Media & Entertainment

  • April 12, 2021

    Ex-LA Rams Employee Settles 'Trash Talk' Suit

    Former New England Patriots safety Patrick Chung and an ex-Los Angeles Rams employee told a California federal court Monday that they have reached a settlement in the employee's defamation lawsuit over a "trash talk" text message that was posted online.

  • April 12, 2021

    Three Firms Tapped To Lead Robinhood Order Flow Suits

    A California federal judge Monday consolidated five putative class actions from Robinhood users over the alleged failure to disclose the processes of payment for order flow, appointing Ahdoot & Wolfson PC, Bursor & Fisher PA and Liddle & Dubin PC as lead counsel.

  • April 12, 2021

    9th Circ. Doubts NSO's Immunity Defense In WhatsApp Suit

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared skeptical Monday of Israeli spyware company NSO Group's argument that sovereign immunity protects it from Facebook's lawsuit over hacks to subsidiary WhatsApp, with two judges pointing out the lack of case law to support NSO's position and a third judge saying the case should go to discovery.

  • April 12, 2021

    Ex-CBS Worker, Atty Held In Contempt In Race Bias Dispute

    A New York federal court on Monday held an ex-CBS Corp. employee and her former attorney in contempt of the court, finding that both have "blatantly disregarded" their discovery obligations in the yearslong race discrimination dispute. 

  • April 12, 2021

    Facebook Tells 1st Circ. To Reverse FTC Doc Release Order

    Facebook has urged the First Circuit to reverse an order requiring the Federal Trade Commission to respond to a Freedom of Information Act request for documents related to a $5 billion settlement with Facebook, saying dissenting comments from two FTC commissioners are not "official" disclosures triggering the official-acknowledgment doctrine.

  • April 12, 2021

    NYC Man Denies Insider Trading In Press-Linked Case

    A Brooklyn trader on Monday denied a range of charges accusing him of trading on inside information involving companies including specialty chemical producer Ferro Corp., a scheme prosecutors say used information from a Bloomberg News reporter about potential deals. 

  • April 12, 2021

    FCC Wants Your Internet Speed Data For Broadband Maps

    The Federal Communications Commission wants everyone to download the agency's speed test smartphone application to help it quickly gather data about network performance across the country.

  • April 12, 2021

    Dr. Seuss Estate Wants Win In IP Suit Over 'Star Trek' Mashup

    Dr. Seuss' estate wants a California federal court to find that a comic book "mashup" of his work and "Star Trek" impermissibly ripped off the estate's copyrights, saying an opinion from the Ninth Circuit made clear there was infringement.

  • April 12, 2021

    T-Mobile Says Dish To Blame For 3G Shutdown Threat

    T-Mobile is combating assertions that it's trying to "prematurely" kick Boost Mobile subscribers off its 3G network, telling the Federal Communications Commission that its network transition plan is firmly in line with prior merger commitments.

  • April 12, 2021

    Ex-Netflix Biz Partner Acknowledged 'Pay-To-Play,' Jury Told

    During the second day of a former Netflix executive's criminal bribery trial, a California federal jury viewed internal email exchanges in which a startup CEO acknowledged that "there's clearly some pay-to-play" occurring between his company and the streaming giant.

  • April 12, 2021

    Disney Wants Out Of Ex-Analyst's Whistleblower Suit

    Disney's financial arm has asked a federal court to dismiss a suit brought by a former financial analyst for the company who claims she was fired after reporting accounting irregularities, saying she had not exhausted her administrative remedies and can't prove the company engaged in illegal activity.

  • April 12, 2021

    Md. Bill To Bar Passing On Digital Ad Tax Goes To Gov.

    Large online companies such as Google and Facebook would be prohibited from passing along the cost of a new tax on digital advertising in Maryland under a bill sent Monday to the state's governor.

  • April 12, 2021

    Nat'l Security Team Clears Polhem's $1B Telia Carrier Buy

    A key U.S. national security panel said Monday it won't object to Telia Co. selling its international carrier business to Polhem Infra for 9,450 million Swedish krona ($1.1 billion) if certain conditions are met.

