Illinois

  • December 06, 2019

    The AGs Challenging T-Mobile/Sprint & The Ones Left Behind

    Ten state attorneys general, all Democrats, entered the challenge to T-Mobile’s purchase of Sprint. Now, after months of ebb and flow that included the addition of a single Republican AG, the number stands at 14 and no longer includes that sole claim to bipartisanship. Here, Law360 takes a look at the states that have joined the challenge and the ones that have left.

  • December 06, 2019

    States, Enviros Say EPA Still Trying To Delay Emissions Regs

    States and environmentalists fought the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's bid to hold off on enforcing Obama-era regulations to reduce emissions from landfills while it weighs an appeal, telling a California federal court the stay would just be another delay tactic.

  • December 06, 2019

    Wingstop Owner's Scans Skirt Ill. Biometric Law, Workers Say

    An Illinois Wingstop franchisee who owns and operates at least six restaurants in the state requires his employees to scan their fingerprints to track their attendance in violation of their biometric privacy rights, according to a state class action filed Thursday.

  • December 06, 2019

    TikTok Brokers $1M Deal To Settle Claims It Shared Kids' Data

    A proposed class of parents and children urged an Illinois federal court Thursday to approve a “groundbreaking” $1.1 million settlement to resolve claims that the popular short-form video app TikTok collected and shared personally identifiable information about children under the age of 13 without parental consent.

  • December 06, 2019

    11 Firms To Steer IPOs Raising $2.7B, Led By Brazilian Fintech

    Eleven law firms are slated to guide six initial public offerings that could raise a combined $2.7 billion during the week of Dec. 9 as the IPO market enters the final stretch of 2019, led by a sizable offering from a Brazilian digital broker.

  • December 06, 2019

    DeVry Investors' $27.5M Stock-Drop Deal Gets Final OK

    An Illinois federal judge gave the final signoff Friday to a $27.5 million deal over DeVry Education Group Inc.'s allegedly inflated graduate data, including a request for almost $7.43 million in attorney fees.

  • December 06, 2019

    Sears Vendor Lobs Appeal Over $5.4M Christmas Tree Bill

    A Chinese artificial Christmas tree maker is seeking to recoup the money it lost for 2018 holiday shipments to Sears, asking a New York federal judge to overturn a bankruptcy court ruling that its $5.4 million claim in the retailer's Chapter 11 case is unsecured, according to a Friday announcement.

  • December 05, 2019

    Facebook Asks High Court To Take Up Biometric Privacy Case

    Facebook is pressing the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Ninth Circuit ruling that preserved a potentially multibillion-dollar class action over its face-scanning practices, arguing that the dispute provides a "clean vehicle" to review thorny standing and class certification issues.

  • December 05, 2019

    EY Duo Can't Bring Trade Secrets Case To Early End

    A Cook County judge said Thursday it would be “premature” to dismiss claims against two EY employees accused of stealing confidential information from their former employer, saying discovery would offer a clearer picture of whether the information in question amounts to trade secrets.

  • December 05, 2019

    Analysts Plead Not Guilty To Doctor's Office Ad Fraud Scheme

    Two former analysts for health care advertising company Outcome Health LLC told an Illinois federal judge Thursday they are not guilty of charges that they participated in a criminal conspiracy involving a multi-pronged advertising fraud targeting the company’s clients.

  • December 05, 2019

    Hinshaw Picks Up Products Liability Partner In Chicago

    Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP said Wednesday it hired a Williams Montgomery & John litigator to its product liability practice group who has "significant experience" representing domestic and international companies in high-stakes matters.

  • December 05, 2019

    Archer Daniels Midland Says Hemp Co. Is Ripping Off Its TM

    Agriculture giant Archer Daniels Midland Co. filed a trademark infringement suit against similarly named hemp processor ADM Labs LLC in Chicago federal court on Thursday.

  • December 05, 2019

    7th Circ. Revives Police Sergeant's Military Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit has revived a Joliet, Illinois, police sergeant's bias suit claiming he was unlawfully denied pay and benefits while away on National Guard duty, rejecting the city's claim that federal anti-discrimination law didn't apply.

