Illinois

  • July 02, 2020

    DNC, Perkins Coie Must Face Defamation Suit, Page Says

    Former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page has asked an Illinois federal judge not to dismiss his defamation allegations against the Democratic National Committee and its Perkins Coie LLP legal team, arguing that his suit over the infamous "Steele Dossier" was timely and that the court should have jurisdiction over the matter.

  • July 02, 2020

    High Court Won't Touch Rules Restricting Abortion Protestors

    The U.S. Supreme Court won't hear challenges to Chicago and Harrisburg ordinances that set boundaries on anti-abortion protesters outside of clinics, leaving in place Seventh and Third Circuit rulings upholding the buffers.

  • July 02, 2020

    United Airlines Seeks To Duck Suit Over $5B Virus Relief Deal

    United Airlines urged an Illinois federal judge on Thursday to dismiss a putative class action accusing it of breaching its agreement with the federal government over $5 billion in payroll support funds amid the coronavirus pandemic, arguing the employee who filed the suit has no statutory rights to enforce the agreement.

  • July 02, 2020

    CareerBuilder Beats 401(k) Fee Suit After Northwestern Does

    An Illinois federal judge has tossed a proposed ERISA class action against CareerBuilder LLC, rejecting allegations of excessive 401(k) plan fees by citing Northwestern University's recent defeat of similar claims in the Seventh Circuit.

  • July 02, 2020

    Grubhub Says Customer Misled Court On FCC Ruling

    Grubhub Inc. told an Illinois federal court that a customer who proposed a class action over unwanted autodialed calls has mischaracterized a recent Federal Communications Commission ruling related to the definition of an "autodialer," saying it "has no relevance to this action."

  • July 02, 2020

    Jimmy John's Slams Class Certification Bid In No-Poach Suit

    A Jimmy John's employee can't certify a class in his suit challenging the company's no-poach agreements because the class would include conflicting class members and their claims can't be proven with common evidence, the sandwich chain argued in Illinois federal court.

  • July 02, 2020

    Insurer Won't Defend Biz That Sold Access To Biometric Data

    Citizens Insurance Co. of America told an Illinois federal judge that it has no duty to defend Wynndalco Enterprises in a class suit accusing Wynndalco of violating biometric privacy by selling access to Clearview AI Inc.'s database to Illinois consumers.

  • July 02, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Grocery delivery service Instacart is suing to block a Seattle ordinance requiring coronavirus hazard pay for gig delivery workers, New York police officers and Las Vegas resort workers claim they haven't been provided with adequate protections during the pandemic, and the ACLU says California courts can't block public access to trials, despite the virus. 

  • July 02, 2020

    7th Circ. Told Dynegy Ash Pits Subject To Maui Water Ruling

    Coal ash pits owned by Dynegy Midwest Generation LLC are illegally leaking pollution through groundwater that has turned an Illinois river orange-red and must be more strictly regulated under the Clean Water Act, environmentalists told the Seventh Circuit on Wednesday.

  • July 02, 2020

    Calif. Criticizes FERC Transmission Incentives Proposal

    A coalition of states, including California and Massachusetts, criticized the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's proposal to update incentives for transmission projects, saying it doesn't do much to reduce the amount consumers must pay or help the right kinds of projects.

  • July 02, 2020

    Anonymity Won't Be Allowed In Suit Over COVID-19 Payment

    A man suing U.S. officials claiming that he didn't receive a pandemic stimulus check from the Internal Revenue Service because of his marriage to an immigrant must identify himself before the court, an Illinois federal judge ordered. 

  • July 02, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Won't Rethink Upholding Bike Chainring Patent

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday denied Fox Factory's request for a rehearing of a panel's decision upholding an Illinois rival's bicycle chainring patent, after the Georgia-based bike parts maker argued that the issues on appeal are the "mirror image" of another appeal that resulted in a related patent's invalidation.

  • July 02, 2020

    Eversheds Sutherland Picks Up Real Estate Trio In Chicago

    Eversheds Sutherland has picked up a trio of experienced attorneys focused on retail development from White & Case LLP and Meltzer Purtill & Stelleto LLC to add to its growing real estate practice in Chicago.

