Illinois

  • July 19, 2019

    Ill. Atty Says Sanctions Should Be Dropped Over Mix-Up

    The attorney for former Segerdahl Corp. employees accused of misappropriating trade secrets asked an Illinois federal judge on Friday to reconsider sanctions imposed against him, saying they were only granted because of a deadline mix-up.

  • July 19, 2019

    Endo Pharma To Pay $2.3M To 18 States In Lidoderm Deal

    Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc. has agreed to pay $2.3 million to 18 states in a deal reached Friday, the same day the states hit the pharmaceutical company with a suit alleging it entered into a reverse-payment agreement to obstruct generic competition to Lidoderm, a pain relief patch.

  • July 19, 2019

    'Conspiracy' Claim Can't Save Antitrust Case, 7th Circ. Told

    The Seventh Circuit should reject attempts to cut the legs off a rule blocking indirect purchasers from suing a manufacturer for antitrust violations, the Washington Legal Foundation told the court, which is considering antitrust claims from buyers of syringes and catheters who think they were forced to pay too much.

  • July 19, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Most Important Personal Injury Opinions

    The more than 1,000 opinions the late Justice John Paul Stevens authored during his three-plus decades on the U.S. Supreme Court included seminal rulings on punitive damages awards and maritime wrongful death cases. Here, Law360 looks back at a handful of opinions he wrote that have affected the personal injury bar and changed the way trial attorneys practice law.

  • July 19, 2019

    7th Circ. Affirms 5-Year Sentence For Chiropractor's Fraud

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday upheld a five-year sentence for an Illinois chiropractor found guilty of health care fraud, saying he failed to show evidence of an error that could have gotten him a lighter sentencing recommendation.

  • July 19, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Blackstone, Hasta Capital, Shorewood

    Blackstone is reportedly seeking to sell $1 billion or more of logistics assets that it will soon acquire, Hasta Capital is said to have picked up a Florida apartment complex for $23.2 million and Shorewood Development Group is reportedly buying four Chicago buildings from Nealey Foods.

  • July 19, 2019

    Engine Maker Execs Inflated Revenues By $25M, Feds Say

    An Illinois-based alternative-energy engine maker’s former executives got hit with criminal and civil securities fraud charges Friday over claims they engaged in an accounting fraud scheme that inflated company revenues by $25 million.

  • July 19, 2019

    Perkins Coie Adds Middle-Market M&A Pro From Kirkland

    Perkins Coie LLP has brought on board a partner in its Chicago office who will focus on middle-market mergers and acquisitions for private equity companies and other matters, the firm has announced.

  • July 19, 2019

    Former Congressman Peter Roskam Joins Sidley Austin

    Sidley Austin LLP has hired former U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill., to join the firm's government strategies group after 25 years serving in both state and national government.

  • July 18, 2019

    State AGs Urge FDA To Keep Exploring Cannabis Regulation

    Dozens of state attorneys general have told the U.S. Food and Drug Administration they support the agency’s recent push to regulate cannabis-derived products like cannabidiol, while asking it to ensure that the states maintain their roles as regulators as the market emerges.

  • July 18, 2019

    Justice Stevens Ruling Set Groundwork For US Climate Policy

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Massachusetts v. EPA forced the federal government to address the problem of climate change and unleashed a flood of decarbonization policies, a deluge that the Trump administration is trying to reverse.

  • July 18, 2019

    BNSF Not Liable For Worker's Fatal Crash, 7th Circ. Says

    BNSF Railway Co. was right to defeat a lawsuit that claimed it was liable for its employee's fatal snowstorm car crash because there is no way the railroad company could have been found negligent in the case, the Seventh Circuit has ruled.

  • July 18, 2019

    Hertz Escapes Class Allegations In Robocall Suit

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday struck class allegations against The Hertz Corp. from consumers who accused the car rental company of repeatedly making unwanted robocalls, finding that the circumstances in the named plaintiff's case are too specific to represent the proposed class.

  • July 18, 2019

    Ill. Latest Battleground For Bayer In Essure Safety Suits

    Bayer Corp. has been hit with a lawsuit in Illinois state court claiming the company misrepresented the safety of its Essure permanent birth control device and hid its serious and potentially life-threatening risks in women.

  • July 18, 2019

    Investors Slam Camping World's Bid To Toss Stock-Drop Suit

    A putative class of investors urged an Illinois federal court not to toss their suit against Camping World Holdings Inc., saying "operational challenges" and a failure to predict the future by its leadership still meant it misled investors.

