Media & Entertainment

  • June 29, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Judge Says Key Legal Issue Could Sink Verdict

    A Massachusetts federal judge suggested Wednesday that a coach's conviction in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case could be undone, expressing skepticism about whether the University of Southern California could be considered a victim in the scheme to admit wealthy children through bribery.

  • June 29, 2022

    FCC Republican Calls On Smartphone Giants To Dump TikTok

    A Republican on the Federal Communications Commission called on Apple and Google to pull the TikTok app from smartphones after a deluge of reports laying out the Chinese-owned app's data-snooping risks to Americans.

  • June 28, 2022

    Erika Girardi Ordered To Turn Over Pricey Diamond Earrings

    Reality television star Erika Girardi must turn over to a bankruptcy trustee a pair of diamond earrings that her estranged husband, the disbarred attorney Thomas V. Girardi, bought in 2007 for $750,000, a Los Angeles bankruptcy judge said Tuesday, finding that it was clear that stolen funds were used to buy them. 

  • June 28, 2022

    NY Law Firm Beats Malpractice Claim In 'Doxxing' Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge has tossed a legal malpractice claim by an ex-Teamster who accused his union's New York law firm of failing to properly contest his firing from the New York Daily News after a purported left-wing activist exposed his personal information on Twitter to "dox," or harass, him.

  • June 28, 2022

    11th Circ. Reverses Amazon's Win In Porn Biz Trademark Suit

    Amazon must face a jury trial over claims that its Fire TV video streaming device violates the trademark rights of the owner of porn streaming service FyreTV, the Eleventh Circuit ruled in a published opinion Tuesday.

  • June 28, 2022

    House Bill Would Stop FCC From Weeding Out Cannabis Ads

    House lawmakers tacked language onto a Federal Communication Commission spending bill for next year to block the FCC from trying to prevent broadcasters from running ads for cannabis products in states with legalized marijuana.

  • June 28, 2022

    Instagram Photo Embedding Fight Lands In 9th Circ.

    The Ninth Circuit has been asked to revive a proposed class action challenging how easily Instagram lets websites embed photos, with two photographers arguing that a lower court relied on an outdated test that has been rejected by "virtually every court" considering the same issue.

  • June 28, 2022

    Atari Asks 9th Circ. To Revive IP Suit Against Redbubble

    Atari wants the Ninth Circuit to let it have a new trial after it was dealt a loss in its suit alleging Redbubble sold merchandise with images stolen from its signature video games, saying the jury was given incorrect instructions.

  • June 28, 2022

    Broadband Projects Likely Face Severe Workforce Shortages

    An agency chief at the U.S. Department of Commerce heading up a $42.5 billion effort to deploy broadband told industry leaders Tuesday that workforce shortages raise one of the biggest obstacles to using the money efficiently.

  • June 28, 2022

    Fraudulent Transfer Claim Survives In Alchemy Ch. 7 Suit

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge has rejected Anderson Media Corp.'s bid to dismiss a fraudulent transfer claim in litigation brought by the Chapter 7 trustee of defunct film and television show distributor Alchemy in the wake of a 2015 deal between the companies but tossed the suit's breach of fiduciary duty claims.

  • June 28, 2022

    DraftKings' Site Inaccessible To Visually Impaired, Suit Says

    DraftKings Inc. was hit with a lawsuit Tuesday alleging the sports betting giant is violating the Americans with Disabilities Act because its website is inaccessible to blind individuals.

  • June 28, 2022

    Ghislaine Maxwell Gets 20 Years In Epstein Case

    A Manhattan federal judge hit socialite Ghislaine Maxwell with 20 years in prison Tuesday after a jury convicted her of trafficking underage girls for deceased financier Jeffrey Epstein, saying the 60-year-old defendant played a key role in a "horrific" course of criminality.

  • June 28, 2022

    Calif. Couple, Coach Avoid Prison For 'Varsity Blues' Bribes

    A California couple and a former soccer coach who were among the first to plead guilty in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case all avoided prison time Tuesday after cooperating with prosecutors, even as a judge said the parents' remorse "doesn't wipe the slate clean."

  • June 27, 2022

    Regal Ordered To Pay Rent Despite COVID Theater Closures

    A Delaware state judge on Monday ruled that Regal Entertainment Group must pay $5.5 million in unpaid rent and other charges stemming from leases with Simon Property Group, finding that the pandemic doesn't excuse Regal from its rent payment obligations under the leases.