  • April 12, 2021

    Mohawk Gaming Cites New Ruling In COVID Coverage Case

    Casino owner Mohawk Gaming Enterprises LLC has asked a New York federal judge overseeing its lawsuit for COVID-19 insurance coverage to take into account another district judge's recent ruling in a commercial landlord's suit seeking payment from its insurer for pandemic-related losses.

  • April 12, 2021

    Weinstein Confirms LA Indictment, Fights Extradition From NY

    Harvey Weinstein has been indicted on sexual assault charges in Los Angeles, his attorney confirmed Monday during a court hearing in New York state court where the disgraced movie mogul fought extradition to California on "humanitarian" grounds.

  • April 12, 2021

    Apple Says Not Naming Third-Party Witnesses Was Epic Fail

    Apple has urged a California federal judge to block Epic Games from calling three witnesses in an upcoming antitrust trial unless they hand over troves of documents, saying Epic caused a "procedural Catch-22" by not disclosing their names in earlier discovery.

  • April 12, 2021

    Fox News Taps Ex-Google Atty For General Counsel Spot

    Fox News Media has recruited an in-house lawyer who has worked at Google and Oprah Winfrey's global media company as its next general counsel and executive vice president of corporate development, the New York City-based network said Monday.

  • April 09, 2021

    Fed. Circ. Won't Let Foxconn Get TM In Amazon Echo Fight

    The Federal Circuit handed Amazon a win Friday in its fight to block Foxconn from registering a trademark for the word "Duoecho" for its magnetic portable speaker line, affirming a decision that found consumers would likely confuse the proposed mark with Amazon's Echo smart speaker trademarks.

  • April 09, 2021

    Biden Looks To Up Cybersecurity Spending With Budget Plan

    The Biden administration on Friday urged Congress to set aside more than $1.3 billion in funds to bolster the federal government's cybersecurity posture in the wake of a pair of massive cyberattacks suspected to have been orchestrated by foreign nation-states, including a requested $110 million boost for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security agency tasked with leading these efforts. 

  • April 09, 2021

    Former Netflix Exec Faces Bribery Charges As Trial Kicks Off

    Prosecutors accused a former Netflix executive of illegally receiving kickbacks and stock options from startups in exchange for lucrative contracts with the streaming giant during opening arguments in a bribery trial in California federal court Friday, while defense counsel argued the deals were legitimate and a product of Netflix's "no rules" culture.

  • April 09, 2021

    Credit Suisse Sues Spoofers Over Stolen Employee Records

    Credit Suisse Securities has filed suit in California federal court accusing anonymous spoofers of stealing personal information about some of its former employees and sending it to media outlets, law enforcement and former employees while pretending to be the bank's CEO.

  • April 09, 2021

    Writers' Group CEO Blames PRO Act 'Confusion' On Big Biz

    A corporate media law veteran who now heads the Authors Guild said Friday that businesses and pro-business lobbyists have sown "confusion" that has led a vocal segment of freelance writers to fight part of a pending labor law overhaul over worries that it would cost them work.

  • April 09, 2021

    Roku Cleared Of Infringement In $228M Interactive TV IP Trial

    A Western District of Texas jury decided on Friday that Roku Inc. had not infringed two interactive television technology patents held by software development company ESW Holdings Inc. and awarded no damages.

  • April 09, 2021

    Justices Asked To Revisit 'Life Issues' In Tinder's IP Alice Win

    A company that owns a patent for using social networks to help people with their "life issues" has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide if the Federal Circuit wrongly established a per se rule that a computer-implemented social network is invalid under Alice.

  • April 09, 2021

    NFL Moves To Sack Suit Over Super Bowl Livestream Crash

    The National Football League told a New York federal judge that it is not liable for claims from international fans whose livestreams crashed during the 2020 Super Bowl because they bought their subscriptions from third parties.

Expert Analysis

  • What Associates Should Consider Before Switching Practices

    Author Photo

    The current high demand for midlevel associates provides them a rare opportunity to potentially explore new practice areas, but associates should first ask themselves six questions to begin figuring out why a change sounds appealing, says Stephanie Biderman at Major Lindsey.

