Media & Entertainment

  • January 24, 2020

    Skadden, Goulston Lead Deal Valuing Game Maker At $579M

    Online game developer Changyou.com Ltd. will be taken private by Chinese internet media company Sohu.com Ltd. in a deal that values the gaming group at $579 million, with the help of Skadden and Goulston & Storrs.

  • January 24, 2020

    Google, Cartoon Network Want Out Of Data Gathering Suit

    Google, Cartoon Network and a handful of other companies are seeking to drop a proposed class action that alleges they illegally collected children’s personal data through YouTube for targeted advertisements.

  • January 24, 2020

    Dish Spectrum Rival Seeks To Weigh In On Sprint Deal

    A telecom suing the government over preferential treatment Dish Network allegedly received in a spectrum auction wants to weigh in on the separate legal challenge to Sprint and T-Mobile's megamerger, telling a D.C. federal judge that the outcome of the auction case will have bearing on the merger litigation.

  • January 24, 2020

    Ill. Appeals Court Revives Suit Over Six Flags Receipts

    Six Flags customers don't have to show they were harmed by a violation of a federal credit protection act to move forward with a proposed class action accusing the amusement park chain of printing too much information on sales receipts, an Illinois appellate court has held.

  • January 24, 2020

    'Overbuilding' Pits Faster Web Speeds Against New Coverage

    The Federal Communications Commission is tasked with funding internet connections in remote areas where connectivity wouldn't flourish naturally, but balancing the distribution of those subsidies quickly turns contentious.

  • January 24, 2020

    Citing 'Behavior,' Judge Won't Give Atty Fees To Liebowitz

    A Manhattan federal judge is refusing to award attorney fees to Richard Liebowitz despite a successful lawsuit against Hearst over a photo of President Donald Trump, citing the prolific copyright lawyer's "behavior" in the case, including “unsubstantiated and outsized demands.”

  • January 24, 2020

    House Leaders Ask Watchdog To Probe Spectrum Breakdown

    Two House Energy and Commerce Committee leaders have asked a government watchdog to probe “breakdowns” within a federal spectrum management agency, citing numerous instances in which other agencies broke rank to criticize planned airwaves reorganization projects.

  • January 24, 2020

    Comcast Tower Owner Says Contractors Botched Glass Walls

    Contractors that helped build Philadelphia's Comcast Center tower should be held liable for over $1 million in expected repairs resulting from allegedly shoddy sealant used on the skyscraper's exterior glass walls, the building's owner has alleged.

  • January 23, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Says Judge Wrongly Let Facebook Win Patent Fight

    Facebook was dealt a blow in a patent dispute over its Timeline and Newsfeed features after the Federal Circuit on Thursday revived a lawsuit accusing the social media giant of infringing three patents on displaying computer files in searchable, chronological streams.

  • January 23, 2020

    'Sopranos' Star Says Weinstein Raped Her

    Actress Annabella Sciorra shared her vivid allegations of rape and manipulation at the hands of Harvey Weinstein with a New York state jury Thursday as the first of several witnesses who will claim at trial that the Hollywood titan violently sexually assaulted them.

  • January 23, 2020

    Google And Amazon Accused Of Selling Pirated Recordings

    Google and Amazon are selling bootlegged copies of recordings by “virtually every well-known recording artist from the 1930s through the 1960s,” including Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald, side-by-side with legal recordings from legitimate record labels, according to six lawsuits filed this week in California and Washington federal courts.

  • January 23, 2020

    IBM Hit With Biometric Privacy Suit Over Image Use

    ​​​​​​IBM Corp. is accused in an Illinois court lawsuit of violating the state's landmark biometrics law when it allegedly collected photographs to develop its facial recognition technology without getting consent to use biometric information from the subjects.

  • January 23, 2020

    Maine Wants 1st Circ. To Unblock Pay-Per-Channel Cable Law

    Maine wants the First Circuit to give it the go-ahead to start enforcing its new law that would allow customers to buy channels individually without being locked into a specific cable package, after a federal judge blocked it from taking effect.