  • June 27, 2022

    Trump Takes Twitter 'Censorship' Case Loss To 9th Circ.

    Former President Donald Trump is appealing last month's dismissal of his putative censorship class action against Twitter, according to a notice filed in California federal court on Monday.

  • June 27, 2022

    Feds Shut Down 6 Websites In Music Piracy Sting

    Prosecutors in Virginia announced Monday that they have "seized" a handful of website domain names that they say were involved in "streaming and downloading copyright-protected content," as part of a larger anti-piracy operation that the federal government is conducting in tandem with prosecutors in Brazil.

  • June 27, 2022

    Twitter Stock Pumper Avoids Prison For Microcap Fraud

    A would-be Twitter-based stock sage on Monday was sentenced to six months of house arrest for what prosecutors say was a social media-based pump-and-dump scheme designed to induce his followers to drive up the share price of a worthless shell company.

  • June 27, 2022

    Meta Says Section 230 Bars Suit Over Girl's Death By Suicide

    Meta Platforms Inc. has urged a California federal judge to toss claims that bullying and sex trafficking on its allegedly addictive platforms caused a minor's death by suicide, arguing it can't be held liable for the conduct of third parties.

  • June 27, 2022

    Apple Rival Blasted For 'Defective And Unnecessary' Brief

    A California federal judge took a would-be Apple App Store competitor to task for a "procedurally defective" bid to tweak a ruling that tossed chunks of its monopolization lawsuit over Apple policies locking rivals out of the iPhone.

  • June 27, 2022

    Federal Agencies Ink Deal To Tout Broadband Funding

    The Federal Communications Commission has reached a deal with a federal grantmaking agency to trumpet the availability of funds to develop broadband in areas that need better coverage around the U.S.

  • June 27, 2022

    Google Fights App Users' Class Cert. Bid In Antitrust Row

    A month after announcing a settlement to resolve app developers' antitrust claims, Google wants to escape allegations that its policies inflate the cost of apps on its Play Store, accusing a group of consumers seeking class certification of "misconstruing evidence and brushing aside competitive realities."

  • June 27, 2022

    Cable Group Wants Retransmission Conditions On Tegna Deal

    A major cable TV trade group has called on the Federal Communications Commission to prevent Tegna's potential new owners from wielding too much leverage in broadcast retransmission talks if their proposed $8.6 billion takeover of the broadcasting giant succeeds.

  • June 27, 2022

    Yuga Labs Says Alleged NFT Ripoff Is No 'Monkey Business'

    A self-styled conceptual artist is copying and reselling images that are part of the Bored Ape Yacht Club non-fungible token collection, the company behind the trendy digital art series told a California federal court.

  • June 27, 2022

    Fed. Circ. Says PTAB Erred In Netflix Challenge To DivX Patent

    The Federal Circuit said Monday the Patent Trial and Appeal Board misconstrued a key claim term in a DivX video deblocking patent and ordered the board to take another look at the challenge from Netflix and Hulu, which the board held failed to show the patent was invalid.

  • June 27, 2022

    Grand Jury Probes Trump Platform's SPAC Merger

    Digital World Acquisition Corp., the special-purpose acquisition company planning to buy and take public former President Donald Trump's social media platform, said Monday a federal grand jury issued subpoenas to its board of directors that could derail the planned acquisition.

Expert Analysis

  • What 'The' OSU Trademark Win Means For Businesses

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    Ohio State University's successful argument to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that the word "The" is essential to its brand gives OSU the opportunity to assert its mark, and college administrators and small T-shirt business owners seeking to establish a brand or business name would do well to utilize a number of tools available to help avoid conflicts, says David Newman at Mahamedi IP.

  • Opinion

    Now's The Time To Address Archaic Law School Curricula

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    With law school enrollments jumping significantly ahead of a potential recession and more students graduating than the market can absorb, law schools should turn to creative solutions to teach students how to negotiate, work with clients, specialize and use technology to practice their craft more efficiently, says University of Colorado adjunct professor Jason Mendelson.

