Media & Entertainment

  • January 27, 2022

    Netflix Can't Checkmate 'Queen's Gambit' Defamation Suit

    A California federal judge denied Netflix's attempt to dismiss a defamation suit from Georgian chess champion Nona Gaprindashvili over her portrayal in the hit show "The Queen's Gambit," ruling Thursday that while the show is fictional, the reference to Gaprindashvili could be interpreted as a true historical detail.

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Says Shkreli's Picasso Can Be Sold To Pay $2.6M Debt

    A New York federal judge on Thursday authorized a receiver to sell a Picasso etching seized from imprisoned "pharma bro" Martin Shkreli to settle a $2.6 million debt the former drug firm executive owes to a Pennsylvania pharmaceutical industry consultant.

  • January 27, 2022

    DVD Pirate Must Face Over 2 Years In The Brig, Feds Say

    Federal prosecutors on Wednesday asked a New York judge to sentence a British hacker to more than two years in prison after he admitted his role in a syndicate responsible for pirating nearly every major motion picture released on disc from 2011 to early 2020.

  • January 27, 2022

    FTC Says Social Media Is A 'Gold Mine' For Crypto Scammers

    Facebook, Instagram and other social media platforms are a "gold mine" for scammers, according to a new consumer protection data report from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which said last year saw a sharp spike in online fraud schemes, particularly bogus cryptocurrency ventures.

  • January 27, 2022

    Breyer's Departure Opens Door For More Reliable Privacy Vote

    Retiring U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer has had a mixed record on defending individuals from warrantless government searches and unwanted robocalls, presenting an opportunity for the "wild card" to be replaced with a jurist who's more solidly on the side of protecting privacy and civil liberties. 

  • January 27, 2022

    Lil Yachty Says NFT Biz Used His TMs To Boost Cash Flow

    Rapper Lil Yachty filed a trademark infringement suit in California federal court against two music companies he claims used his likeness and name without his permission to raise over $6.5 million in venture capital funds for a line of nonfungible tokens.

  • January 27, 2022

    The Term: Breyer's Legacy And The Nomination To Come

    Justice Stephen Breyer on Thursday formally announced he would be retiring at the end of the Supreme Court term. Here, The Term breaks down the legacy he will leave behind and takes a look at what lies ahead for his potential successor with two special guests.

  • January 27, 2022

    Ex-Defense Chief Esper Close To Deal On Book Redactions

    Former Defense Secretary Mark Esper has neared an agreement with the Biden administration on redacting portions of his upcoming memoir to deal with security concerns, lawyers told a D.C. federal judge Thursday.

  • January 27, 2022

    Breyer Retiring As Supreme Court Lurches Right

    Justice Stephen Breyer is retiring from the U.S. Supreme Court at a time when his conservative colleagues on the bench seem intent on dismantling landmark precedents on abortion, affirmative action and the administrative state, to name a few. Can his successor preserve his liberal legacy?

  • January 27, 2022

    Apple Can't Hide Behind Privacy In Epic Fight, 9th Circ. Told

    Nearly 40 law, business and economics academics urged the Ninth Circuit on Thursday to upend Apple's win over Epic Games' allegations that the technology giant's App Store policies are anti-competitive, arguing the judge wrongly accepted Apple's justifications that restrictions on third-party app distribution are necessary to protect users.

  • January 27, 2022

    FCC Kicks Off Study For Broadband 'Nutrition Labels'

    The Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously Thursday to begin considering new rules that would require broadband providers to display easy-to-understand labels to allow consumers to comparison shop for broadband services, similar to nutrition labels on foods.

  • January 27, 2022

    Injured Live Nation Worker, Atty Take $5M Fee Spat To Court

    An event worker who won a historic award from Live Nation over an accident that left him with severe brain injuries is embroiled in an acrimonious dispute over attorney fees with his lawyer, who is suing him in New York over a $5.5 million fee.

  • January 27, 2022

    Stormy Daniels Tells Jury Avenatti Lied And Stole From Her

    Former Michael Avenatti client Stormy Daniels took the witness stand Thursday in the criminal case accusing the celebrity lawyer of defrauding the adult film actress out of hundreds of thousands of dollars from a book deal, saying Avenatti "stole from me and lied to me."

  • January 27, 2022

    Zillow Gets Damages Cut To $1.9M In Photo Copyright Fight

    Zillow has convinced a Washington federal court to trim a damages award against it to $1.9 million in a copyright dispute over the use of real estate photographs on its website, a considerable reduction from the $8 million it was initially supposed to pay.

  • January 27, 2022

    Labaton Nabs Lead In Honest Co. Investor's Diaper IPO Suit

    Labaton Sucharow LLP will represent a proposed class of investors in the Honest Co. baby and beauty concern in a suit accusing the company of failing to properly explain that it might see a post-lockdown slump in diaper sales ahead of its May 2021 initial public offering.

  • January 27, 2022

    Facebook Data Antitrust Suits Get New Judge

    A string of cases in California federal court accusing Facebook of monopolizing social media markets through its use of consumer data have been reassigned to a new judge thanks to the recent elevation of Judge Lucy H. Koh to the Ninth Circuit.

  • January 27, 2022

    Privacy Groups Push 'Fourth Amendment Not For Sale' Bill

    Consumer privacy advocates are urging lawmakers to advance a bill to prevent law enforcement and intelligence agencies from buying Americans' private data from telecom providers.

  • January 27, 2022

    Robinhood Defeats Investors' 'Meme Stock' Claims

    Robinhood on Thursday defeated claims that it wrongly blocked investors from buying "meme stocks" during last year's market volatility, with a Florida federal court finding the stock-trading platform acted within the scope of its customer agreement.

