Project Finance

  • November 25, 2020

    Akin Gump Must Explain Role In $1B Ohio Energy Bailout Bill

    An Ohio bankruptcy judge ordered Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP attorneys billing the bankruptcy estate of reorganized debtor FirstEnergy Solutions Corp. to explain what role, if any, they had in lobbying efforts to get a controversial $1 billion nuclear reactor bailout bill passed by the Ohio Legislature before he would approve their fees.

  • November 25, 2020

    Pebble Mine's Future Dims As Key Permit Is Denied

    The Army Corps of Engineers on Wednesday said it will not approve a critical water permit for a controversial gold and copper mine in Alaska, saying the project's environmental harms are too great, even considering the estimated economic benefits.

  • November 25, 2020

    Guatemala Pays Teco $37M In Long-Running Power Tariff Suit

    Guatemala has paid $37.4 million to a subsidiary of U.S.-based Teco Energy Inc. to satisfy an arbitral award the country had challenged for seven years in a long-running dispute over electricity tariffs.

  • November 25, 2020

    Texas Tries Again To Undo $29M Verdict Over Highway Project

    Texas' government asked the state Supreme Court on Tuesday to review an appeals court's approval of a $29 million verdict for a developer who claimed that a highway project and related land condemnation tanked the value of the developer's residential project site, saying the ruling was incorrect.

  • November 25, 2020

    Odebrecht Construction Co. Files For Ch. 15 Bankruptcy In NY

    Brazilian construction firm Odebrecht Engineering and Construction has asked a New York bankruptcy judge to extend U.S. bankruptcy protections to its construction division in a Chapter 15 petition and enforce the terms of its $4.1 billion restructuring plan.

  • November 25, 2020

    Trump's Exit Draws Fresh Battle Lines Over Tariff Power

    Lawmakers tried but failed to mount a meaningful challenge to President Donald Trump's aggressive use of tariffs over the last four years, but his ouster will not necessarily make Congress' goal to claw back more tariff power any easier.

  • November 25, 2020

    PE Firm INNIO Sues GE Over Failed $3B Deal

    A private equity firm sued in London over its $3 billion purchase of a General Electric power unit has hit back with its own suit, accusing the conglomerate of making key omissions in financial statements used to evaluate the final price of the deal.  

  • November 25, 2020

    BigLaw's Sustainability Pro Bono Drive Blew Past $15M Goal

    When a group of BigLaw firms committed two years ago to devote $15 million worth of time to climate change and sustainability issues, they got overwhelming interest from junior associates and senior partners alike, and as the program has grown, firms have contributed at least $24 million in pro bono work.

  • November 24, 2020

    Feds Say 4th Circ. Skimped On Baltimore Climate Suit Review

    The federal government has told the U.S. Supreme Court that it should be easier for energy giants like Chevron and Exxon Mobil to move state court lawsuits seeking to hold them liable for climate change damages to federal court.

  • November 24, 2020

    UK Judge Nixes Miner's Award In Fight With Kazakhstan

    An English judge has set aside a damages award issued to a Canadian minerals company following a dispute over a terminated uranium processing project, saying the tribunal had wrongly denied Kazakhstan a chance to present its case on the damages issue.

  • November 24, 2020

    Water Permits Voided For $2B Wash. Methanol Refinery

    A Washington federal court has struck down water quality permits granted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to an export terminal for a 90-acre, $2 billion methanol manufacturing project in the state, ruling the approvals were issued without properly considering the full indirect emissions of the project.

  • November 24, 2020

    States, Cities Seek Demise Of Trump's Narrowed Water Rule

    A group of states on Monday asked a federal judge to scrap the Trump administration's rule narrowing the scope of the Clean Water Act's jurisdiction, saying the government failed to study how excluding many previously protected waters would harm water quality and step on states' rights.

  • November 24, 2020

    Divided DC Circ. Denies Tribes' Bid To Halt Border Wall

    A divided D.C. Circuit panel refused to halt construction of President Donald Trump's border wall on Monday, overriding claims from Native American groups that the project is irreversibly destroying significant archeological sites, in violation of federal law.

  • November 24, 2020

    Colo. Enacts Stricter Rules For Oil And Gas Drillers

    Colorado oil and gas regulators on Monday adopted an overhaul of drilling rules to require greater consideration of public health and environmental impacts, including drilling further away from homes and schools and limiting venting and flaring from gas wells.

  • November 24, 2020

    GOP Reps. Seek GAO Audit Of Ag Dept. Rural Broadband Pilot

    Nearly a dozen House Republicans have asked the Government Accountability Office to probe the operations of a pilot program run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fund rural broadband projects, saying they worry millions of dollars are going to waste.

  • November 24, 2020

    Trump Admin. Tells 9th Circ. Alaska Land Swap Is Valid

    The Trump administration has told the Ninth Circuit that it properly weighed public health concerns when it approved a land transfer that could allow an isolated Native community to build a road through a wildlife refuge, despite the Obama administration's concern about the project's environmental impact.

  • November 23, 2020

    Ukraine Can't Block Enforcement Of $81M Tatneft Award

    Ukraine came up short on Monday in its efforts to reverse an enforcement order for $81 million of a $112 million arbitral award issued to the Russian oil company Tatneft after an English judge rejected Kyiv's petition as an abuse of process.

  • November 23, 2020

    Calif. Law Limiting Review Of Gas Power Plants Struck Down

    A California law unconstitutionally limited court review of where natural gas-fired and thermal power plants can be located to only the state's Supreme Court, a state appeals court ruled Friday.

  • November 23, 2020

    Chesapeake Energy Floats Ch. 11 Pipeline Deal With Williams

    Bankrupt oil and gas driller Chesapeake Energy Corp. proposed a deal Sunday in Texas bankruptcy court that would provide an agreeable resolution of disputes over gas gathering agreements with The Williams Companies by turning over some of the debtor's assets to the pipeline operator and receiving beneficial amendments to the gas deals.