  • Lessons From Lawyer Fee-Sharing Agreements Gone Wrong

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    The recent fee-sharing dispute between Edelson and Girardi Keese is a reminder that lawyers who do not strictly follow the applicable rules may risk a disciplinary complaint, lose their share of the fee, or wind up in costly litigation with co-counsel, says David Grossbaum at Hinshaw.

  • LeClairRyan Bankruptcy Highlights Pass-Through Tax Issue

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    A Virginia bankruptcy court's recent ruling in the case of defunct law firm LeClairRyan shows there may be serious tax consequences for pass-through entity partners who give up their ownership interest without following operating agreement exit provisions and updating bankruptcy court filings, say Edward Schnitzer and Hannah Travaglini at Montgomery McCracken.

  • Counting Down To New Year's Day Sports Betting In Ohio

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    While Ohio's first legal sports bets can't be placed until Jan. 1, 2023, a key factor making its extended preparation period more palatable is H.B. 29's scope — broader than many states' laws — covering all commercial access points to betting, and permits betting on esports, Olympic, college and professional events, says Jake Nicholson at Roetzel & Andress.

  • Depp Verdict Shows Why Va. Is Ideal Defamation Claim Venue

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    In the wake of Depp v. Heard, it is worth noting that factors unique to Virginia — including the state's weak anti-SLAPP legislation, amenability to personal jurisdiction and limits on summary judgment for defendants — make it a favorable venue for defamation plaintiffs, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • Understanding Georgia's New Worker Classification Law

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    A Georgia law taking effect next month amends the definition of employment for unemployment compensation purposes and may benefit certain technology companies, including ride-sharing and delivery services — as long as their independent contractor arrangements comply with the statute’s requirements, say Meredith Caiafa and Kelli Church at Morris Manning.

  • Force Majeure Claims Amid New Supply Chain Disruptions

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    Port tie-ups, labor shortages and other recent supply disruptions will likely prove even more difficult to assert than force majeure claims from earlier phases of COVID-19, and the better bet may be to make claims based on the pandemic, says Neil Schur at Anderson Kill.

  • 8 Steps To Creating A Legal Ops Technology Road Map

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    Legal departments struggling to find and implement the right technologies for their operations should consider creating a road map that summarizes their approach to technology changes, provides clearly defined metrics for success, and serves as the single source of truth for stakeholders, says Melanie Shafer at SimpleLegal.

  • How High Court May Tackle Fair Use In Warhol Case

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    After disappointing the technology world last year by leaving questions of copyrightability unanswered in Google v. Oracle, the U.S. Supreme Court appears primed to extend the fair use doctrine in the pending Warhol Foundation v. Goldsmith case and clarify where to draw the line between transformative use and derivative works, say Benjamin Stern and Anuj Khetarpal at Nutter.

  • The Importance Of Data And Data Analysis In Litigation

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    Understanding, analyzing and effectively presenting large data sets is an increasingly important skill in litigation as it allows plaintiffs to dramatically scale up the scope of cases and is often critical to defeating motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment, says David Burnett at Motley Rice.

  • US Immigration Should Clarify Status Of Esports Athletes

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    As the U.S. hosts a growing number of esports leagues and competitions, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services should make it easier for international professional gamers to compete in stateside tournaments by issuing guidance that expressly addresses esports or clarifies the definition of athlete in the visa context, says Gabriel Castro at Berry Appleman.

  • Suits Against Google Signal Increased 'Dark Patterns' Scrutiny

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    Recent lawsuits brought against Google by attorneys general in multiple states illustrate a growing trend of pushback against dark patterns — design tricks that harmfully manipulate consumer behavior — so companies should ensure their current and future marketing practices do not put them at risk, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Steps Companies Can Take To Mitigate Privilege Labeling Risk

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    Although Google prevailed on a recent privilege labeling sanctions motion, an important takeaway from the decision is that companies should assess their in-house procedures and employee training programs regarding privileged communications to mitigate risks of the potential appearance of bad faith privilege claims, say Gareth Evans at Redgrave and e-discovery attorney James Hertsch.

  • What Litigation Funding Disclosure In Delaware May Look Like

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    A standing order issued by Delaware's chief federal judge requiring litigants to disclose whether their cases or defenses are being financed by third parties is unlikely to have onerous effects but may raise questions regarding potential conflicts of interest and access to justice, say Cayse Llorens and Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

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