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Energy

  • March 21, 2019

    US Can Sell $82M Yacht Linked To Nigerian Corruption Case

    A federal judge in Texas has approved a request from the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Republic of Nigeria to sell an $82 million mega-yacht linked to an ongoing Nigerian corruption case.

  • March 21, 2019

    FERC Mulls Grid Rate Incentive Policy Changes

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday said it would explore revising its incentive policy for electric transmission projects to ensure it's properly encouraging new development, as well as how it calculates transmission company investor returns.

  • March 21, 2019

    Calif. Approves Final Regulations For Idle Oil And Gas Wells

    A California agency on Thursday announced it had approved regulations aimed at ensuring idle oil and gas wells do not harm the environment and that there are more resources to plug wells that are abandoned by operators.

  • March 21, 2019

    Donziger Still Defying Court In $9.5B Ecuador Fight: Chevron

    Chevron Corp. told a New York federal judge Wednesday that new evidence proves attorney Steven Donziger flouted an order barring him from profiting off a fraudulent $9.5 billion judgment in an Ecuadorian environmental case, saying his “brazen” misdeeds warrant sanctions.

  • March 21, 2019

    Insurers Must Name Climate-Problem Clients, Nonprofits Say

    California is under pressure to force insurers to name the fossil-fuel projects they insure and underwrite, with nonprofit groups calling Thursday for emergency measures from the state’s insurance regulator.

  • March 21, 2019

    DLA Piper Nabs Baker McKenzie, Wilson Sonsini Partners

    DLA Piper LLP said Wednesday that it's beefed up its California offices by hiring a former Baker McKenzie partner who focuses her practice on energy and project finance and a former Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati partner who specializes in advising startups, emerging technology and media companies.

  • March 21, 2019

    Native Groups Can't Weigh In On National Monuments Cuts

    Efforts of Native American advocacy groups to support challenges to President Donald Trump’s decision to shrink two national monuments were halted Wednesday when a D.C federal judge said their proposed amicus brief would not help determine whether the president’s decision was authorized by the Antiquities Act.

  • March 21, 2019

    DOI Gives Tribes, States $291M For Coal Mine Cleanup

    The U.S. Department of the Interior announced that states including Illinois, Pennsylvania and Texas along with several tribes will benefit from more than $291 million in funding to be used for the reclamation and regeneration of abandoned coal mines.

  • March 21, 2019

    Equistar Asks Redo To Prove $5M Damages For Faulty Pumps

    Equistar Chemicals LP was wrongly prohibited from presenting evidence to a jury that would have shown its damages stemming from faulty ethane pumps were $5.1 million, as it argued, and not the $37,500 it was awarded, its counsel told a Texas appellate court on Thursday.

  • March 21, 2019

    EPA Contractors Can't Dodge Suit Over Gold King Mine Spill

    A New Mexico federal judge has allowed the bulk of claims to proceed against two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contractors who worked on the Gold King Mine that spilled 3 million gallons of contaminants, saying they must face allegations brought under federal environmental and state tort laws.

  • March 21, 2019

    Gibson Dunn Steers Murphy Oil's $2.1B Sale Of Malaysia Biz

    Murphy Oil Corp. on Thursday said it will hand off a pair of Malaysian subsidiaries to Taiwan-based PTT Exploration and Production Public Co. Ltd. in a $2.13 billion deal, with Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP steering the seller.

  • March 21, 2019

    Mo. Regulators OK $2.3B Power Line After Court Rebuke

    Missouri utility regulators on Wednesday greenlighted the construction of a $2.3 billion interstate electric transmission line, less than a year after the Missouri Supreme Court said the state's public service commission got it wrong in rejecting the long-gestating project.

  • March 21, 2019

    'New Consol' Disputes Role In 1st Female Leader's Pay, Firing

    The Consol Energy Inc. that made Katharine Fredriksen the first female president of its coal operations was a different company from the one that fired her, so the "new Consol" shouldn't be liable for any of her gender discrimination claims prior to its formal creation, an attorney for the company said in Pennsylvania federal court Thursday.

