Illinois

  • June 11, 2021

    Ill. Atty Created Sham Creditor To Hide Client Assets, Jury Told

    A former Freeborn & Peters partner engaged in a scheme to create a sham secured creditor with a senior lien on a client's struggling Chicago company in order to hide its assets from legitimate creditors, prosecutors told an Illinois federal jury Friday.

  • June 11, 2021

    Ex-CVS Exec Probed On Drug Prices In Overcharge Trial

    A former CVS Pharmacy executive conceded to a California federal jury trial Friday that the chain didn't report its discounted drug prices to pharmacy benefit managers to avoid losing about $500 million annually.

  • June 11, 2021

    Insurer Needn't Help Cover $20M Award From Akorn Meds Suit

    An Illinois federal judge ruled Friday that Ironshore Specialty Insurance Co. doesn't have to cover any part of a $20 million judgment against drugmaker Akorn Inc. over an adverse effect from one of its medications, finding that punitive damages stemming from the company's negligence aren't covered.

  • June 11, 2021

    Gov't Right To Criticize Northwestern ERISA Win, Workers Say

    Northwestern University workers have further urged the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Seventh Circuit decision tossing their challenge to the university's retirement plan investments and fees, arguing the federal government was right to question the ruling in an amicus brief.

  • June 11, 2021

    'Onion Ring' Snack Maker Hit For Failure To Use Real Onions

    The maker of TGI Fridays branded onion rings snacks has been hit in Illinois federal court with accusations that the company unlawfully misleads consumers into thinking its product contains real onions instead of just cornmeal, powder and flavoring.

  • June 11, 2021

    NLRB Rules Nursing Home Fired Worker To Halt Union

    The National Labor Relations Board issued a default judgment against an Illinois nursing home, ruling that it fired one of its workers after she engaged in union activity and failed to bargain with the union over changes in pay rates.

  • June 11, 2021

    Insurers Want Golden Corral Franchisees' COVID Suit Tossed

    Three insurers to a group of Golden Corral buffet owners have told an Iowa federal court that the restaurants aren't entitled to coverage of losses they sustained during the COVID-19 pandemic, citing a series of virus exclusions in their policies.

  • June 10, 2021

    Calif. Bar Admits Errors In 40 Years Of Girardi Probes

    The State Bar of California "made mistakes" during multiple investigations into high-profile plaintiffs lawyer Thomas V. Girardi over the course of 40 years, revealing weaknesses in its ability to spot wrongdoing involving large and complex client trust accounts, the organization said Thursday.

  • June 10, 2021

    Judge Grants Partial Cert., Further Trims 'Empire' Filming Row

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday let four classes pursue narrowed claims over "modest disruptions" detainees say they experienced when Twentieth Century Fox filmed parts of the show "Empire" in a Cook County juvenile detention center.

  • June 10, 2021

    Ill. City Goes After Netflix, Hulu Over Franchise Fees

    East St. Louis, Illinois, became the latest city to accuse Hulu and Netflix of illegally providing video service in its city limits by failing to comply with a state law and register as a franchise and pay fees for use of public rights-of-way.

  • June 10, 2021

    CVS Pricing Practice 'Cheated' Insured Drug Buyers, Jury Told

    Drug buyers leading a class action alleging CVS Pharmacy Inc.'s now-defunct discount program overcharged insured customers for generic drugs took the stand in a California federal jury trial Thursday, testifying that they believe CVS "cheated" them out of lower copays and lied about their insurance coverage for years.

  • June 10, 2021

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Food delivery apps have been accused of flouting New York City's 20% cap on delivery service fees, the owner of StubHub is trying to block certification of a class of ticket buyers seeking refunds for events canceled during the pandemic, and Amazon wants out of a suit alleging it failed to pay workers for time spent on COVID-19 screenings before work. 

  • June 10, 2021

    State Farm Sued For $5M Over 'Ambiguous' Auto Injury Policy

    A Georgia resident has slapped State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. with a $5 million proposed class action, alleging it uses an ambiguous policy to deny as unreasonable coverage for medical expenses related to vehicle crash injuries.

