Media & Entertainment

  • October 19, 2020

    Justices Urged To Make Germany Face $250M Nazi Art Fight

    An advocacy group representing U.S. Orthodox Jews is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to force Germany to face claims relating to $250 million worth of medieval art that was allegedly looted by the Nazis, saying an exception under sovereign immunity law doesn't apply.

  • October 19, 2020

    High Court Urged To Block Robocall Barrage In Facebook Suit

    A man suing Facebook over allegedly unsolicited text messages is pushing the U.S. Supreme Court to declare that the Telephone Consumer Protection Act broadly encompasses any device that can automatically dial numbers, arguing that adopting a narrower reading would "unleash the torrent of robocalls" that the law is intended to stop.

  • October 19, 2020

    New Yorker Suspends Toobin For Exposing Himself On Zoom

    The New Yorker has suspended Jeffrey Toobin while it investigates allegations the prominent reporter, lawyer and legal analyst masturbated during a Zoom call with colleagues, a New Yorker spokesperson confirmed Monday.

  • October 19, 2020

    Regal Theaters Report Slammed In Trial Over $3.6B Merger

    A longtime movie industry on Monday executive branded as "wildly misleading" documents used to support Regal Entertainment Group's $3.6 billion sale to Cineworld Group in 2018, at the start of a four-day Delaware Chancery Court trial on stockholder demands for a 47% higher price.

  • October 19, 2020

    Trump Tells DC Circ. TikTok Ruling Undermines His Authority

    The Trump administration has told the D.C. Circuit that a trial judge's order temporarily blocking the government from banning new downloads of video-sharing app TikTok from U.S. app stores erroneously second-guessed President Donald Trump's "sensitive national security judgments" and his assessment that personal data of Americans was being collected by the Chinese government.

  • October 19, 2020

    Missy Elliott Looks To Keep Copyright Claims In Fla.

    Grammy-winning rapper Missy Elliott fought back efforts by a producer to dismiss her suit claiming he unlawfully tried to sell recordings she created at his studio in the 1990s, arguing that his threats to use the recordings if she did not agree to buy them should be enough to rope him into court in Florida.

  • October 19, 2020

    Preparing The Next Generation Of Female Trial Lawyers

    To build the ranks of female trial attorneys, law firms must integrate them into every aspect of a case — from witness preparation to courtroom arguments — instead of relegating them to small roles, says Kalpana Srinivasan, co-managing partner at Susman Godfrey.

  • October 19, 2020

    Mentorship Is Key To Fixing Drop-Off Of Women In Law

    It falls to senior male attorneys to recognize the crisis female attorneys face as the pandemic amplifies an already unequal system and to offer their knowledge, experience and counsel to build a better future for women in law, says James Meadows at Culhane Meadows.

  • October 19, 2020

    What BigLaw Can Do To Actually Retain Female Attorneys

    Even as BigLaw firms are recruiting women into their ranks in larger numbers, their presence in leadership and equity partnerships remains stubbornly low. Here’s a look at why this is happening — and what firms can do.

  • October 19, 2020

    Female Attorneys Gain Ground In Battle For Clerkships​

    More female attorneys are landing highly sought-after U.S. Supreme Court clerkships, and the experience can turbocharge their careers.

  • October 19, 2020

    These Firms Have The Most Women In Equity Partnerships

    At most U.S. law firms, equity partnerships are still overwhelmingly male, but women at some firms are starting to shake up that reality and smash the glass ceiling that has prevented them from advancing to the uppermost ranks. Here are this year’s Ceiling Smashers — the firms that are outpacing their peers as the legal industry works toward closing the gender gap in its top ranks.

  • October 19, 2020

    Wearing Natural Hair In BigLaw

    In this video, four Black women share their thoughts about wearing natural hair as BigLaw attorneys. In order of appearance, the attorneys are: Rukayatu Tijani, founder of Firm for the Culture and a former BigLaw associate; Delilah Clay, legislative & regulatory advisor at Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP; Rachel Boyce, associate at Cooley LLP; and Crystal Nwaneri, associate at Fenwick & West LLP.