  • November 23, 2020

    Harm Of Proposed DAPL Shutdown Too Great, ND Says

    The state of North Dakota on Friday urged a D.C. federal judge not to shut down the Dakota Access Pipeline during a court-ordered environmental review, saying that doing so would harm the state by drastically cutting tax revenues.

  • November 23, 2020

    Biden Names John Kerry To New Climate Envoy Position

    President-elect Joe Biden on Monday made clear his commitment to tackling climate change, saying he'll name former Secretary of State John Kerry as a special White House climate envoy, a position that also features a seat on the National Security Council.

  • November 23, 2020

    Judge Backs Sanctions For AWOL EB-5 Fraud Suit Defendant

    A Florida federal judge recommended Monday that a son should follow in his father's footsteps by being sanctioned with the striking of his pleadings and a default judgment for violating court orders and abandoning his defense in a suit accusing him of aiding a $50 million EB-5 investment fraud.

  • November 23, 2020

    Sierra Club Says Calif. Dam Hasn't Gotten Proper Review

    The Sierra Club and other environmental groups asked a California state court to block a new dam project that will provide water for agriculture that the coalition says was justified by an environmental review that suffered from a host of deficiencies.

  • November 20, 2020

    $1B Solar Plant Faces Feasibility Hurdle In Del. Ch. 11

    Unsecured creditors of a massive, bankrupt, $1 billion Nevada solar power plant pressed arguments in Delaware on Friday that Tonopah Solar Energy LLC's Chapter 11 assumptions are far too sunny, with a plan that will earn too little and give away too much.

  • November 20, 2020

    No Extra Discovery For Engineering Co. In Oman Contract Suit

    Parsons Engineering has lost its emergency bid for more time to seek additional evidence about an allegedly biased arbitrator who issued a $24 million award against the company, with a California federal judge finding that "any urgency or potential prejudice is of Parsons's own making."

Expert Analysis

  • Biden Must Sustain Laser Focus To Meet Lofty Green Goals

    Author Photo

    President-elect Joe Biden has targeted climate change with ambitious power-sector and emissions targets, but several obstacles will need to be addressed, including the power markets' decentralized nature, certain states and constituencies' resistance, and the expected lack of a congressional mandate, say Sandra Rizzo and Jamie Lee at Arnold & Porter.

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

    Author Photo

    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

  • Carbon Capture Policy Should Be Aligned For Global Adoption

    Author Photo

    With support from both Republicans and Democrats, carbon capture, utilization and storage technology as a tool for decarbonization may be poised for domestic growth — but the U.S. and the European Union must coordinate their policies to promote a global approach, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

    Author Photo

    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • How Federal, State Plans Could Bring Carbon Capture To US

    Author Photo

    Proposals from President-elect Joe Biden, a pair of bills currently pending in Congress and a low-carbon fuels program in California provide insights into how carbon capture, utilization and storage technology could be integrated into the fight against climate change in the U.S., say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

    Author Photo

    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • EU Climate Goals Are Hard To Reach Without Carbon Capture

    Author Photo

    The European Union's failure to fully embrace blue fuels, produced using carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies, may hinder the region's pursuit of its aggressive decarbonization goals, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Picking The Right Location And Tools For Virtual Courtrooms

    Author Photo

    Attorneys should consider the pros and cons of participating in virtual court proceedings from home versus their law firm offices, and whether they have the right audio, video and team communication tools for their particular setup, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Carbon Capture Tech Offers A Fast Path Toward Climate Goals

    Author Photo

    To meet ambitious climate goals, the U.S., EU and other developed nations must immediately start reducing carbon emissions from fossil fuels, which policymakers can encourage by supporting carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe.

  • Beware Atty Ethics Rules When Reporting COVID-19 Fraud

    Author Photo

    Attorneys considering blowing the whistle on False Claims Act violations by recipients of COVID-19 relief may face a number of ethical constraints on their ability to disclose client information and file qui tam actions, say Breon Peace and Jennifer Kennedy Park at Cleary.

  • Looking For Judicial Activists? Check The Footnotes

    Author Photo

    U.S. Supreme Court nominees typically face intense questioning over potential judicial activism, but a better way to gauge judges' activist tendencies may be to look at the footnotes in their opinions, say Christopher Collier at Hawkins Parnell and Michael Arndt at Rohan Law.

  • Best Practices For Legal Technology Adoption

    Author Photo

    The pandemic has accelerated the need to improve the practice of law through technology, but law firms and in-house legal departments must first ensure they have employee buy-in and well-defined processes for new digital tools, say Dan Broderick at BlackBoiler and Daryl Shetterly at Orrick.

  • Opinion

    Dakota Pipeline Challenge Undermines Permitting Process

    Author Photo

    If Standing Rock Sioux Tribe v. Army Corps of Engineers succeeds at challenging the Dakota Access Pipeline's environmental permitting more than three years after it came online, other infrastructure projects might also face legal battles long after they are built, says David Hill at the Columbia University Center on Global Energy Policy.

  • The Pandemic's Long-Term Impact On Law Firm Operations

    Author Photo

    Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey looks at how pandemic-era remote work has changed the way law firms operate — from shifts in secretarial functions to associate professional development — and explains why some alterations may be here to stay.

  • Opinion

    Lack Of Access To Remote Court Proceedings Is Inexcusable

    Author Photo

    Blanket rules that bar recording or dissemination of remote public court proceedings impede presumptive common law and First Amendment right of access, greatly expand courts' powers over nonparties, and likely run afoul of U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Matthew Schafer at ViacomCBS.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!