  • March 20, 2019

    What’s In A Judgeship? More Than Meets The Eye

    Figuring out what constitutes a manageable workload for the nation’s district judges is no simple task. Getting the judiciary the resources it needs is even harder.

  • March 20, 2019

    Swamped: How Magistrate Judges Salvaged Louisiana's Judicial Crisis

    The Western District of Louisiana is supposed to have seven district judges. But for a year, most of the courthouses were operating without a single Article III judge. As usual, magistrate judges picked up the slack.

  • March 20, 2019

    Seadrill Can't Dodge Oro Negro Ch. 15 Depo Subpoena

    Seadrill Ltd. cannot duck a subpoena seeking to unearth what the company knew about alleged efforts to disrupt rival Perforadora Oro Negro's Gulf of Mexico oil drilling operations, a New York bankruptcy judge ruled Wednesday, saying it would not be overly burdensome for the company to designate a suitable deponent.

  • March 20, 2019

    Gorsuch's Take On Treaty And Tax Bodes Well For Tribes

    The U.S. Supreme Court bolstered the Yakama Nation's rights Tuesday when it ruled that a tribal company is shielded from a Washington state fuel tax by the Yakamas' federal treaty, but Justice Neil Gorsuch's robust concurrence could prove of greater long-term consequence as it shows the justice poised to become a swing vote in tribal cases.

  • March 20, 2019

    States Join Push For DC Circ. To Rehear FERC Dam Dispute

    Several states, including Oregon, New Jersey and Massachusetts, have urged the D.C. Circuit to reconsider its determination that the one-year time limit for states to act on Clean Water Act permit requests doesn't reset if applications are withdrawn and resubmitted.

  • March 20, 2019

    S. Korean Oil Cos. To Pay $126M For Bid-Rigging Scheme

    Two South Korean petroleum and refinery companies have agreed to plead guilty and pay $126 million in criminal fines and civil damages for rigging bids on defense fuel supply contracts, the U.S. Department of Justice’s antitrust chief said Wednesday.

  • March 20, 2019

    BLM Fell Short On Wyo. Drilling's Climate Impact, Judge Says

    A D.C. federal judge has halted the Bureau of Land Management from authorizing new oil and gas drilling on roughly 300,000 acres of land in Wyoming until the government goes back and takes a closer look at how it will impact climate change.

Expert Analysis

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Trial Counsel's Role On A Mass Tort Virtual Law Team

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    Trial counsel’s contribution to the virtual law team throughout the life cycle of a mass tort litigation rests in the key skill of viewing the case through the eyes of the ultimate audience for the defense, the jury, say attorneys at Covington & Burling LLP and Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • How China's Version Of CFIUS Will Expand Security Reviews

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    China's foreign investment security review regime shares many characteristics with the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. And as tensions rise between the two countries, China, like the U.S., is set to scrutinize more deals, says Guogang Li of the Tahota Law Firm.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Refreshed Efficiency Regulations May Impact Appliance Cos.

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    With the U.S. Department of Energy proposing to rewrite its process for determining energy efficiency standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, appliance manufacturers and importers must understand how these changes may affect their products, say attorneys with Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • Del. Bankruptcy Court Reclaims Control Of Article III Suits

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    A Delaware bankruptcy court's recent decision in Paragon Litigation Trust v. Noble Corp. makes it more likely that fraudulent transfer claims can be finally adjudicated in bankruptcy courts, but sets up a potential circuit split, say Matthew Kelsey and Matthew Porcelli of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • The Future Of The USMCA: 3 Possible Scenarios

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    The Trump administration would like Congress to pass the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement by June, but progress has been slow. The deal's fate will depend on cooperation from Democrats, support from Republicans and the strategy pursued by the president, says Robert Kyle of Hogan Lovells.