Energy

  • July 30, 2021

    FERC Asks DC Circ. To Keep Mitts Off Grid Builder Decision

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission told the D.C. Circuit Friday that it didn't do anything wrong when it closed a probe into the way a New England power transmission operator was implementing a certain competition rule, but it isn't the panel's place to hear a challenge to its decision in the first place.

  • July 30, 2021

    Hedge Fund, Kazakhstan Jostle Over Venue In Fraud Suit

    Kazakhstan and a hedge fund it has accused of conspiring with Moldovan oil and gas investors to secure an allegedly fraudulent half-billion-dollar arbitral award remain at loggerheads over the dispute's proper venue, as both sides jostled on Thursday over threshold jurisdictional issues.

  • July 30, 2021

    TC Energy Can't Kill Suit Over Nixed Keystone XL Pipeline

    The fight over the now-defunct Keystone XL pipeline isn't over just because the project's developer has thrown in the towel, a Montana federal judge said Friday in an order denying a motion to dismiss.

  • July 30, 2021

    Experts Tapped To Hear Malaysia Palm Oil Fight Against EU

    Three trade law experts were tapped by the World Trade Organization's director-general to fill a panel that will hear Malaysia's challenge to a European Union plan phasing out palm oil-based biofuels, according to a notice published Friday.

  • July 30, 2021

    Exxon Again Seeks Win In Indonesian Human Rights Suit

    Exxon has again asked a D.C. federal court to put a clean end to decades-old litigation seeking to hold the company liable for human rights abuses Indonesians allegedly suffered at the hands of the country's soldiers when they were purportedly providing security for the oil giant, arguing there is no evidence to suggest the company bears any blame for the military's actions.

  • July 30, 2021

    5th Circ. Told To Affirm Ax Of $36M Failed Contract Bid Suit

    A Texas engineering and construction company has asked the Fifth Circuit to uphold a district court's dismissal of breach of contract and fraud claims launched by a Bolivian company seeking about $36 million for a failed joint venture, saying the claims are based on a void agreement.

  • July 30, 2021

    DC Circ. Told To Back FERC's Security Upgrades Ruling

    First Energy Corp., Duke Energy and other transmission owners have urged the D.C. Circuit to back up a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rule that largely leaves infrastructure upgrade responsibilities and strategies in the hands of the owners rather than regional grid operators.

  • July 30, 2021

    Engie Sells Stake In €14.6B French Gas Network GRTgaz

    CNP Assurances SA and Caisse des Depots et Consignations are increasing their stakes in Engie SA's GRTgaz in a transaction that implies an enterprise value of €14.6 billion ($17.2 billion) for the French gas network, the companies said Friday.

  • July 30, 2021

    Fed. Circ. Affirms PTAB Ax Of Seismic Data Collection Patents

    The Federal Circuit has affirmed two decisions by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board that the vast majority of claims in two Magseis FF LLC patents on an ocean bottom seismometer are invalid as obvious, upholding a win for challenger Seabed Geosolutions US Inc.

  • July 30, 2021

    Judge Says Iraq Can't Ditch $53M Mineral Contract Fight

    A Jordanian company's efforts to enforce a $53 million foreign judgment against the Iraqi government over a mineral contract should proceed, a D.C. federal magistrate judge said, finding the country hasn't disproved claims it waived its sovereign immunity. 

  • July 30, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. sue an Indian bank, eight insurers go after British construction giant John Wood, and Visa and MasterCard face new competition claims. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims filed in the U.K.

  • July 29, 2021

    Judge Says Zoom Formal Attire Optional, But Clothing A Must

    A Texas federal magistrate judge on Wednesday told attorneys representing parties in litigation over the Keystone XL Pipeline that they're not required to wear formal attire when they appear before him in an upcoming virtual hearing on Zoom, but offered a friendly reminder that some form of clothing is required.

  • July 29, 2021

    IP Forecast: Fed. Circ. To Mull Narcan Patents

    Emergent BioSolutions' grip on its blockbuster opioid overdose medication Narcan is at stake in a patent case that reaches the Federal Circuit on Monday. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • July 29, 2021

    Biden Pulls Back Veil On Trump-Era Trade Security Probes

    The Biden administration formally closed the book on a series of Trump-era trade probes Thursday, publishing months-old reports that outlined the U.S. Department of Commerce's assessments on the national security threats posed by various imports.

  • July 29, 2021

    Ill. Justices Sink Energy Co.'s Suit Over Ex-Execs' Departure

    The Illinois Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a lower court wrongly revived an energy company's claim that two of its former business developers usurped a corporate opportunity for a power plant project because the project ultimately failed.

  • July 29, 2021

    House OKs $15.6B DOI Budget With $4B For Tribal Programs

    The House on Thursday approved a $15.6 billion budget for the U.S. Department of the Interior, including $4 billion to increase spending for tribal health, housing, environmental and education programs.

  • July 29, 2021

    House Approves $19B Boost For DOT Budget

    The U.S. Department of Transportation could see its budget bumped up to $105.7 billion to expand safety programs and fund highway, rail, transit and climate-focused infrastructure projects as part of a sprawling spending package the U.S. House of Representatives approved Thursday.

  • July 29, 2021

    GE Opposes Energy Co.'s Fast-Track Appeal Bid In $1.1B Case

    GE has asked the Second Circuit not to expedite an Angolan energy company's appeal of a lower court order dismissing a $1.1 billion contract forgery suit on the grounds that the case should go to an Angolan forum, arguing that its challenge doesn't merit such special treatment.

  • July 29, 2021

    ITC Vote Upholds New Silicon Metal Levies On Malaysia

    The U.S. International Trade Commission unanimously held that silicon metal imports from Malaysia have injured the domestic industry, paving the way for duty orders on a fourth foreign producer following a vote Wednesday.

  • July 29, 2021

    'Mixed Bag' Chancery Ruling Keeps Utah Mine Suit Alive

    In what he called a "mixed bag" ruling, a Delaware vice chancellor moved toward trial counterclaims in a sprawling Chancery Court battle over an alleged international loan-to-own scheme dating to 2013 and focused on a $600 million Utah copper mine.

  • July 29, 2021

    Deals Rumor Mill: Baxter International, Didi Global, Nanosys

    Baxter International could buy $8 billion health care technology company Hill-Rom, Didi Global is weighing a go-private deal to appease Chinese regulators just one month after hitting the U.S. public markets, and Nanosys is mulling a SPAC merger. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • July 29, 2021

    Feds Seek $25M Penalty For Alleged Steel Tariff Fraud

    The federal government sued a Pennsylvania metal lid company seeking $25 million, saying the company had passed off steel lids from Europe as duty-free products for years, but then refused to pay the penalties.

  • July 29, 2021

    Chemical Co. Sues Seller Over IP Claim In $240M Deal

    A Kansas oilfield company has filed suit in Delaware Chancery Court against the founder of one of the companies it purchased in a $240 million deal, saying that he launched a competing business using trade secrets that he now claims are public information.

  • July 29, 2021

    4 Areas EPA Could Expand With House's 23% Budget Boost

    With the House approving its biggest budget boost in a decade, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is potentially poised to go on a hiring spree, increase its funding for programs at the state and tribal level, ramp up enforcement efforts and expand its commitment to environmental justice issues.

  • July 29, 2021

    Tribes Get OK To Join Fight Over Nevada Lithium Mine

    A Nevada federal judge has found that two tribal communities have the right to intervene in a lawsuit seeking to halt progress of a disputed lithium mine project, dismissing the objections of a Canadian mining company.

Expert Analysis

  • What To Expect Under New SEC Enforcement Director Grewal

    Author Photo

    Newly appointed U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Director of Enforcement Gurbir Grewal’s record as a public servant provides insight into the SEC’s likely priorities for the coming year, and firms should expect him to work closely with Chair Gary Gensler in pursuing an aggressive enforcement agenda, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • White House Vision For Carbon Capture Faces Obstacles

    Author Photo

    A recent White House Council on Environmental Quality report suggests policies that could bolster carbon capture and storage projects in the U.S., but federal and state regulators and the private sector will face red tape, environmental justice concerns and other challenges in expanding CCS infrastructure, say Ethan Shenkman and Sarah Grey at Arnold & Porter.

  • Law Firms, Know Who's Responsible For Your Cloud Security

    Author Photo

    Lawyers generally know that files go into the cloud and that the files are then secured and protected, but it's necessary for firms to take a closer look at their cloud supply chain and then come up with a responsibility matrix that helps mitigate any potential risks or weaknesses, says Martin Ward at iManage.

  • Texas Power Crisis Suits Bring Market Price Questions

    Author Photo

    As lawsuits mount centering on Texas' February power crisis, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas operating reserve demand curve will be critical in pinning down what prices would have been absent the Texas Public Utility Commission's interference and how much the generators now owe the suppliers for the shortfall, say Todd Aagaard at Villanova University Law School and Andrew Kleit at Penn State University.

  • Benefits For Law Firms Venturing Into New Services

    Author Photo

    By offering more services, law firms can deepen and strengthen their client relationships and truly become an extension of their clients' teams while generating new revenue streams, and while there are risks associated with expanding into consulting, they may be worth it, says Lou Ramos at Major Lindsey.

  • 6 Ways To Excise Xinjiang Forced Labor From Supply Chains

    Author Photo

    As the U.S. increases scrutiny of China's Xinjiang province and considers legislation to bar all goods produced, mined or manufactured there unless the importer can prove the absence of forced labor, importers can take steps to ensure supply chain compliance, say Rachel Alpert and Grace Signorelli-Cassady at Jenner & Block.

  • Green Investments Are Not Immune To ESG Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    As investment informed and motivated by environmental, social and governance considerations accelerates, companies and investors in the green technology sector must keep in mind that regulators, consumers and communities will not grant them free passes on the full range of ESG concerns, say Michael Murphy and Kyle Guest at Gibson Dunn.

  • New FTC Mergers Approach Raises Risks For Buyers, Sellers

    Author Photo

    In rescinding a 1995 policy statement last week, the Federal Trade Commission likely seeks to more regularly impose "prior approval" obligations for future transactions in its merger cases, which changes the risk profile for buyers and sellers negotiating antitrust provisions in deal agreements, say Jon Dubrow and Noah Feldman Greene at McDermott.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Exelon GC Talks Diversity Initiatives

    Author Photo

    Executing a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion programming, through recruitment, inclusive legal pipelines and community empowerment via pro bono efforts, can ensure a strong environmental, social and governance proposition, says Gayle Littleton at Exelon.

  • Methane Rule Changes Add Complexity For Oil And Gas Cos.

    Author Photo

    President Joe Biden's recent move to reinstitute regulation of methane under the federal New Source Performance Standards, thus rolling back changes made by the prior administration, creates additional compliance challenges for oil and gas transportation and storage companies, say Whit Swift and Brittany Pemberton at Bracewell.

  • Revamping Law Firm Marketing Lists — With Partner Buy-In

    Author Photo

    Jackson Lewis’ Paige Bowser shares lessons from the firm's recent overhaul of an outdated email marketing database, including tips for getting partners on board, ensuring compliance with privacy laws and augmenting outreach strategies.

  • First 2021 Corporate FCPA Case Offers Compliance Reminders

    Author Photo

    Foster Wheeler's recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlement — the first corporate enforcement action since President Joe Biden took office — highlights the FCPA risks related to public contracting and tenders, the use of third-party agents, successor liability following M&A activity, and the U.S. authorities' aggressive assertion of jurisdiction in international corruption cases, says Robert Johnston Jr. at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Gov't Contractor Input Vital After Biden Cybersecurity Order

    Author Photo

    The Office of Management and Budget's upcoming recommendations for improving U.S. cybersecurity defenses, following President Joe Biden's recent executive order, could create burdensome obligations for government contractors, so it's important for the government to actively engage with the industry during the rulemaking process, say executives at Leidos.

  • The Murky World Of Legal Rankings Gets Some Clarity In NJ

    Author Photo

    New Jersey's new, stringent approach to legal rankings will make accolade advertising more transparent, benefiting both attorneys and clients and offering legal marketers a new set of best practices amid evolving standards, say Penny Paul at Lowenstein Sandler and Susan Peters at Greybridge.

  • Justices' Biofuel Exemption Ruling Boosts Small Refineries

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in HollyFrontier Cheyenne Refining v. Renewable Fuels Association, enabling the revival of lapsed exemptions from biofuel requirements under the Clean Air Act, gives small oil refineries added flexibility, says Scott Press at Goldberg Segalla.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!