  • High Court Oracle Copyright Ruling Is A Boon For Innovation

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on Monday that Google made fair use of the declaring code of Oracle's Java application programming interface should encourage development of new code based on existing APIs and spur technological growth, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • 4 Effective Ways To Prioritize Client Advocacy

    Author Photo

    To truly support a client going through a complicated lawsuit or a painful experience, lawyers must think beyond interpreting legal guidelines and navigating court proceedings, says attorney Scott Corwin.

  • Remote Law Firm Culture Should Prioritize Associate Training

    Author Photo

    Due to the pandemic, the gap between law school and the first day on the job has never been wider, but law firms can leverage training to bridge that intimidating gap and convey the unique value of their culture in a virtual environment, say Melissa Schwind at Ward and Smith, and William Kenney and Jaron Luttich at Element Standard.

  • Virtual Litigation May Unravel The Narcissistic Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The virtual courtroom limits a narcissistic lawyer's ability to intimidate witnesses and opposing counsel, boast to clients or engage in grandstanding — an unexpected benefit of the global pandemic as some aspects of remote litigation are likely here to stay, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • Online Accessibility Bill Needs Clearer Compliance Standards

    Author Photo

    A U.S. House bill establishing guidelines for making websites accessible for disabled users is meant to slow down a torrent of lawsuits filed against companies over their sites' alleged noncompliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act — but the legislation's lack of clear standards makes it unlikely to stop the litigation, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • ABA Remote Work Guide Raises Bar For Atty Tech Know-How

    Author Photo

    A recent American Bar Association opinion on lawyers' ethical duties of competence and confidentiality when working remotely should be viewed as part of a larger movement by which attorneys are being exhorted to develop competence in 21st century technology, say Jennifer Goldsmith at Ironshore and Barry Temkin at Mound Cotton.

  • Lateral Hire Conflict Screening Lessons From DLA Piper Case

    Author Photo

    While a Texas federal court recently denied a motion to disqualify DLA Piper from representing Apple in a patent dispute after the law firm hired an attorney who formerly represented opponent Maxwell, the case is a reminder that robust conflict checks during lateral hiring can save firms the time and expense of defending disqualification motions, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • High Court's Autodialer Ruling Raises Bar For TCPA Plaintiffs

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Facebook v. Duguid, adopting a narrow definition of "automatic telephone dialing system," will create hurdles for Telephone Consumer Protection Act plaintiffs, though the effects of the court's guidance may be short-lived if Congress revisits the statute, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Key Enforcement Risks For SPAC Parties Amid SEC Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent attention to special purpose acquisition companies could beget a wave of enforcement inquiries scrutinizing parties involved at any SPAC transaction stage, from sponsors to operating companies, targets, underwriters and broker-dealers, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • Using Online Arbitration Agreements To Mitigate BIPA Liability

    Author Photo

    Companies facing costly, and increasingly frequent, Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act class actions should follow several drafting and presentation best practices to ensure courts will uphold binding online arbitration agreements — a powerful tool for forcing these suits out of court, says David Oberly at Blank Rome.

  • 3 Cybersecurity Questions To Ask Before A Remote Mediation

    Author Photo

    Lawyers preparing to mediate or arbitrate a case through videoconference should take steps to ensure they and their alternative dispute resolution providers are employing reasonable security precautions to protect digital client data and conform to confidentiality obligations, say F. Keith Brown and Michael Koss at ADR Systems.

  • Decoding The Fine Print On Nonfungible Token Licenses

    Author Photo

    As the nonfungible token industry grows, creators and rights holders need to understand the NFT marketplaces' terms of use and consider how NFTs will be handled under existing and new agreements, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • A Uniform Mediation Act Primer As States Continue Adoption

    Author Photo

    With Georgia expected to soon become the 13th jurisdiction to adopt the Uniform Mediation Act and with more states likely to follow suit amid widespread trial delays, practitioners should familiarize themselves with the act's conflict disclosure requirements and the boundaries of its confidentiality provisions, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Opinion

    We Can Fix Defamation Law While Respecting 1st Amendment

    Author Photo

    Following recent criticism of defamation law, including a D.C. Circuit dissent earlier this month, we should move away from outdated U.S. Supreme Court analysis and tailor the law of defamation to today's media climate, so it protects both the reputation of public figures, and freedoms of speech and of the press, says Victor Schwartz at Shook Hardy.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!