Media & Entertainment

  • November 21, 2019

    Pinterest Promotes Copyright Violations, Photographer Says

    A photographer sued Pinterest Inc. on Wednesday in California federal court, claiming the social media company promotes copyright infringement by encouraging users to share protected images without obtaining the permission of the artists who create them.

  • November 21, 2019

    Take-Two Wants WWE Game Tattoo IP Suit Paused

    Take-Two Interactive Software Inc. has asked an Illinois federal court to pause a tattoo artist's lawsuit alleging it infringed her copyright by depicting a wrestler she inked in a video game, arguing that a pending motion could decide the matter once and for all.

  • November 21, 2019

    New Barnes & Noble Owner 'Purged' Older Workers, Suit Says

    Barnes & Noble's new "vulture fund" owners have implemented a cost-saving strategy that depends on the "ruthless and unscrupulous purging" of workers over the age of 40, a former worker said in a proposed class action filed Wednesday.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-Baltimore Mayor Cops To Kids' Book Scheme, Tax Dodging

    Former Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh pled guilty to conspiracy and tax evasion on Thursday, a day after prosecutors accused her of bilking the city and customers by overselling and underdelivering her "Healthy Holly" children's books and of hiding the revenue on tax returns.

  • November 21, 2019

    Dish Goes After 'Free TV' Websites For Pirating Asian Shows

    DishNetwork is still taking aim at websites it says survive off of siphoning its content, asking a Texas federal judge Thursday to step in and stop more than a dozen websites from pirating its channels.

  • November 21, 2019

    Snap Investors Win Cert. In IPO Class Action

    Shareholders in Snapchat parent Snap Inc. won certification in California federal court Wednesday in their class action over the company's alleged cover-up of problematic growth metrics ahead of its initial public offering.

  • November 21, 2019

    UK Probing Hasbro's $4B Buy Of Entertainment One

    Britain's antitrust watchdog on Thursday said it is looking into whether toy and board game giant Hasbro Inc.'s proposed $4 billion takeover of Canada's film and TV studio Entertainment One Ltd. would threaten competition in the U.K. or in the global market.

  • November 21, 2019

    Facebook Asks Texas Justices To Pause Sex Trafficking Suit

    Facebook Inc. has asked the Texas Supreme Court to pause proceedings in a lawsuit against it by a sex trafficking survivor to prevent the company from answering “burdensome discovery” before an appellate court can decide whether it’s immune from the claims.

  • November 21, 2019

    Angry Fans Can't Sue Over Pacquiao Fight, 9th Circ. Says

    Dissatisfied consumers of the underwhelming "Fight of the Century" boxing match between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr., two of this generation's top fighters, have no legal recourse even though Pacquiao hid an injury that may have hampered him during the fight, the Ninth Circuit said Thursday.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-Twitter Worker Wins Release Pending Trial On Spy Charges

    A California federal judge will allow the pretrial release of a former Twitter employee accused of helping Saudi Arabia spy on users deemed critics of the regime, saying prosecutors did not sufficiently demonstrate that the Seattle resident is a flight risk.

  • November 21, 2019

    Pai Drawing Up New Robocall Regs If Carriers Don't Hustle

    Unhappy with the progress carriers have made toward implementing robocall-screening caller ID measures, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said Thursday that his staff is preparing new rules in case carriers don’t move fast enough by the end of the year.

  • November 21, 2019

    Pharma Co. Wins $16.7M At Trial Over Inflated Ad Costs

    A New York federal jury on Wednesday found that a Florida-based marketing company overcharged the U.S. arm of a large Mexican pharmaceutical and cosmetics company nearly $16.7 million when placing its ads on Spanish-language television across the country.

  • November 21, 2019

    MVP: Davis Wright Tremaine's Katherine Bolger

    Davis Wright Tremaine LLP's Katherine M. Bolger's work helping BuzzFeed beat a defamation suit after it published a dossier linking Russia and President Donald Trump, along with other high-profile victories in the media world, makes her one of Law360's 2019 Media & Entertainment MVPs.

  • November 21, 2019

    USA Today Shunned Grieving Mom, Pregnancy Bias Suit Says

    USA Today told a sales executive she was too "negative" when she returned to work following her infant son's death and fired her when she became pregnant again a few months later, according to a suit filed in New York federal court Thursday.

