Illinois

  • June 29, 2022

    Curaleaf Wants Workers' Stolen Tips Suit To Go Up In Smoke

    Cannabis dispensary Curaleaf Holdings Inc. asked an Illinois federal court to toss claims that it stole the contents of a tip jar, arguing that it never agreed to pay those tips to workers in the first place.

  • June 29, 2022

    Boeing Can't Escape Fired Worker's Intentional Distress Claim

    An Illinois federal judge cut most of an ex-Boeing employee's claims that his supervisors terminated him for taking extended disability leave but left Boeing on the hook for his allegation that the company purposely caused emotional distress by stringing him along only to fire him when he tried to return.

  • June 28, 2022

    Contested GOP Primary For Ill. High Court Too Close To Call

    Suburban Chicago voters appeared to choose Lake County Associate Judge Elizabeth Rochford on Tuesday as their Democratic candidate heading into November for a wide-open seat in the Illinois Supreme Court bench, but the district's Republican race remained too close to call early Wednesday morning.

  • June 28, 2022

    Airport Workers, Food Provider Ink $1.3M Time Trimming Deal

    Food service workers at Chicago Midway International Airport asked an Illinois federal judge on Tuesday to give an initial green light to a $1.3 million deal brokered with an airport food provider to resolve their proposed class and collective action alleging that the company trimmed hours from workers' timecards.

  • June 28, 2022

    FTC Claims Walmart Facilitated $197M Money Transfer Fraud

    The Federal Trade Commission sued Walmart in Illinois federal court on Tuesday, claiming the retail giant allowed its money transfer services to be used by fraudsters who cheated customers out of hundreds of millions of dollars.

  • June 28, 2022

    State AGs Press FDA To Cut Toxic Metals In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from 22 states have urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to step up efforts to eliminate toxic metals in baby food, chiding the agency for missing an April deadline to propose limits for lead.

  • June 28, 2022

    Ex-Northwestern Law Student's 'Unintelligible' Suit Tossed

    An Illinois federal judge threw out a suit by a former law student claiming his suspension and expulsion from Northwestern University were rooted in discrimination, calling the complaint "so long, confusing, and unwieldy that it is unintelligible."

  • June 28, 2022

    SEC Wins Default Judgment In Ex-Herbalife Exec's Absence

    A New York district court judge ordered a former executive at the Chinese subsidiary of California-based health supplement company Herbalife Ltd. to pay $550,092 in civil penalties after he was charged with plotting to bribe Chinese officials.

  • June 28, 2022

    McDonald's Defeats Ex-Workers' No-Poach Claims

    An Illinois federal court on Tuesday granted a bid from McDonald's to escape claims from ex-workers over the fast-food chain's alleged past use of no-poach provisions in its franchise agreements, saying there was too much competition for their labor to support an antitrust case.

  • June 28, 2022

    7th Circ. Won't Revive Antitrust Suit Against Radiology Board

    A Seventh Circuit panel on Tuesday affirmed the dismissal of an antitrust suit against the American Board of Radiology, saying the lead plaintiff "has fallen short" in showing the group illegally tied its initial board certification for radiologists to a continuous certification program some physicians would rather buy elsewhere.

  • June 27, 2022

    Groupon To Pay $13.5M To End Investors' Hidden Losses Suit

    Groupon Inc. has agreed to pay $13.5 million to end a proposed securities class action that alleges it misled investors about its financial health before ending its sale of physical goods and announcing the departure of two top executives, the investor said in Illinois federal court on Monday.

  • June 27, 2022

    7th Circ. Won't Let Red States Step Into Public Charge Fight

    The Seventh Circuit on Monday refused to allow a group of Republican-led states to intervene in a dispute over a Trump-era public charge rule that the Biden administration has already begun redrafting.

  • June 27, 2022

    Illinois To Become Abortion 'Oasis' In Wake Of Dobbs Ruling

    Abortion providers and officials in Illinois are preparing for potential interstate conflict and litigation as they expect a flood of patients to cross the state's borders following Friday's U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade that could clear the way for every surrounding state to outlaw the procedure.

  • June 27, 2022

    Insurer Owes $3M For Hockey Coach's Injury, Ill. Panel Says

    An insurer must cover half of a $6 million settlement resolving a high school hockey coach's allegations that he was assaulted by a former player, an Illinois state appellate panel ruled Monday, agreeing with a trial court's judgment that the agreement wasn't collusive despite an "obvious conflict of interest" in negotiations.

