We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Media & Entertainment

  • May 17, 2019

    Music Industry Execs Denied Claim To Michael Jackson Co.

    The Michael Jackson Co. is solely owned by the late entertainer's estate and not by a group of entertainment industry executives claiming the King of Pop promised them partial ownership prior to his death, a California appellate court said Thursday, affirming a lower court's findings.

  • May 17, 2019

    Widower Wrongfully Denied Husband's Pension, 9th Circ. Says

    The Ninth Circuit cleared the way for a widower to receive spousal pension benefits on Thursday, saying a lower court was wrong to deny him benefits on the grounds that the couple were domestic partners when the man’s late husband retired.

  • May 17, 2019

    Structural Remedies In Spotlight In Facebook Privacy Probe

    In the wake of Facebook's revelation that it expects to pay a multibillion-dollar fine to resolve the Federal Trade Commission's pending probe of its privacy practices, experts mull what the agency should include in a settlement for it to truly have teeth.

  • May 17, 2019

    'Crazy Expensive' Law Firm Wouldn't Return Calls, Jury Told

    The wife of a former U.K. attorney who hired Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP to pursue a failed privacy suit against the Daily Mail tabloid told a California jury Friday that the firm did little work, billed "crazy expensive" invoices and failed to return phone calls.

  • May 17, 2019

    Calif. Man Who Threatened FCC Chair's Kids Gets 1.5 Years

    A California man who threatened to kill the children of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai was sentenced Friday morning to 20 months in prison, the U.S. Department of Justice has announced.

  • May 17, 2019

    Group Questions T-Mobile's Lifeline Pledge, Drawbacks

    In a letter to the Federal Communications Commission Thursday, an Oklahoma phone company expressed doubt that T-Mobile would maintain a commitment to the Lifeline program for low-income consumers, citing the company’s track record of limited participation.

  • May 17, 2019

    Call Blocking May Come With Cost, Advocacy Org Cautions

    A Federal Communications Commission plan to allow carriers to block robocalls could mean those carriers could pass along charges for the blocking services, whether customers want it or not, an advocacy group said Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Rep. Asks FCC's Pai To Clarify Whether He 'Withheld' Info

    Rep. Anna Eshoo has demanded that the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission share information about a probe into mobile location tracking with his Democratic colleagues and suggested he correct statements that portrayed he didn’t know of their requests.

  • May 17, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: OneConnect, Starz, Carrefour

    A financial technology unit of Chinese conglomerate Ping An Insurance has tapped advisers related to its plans to go public in Hong Kong, Lions Gate rebuffed a $5 billion offer for its Starz network from CBS Corp, and Carrefour is considering selling a minority stake in its Chinese business.

  • May 17, 2019

    YouTube Celeb Logan Paul Sued Over Parody Video

    Members of the alt-hip hop band Flobots slapped YouTube personality Logan Paul with a lawsuit Thursday claiming the release of his parody song "No Handlebars," which riffed on their hit song "Handlebars,” infringed on their copyright.

  • May 17, 2019

    Conrad Black Prosecutors Irked By Bypass Of Pardon Process

    Three of the former prosecutors who tried former media mogul Lord Conrad Black are upset about his pardon — not because it happened, but because President Donald Trump appears to have bypassed the U.S. Department of Justice's traditional role in the process.

  • May 17, 2019

    FCC Challenger Loses At DC Circ. Over One-Day Delay

    A Hawaii-based telecom carrier appealed a subsidy dispute with the Federal Communications Commission one day too late, the D.C. Circuit ruled Friday, leading the agency's general counsel to call out the incident as a cautionary tale for attorneys.

  • May 17, 2019

    PG Rating For 'Dating Naked' Show Not Clear To FCC Either

    The oversight board that issues TV parental ratings needs to better explain how a show with constant nudity like "Dating Naked" gets the same PG rating as a show with mild innuendo like "The Big Bang Theory," the Federal Communications Commission advised after considering complaints from unhappy parents and concerned organizations.

  • May 17, 2019

    As 'John Doe' Copyright Cases Spike, Judges Push Back

    A surge in file-sharing cases from porn studios and others led to a spike in new copyright lawsuits in 2018, but the past year has also seen judges around the country attack key aspects of those cases. As the John Doe suits continue to pour in, here are four past rulings to know.

  • May 17, 2019

    Broadband Mapping Bill Reflects Cable Group's Strategy

    A bipartisan group of senators have proposed a "more granular" approach to mapping the nationwide availability of broadband service in a bill that appears to mirror a strategy already floated by the cable industry.

  • May 17, 2019

    'Pepe The Frog' Case Against InfoWars Heads To Trial

    A copyright lawsuit filed by the creator of Pepe the Frog — a cartoon that's become an online symbol for the controversial "alt-right" movement — is headed for a jury trial in California federal court after a judge refused to rule that the far-right website InfoWars made fair use of the character.

  • May 17, 2019

    Texas Justices Side With Time Warner In Utility Fees Row

    The Texas Supreme Court said Friday that San Antonio's municipal utility charged discriminatory utility pole attachment fees to Time Warner Cable Texas LLC by collecting lower fees from AT&T Inc. despite billing both companies the same price for access.

  • May 17, 2019

    Fla. High Court Won't Review Beckham Stadium Sale Spat

    The Florida Supreme Court has blocked a Miami activist's bid to reverse the approval of a $9 million, no-bid sale of county-owned land to ex-soccer star David Beckham for the construction of a Major League Soccer stadium.

  • May 16, 2019

    Calif. Senate Blocks Bill To Update Consumer Privacy Law

    The California Senate appropriations committee on Thursday blocked the progress of legislation that supporters say would strengthen a landmark privacy bill that forces technology companies to disclose how they use and share customers’ personal data.

  • May 16, 2019

    MGM Estimates $800M To End Las Vegas Shooting Suits

    MGM Resorts International could settle lawsuits stemming from the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas for up to $800 million, according to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing from the company.

Expert Analysis

  • The Precarious State Of Public Injunction Waivers In Calif.

    Author Photo

    Two years ago, in McGill v. Citibank, the California Supreme Court made arbitration agreements that preclude consumers from seeking public injunctive relief unenforceable. But some federal courts have deviated from that holding so as to make its future uncertain, say Brian Kabateck and Brian Hong of Kabateck.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

    Author Photo

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

    Author Photo

    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

    Author Photo

    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • What's At Stake In Battle Over TCPA Constitutionality

    Author Photo

    As courts across the country grapple with whether the Telephone Consumer Protection Act passes First Amendment scrutiny, the eventual outcome is likely to permanently shift the contours of free speech jurisprudence, one way or another, say Eric Troutman and Petrina McDaniel of Squire Patton Boggs.

  • Timing Questions Arise After Copyright Registration Ruling

    Author Photo

    It appears that courts may now retroactively apply the completed copyright registration requirements of the U.S. Supreme Court's holding in Fourth Estate v. Wall-Street.com to pending actions, but it remains to be seen whether the standards may be different for actions filed before copyright registrations were completed, says William Janicki of LeClairRyan.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

    Author Photo

    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

    Author Photo

    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

    Author Photo

    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.

  • The 'Varsity Blues' Sentencing Battles To Come

    Author Photo

    Of the seven factors federal judges consider when sentencing defendants, three will be particularly interesting to watch in the college admissions bribery case, says Brooklyn Sawyers Belk of Weinberg Wheeler.