  • July 01, 2020

    Ill. Panel Reverses Chicago Health Care Pension Fight Ruling

    An Illinois appeals court on Tuesday partially reversed a lower court's ruling in long-running proposed class action over pension fund obligations after the city of Chicago said it would stop providing its retirees with fixed-rate health care subsidies funded by city taxes.

  • July 01, 2020

    Abbott Labs Tries To Shake ERISA Cybersecurity Suit

    Abbott Laboratories wants an Illinois federal judge to toss a former employee's suit claiming the company and its retirement plan record-keeper allowed an imposter to steal $245,000 from her retirement account, arguing that the pharmaceutical giant wasn't responsible for the theft.

  • July 01, 2020

    Ill. Court Upholds Cook County's $9M Insurance Trial Win

    An Illinois appellate court on Tuesday upheld a jury's decision to award Cook County roughly $9 million in damages in a contract dispute with insurance broker USI Insurance, rejecting both the insurer's bid to ax the award and the county's attempt to boost it to $32.5 million.

  • July 01, 2020

    Judge May Allow Suit Over 'Troubling' McClatchy Debt Rework

    The New York bankruptcy judge overseeing newspaper chain McClatchy Co.'s bankruptcy said he would decide by the end of the week whether to give unsecured creditors permission to sue over what he called "troubling" aspects of a 2018 debt restructuring.

  • July 01, 2020

    Investors Say Fund Cost Them $52M By Inflating Assets

    Investors in a Wisconsin-based fund focused primarily on gems and minerals are claiming in Illinois state court that they lost $52 million when fund operators and owners inflated the value of its assets and charged millions in fees.

  • July 01, 2020

    Remote Hearings Will Play Big Role As Illinois Courts Reopen

    Illinois state courts staring down a backlog from the coronavirus pandemic have geared up their work on plans for how to safely reopen, and remote hearings will continue to play a significant role in court operations for the foreseeable future.

  • July 01, 2020

    Boeing Wants Out Of Investor Suit Over Max 8 Safety

    Boeing pushed an Illinois federal judge to toss a proposed securities class action accusing the company of hiding safety problems in its 737 Max 8 jets, arguing Tuesday that while the shareholders bring "an avalanche of allegations," none of the purported misstatements show that Boeing intentionally misled investors.

  • July 01, 2020

    Much Shelist Merges With Calif. Firm, Opens Newport Office

    Full-service law firm Much Shelist PC has merged with the Orange County-based business litigation firm Zfaty Burns and has opened a new office in Newport Beach, California, Much Shelist announced Wednesday.

  • June 30, 2020

    7th Circ. Clarifies Decision On Standing In Biometric Case

    The Seventh Circuit declined on Tuesday to rehear arguments over a decision that partially kept a woman's biometric privacy suit against Compass Group USA Inc. at the federal level, but clarified why it found she lacked federal standing for claims over the company's retention of data.

  • June 30, 2020

    Virus Delays Second Round Of Illinois Marijuana Licenses

    Illinois will miss another deadline to award marijuana licenses, a state agency said Tuesday, delaying awards of craft grower, infuser and transporter licenses that were expected to be awarded July 1.

  • June 30, 2020

    7th Circ. Won't Revive $8.6M Suit Over Unpaid Air Base Work

    The Seventh Circuit on Tuesday denied a contractor's bid to revive its suit against Zurich American Insurance Co. and The Insurance Co. of the State of Pennsylvania over $8.6 million it claims it's owed from work on a Qatar air base, saying the contractor failed to give notice within the right time frame that it wasn't paid.

  • June 30, 2020

    States Criticize EPA Push To Maintain Particulate Matter Regs

    A coalition of states including Maryland and New York told the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that fine and coarse particulate matter pollution kills thousands of people each year and the agency is wrong not to tighten its rules to better protect public health.

Expert Analysis

  • How COVID-19 Impact Analysis May Shape MAE Disputes

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    Emerging disputes over whether the COVID-19 crisis has triggered a merger transaction’s material adverse effect clause shine a spotlight on the importance of showing whether the pandemic has disproportionately impacted particular industries and companies, say David Tabak and Edward Flores at NERA.