  • January 27, 2022

    EPA Asks Court To OK $1.8M CERCLA Deal For Past Navy Site

    The U.S. government asked a North Carolina federal court to sign off on a deal for the Defense Department to put $1.2 million toward cleaning up the site of an old Navy base while ViacomCBS and two other companies agreed to pay over half a million dollars for pollution tied to cabinet manufacturing.

  • January 27, 2022

    FCC Revokes China Unicom's Right To Operate In US

    The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday to block China Unicom from continuing to operate communications networks in the U.S., citing national security risks based on the company's ties to the Chinese government. 

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Jackson Back In Spotlight As High Court Contender

    The upcoming vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court quickly threw the spotlight back on D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, a former clerk for Justice Stephen Breyer whose stature as a likely successor to the retiring justice was suddenly raised Wednesday.

  • January 27, 2022

    Biden At His Side, Justice Breyer Announces Retirement

    Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer joined President Joe Biden at the White House Thursday to formally announce his retirement, kicking off a rush among Democrats to confirm a new member of the court to replace the oldest serving justice.

  • January 27, 2022

    EU Clears Facebook's Kustomer Deal, But Rivals Get Access

    European Union antitrust officials announced Thursday that they will permit Facebook parent company Meta Platforms Inc. to buy customer service management provider Kustomer, assuaged by commitments to guarantee 10 years of access to rival providers.

  • January 26, 2022

    Manatt Partner, Ex-'Varsity Blues' Atty Picked For Mass. Bench

    Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker on Wednesday nominated a Manatt Phelps & Phillips partner and former government attorney involved in the "Varsity Blues" case to be an associate justice of the state's superior court, according to an announcement from the governor's office.

  • January 26, 2022

    Apple Fights Uphill To Trim Willfulness Claims In Piracy Suits

    A California federal judge said he's not inclined to grant Apple's request to cut willful copyright infringement claims from a trio of suits alleging it infringed by selling pirated copies of hit songs such as “Over the Rainbow” and “Stormy Weather” on iTunes.

Expert Analysis

  • How AI Can Transform Crisis Management In Litigation

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    Attorneys should understand how to use rapidly advancing artificial intelligence technology to help clients prepare for potential catastrophic events and the inevitable litigation arising from them, from predicting crises before they occur to testing legal theories once they arise, say Stratton Horres at Wilson Elser and David Steiger.

  • Supervisor Relationships Are Key To Beating Atty Burnout

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    In order to combat record attorney turnover and high levels of burnout, law firm partners and leaders must build engaging relationships with supervisees, fostering autonomy and control, enabling expression of values, and building a sense of community and belonging, says Anne Brafford at the Institute for Well-Being in Law.

  • Opinion

    FTC Rulemaking Risks Expansion Of Unfair-Method Bounds

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    The Federal Trade Commission's plan to issue rules defining unfair methods of competition under Section 5 of the FTC Act arguably exceeds the commission's power, and isn't justified, because the current case-by-case approach to promoting competition through adjudication is preferable, says Sean Gates at Charis Lex.

  • Germany's Google Controls Illustrate Global Antitrust Trend

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    Germany's recent move to rein in Google with extended restrictions on anti-competitive behavior provides an example of the new aggressive stance regulators around the world are adopting as tech giants grow their power in the digital economy, says Andrea Pomana at ADVANT Beiten.

  • What To Expect From Merger Guideline Modernization

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's and Federal Trade Commission's recent request for comment on amending the merger review guidelines provides perhaps the clearest indication yet of where guideline revisions might focus, including on structural presumptions, the role of market definition and the effect of transactions on labor, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

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    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • 5 Global Digital Markets Regulatory Issues To Watch In 2022

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    Francesco Liberatore at Squire Patton lays out the key regulatory developments that will affect global digital markets this year, from new enforcement measures aimed at electronic communications services in the European Union to increased cooperation between antitrust officials in the U.S., U.K. and EU.

  • Aviation Watch: Resolving The FAA-FCC Fight Over 5G

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    Concerns over interference with aircraft altimeters are delaying the U.S. rollout of 5G wireless technology, and it may take special action by the Biden administration to resolve the standoff between the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Aviation Administration over the issue, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Opinion

    Money Laundering Regs Too Unwieldy To Police Art Market

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    As the arts and antiquities trade awaits the U.S. Department of the Treasury's new money laundering regulations — which apply the Bank Secrecy Act to the arts for the first time — whether they are reasonable, optimal or practical remains in question, says Alexandra Darraby at The Art Law Firm.

  • Opinion

    FTC Should Rethink Market Issues In Facebook Case

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    The Federal Trade Commission's antitrust prosecution of Meta Platforms, formerly Facebook, may have survived the initial litigation stage this week, but the case still does not embrace the markets it purports to fix, says David Reichenberg at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 5 Advertising Law Trends To Watch

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    For the world of advertising, 2022 will bring new compliance challenges and considerations shaped by legal developments in everything from nonfungible-token commerce in the metaverse to the ever-growing impact of social media on young users, say Jason Gordon and Deborah Bessner at Reed Smith.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

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    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • Ruling Confirms Causation Is Key Under NY Anti-SLAPP Law

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    New York's anti-SLAPP statute gives defendants a powerful tool against speech suppression, but the New York Supreme Court's recent decision in RSR v. LEG Q shows that the law requires clear proof of a connection between protected speech and an allegedly retaliatory SLAPP suit, says William Brewer at Brewer Attorneys & Counselors.

  • More Securities Class Actions May Rely On Short-Seller Data

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    In light of a recent increase in global securities class action exposure, and ongoing reliance on short-seller research to substantiate claims, issuers should prepare for more frequent and severe fraud-on-the-market suits, say analysts at SAR.

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