  • June 27, 2022

    McDonald's Customer Sues Over Mobile App's Payment Glitch

    McDonald's got hit Friday with a proposed class suit seeking refunds for customers who've allegedly had to pay for their orders twice because of a glitch in the company's mobile app that can prevent their card payments from reaching its stores.

  • June 27, 2022

    Aon Failed Customers In Yearlong Data Breach, Suit Claims

    Aon Corp. was hit with a proposed class action lawsuit in Illinois state court claiming hackers had access to consumers' personal information for more than a year before the global insurer discovered its data was breached and offered only meager identity protection services to those affected.

  • June 27, 2022

    FisherBroyles Beats Ex-Client's Suit Over Insurance Coverage

    FisherBroyles LLP has escaped a legal malpractice claim in Illinois, with a federal judge recently ruling that a Canadian furniture manufacturer's complaint against the firm over allegedly botched insurance guidance was outside the state's statute of limitations.

  • June 27, 2022

    LA Chiropractor Cops To NBA Health Plan Fraud Scheme

    A Los Angeles-based chiropractor has pled guilty to his role in a multimillion-dollar scheme to defraud the NBA's health benefits plan, admitting he created fake invoices for players to be reimbursed for services they never received.

  • June 27, 2022

    High Court To Hear Sears Lease Fight With Mall Of America

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday it will hear a long-running dispute between the successor to retail giant Sears Holding Corp. and the Mall of America over the assignment of a store lease, taking up the question of whether appellate courts have jurisdiction to hear appeals of bankruptcy sale orders.

  • June 24, 2022

    Walgreens Inks $105M Deal To End Investor Suit Over Merger

    Pharmacy chain Walgreens and two of its former executives have agreed to pay $105 million to end investor claims the company touted overly rosy ​​financial projections as it sought shareholder approval of its plan to complete the acquisition of Swiss-based pharmacy chain operator Alliance Boots GmbH.

  • June 24, 2022

    Costco Can't Subpoena Itself To Use Chicken Docs In Arb.

    An Illinois federal magistrate judge refused Thursday to let Costco Wholesale Corp. "circumvent" confidentiality protections for documents in a sprawling antitrust lawsuit accusing major chicken producers of price-fixing, documents Costco wanted to use in parallel arbitration against Tyson Foods Inc.

  • June 24, 2022

    Ill. Justices Back Revival Of 1 Claim In Hip Surgery Suit

    The Illinois Supreme Court said Friday that a lower appellate panel was only half right to revive negligence claims against two doctors who allegedly botched a hip replacement surgery, because the panel lacked jurisdiction to review one of the doctor's summary judgment wins.

  • June 24, 2022

    Roe Reversal Leaves States To Make Own Abortion Rules

    State and local lawmakers now have new powers to outlaw abortions and punish those who seek or perform the procedure under Friday's U.S. Supreme Court decision that overturned abortion as a constitutional right.

  • June 24, 2022

    Retailers Cut Midtrial Deal With Impax In Opana Delay Case

    Well into an antitrust trial over an alleged pay-for-delay scheme surrounding Endo Pharmaceuticals' Opana ER painkiller, a group of major retail chains cut a midtrial settlement Friday with Impax Laboratories, one of the defendants in the wide-ranging case.

  • June 24, 2022

    7th Circ. Won't Revive Class Fraud Claims In Sex Abuse Suit

    The Seventh Circuit has affirmed former USA Volleyball coach Rick Butler's defeat of consumer fraud claims stemming from his alleged concealment of sexual abuse accusations against him, agreeing that the lead plaintiff in the case knew about an Illinois agency and USA Volleyball's findings about his alleged sexual abuse and enrolled her children in his club's programs anyway.

Expert Analysis

  • NYC Office Tower Ch. 11 Shines Light On Blocking Provisions

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    PMW Management's Chapter 11 filing, which recently received extra time to submit a restructuring plan, highlights courts' increasing skepticism of bankruptcy blocking provisions and favoritism toward leaving bankruptcy restructuring plans in the hands of the debtor, say Jeff Marwil and Ashley Weringa at Proskauer.

  • Opinion

    Justices Should Resolve FCA Cases' Rule 9(b) Circuit Split

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    The U.S. Supreme Court should agree to hear three related False Claims Act cases and resolve the circuit split over the level of detail Rule 9(b) requires in qui tam complaints, or the viability of such actions will increasingly depend on where they are filed, say Kenneth Abell and Katherine Kulkarni at Abell Eskew.