  • EPA Limits On States' Project Reviews Likely To Face Lawsuits

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recently announced rule limiting the scope of states' reviews of planned energy infrastructure projects will likely mean more litigation between states and the federal government — and more uncertainty for businesses and other stakeholders, says Philip Sholtz at Goldberg Segalla.

  • 10 Tips For A Successful Remote Arbitration Hearing

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    As I learned after completing a recent international arbitration remotely, with advance planning a video hearing can replicate the in-person experience surprisingly well, and may actually be superior in certain respects, says Kate Shih at Quinn Emanuel.

  • Opinion

    To Achieve Diversity, Law Firms Must Reinvent Hiring Process

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    If law firms are truly serious about making meaningful change in terms of diversity, they must adopt a demographically neutral, unbiased hiring equation that looks at personality traits with greater import than grades and class rank, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University College of Law.

  • Virus, Regs Highlight Need For Model State Whistleblower Law

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    The North American Securities Administrators Association's recently proposed model state whistleblower law could be a timely weapon against securities misconduct in light of the new and unique opportunities COVID-19 presents for fraudsters, and certain federal registration exemptions that may soon be relaxed, says attorney Patrick McCloskey.

  • A New Antitrust Approach After Humira 'Patent Thicket' Ruling

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    In light of an Illinois federal court's recent holding that AbbVie's Humira "patent thicket" did not violate antitrust laws, parties concerned with the potential anti-competitive conduct of a biologic reference product sponsor should focus on conduct and look beyond patent obtainment, says Kevin Nelson at Schiff Hardin.

  • Cybersecurity Steps For Law Firms Amid Heightened Risks

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    With large swaths of the population indoors and primarily online, cybercriminals will be able to exploit law firms more easily now than ever before, but some basic precautions can help, says Joel Wallenstrom at Wickr.

  • Ill. Force Majeure Ruling Could Be Problematic For Landlords

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    Businesses considered nonessential during the pandemic may be able to look to an Illinois bankruptcy court's recent ruling in Hitz Restaurant Group to invoke a force majeure defense and get excused for rental obligations during the time they were unable to operate, say attorneys at Saul Ewing.

  • Opinion

    It's Time For Law Firms To Support Work-From-Home Culture

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    Now that law firms are on board with fully remote work environments, they must develop policies that match in-office culture and align partner and associate expectations, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    Republicans Keep Confirming Unqualified Judicial Nominees

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    What emerges from the group of 200 federal judges confirmed by the Senate under President Donald Trump is a judiciary stacked with young conservative ideologues, many of whom lack basic judicial qualifications, says Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • Tips For Crafting The Perfect Law Firm Alert

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    As lawyers have had more time to write in recent weeks, the number of law firm alerts has increased massively, but a lot of them fail to capture readers and deliver new business, says Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Elrod Reviews 'Shortlisted'

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    Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson's new book, "Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court," is a service to an overlooked group of nine women who were considered for the U.S. Supreme Court before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was confirmed, and offers constructive tips for women looking to break through the glass ceiling, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • Mandatory State Bars Likely To Remain Intact, For Now

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    A Texas federal judge’s recent holding in McDonald v. Sorrels that mandatory bar memberships do not violate members' constitutional rights indicates that such requirements survive the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision in Janus, but it may mean that the Supreme Court will address the issue in the not-too-distant future, say Majed Nachawati and Misty Farris at Fears Nachawati.

  • 11 Keys To Success At Remote Mediation

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    Attorneys should accept that remote mediation may be their only current option for resolving a dispute and take steps to obtain a fantastic outcome for their clients, including making sure the right people attend the remote mediation and beginning the session with an apology, says Eric Meyer at FisherBroyles.

  • Property Coverage For Riot-Related Claims Is Not Automatic

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    Property damage claims related to recent civil unrest are not categorically covered, but require careful consideration of insurance policy language, claim-specific facts under controlling law and any applicable exclusions, such as vacancy, insurrection or terrorism laws, that may preclude or limit coverage, say attorneys at Hinshaw & Culbertson.

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