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Media & Entertainment

  • March 21, 2019

    Netflix Wants Out Of 'Choose Your Own Adventure' TM Claims

    Netflix Inc. urged a Vermont federal judge on Thursday to toss a trademark suit over its "Black Mirror: Bandersnatch" movie, ripping into claims from the company that owns the rights to the "Choose Your Own Adventure" book series and calling a recently filed amended complaint "even weaker" than the first.

  • March 21, 2019

    College Bribery Defendants Tap Quinn Emanuel, Dentons

    Attorneys from Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP, Dentons and Greenberg Traurig LLP have been added to the ranks of defense counsel in the college admissions fraud scheme federal prosecutors revealed last week.

  • March 21, 2019

    DOI OKs Changes To Conn.'s Gambling Deal With Tribe

    The U.S. Department of the Interior has approved changes to Connecticut’s gambling agreement with the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, according to a notice to be published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, a move that could pave the way for a proposed $300 million casino project and resolve a related lawsuit.

  • March 21, 2019

    In Latest EU Fine, Signs Of Google's Next Sanction

    Despite leveling its third major fine against Google for abusing its market power, the European Commission is far from done with the search engine giant.

  • March 21, 2019

    End Dates For Tribal-State Gaming Deals OK, 9th Circ. Says

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday upheld a lower court’s order tossing a suit that claimed California wasn’t allowed to put expiration dates on its gaming agreements with tribes, saying that negotiating such dates is permitted by the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.

  • March 21, 2019

    Willkie Boss' College Bribery Scheme Appearance Delayed

    Gordon Caplan, the co-chairman of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP who was suspended from the firm following charges that he paid a college admissions consultant to bolster his daughter’s test scores, will make his first appearance in Massachusetts federal court five days later than planned.

  • March 21, 2019

    DLA Piper Nabs Baker McKenzie, Wilson Sonsini Partners

    DLA Piper LLP said Wednesday that it's beefed up its California offices by hiring a former Baker McKenzie partner who focuses her practice on energy and project finance and a former Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati partner who specializes in advising startups, emerging technology and media companies.

  • March 21, 2019

    Don Imus’ Ex-Sportscaster Loses Ageism Suit On Appeal

    A New York appellate panel has rejected a sportscaster’s age discrimination claims against his former boss Don Imus, finding they don't jibe with state human rights laws because the ex-employee was working in Florida when he was fired.

  • March 21, 2019

    National Events Ch. 7 Trustee Sues Ex-CEO For $45M

    The liquidating estate of defunct concert and sporting event ticket brokerage National Events Holdings LLC filed a lawsuit Wednesday seeking over $45 million from the company's former chief, who pled guilty to wire fraud after being accused of running a Ponzi scheme.

  • March 21, 2019

    USTelecom Pilot Program To Gather Broadband Location Data

    Trade groups headlined by USTelecom officially unveiled a plan Thursday that they say could cure the federal government’s ailing broadband maps, announcing a pilot program that will layer data from public sources, providers and customers to visualize where internet service is and is not.

  • March 21, 2019

    'Real Housewives' Star Settles Signature Apparel Suit

    An apparel company formerly owned by “Real Housewives of New Jersey” star Christopher Laurita says it has reached a $500,000 settlement of its claims that Laurita and his family's spending habits sent the company into Chapter 11.

  • March 21, 2019

    Facebook Staff Had Access To Millions Of User Passwords

    Facebook admitted Thursday that it stored hundreds of millions of users' passwords in a format that would have allowed Facebook employees to read them, the latest of several privacy lapses for the company.

  • March 21, 2019

    Falling Ads, New-HQ Debt Push Reading Eagle To Ch. 11 Sale

    The company that owns the 150-year-old Reading Eagle newspaper filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in Philadelphia Wednesday and is seeking a buyer as a result of declining ad revenue, rising print costs and debts left over from a 2009 headquarters expansion, according to court documents.