  • June 10, 2021

    FINRA Fines Firm $1.4M On Alleged BestEx Failures

    A Chicago-based securities market maker allegedly failed to provide best execution on more than 40,000 orders during a three-year period, contributing to a nearly $1.4 million settlement with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

  • June 10, 2021

    Willkie Adds Ex-DLA Piper Restructuring Partner In Chicago

    Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP announced it has hired an attorney from DLA Piper who has significant experience helping clients with investments and debt reorganizations and will be the first finance and restructuring partner based in the firm's year-old Chicago office.

  • June 10, 2021

    Allstate Says Employees In ERISA Suit 'Lost Nothing'

    Allstate Corp. pushed back Wednesday on a proposed class of current and former employees fighting to maintain claims they lost more than $70 million in retirement savings due to plan mismanagement, saying "the plain truth is that plaintiffs lost nothing."

  • June 10, 2021

    Hertz Gets OK For Ch. 11 Plan Providing $1B To Stockholders

    Car rental giant Hertz Global on Thursday gained approval for a Chapter 11 plan of reorganization returning $1 billion of value to shareholders, which a Delaware bankruptcy judge called "a remarkable result" about a year after the company had been staring down the edge of a liquidation cliff.

  • June 10, 2021

    5th Circ. Wary Of Clinic's Bid To Revive NFL Benefits Suit

    A Fifth Circuit panel appeared unswayed Thursday by a medical clinic's argument to revive its Texas federal lawsuit against the National Football League for allegedly telling Cigna not to pay claims for players who used its services.

  • June 09, 2021

    Ill. Court Rules Home Health Co. Took Kickbacks

    After its original decision was sent back down from the Seventh Circuit, an Illinois federal court has made an about-face, declaring that a home health care company did break federal kickback laws.

  • June 09, 2021

    JPML Won't Centralize Accellion Data Hack Cases

    The Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation has rejected a bid to centralize stockholder class and major customer suits against cloud-based file transfer giant Accellion Inc. over damages tied to multiple hacks of its widely used network, which saw intrusions and user-data thefts on multiple continents.

  • June 09, 2021

    Kraft Says Chemical In Mac And Cheese Permitted By FDA

    Kraft Heinz has asked an Illinois federal judge to throw out claims that it failed to tell customers its boxed macaroni and cheese could contain phthalates that could cause adverse health effects if consumed, saying federal regulators have expressly authorized use of those chemicals in food products.

  • June 09, 2021

    Investors Fall Short On Claims Wind Co. Buyer Had 'Side Deal'

    A Delaware vice chancellor said Tuesday there was no reliable evidence that the buyer of a wind farm company that was developing a project in Illinois struck a "nefarious side deal" to diminish the payout to minority stockholders.

  • June 09, 2021

    Ill. Firm's Appeal In Legal Bill Fight Is Premature, Court Says

    An Illinois appellate court on Tuesday tossed an appeal filed by Illinois law firm Melei Petsche Spencer over the dismissal of its claims alleging that a client's mother had breached an agreement to pay her son's legal bills and conspired to defame the firm, saying that claims against her son and his wife are still pending.

  • June 09, 2021

    Attys Score $1.1M Payday From $1.8M Jimmy John's OT Deal

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday gave his final blessing to a roughly $1.8 million settlement resolving claims that Jimmy John's unlawfully misclassified a group of managers as overtime-exempt, and awarded $1.1 million in attorney fees for the managers' counsel.

  • June 09, 2021

    Baker McKenzie Nabs Ice Miller's Data Security Co-Founder

    Baker McKenzie has added a partner to its North America intellectual property and technology practice, the firm said Wednesday, further building out the unit as companies face growing cyber threats and an expansion of data privacy regulations.

Expert Analysis

  • A Biz Strategy Model To Improve Lateral Atty Hiring Diversity

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    Quantitative comparison tools commonly used by companies in evaluating merger targets will allow law firms to assess lateral hire candidates in a demographically neutral manner, help remove bias from the hiring process and bring real diversity to the legal profession, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University.

  • Smaller Firms Need Employee Wellness Programs, Too

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    As we emerge from the pandemic, small and midsize firms — which offer an ideal setting for companywide connection — should follow in the footsteps of larger organizations and heed the American Bar Association’s recommendations by adopting well-being initiatives and appointing a chief wellness officer, says Janine Pollack at Calcaterra Pollack.