  • December 04, 2019

    Guardswoman Wrongly Penalized For Writing Phone Sex Book

    The Seventh Circuit has partially revived a lawsuit filed by woman who joined the Indiana Army National Guard to participate in a volunteer program but was kicked out for writing a book based on her earlier work as a phone sex operator, ruling that the woman's book was protected speech.

  • December 04, 2019

    Milk Producers Agree To Pay $220M To End Price-Fixing Suit

    Dairy producers and buyers said Wednesday they've reached a $220 million settlement to end class action claims in Illinois federal court accusing the producers of orchestrating a price-fixing scheme through a now-canceled program to slaughter dairy cows.

  • December 04, 2019

    AIG Unit Says Privacy Breach Is Contract Issue And Not Hack

    A privacy breach exposing customers’ credit card numbers at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport was the result of a Pittsburgh-area parking technology company’s maintenance failure and contract breach, not a hack or cyberattack that would be covered by the company’s insurance policy, an AIG unit told a Pennsylvania federal court Wednesday.

  • December 04, 2019

    PE Firm, Execs Can't Exit SEC Suit Over $17.8M Stock Scheme

    A Chicago private equity firm and its executives accused of acting as unregistered brokers and dealers must face the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission's lawsuit seeking to hold them liable over an alleged $17.8 million stock scheme, an Illinois federal judge said Wednesday.

  • December 04, 2019

    7th Circ. Judge Won't Bite At Developer's Bid For Less Time

    A Seventh Circuit judge cast doubt Wednesday on a Chicago real estate developer's claim that mitigating evidence would have led to a lower sentence for his role in a $22.9 million bank fraud.  

  • December 04, 2019

    CareerBuilder Says Suit Over 401(k) Plan 'Too Conclusory'

    CareerBuilder has urged an Illinois federal judge to toss a former worker's proposed class action claiming the company lost its 401(k) plan millions of dollars in excessive fees in violation of ERISA, saying his complaint was "long on conclusions but short on relevant facts."

  • December 03, 2019

    TikTok Illegally Collected, Shared Children's Data, Parents Say

    A proposed class of parents and children on Tuesday accused popular short-form video app TikTok of tracking, collecting and sharing personally identifiable information about children under the age of 13 without parental consent, according to a suit lodged in Illinois federal court.

  • December 03, 2019

    FDIC Scores Partial Win Over Title Insurer In Post-Trial Dispute

    An Illinois federal judge sided with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Tuesday in determining a jury didn't need to consider the defense of contributory negligence when it found Chicago Title Insurance Co. breached its fiduciary duty to Founders Bank in a real estate flip case.

  • December 03, 2019

    Ill. Jury Convicts Father, Son Over $1.3M Investment Scheme

    An Illinois federal jury on Tuesday convicted a father on 24 counts and his son on 13 counts over charges that they convinced family members and two church congregations to invest in what was really a $1.3 million Ponzi scheme involving apartments in distress.

  • December 03, 2019

    T-Mobile, Sprint Pare Down States' Evidence Ahead Of Trial

    A New York federal judge barred states behind a legal challenge to T-Mobile's planned purchase of Sprint from using foreign wireless merger studies Monday, saying their relevance would be “dubious at best.”

  • December 03, 2019

    Dems To Float Bill Boosting Part-Timers' Hours, Benefits

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., are readying a bill that would make businesses assign shifts to existing part-time workers before taking on new hires, and extend some benefits to part-timers, they said Tuesday.

  • December 03, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Numerator, Vornado, Walmart

    Numerator is reportedly close to leasing roughly 60,000 square feet in Chicago from Brookfield, Vornado is said to have landed $800 million in financing for a New York City property, and Walmart has reportedly sold a former Sam's Club store in Florida for $13 million.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    How States' 2020 Policy Agendas Are Taking Shape

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    State legislators are already hammering out their agendas for 2020, with data privacy and security, the gig economy, drug prices and Medicaid expansion likely to be central to next year's state legislative battles, says Rich Ehisen of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Secured Creditor Duties Ripe For High Court Consideration

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    If certiorari is granted in the Seventh Circuit's Chicago v. Fulton case, the U.S. Supreme Court will have the opportunity to resolve the growing circuit split over the Bankruptcy Code’s automatic stay on creditors concerning turnover of a debtor’s impounded vehicle, say Alexandra Dugan and Elizabeth Brusa of Bradley Arant.