  • November 21, 2019

    Atty Talks Over Tribune Buyout Are Protected, Ill. Justices Say

    Two foundations that were formerly the Tribune Co.'s second-largest shareholders don't have to fork over documents detailing their discussions with attorneys ahead of their participation in the Tribune's 2008 leveraged buyout, the Illinois Supreme Court said Thursday.

  • November 21, 2019

    Media-Focused PE Shop Taps Kirkland For $775M Fund Group

    Middle-market private equity shop ZMC, advised by Kirkland & Ellis, said Thursday it has completed fundraising for its third group of funds after picking up $775 million from limited partners, with plans to target investments in tech-enabled media and communications companies.

  • November 20, 2019

    Billionaire Grabbed Worker's Genitals, 2nd Witness Says

    A woman who worked at the offices of FilmOn told a Los Angeles jury Wednesday that she saw the company's founder Alki David walk up behind a female worker and grab her by the genitals, becoming the second witness to recount seeing the billionaire commit sexually battery on his accuser.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-Twitter Worker Accused Of Spying Is Flight Risk, Feds Say

    Prosecutors asked a California federal judge Wednesday not to release a former Twitter employee accused of helping Saudi Arabia spy on users deemed critics of the regime, arguing that the Seattle resident is a flight risk.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-Baltimore Mayor Used Kids' Books To Commit Fraud: DOJ

    Former Baltimore Mayor Catherine Elizabeth Pugh has been hit with fraud charges stemming from an alleged scheme to use her “Healthy Holly” children’s books to defraud consumers, Baltimore schools and taxpayers, according to an indictment unsealed Wednesday in Maryland federal court.

  • November 20, 2019

    Jussie Smollett Says False Reporting Charges Were Frame-Up

    Jussie Smollett said Wednesday that the city of Chicago, its police department and others participated in a malicious prosecution of the "Empire" actor after he was attacked earlier this year and then accused of staging the incident himself.

  • November 20, 2019

    FCC's 5.9 GHz Plan Leaves Auto Industry Details Hanging

    The Federal Communications Commission's new plan to introduce Wi-Fi and unlicensed mobile devices into a spectrum band previously dedicated to car safety uses is a win for the wireless industries, but opponents in the auto industry and the U.S. Department of Transportation aren't ready to concede defeat.

  • November 20, 2019

    Vindman's Boies Atty Asks Fox News To Retract Spy Charges

    Boies Schiller Flexner LLP sent Fox News a letter Wednesday on behalf of the National Security Council's Ukraine expert Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman, demanding that the show retract or correct a "deeply flawed and erroneous" segment that suggested the decorated Iraq war veteran could be guilty of espionage.

  • November 20, 2019

    Pot Data Co. Seeks $4M For Rival's TM Infringement

    Cannabis price tracker New Leaf Data Services LLC on Wednesday asked a Connecticut federal court to hit a rival with a default judgment and $4 million in damages for infringing its trademarks and buying up dummy domains to poach users.

  • November 20, 2019

    Orioles Can Arbitrate TV Profits Dispute With Nationals

    Four New York Supreme Court justices unanimously ruled Tuesday that the Baltimore Orioles can ask the American Arbitration Association to resolve its dispute with the Washington Nationals over profits from their regional sports TV network.

  • November 20, 2019

    Shia LaBeouf Must Face Bartender's Assault, Slander Suit

    A California state appeals court has refused to toss a bartender's suit accusing actor Shia LaBeouf of physically threatening him and accusing him of racism in an alcohol-fueled rage when the bartender refused to serve him drinks, saying the actor's conduct is not constitutionally protected.

Expert Analysis

  • Jurisdiction At The Heart Of Charlottesville Defamation Case

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    In Gilmore v. Jones, the Fourth Circuit will consider whether a counterprotester at the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, can sue conservative commentators for defamation in state court. The case will help determine what confers personal jurisdiction over an online publication, say James Stewart and Rian Dawson of Honigman.

  • How To Hire Lateral Partners More Effectively

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    Although lateral partner hiring is the preferred method of inorganic growth among law firms, the traditional approach to vetting does not employ sufficient due diligence by the hiring firm, says Michael Ellenhorn at executive search firm Decipher Competitive Intelligence.