  • Ill. BIPA Ruling Marks Critical Win For Silent Cyber Coverage

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent decision in West Bend Mutual v. Krishna Schaumburg Tan, confirming that commercial general liability policies do not have to include specific language to cover claims under the Biometric Information Privacy Act, represents a critical victory for policyholders, but leaves unresolved issues in the battle over BIPA coverage, says Tae Andrews at Miller Friel.

  • How Ad Disputes Between Cos. Fuel Consumer Class Actions

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    Whether companies are bringing or defending claims of false advertising against competitors, they should recognize and anticipate the additional legal risk that may accrue from follow-on consumer actions, says Ross Weiner at Risk Settlements.

  • Stop Networking, Start Relationship Marketing

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    USA 500 Clubs' Joe Chatham offers four tips for lawyers to get started with relationship marketing — an approach to business development that prioritizes authentic connections — and explains why it may be more helpful than traditional networking post-pandemic.

  • 7th Circ. Decision Highlights Difficulties Of 'No Harm' Cases

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    The Seventh Circuit's recent decision in Markakos v. Medicredit showcases the judiciary's struggle with whether it is usurping Congress' authority by questioning statutory penalties for "no harm" consumer protection violations, and highlights the need to resolve a growing circuit split on this issue, says Jason Stiehl at Loeb & Loeb.

  • What Attorneys Should Know About Fee Deferral

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    Milestone Consulting’s John Bair explores contingency-fee structuring considerations for attorneys, laying out the advantages — such as tax benefits and income control — as well as caveats and investment options.

  • Predictions On Pandemic's Lasting Impact On Legal Education

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    The pandemic accelerated the pace of technological change for legal education, and some of the changes to how law school courses are taught and on-campus interviews are conducted may be here to stay, says Leonard Baynes at the University of Houston.

  • Opinion

    Ill. Noncompete Reform Balances Employee And Biz Interests

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    The noncompete bill recently passed by the Illinois Legislature protects due process for workers while preserving employers' ability to guard business assets — a rare political compromise that may reduce noncompete litigation but increase the chances of enforceability in court, say Peter Steinmeyer and Brian Spang at Epstein Becker.

  • Lawyer Perfectionism Is A Disease We Can Control

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    The pursuit of perfection that is prevalent among lawyers can lead to depression, anxiety and other mental health impacts, but new attorneys and industry leaders alike can take four steps to treat this malady, says Liam Montgomery at Williams & Connolly.

  • 5 Tips To Help Your 2021 Summer Associates Succeed

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    Despite pandemic-related challenges this year, law firms can effectively train summer associates on writing and communicating — without investing more time than they ordinarily would, says Julie Schrager at Schiff Hardin.

  • Opinion

    It's Time For States To Enact Effective Marijuana DUI Laws

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    The increasing legalization of recreational marijuana spotlights the need for states to safeguard the public by developing laws to curb driving under the influence of drugs with uniform bright-line rules, along with more accurate testing and increased law enforcement training, say Laura Sedrish at Jacoby & Meyers and Victor Schwartz at Shook Hardy.

  • Firms Should Use Surveys To Make Smart Legal Tech Choices

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    The utility of legal technology innovations may be limited without clear data and objectives from the outset, but targeted surveys can provide specific insights that enable law firms to adopt the most appropriate and efficient tech solutions, says Tim Scott at Frogslayer.

  • Don't Forget Due Diligence In Race For Lateral Associate Hires

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    Amid high demand for associates and aggressive competition to attract talent, law firms should take three key steps to conduct meaningful prehire due diligence and safeguard against lateral hiring mistakes that can hurt their revenue and reputation, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • FDCPA Rulings Show Spokeo's Influence, 5 Years Later

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's 2016 Spokeo v. Robins decision made it harder for plaintiffs to establish violations of consumer protection statutes such as the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, federal appeals courts didn't immediately fall in line — but recent decisions suggest that the tide may be turning, say Brett Watson and Karl Riley at Cozen O'Connor.

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