  • Opinion

    Now's The Time To Address Archaic Law School Curricula

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    With law school enrollments jumping significantly ahead of a potential recession and more students graduating than the market can absorb, law schools should turn to creative solutions to teach students how to negotiate, work with clients, specialize and use technology to practice their craft more efficiently, says University of Colorado adjunct professor Jason Mendelson.

  • Lessons From Lawyer Fee-Sharing Agreements Gone Wrong

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    The recent fee-sharing dispute between Edelson and Girardi Keese is a reminder that lawyers who do not strictly follow the applicable rules may risk a disciplinary complaint, lose their share of the fee, or wind up in costly litigation with co-counsel, says David Grossbaum at Hinshaw.

  • LeClairRyan Bankruptcy Highlights Pass-Through Tax Issue

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    A Virginia bankruptcy court's recent ruling in the case of defunct law firm LeClairRyan shows there may be serious tax consequences for pass-through entity partners who give up their ownership interest without following operating agreement exit provisions and updating bankruptcy court filings, say Edward Schnitzer and Hannah Travaglini at Montgomery McCracken.

  • Chicago Cos. Must Prepare For New Sex Harassment Law

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    A Chicago ordinance taking effect next week imposes new requirements on employers around preventing sexual harassment in the workplace, so in-house employment counsel and human resources professionals should take several compliance steps and invest in efforts to foster respectful workplaces, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • 1st Amendment May Help Cannabis Cos. Beat TM Claims

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    Frederic Rocafort at Harris Bricken explains how the First Amendment’s free speech protections may present a legal recourse for cannabis brands facing trademark infringement claims — if they can show that their parodic marks have artistic relevance and do not intentionally mislead consumers.

  • How Day-Of-Rest Law Changes May Affect Ill. Employers

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    Recent amendments to Illinois' One Day Rest in Seven Act change meal break calculations and increase penalties for violations, so employers should review their meal, break and day of rest policies and consider conservative precautions to avoid accidental violations or litigation, says Darren Mungerson at Littler.

  • A Robust Tool For Defending Against Illinois Biometric Suits

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    Many defendants in class actions brought under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act may be able to avail themselves of the law's financial institution exemption, which, as two recent cases demonstrate, covers a range of entities beyond traditional banks — but parties must be able to establish their entitlement to this defense, says David Oberly at Squire Patton.

  • 8 Steps To Creating A Legal Ops Technology Road Map

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    Legal departments struggling to find and implement the right technologies for their operations should consider creating a road map that summarizes their approach to technology changes, provides clearly defined metrics for success, and serves as the single source of truth for stakeholders, says Melanie Shafer at SimpleLegal.

  • The Importance Of Data And Data Analysis In Litigation

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    Understanding, analyzing and effectively presenting large data sets is an increasingly important skill in litigation as it allows plaintiffs to dramatically scale up the scope of cases and is often critical to defeating motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment, says David Burnett at Motley Rice.

  • Justices' Airline Ruling Bolsters Arbitration Course Correction

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision last week in Southwest v. Saxon, together with its May ruling in Morgan v. Sundance, limits the reach of mandatory arbitration and sends a strong message to the federal judiciary, with potentially broad applications in the employment context, says University of Denver professor and Outten & Golden counsel Nantiya Ruan.

  • 2 New Defenses To Federal Shareholder Derivative Claims

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    Increasingly, plaintiffs are bringing Securities Exchange Act claims in derivative suits because they perceive these claims to have advantages compared to traditional fiduciary duty claims, but there are several reasons why plaintiffs are wrong and the flawed assumptions underlying these claims should be tested in court, say Brian Lutz and Michael Kahn at Gibson Dunn.

  • Steps Companies Can Take To Mitigate Privilege Labeling Risk

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    Although Google prevailed on a recent privilege labeling sanctions motion, an important takeaway from the decision is that companies should assess their in-house procedures and employee training programs regarding privileged communications to mitigate risks of the potential appearance of bad faith privilege claims, say Gareth Evans at Redgrave and e-discovery attorney James Hertsch.

  • What Litigation Funding Disclosure In Delaware May Look Like

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    A standing order issued by Delaware's chief federal judge requiring litigants to disclose whether their cases or defenses are being financed by third parties is unlikely to have onerous effects but may raise questions regarding potential conflicts of interest and access to justice, say Cayse Llorens and Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

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