  • March 21, 2019

    FCC Still Weighing All C-Band Options, Pai Says

    The Federal Communications Commission is still equally weighing options for reorganizing a valuable slice of the airwaves known as the C-band to power 5G, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said Thursday, noting that he'll prioritize making an informed decision over rushing out an order.

  • March 20, 2019

    What’s In A Judgeship? More Than Meets The Eye

    Figuring out what constitutes a manageable workload for the nation’s district judges is no simple task. Getting the judiciary the resources it needs is even harder.

  • March 20, 2019

    Swamped: How Magistrate Judges Salvaged Louisiana's Judicial Crisis

    The Western District of Louisiana is supposed to have seven district judges. But for a year, most of the courthouses were operating without a single Article III judge. As usual, magistrate judges picked up the slack.

  • March 20, 2019

    Fired Waiter Blasts Trump Critic Restaurateur's 'Glass House'

    A waiter cut loose from the Waverly Inn tossed a stone at the "glass house" of Graydon Carter, slamming the New York City restaurant's co-owner for criticizing President Donald Trump while purportedly mistreating his own workers, according to a proposed class action filed Wednesday in New York federal court.

  • March 20, 2019

    Wells Fargo Settles Bond Sale Case With SEC For $812K

    Wells Fargo Securities has agreed to pay $812,500 to settle a government civil action claiming the bank misled investors in a $75 million bond offering involving a Major League Baseball pitcher's video game company, according to an order signed in Rhode Island federal court Tuesday.

  • March 20, 2019

    Nexstar Sells 19 Stations For $1.32B To Satisfy Regulators

    Nexstar Media Group said Wednesday it has reached deals to sell 19 TV stations totaling $1.32 billion to resolve regulators’ antitrust concerns about its proposed megadeal to buy Tribune Media Co.

  • March 20, 2019

    AT&T-Time Warner Trial Sets Poor Example, Delrahim Says

    The D.C. Circuit’s handling of the AT&T-Time Warner trial last summer doesn’t set an ideal example for how courts should analyze mergers for anti-competitive harms, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division head said Wednesday, prompting criticism from one Federal Communications Commission member who said the DOJ's current benchmarks "stink."

Expert Analysis

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Profit Participation Mediation Tips From The 'Bones' Case

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    Despite the inevitable rocky start typical of profit participation mediation cases, a settlement can usually be achieved if parties avoid engaging in premature mediation and carefully address key open issues, some of which were exemplified in the "Bones" arbitration decided last month, says Bruce Isaacs of Signature Resolution.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • 2 High Court Decisions Highlight Copyright Act Complexities

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent unanimous decisions in Rimini Street v. Oracle and Fourth Estate v. Wall-Street.com clarify terms in the Copyright Act that have been misconstrued for decades, say Alain Villeneuve and Evan Muller of Duane Morris LLP.

  • Liability For CEO Misconduct Expands After #MeToo

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    The Nevada Gaming Commission's recent $20 million fine against Wynn Resorts for failing to act after reports of its former CEO's alleged sexual misconduct demonstrates how #MeToo has altered the classic economic assessment for harassment claims, says Dove Burns of Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • DOJ's Wire Act Opinion Means Uncertainty For Tribal Gaming

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    While tribes may be split on the U.S. Department of Justice's new interpretation of the Wire Act, they should all note the DOJ's willingness to weigh in on otherwise established gaming laws, say Charles Galbraith and Julian SpearChief-Morris of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP.

  • Trump's NDA Use Raises 1st Amendment Questions

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    With respect to the First Amendment, the reported terms of President Donald Trump's nondisclosure agreements for White House staff do not conform with legal precedent because they extend past employees’ service and do not narrowly target classified or confidential information, says Leonard Samuels of Berger Singerman LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Advertisers Should Heed FTC Stats On NAD Referrals

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    While the Federal Trade Commission cannot be expected to act on every referral from the Better Business Bureau’s National Advertising Division, the FTC’s recent follow-up record demonstrates that companies choosing not to comply with NAD recommendations are making a risky bet, says Alexander Goldman, staff attorney at the National Advertising Division.