  • How High Court May Resolve Generic '.Com' TM Issue

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    In its upcoming U.S. Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com decision, the U.S. Supreme Court could uphold the Fourth Circuit’s ruling that generic terms can be transformed into protectable marks when combined with a top-level domain in some cases or, instead, adopt the Ninth and Federal Circuits' more stringent view requiring exceptional circumstances, say attorneys at Knobbe Martens.

  • NLRB Ruling Further Clarifies Employer Handbook Standards

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    The National Labor Relations Board’s recent LA Specialty Produce decision demonstrates the impact of the board's 2017 Boeing decision on workplace handbook standards and allowed the NLRB to explain certain aspects of the Boeing ruling, says Anthony Glenn at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Comcast Bias Suit A Bad Way To Make Law, Arguments Show

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    Oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in Comcast v. National Association of African American-Owned Media highlighted the case's flaws, including that it concerns the dismissal of a complaint that omitted a key fact and was tainted by dubious insinuations, says R. Scott Oswald of The Employment Law Group.

  • Adapting 4th Amendment Standards To Connected Tech

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    An evolving view of the Fourth Amendment acknowledges that the detailed and sensitive nature of internet of things data — which is starting to find its way into courtroom evidence — requires strong privacy protections and a shift away from a blunt, either-or approach to third-party access, say Jennifer Huddleston and Anne Philpot of George Mason University.

  • Texas Could Take Page From Mass.'s Judicial Selection Book

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    As Texas and other states review their judicial election processes, they would be well served by taking guidance from Massachusetts' Governor’s Council system, which protects the judiciary from the hazards of campaigning, says Richard Baker of New England Intellectual Property.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McKeown Reviews 'Conversations With RBG'

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    Reading Jeffrey Rosen’s "Conversations With RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law" is like eavesdropping on the author and his subject while they discuss how the restrained judicial minimalist became the fiery leader of the opposition, says Ninth Circuit Judge M. Margaret McKeown.

  • What NCAA Publicity Rights Guidance Means For Athletes

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    Following the recent release of NCAA student-athlete compensation guidelines, it remains unclear how disparate governing bodies will choose to set rules, leaving student-athletes seeking to commercialize their names, images or likenesses through contracts or trademark rights with a confusing mix of incentives and prohibitions, says Radhika Raman of Knobbe Martens.

  • How Fed. Circ. May Defer To PTAB In Facebook Case

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    The appeal of six inter partes reviews in Facebook v. Windy City presents an opportunity for the Federal Circuit to provide clarity on the appropriate level of deference to be afforded holdings of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's precedent-setting panel, and it may even provide a chance for the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • AI Bill Emphasizes Transparency And Consumer Control

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    The Filter Bubble Transparency Act introduced in the Senate last month is the latest of growing congressional efforts to regulate artificial intelligence, and the first substantive federal bill aimed at curbing companies' algorithmic control of content on internet platforms, say Adam Aft and Yoon Chae of Baker McKenzie.

  • 2 FTC Cases Take A Stand Against Online Endorsement Fraud

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    Businesses involved in e-commerce should take careful note of the Federal Trade Commission's recent cases against Sunday Riley Modern Skincare and Devumi, because until now consumer protection agencies have struggled to govern fake reviews and false indicators of brand value online, says Brad Elbein at Culhane Meadows.

  • Where A Litigator's Advice Can Improve Agreement Drafting

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    Transactional attorneys should consider consulting with litigation counsel when drafting certain contractual provisions — choice of law, choice of forum, attorney fees and others — that could come into play in a broad range of substantive disputes, says Adrienne Koch at Katsky Korins.

  • Opinion

    Flat-Fee Legal Billing Can Liberate Attorneys

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    Replacing hourly billing with flat-fee arrangements, especially for appellate work, will leave attorneys feeling free to spend as much time as necessary to produce their highest quality work, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Spoliation Rule Remains Ambiguous Despite Amendments

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    Although the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended to provide a uniform standard of culpability for spoliation, cases with similar facts are still reaching differing results because the rule does not specify how a court should evaluate a party's intent, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton.