Public Policy

  • September 18, 2019

    SEC Joins Other Regulators In OK'ing Volcker Rule Changes

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday announced it had followed other federal agencies with responsibility for the financial sector in approving a final set of changes to the Volcker Rule's ban on proprietary trading.

  • September 18, 2019

    CFPB Will Keep Consumer Complaint Database Public

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Wednesday that it will keep its consumer complaint database open to the public, stepping back from what consumer advocates had feared would be a shuttering of a resource they say is vital for keeping tabs on the financial services industry.

  • September 18, 2019

    House Dems Ask DOD For More Info On Trump Resort Stays

    Top Democrats on the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday reiterated their demand that the U.S. Department of Defense hand over records related to Air Force personnel staying at President Donald Trump’s resort in Scotland during layovers at a nearby civilian airport.

  • September 18, 2019

    Senate Bill Would Establish Center To Fight Election Meddling

    A pair of U.S. Senate Democrats, including 2020 presidential hopeful Amy Klobuchar, is pressing election security legislation that would require the intelligence community to create a new information-sharing center to combat foreign interference. 

  • September 18, 2019

    Proposed Bitcoin ETF Issuers Withdraw From SEC Evaluation

    The proposal to list a bitcoin exchange-traded fund issued by asset manager VanEck and startup SolidX on the Cboe BZX Exchange has been withdrawn, according to a filing from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • September 18, 2019

    Probe Of Big Tech Could Yield Big Results

    A slew of major investigations at the state, federal, congressional and international level have put internet giants Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon under the microscope of nearly every jurisdiction imaginable and have the potential for a range of dramatic outcomes.

  • September 18, 2019

    Senate Dems Block Gov't Funding Bill Amid Border Wall Fight

    Senate Democrats on Wednesday derailed a Republican attempt to take up a government spending package as the fight over funding for President Donald Trump’s long-promised border wall continues on Capitol Hill.

  • September 18, 2019

    House Leaders 'Optimistic' On USMCA Ratification

    Democratic and Republican leaders in the U.S. House of Representatives say they’re optimistic about progress toward ratification of President Donald Trump’s renegotiated North American trade pact, the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement.

  • September 18, 2019

    Immigration Court Backlog Tops 1M As Cases Keep Piling Up

    The immigration court backlog surpassed 1 million cases in August, according to a report released Wednesday by Syracuse University's Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, a nonpartisan data research organization.

  • September 18, 2019

    11th Circ. Says Feds Can Sue Under Title II Of ADA

    The Eleventh Circuit has ruled that the federal government has the authority to challenge Florida's institutionalization of disabled children under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, finding that Congress granted the power even though the act's language may be somewhat ambiguous.

  • September 18, 2019

    River Authority Immune From Arbitration, Texas Justices Told

    The San Antonio River Authority is a governmental entity and cannot be ordered into binding arbitration in a dispute over a $10 million dam project because lawmakers have granted it immunity, it told the Texas Supreme Court during oral arguments Wednesday.

  • September 18, 2019

    States Don't Want Sprint-T-Mobile Trial Moved Up

    States suing to block the merger of Sprint and T-Mobile have urged a New York federal court not to move the scheduled trial date up a week in order to avoid a potential conflict with the year-end holidays, saying it would hinder their preparation efforts.

  • September 18, 2019

    FCC Links Lifeline, Medicaid Program Enrollment

    The Federal Communications Commission announced Wednesday that it has launched an automated system that links Medicaid and the agency's Lifeline verification program in an attempt to cut down on waste.

  • September 18, 2019

    Trump's DOL Pick Scalia On The Hot Seat: What To Watch For

    Gibson Dunn attorney Eugene Scalia's work defending companies accused of wrongdoing and challenging regulations meant to shield vulnerable employees has polarized business and worker advocates ahead of Thursday's hearing on his nomination to be the next labor secretary.

  • September 18, 2019

    FTC Dem Calls Out DOJ For Lax Labor Market Enforcement

    The Federal Trade Commission's Rohit Chopra criticized the U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday for failing to use its criminal enforcement authority to combat anti-competitive no-poach and wage-fixing agreements in the labor market.

  • September 18, 2019

    Contractor Revenue Growing Under Immigration Crackdown

    Revenue for contractors who run immigration detention centers and correctional facilities has surged with increased immigration enforcement under the Trump and Obama administrations, a Wednesday report by consumer advocacy group Public Citizen found.

  • September 18, 2019

    Trump Orders More Sanctions On Iran After Saudi Oil Attack

    President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he has instructed the U.S. Treasury Department to "substantially increase" sanctions on Iran as tensions mount between the two countries over suspicions that the Middle East nation was behind a recent attack on Saudi Arabian oil sites.

  • September 18, 2019

    Senate Confirms 2 Treasury Nominees

    The U.S. Senate confirmed the nominations of two individuals to fill key positions at the U.S. Department of the Treasury in largely party-line votes Wednesday.

  • September 18, 2019

    DOD Role Key To Curb Chinese Control Of Rare-Earth Market

    China's domination of the worldwide market for rare-earth minerals used in many defense systems creates a significant national security issue, and the Pentagon's response will have a big impact on whether domestic rare-earth sources can be used to alleviate the issue.

  • September 18, 2019

    Key GOP Senator 'Real Doubtful' On 2nd Circ. Nominee

    A Republican member of the Senate Judiciary Committee voiced doubts Wednesday about President Donald Trump's pick for the powerful Second Circuit appeals court, putting the nomination in question given the thin margins on the committee and in the chamber.

  • September 18, 2019

    DC Judge Tells Gov't To Toe Line On Asylum Parole Order

    A D.C. federal judge said Wednesday that he's going to be much "less indulgent" with the government after having to order immigration officials in New Orleans for the second time to stop ignoring a government policy that allows detained asylum-seekers to be paroled.

  • September 18, 2019

    Indian Lands Need More Spectrum Access, Sens. Hear

    Broadband experts told a Senate panel Wednesday that to spur tribal economic development, the federal government should collect more data about high-speed internet coverage on Native American lands and tap into unused spectrum to improve access for tribes.

  • September 18, 2019

    NJ County Says AG Has No Right To Bar Sharing Info With ICE

    A New Jersey county slammed the state attorney general in federal court Wednesday, challenging his directive last year that barred law enforcement agencies from sharing certain information with federal immigration authorities and saying the move violated federal and state law.

  • September 18, 2019

    Dems Roll Out Bill Blocking Trump's 'Public Charge' Rule

    More than 20 Senate Democrats have rolled out legislation that would block the Trump administration's recent policy penalizing immigrants for using public benefits.

  • September 18, 2019

    Wireless Industry Lauds 3.5 GHz Launch As Milestone

    Industry members and government officials in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday celebrated the launch of commercial applications in the 3.5 GHz spectrum band, once reserved for defense users, lauding the new sharing arrangement after more than a decade of negotiation between federal regulators, the military and private interests.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: When A Firm Brings Counseling On Site

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    One year ago, our firm signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge and embraced a commitment to providing on-site behavioral health resources, which has since become a key aspect of our well-being program, say Meg Meserole and Kimberly Merkel at Akin Gump.

  • Laying The Groundwork For Next-Generation Nuclear Energy

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    Nuclear energy enjoys bipartisan support, as evidenced by a range of recent and pending federal legislation that could help revive the U.S. nuclear industry, say attorneys with Morgan Lewis.

  • New Calif. Law Represents Strategic Shift In PFAS Regulation

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    California recently became the first state in the country to require public water suppliers to notify customers if their water contains per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, which will undoubtedly set into motion more regulatory oversight, and more litigation, say Jeffrey Dintzer and Clynton Namuo of Alston & Bird.

  • IRS Safe Harbor Proposal Hard On Restructuring Cos.

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    Proposed regulations released by the IRS last week would adversely affect many companies involved in M&A transactions and restructurings by substantially restricting their ability to use net operating losses and built-in gains after an ownership change, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Calif. Dynamex Law Shifts Employment Landscape Drastically

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    With its hodgepodge carveout of job categories, a law signed Wednesday that codifies the California Supreme Court's worker classification decision in Dynamex is far from clear and will likely result in increased litigation with potentially devastating consequences for noncompliant businesses, says Eve Wagner at Signature Resolution.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Inside A Firm Meditation Program

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    After our firm signed the American Bar Association’s well-being pledge one year ago, we launched two key programs that included weekly meditation sessions and monthly on-site chair massages to help people address both the mental and physical aspects of working at a law firm, says Marci Eisenstein at Schiff Hardin.

  • Commerce Move Affects Exports To Chinese Nuclear Co.

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    The U.S. Department of Commerce’s recent addition of China's largest nuclear power company, the China General Nuclear Power Group, to its entity list dramatically increases the scope of U.S. export restrictions on CGN, even prohibiting the export of low-technology consumer goods and software, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Updated NJ Site Remediation Law Makes Public Outreach Key

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    New Jersey's newly updated Site Remediation Reform Act requires those responsible for conducting remediation to handle open records requests from the public, so companies should make public outreach strategy an integral part of site remediation planning, says Lori Mills of Duane Morris.

  • Calif. Guidelines Advance Telehealth For Medicaid Patients

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    Although the California Department of Health Care Services' updated guidelines expanding telemedicine reimbursement have some shortcomings, they open new channels of care for many Medicaid beneficiaries and raise intriguing prospects for similar programs across the country, say Harsh Parikh and Jill Gordon of Nixon Peabody.

  • NY Tax Minutes: City Finances, Transparency, Tribunal Rulings

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    In their recap of New York's recent tax highlights, Timothy Noonan and Craig Reilly of Hodgson Russ discuss the New York City financial plan through 2023, the new industrial development agency transparency requirement and three notable Tax Appeals Tribunal decisions.

  • Utah Blazes Trail With Law Shielding Data From Gov't Search

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    Utah's recently enacted Electronic Information or Data Privacy Act and other states' laws that follow it will change long-standing practices in how companies that collect or store users’ personal data respond to law enforcement requests, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • Top 5 Modern Tax Challenges For Digital Health Companies

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    As jurisdictions around the world adapt and modernize to capture revenue that would otherwise escape taxation under frameworks put in place long before today’s technology existed, digital health companies face rising tax uncertainty, say Kathleen Gregor and Elizabeth Smith of Ropes & Gray.

  • FCC Rural Health Developments Shift Focus To Functionality

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    The Federal Communications Commission's proposed plans to modernize and fund its rural health care programs represent a new approach prioritizing patients' nuanced needs, rather than focusing on the rurality of health care providers, says Danielle Frappier of Davis Wright.

  • Early Sampling Of Electronic Info Is Underutilized In Discovery

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    The early and prompt provision of samples from all electronically stored information sources as a part of ESI protocol search methodology is consistent with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and may allow for significant cost savings during discovery, says Zachary Caplan at Berger Montague.

  • Opinion

    California, Follow NY's Lead And Pass An FCA Tax Bill

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    Legislation poised to expand California’s False Claims Act to include tax cases recently stalled, but in New York similar legislation provided whistleblowers with incentive to come forward and earned the state revenue, says Justin Wagner, a former assistant attorney general in New York's Taxpayer Protection Bureau.