  • October 19, 2020

    ISPs Blast Pentagon's Spectrum-Sharing Proposal For 5G

    Members of the broadband industry sternly warned the Pentagon against a proposal for the government to own and operate its own 5G network, saying Monday it should "reject experimental spectrum-sharing schemes" that could amount to "central government planning."

  • October 19, 2020

    VOA Employee Preserves Age Bias Claims Against Network

    The U.S. agency responsible for Voice of America must face an employee's discrimination lawsuit, a D.C. federal judge has ruled, rejecting its argument that the worker abandoned an age bias claim by failing to mention it in a deposition.

  • October 19, 2020

    Apple, Epic Warned Against Atty 'Nastiness' In Antitrust Fight

    A California federal judge repeatedly warned Apple and Epic Games Inc.'s counsel Monday that she'll sanction attorneys for any "nastiness" as their antitrust fight heads toward a May bench trial, and also aired concerns the public has maxed out the court's Zoom license and posted bootlegged videos of some hearings online.

  • October 19, 2020

    Full DC Circ. Won't Undo Royalty Ruling For Streaming Cos.

    The full D.C. Circuit has rejected an independent songwriter's bid to reconsider its reversal of the Copyright Royalty Board's decision that would have made Spotify, Apple and other streaming services pay artists significantly higher royalties.

  • October 19, 2020

    Ghislaine Maxwell's Effort To Seal Depo Fails In 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit declined Monday to seal a deposition given by Ghislaine Maxwell, the former girlfriend of Jeffrey Epstein charged with helping the financier abuse underage girls, putting Maxwell's testimony in civil litigation on track to be made public before her criminal trial.

  • October 19, 2020

    NY Strip Club's $4M Sales Tax Suit Prohibited, 2nd Circ. Says

    A gentleman's club cannot challenge $4.2 million in unpaid New York state sales taxes for selling in-house currency because federal courts usually cannot restrain state tax collections, the Second Circuit said Monday.

  • October 19, 2020

    High Court Won't Take Up Facebook Patent Cost Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court won't wade into a dispute over whether Facebook should be able to recover costs in a patent lawsuit, leaving in place a Federal Circuit decision allowing the social media giant to collect about $4,400.

  • October 19, 2020

    Ex-Fox News Guest Drops Wigdor Suit Over Seth Rich Claims

    Former Fox News commentator Ed Butowsky on Monday dropped a suit that claimed Wigdor LLP founding partner Douglas H. Wigdor falsely accused him of peddling a conspiracy theory about the death of a Democratic National Committee employee.

  • October 19, 2020

    Post-Gazette Denies It Discriminated Against Black Reporter

    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette pushed back against a Black former reporter's racial bias and retaliation lawsuit, saying it barred her from covering racial justice and police brutality protests because of its journalistic standards.

  • October 19, 2020

    Citing 'Star Wars,' TTAB Rejects 'Millennial Falcon' Trademark

    Citing the iconic "Millennium Falcon" from the "Star Wars" universe, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board is refusing to let an Oregon musician register his "Millennial Falcon" parody as a trademark.

  • October 19, 2020

    House Dems Say Pai's Section 230 Rulemaking Is Political

    House Democrats on Monday criticized FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's move to "clarify" interpretations of a rule that governs when websites' efforts to moderate user-posted content leaves them exposed to potential legal liability, characterizing the chairman's move as an attempt to aid the president before the election.

  • October 19, 2020

    Thomas Decries Okla. 'Uncertainty' As Tribal Tax Case Denied

    Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday blasted the U.S. Supreme Court for failing to dispel "uncertainty" left by its July ruling on federal, state and tribal jurisdiction in McGirt v. Oklahoma, dissenting sharply from the court's refusal to take up a petition over a state tax on gaming equipment leased to a tribal casino.

  • October 16, 2020

    In Their Own Words: Being A Woman In BigLaw

    Firms are recruiting more women than previously to their ranks, but still have trouble retaining them at the same rate as men. Law360 asked three female attorneys who left BigLaw about how firms could better serve the women who work there. Here's what they have to say.

Expert Analysis

  • How A Biden Administration Would Shape IP Policy

    Author Photo

    While Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's intellectual property agenda would likely strengthen patent rights and international trade secret enforcement, proposals to drastically reduce employee noncompete and no-poach agreements could weaken protections domestically, say Charles Barquist and Maren Laurence at Maschoff Brennan.