  • Will College Athletes Be Deemed Employees Soon?

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    In light of the NCAA's recent proposed rule change on student-athlete compensation, and state and federal legislative developments in this area, people are again questioning whether student-athletes should be considered employees of the universities for whom they serve as a major revenue stream, says Sara Moore of Nemeth Law.

  • FAA Efforts Aim To Reduce Drone Jurisdictional Disputes

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    Local and state laws concerning drones are widespread, but so, too, are confusion and disagreement over the extent of federal jurisdiction in this area. The Federal Aviation Administration's forthcoming remote identification rules may help resolve some of these conflicts, says Mark Dombroff of Fox Rothschild.

  • How To Hire Lateral Partners More Effectively

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    Although lateral partner hiring is the preferred method of inorganic growth among law firms, the traditional approach to vetting does not employ sufficient due diligence by the hiring firm, says Michael Ellenhorn at executive search firm Decipher Competitive Intelligence.

  • Illinois Tax Talk: Bounty Hunter Auditors And Qui Tam Claims

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    The Illinois Legislature’s recently passed tax bills — covering sales tax sourcing, contingency-fee auditors and qui tam plaintiffs — conflict with the existing tax infrastructure and each other, making life more complicated for businesses, says Michael Wynne of Jones Day.

  • High Court Hears DACA: Procedure, Practicalities, Predictions

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    At oral argument last week, the U.S. Supreme Court justices seemed likely to rule that the Trump administration had sufficient reasons to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which would leave the lives of DACA recipients and their families in limbo, says Jaclyn Kelley-Widmer at Cornell Law School.

  • The Coming Storm Of Biometric Privacy Laws: How To Comply

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    To respond to the rapidly evolving legal landscape, companies that incorporate biometric data into their business practices can take several steps to minimize the risk of privacy litigation exposure, say Jeffrey Rosenthal and David Oberly of Blank Rome.

  • How Increased Stays Pending IPR May Affect Venue Choice

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    A little over one year after the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in SAS Institute v. Iancu, data show a 5% increase in district court-granted stays of litigation pending inter partes review, and the grant rate disparities may influence new patent filings toward certain venues and defendants facing patent infringement claims toward others, say attorneys at Armond Wilson.

  • The Coming Storm Of Biometric Privacy Laws: What To Expect

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    While there are only three state biometric privacy laws on the books, there is a growing trend of states' introducing biometric privacy bills, many of which feature far-reaching private right of action provisions that would substantially increase the level of regulatory and litigation risk, say Jeffrey Rosenthal and David Oberly of Blank Rome.

  • 7th Circ. Rulings Clarify ADA Obesity Standard For Employers

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    While the Seventh Circuit’s recent Americans with Disabilities Act decisions in Richardson v. Chicago Transit Authority and Shell v. BNSF Railway make clear employers may consider weight when evaluating a worker’s fitness for a position, they don't provide free rein to make hiring decisions based on obesity, say Jennifer Froehlich and Andrew Fiske at Holland & Knight.

  • Wis. PFAS Proposals Present Challenges For Businesses

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    Businesses with a presence in Wisconsin should be aware of the state's proposals for regulating per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances — in particular, its plans to set extremely low allowable levels of PFAS in drinking water, say George Marek and Lauren Harpke of Quarles & Brady.

  • Opinion

    Cannabis Social Equity Programs Are Fundamentally Flawed

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    While programs granting a licensing advantage to communities disproportionately impacted by the criminalization of cannabis have gained support in progressive legislative circles, they are failing due to poor legislative design, says Avis Bulbulyan of SIVA Enterprises.

  • Can State Laws One-Up SEC’s Regulation Best Interest?

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    Because the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has punted on whether Regulation Best Interest will preempt state broker-dealer conduct standards, state laws may face challenges under the doctrines of conflict preemption, as well as limitations from the federal securities laws, say attorneys at Williams & Jensen.

  • FERC Orders Advance Grid Operators' Energy Storage Plans

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    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission recently approved two regional transmission organizations' energy storage proposals. But full integration of storage resources into the wholesale market will be complex — and ongoing litigation could force FERC to change its approach, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

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