge ruled that he failed to show he had incurred those costs in the first place.

  • May 16, 2019

    Insurer Wants Out Of Stanley Cup TM Suit

    Frankenmuth Mutual Insurance Co. asked an Illinois federal judge Wednesday to declare that it has no duty to defend uninsured parties in a lawsuit accusing them of infringing trademarks for the Stanley Cup after its only insured in the case has settled.

  • May 16, 2019

    Ill. Atty Should Be Suspended Over Fake Docs, Panel Affirms

    An Illinois attorney conduct review panel on Wednesday upheld a four-month suspension recommendation for a lawyer accused of falsifying two agreements related to new cellphone towers a client wanted to build downstate.

  • May 16, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Microsoft, Starwood, Uber

    Microsoft has reportedly leased 70,000 square feet in Manhattan, Starwood Capital has reportedly dropped about $100 million on an office building near Amazon's planned new campus in Virginia and Uber is said to be in talks to lease about 450,000 square feet at the Old Post Office in Chicago.

  • May 16, 2019

    Investors Knew Risks Ahead Of $125M Fine, MoneyGram Says

    MoneyGram International Inc. told an Illinois federal court Thursday that it has always been upfront with investors about the costs and challenges of making its anti-fraud and anti-money laundering compliance programs meet the expectations of government regulators, no matter what a securities suit says.

  • May 16, 2019

    Ex-MillerCoors VP Gets 3½ Years For $8M Fraud Scheme

    A former executive with MillerCoors LLC has been sentenced to 3½ years in prison for bilking his employer out of more than $8 million in a 10-year fraudulent scheme.

  • May 15, 2019

    Trump Pardons Ex-Media Mogul Lord Conrad Black

    President Donald Trump on Wednesday fully pardoned former newspaper publisher Lord Conrad Black, who spent several years in prison after being convicted of committing mail fraud and obstruction of justice in 2007.

  • May 15, 2019

    Cops Needed Warrant For Pre-Carpenter GPS Tracking: Judge

    Even before the U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark Carpenter decision last year, police should have been on notice that historical vehicle location data is entitled to heightened privacy protections, an Illinois federal judge ruled in refusing to uphold the warrantless collection of such information in a 2017 robbery investigation. 

  • May 15, 2019

    AGs Jeer Proposed Changes To Consumer Contract Guide

    The attorneys general of 23 states and Washington, D.C., have urged the American Law Institute to reject proposed changes to the guidelines set by the organization to help courts deal with consumer contract cases, arguing that consumers would be harmed by what the officials perceive as a loosening of standards.

  • May 15, 2019

    Ill. Appellate Court Mulls Revival Of NFL Players' Helmet Suit

    More than 50 former NFL athletes on Wednesday urged an Illinois appellate court to revive their lawsuit against helmet maker Riddell Inc., arguing at a hearing that a two-year statute of limitations hadn't expired because the clock shouldn't have begun ticking until they were diagnosed with latent neurodegenerative brain disease.

  • May 15, 2019

    Sears Estate Looks To Avoid $194M Canadian Court Fight

    Sears Holding Corp. is urging a New York bankruptcy judge to reject an attempt to bring the company to Canadian court to try to claw back more than $194 million in dividends it received from Sears Canada, saying the dispute can and should be settled in the U.S.

  • May 15, 2019

    Injuries In Crash Spur Suit Against Ill. Resort, Carriage Maker

    A mother and her two children who suffered injuries including permanent disfigurement and brain trauma after a resort's horse-drawn carriage overturned have filed suit in Illinois federal court, accusing the resort of negligence and the carriage maker of failing to design a safe vehicle.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    Why States And Cities Are Concerned About Census Accuracy

    Author Photo

    The 2020 census will impact every state, city and county in the United States, because population is a major factor in how the federal government distributes funds. Despite apprehensions about an undercount, there are reasons for optimism about the accuracy of the census, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

    Author Photo

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

    Author Photo

    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Examining The Evidence On VIX Manipulation

    Author Photo

    An ongoing multidistrict litigation alleges manipulation of the formula used to determine the settlement price for derivatives based on the Chicago Board Options Exchange’s volatility index. But a review of trading data reveals how reasons other than manipulation can explain trading activity on any given day, say consultants with Analysis Group.

  • Don't Let License Rules Snuff Out Your Fire Expert

    Author Photo

    Lawsuits involving property damage due to fire often require the retention of an expert to investigate the fire, but testimony can be excluded if the expert lacks the required licenses. Attorneys at Tucker Ellis break down the different licensing requirements for fire scene inspection in all 50 states.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

    Author Photo

    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • State Net

    State Lawmakers Stepping Up Fight Against Insurance Fraud

    Author Photo

    Insurance fraud costs insurers and their policyholders tens of billions of dollars a year. With insurance fraud-related bills introduced in 40 states and enacted in 14 so far this year, state lawmakers seem to agree with the industry that fraud is a major problem, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

    Author Photo

    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • Traders At Risk Of DOJ Wire Fraud Charges For Spoofing

    Author Photo

    In U.S. v. Vorley, the U.S. Department of Justice has charged two commodities traders with wire fraud, based on an alleged spoofing scheme. The DOJ's approach could greatly expand potential criminal liability for spoofing activity, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • 4 Ways State AGs Are Targeting Energy Sector

    Author Photo

    State attorneys general are playing an increasingly prominent role in regulating energy and environmental activity within their states. Energy sector participants should note AG priorities and take a proactive approach, say attorneys at WilmerHale.