  • Guest Feature

    5 Ways Firms Can Avoid Female Atty Exodus During Pandemic

    Author Photo

    The pandemic's disproportionate impact on women presents law firms with a unique opportunity to devise innovative policies that will address the increasing home life demands female lawyers face and help retain them long after COVID-19 is over, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • NY Tax Talk: Trump Tax Returns, Revenue Rebound, Reform

    Author Photo

    In the latest New York tax news update, Craig Reilly at Hodgson Russ discusses President Donald Trump's ongoing tax return disclosure battle, a rebound in the state's post-COVID-19 revenue decline, noteworthy tax appeals cases involving Disney and Mars, and recent guidance on corporate tax reform.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

    Author Photo

    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

  • Why Online Mediation May Be Here To Stay

    Author Photo

    Videoconferenced mediation offers several advantages and helps cases settle faster and more cordially, making it hard to imagine going back to logistically difficult in-person dispute resolution after COVID-19 restrictions are gone, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC.

  • Clients Have The Power To Promote Wellness At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    Law firm clients can play a role in lowering mental distress in the legal profession by seeking lawyer wellness data from firms and factoring those responses into outside counsel hiring decisions, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Reinforces FTC Disgorgement Authority

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Federal Trade Commission v. OMICS — a case involving deceptive practices allegations against an academic conference and journals company — may further embolden the commission to seek the broadest possible measure of disgorgement, even when not supported by its own evidence, says August Horvath at Foley Hoag.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Courts Should Welcome Well-Crafted Amicus Briefs

    Author Photo

    A Seventh Circuit judge's recent order granting leave for three organizations to file amicus curiae briefs in Prairie Rivers Network v. Dynegy Midwest Generation is a reminder that relevant, nonduplicative amicus briefs can provide courts with helpful perspective, important facts and legal arguments, says Lawrence Ebner at Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • High Court Oracle-Google Copyright War May Benefit Artists

    Author Photo

    After Wednesday's U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in the Google v. Oracle copyright dispute, artists have reason for optimism, because the law favors reining in the overly expansive transformativeness test and keeping fair use determinations within the province of judges rather than unpredictable juries, says Sandra Aistars at Antonin Scalia Law School.

  • Key Takeaways From Groundbreaking Virtual Civil Jury Trial

    Author Photo

    The nation's first online jury trial with a binding verdict — Griffin v. Albanese Enterprise in Florida’s Fourth Judicial Circuit Court — recently provided crucial insights into how to better prepare for virtual voir dire and trial, says Kevin-Khristián Cosgriff Hernández at Delphi Litigation.

  • NY Art Disputes Highlight Fame's Role In Copyright Suits

    Author Photo

    The long-standing art disputes in New York involving 5Pointz and The Andy Warhol Foundation demonstrate that the Visual Artist Rights Act operates differently than traditional copyright law and that arguments about an artist's fame outside of VARA can undermine public policy, say Susan Kohlmann and Jacob Tracer at Jenner & Block.

  • What Hiring Law Firms Should Consider Instead Of Grades

    Author Photo

    With law schools forgoing traditional grading due to the pandemic, hiring firms that have heavily weighted first-year grades during the on-campus interview process should turn to metrics that allow a more holistic view of a candidate, says Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Schroeder Reviews 'Collegiality'

    Author Photo

    Mark Barringer's new book, "Collegiality and the Constitution," is an engaging, vibrant work of judicial history in Texas' Eastern District, and reveals an atmosphere of civility and respect among all those involved in the business of the court, says U.S. District Judge Robert W. Schroeder III.

  • Now Is The Time To Go Digital With Compliance Training

    Author Photo

    To properly meet the U.S. Department of Justice's latest corporate compliance expectations and adapt to the current remote working environment, consider collaborating with a client on an e-learning solution tailored to its employees, says Alexander Holtan at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Overcoming The Pandemic's Hurdles To Pro Bono Work

    Author Photo

    Sarah McLean at Shearman & Sterling looks at how attorneys and law firms can partner with nonprofits to leverage their collective resources, sharpen their legal skills and beat the unique pandemic-induced challenges to providing free legal services to low-income individuals.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!