  • July 18, 2019

    Alix Seeks Another Probe Of McKinsey Conflict Claims

    McKinsey & Co. critic Jay Alix is asking an Illinois bankruptcy court to reopen another Chapter 11 case involving the rival restructuring consultant to investigate more claims McKinsey failed to disclose its investments with the company's parent and buyer.

  • July 18, 2019

    Drugmakers Tell 7th Circ. Insurer's Testosterone Suit Flawed

    A group of pharmaceutical companies is urging the Seventh Circuit not to revive a suit by Medical Mutual of Ohio that accused them of running a conspiracy to hide the harmful effects of testosterone supplements, saying the insurer never showed how it relied on their alleged misrepresentations.

  • July 17, 2019

    How Deep Chicago Roots Kept Stevens Grounded

    A born Chicagoan who studied at two of the city's elite universities, launched his own firm there and remained a devoted Chicago Cubs fan his entire life, Justice John Paul Stevens wore his Midwestern roots on his sleeve. His clerks and colleagues say his Chicago roots shone through in his work.

  • July 17, 2019

    Sunoco Likely To Win In Butane Blending Patent Trial: Judge

    An Illinois federal judge said Wednesday that Sunoco LP is likely to prevail on its patent infringement claims over a Wisconsin fuel distributor, but that the question of willful infringement, and whether Sunoco is entitled to $32 million in lost profits, is trickier.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    Sterigenics Settles Ill. Emissions Suit, Hopes To Reopen Plant

    Medical device sterilization company Sterigenics announced Wednesday that it reached an agreement with the state of Illinois to install new equipment, paving the way to reopen its Chicago-area facility after the state sued the company over allegations it broke laws governing emissions.

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Boeing, Plan Participants Want Stock-Drop Case Paused

    Boeing and a group of participants in its retirement plan want a federal court to temporarily halt a stock-drop suit over the company's supposed knowledge of safety problems with its 737 Max jets until the U.S. Supreme Court decides a similar suit brought by IBM workers who claim their retirement savings shouldn't have been parked in overvalued IBM stock.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    A Look At How States Are Experimenting With Health Care

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    The fate of the Affordable Care Act is currently pending in federal court, but states are proceeding on the premise that the law will survive its latest legal challenge as they consider competing Democratic and Republican visions of health care, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Opinion

    Time To Heed Justice Stevens' Criticism Of Gun Decision

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    Justice John Paul Stevens was right that the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 gun rights decision in Heller desperately needs to be overruled, but while he viewed revision or repeal of the Second Amendment as the easier course for correction, only the court can clean up the mess it made, says Robert Ludwig​ of the American Enlightenment Project.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • Keeping Conventional Power Going Until Renewables Mature

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    The U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and state regulators have a handful of tools to compel generators to delay the retirement of nuclear, coal and gas plants until greener options are more reliable, but their scope has not yet been tested in court, says Gordon Coffee at Winston & Strawn.

  • Community Solar Needs Clear, Flexible State Regulations

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    As states adopt and expand third-party solar development programs, regulators should streamline rules and avoid prescriptive requirements for developers, say Elliot Hinds and Diana Jeschke at Crowell & Moring.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Inside A Closely Watched FCA And FIRREA Decision

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    Last week’s district court decision in Luce v. U.S. interprets a stricter standard of causation for False Claims Act cases and, significantly, makes a helpful contribution to a dearth of case law interpreting the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act’s penalty provisions, says Derek Adams of Feldesman Tucker.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • USPTO Guidance Changes Cannabis TM Filing Strategy

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    A narrow range of filings for trademark registrations covering cannabis goods or services is permitted under new U.S. Patent and Trademark Office guidelines, and cannabis-related business owners who could not previously receive federal trademark protection should now reassess their options for protecting their brands, says Daniel Lano of Dinsmore & Shohl.

  • State Net

    Local Governments Push To Regulate Public Surveillance

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    San Francisco's Board of Supervisors recently approved an ordinance banning the use of facial recognition technology by all city departments. The law is part of a growing movement among localities and states to increase oversight of the use of surveillance technologies by government entities, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Revenge Porn Can Be Outlawed Under The First Amendment

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    To date, 46 states and the District of Columbia have passed needed legislation penalizing nonconsensual distribution of pornographic images of another person, but constitutionally outlawing this phenomenon is tricky and some statutes will likely be struck down, says Nicole Ligon, supervising attorney of the First Amendment Clinic at Duke Law.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • Illinois Tax Talk: Local Tax Grasp May Exceed Its Reach

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    Illinois Senate Bill 690, enacted last month, will disparately burden certain out-of-state retailers in inverse proportion to their business presence in Illinois, says Michael Wynne of Jones Day.