  • January 23, 2020

    Nude Dancer Hits Fla. Club With Wage Suit

    A nude dancer has slapped a strip club with a Fair Labor Standards Act suit in Florida federal court, claiming it willfully misclassified her and other dancers as independent contractors, instead of as employees, and then avoided paying them wages by telling them they had to work for tips.

  • January 23, 2020

    Music Rights Group Fights Broadcaster Brief In Antitrust Row

    Global Music Rights LLC has blasted a bid from a broadcasters’ trade association to wade into its suit accusing a radio station organization of demanding anti-competitive licensing rates, saying the trade group is a friend of a party, not of the court.

  • January 23, 2020

    O'Rielly Suggests FCC Could Ink 5.9 GHz Rules By Summer

    Federal Communications Commission member Michael O'Rielly told reporters and members of the auto industry on Thursday that he hopes the agency can ink new rules governing the 5.9 GHz spectrum band by midyear, allowing WiFi to share the band with auto-safety applications.

  • January 23, 2020

    Media Can Argue Truth Defense In Texas Defamation Case

    A trial court wrongly failed to consider the truth of an article when it declined to dismiss a defamation lawsuit brought against ProPublica Inc. and the Houston Chronicle, a Texas appellate panel ruled Thursday.

  • January 23, 2020

    Google Wants Media Ad Co.'s Monopolization Suit Deleted

    Google urged a Georgia federal judge Wednesday to toss a flagging digital media advertising company's monopolization suit, arguing that its broad allegations reflect no wrongdoing but only the internet ecosystem's natural move away from the Flash video player.

  • January 23, 2020

    Textbook Publishers Accused Of Trying To Kill Resale Market

    McGraw-Hill, Pearson Education and other big-name textbook publishers and sellers are trying to drive college resellers out of business by developing a new model for course material that doesn't allow students to buy used books, according to a new proposed class action.

  • January 23, 2020

    50 Cent Says Judge Erred In Tossing Case Against Rick Ross

    The Second Circuit pondered Thursday whether a Connecticut federal judge was right in applying copyright law to preempt rapper 50 Cent's state-law claim that rival Rick Ross exploited the former's likeness when Ross used 50 Cent's hit song "In da Club" to promote his own album, "Black Market."

  • January 23, 2020

    Tribe Urges 9th Circ. To Revive Gambling Compact Suit

    A Native American tribe is asking the Ninth Circuit to reverse a lower court ruling that California acted in good faith during negotiations over a gambling compact, saying talks broke down because the state was unwilling to discuss compact changes.

  • January 23, 2020

    Deny Bids To Kill AT&T Rate Rulings, Gov't. Urges DC Circ.

    The Federal Communications Commission is urging the D.C. Circuit to stay out of a rate dispute between AT&T and an Iowa local exchange carrier, saying both companies are seeking to overturn an FCC decision that was based on established agency rules for resolving these kinds of disagreements.

  • January 23, 2020

    Deals Rumor Mill: Univision, Eurazeo, Tegna

    Suitors are lining up to bid on Spanish-language media company Univision, which has a market value of $12.4 billion, Eurazeo is readying a sale of its €2 billion payments business, and multiple Tegna investors want the U.S. broadcasting company to pursue a merger or sale. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deals rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • January 22, 2020

    Execs On Notice After Report Of Saudi Bezos Cellphone Hack

    Revelations that Saudi Arabian leader Mohammed bin Salman may have personally duped Amazon.com Inc. CEO Jeff Bezos into clicking on a WhatsApp file loaded with malware, allowing Saudi spies to snoop on his cellphone, should make executives consider submitting their devices to security scans even if it means sacrificing their privacy.

  • January 22, 2020

    ​​​​​​​Unsweet Emotion As Aerosmith Drummer Sues Band

    A Massachusetts state judge on Wednesday denied a bid by Aerosmith's drummer to force the band to let him play at the upcoming Grammy Awards and another event, denying a preliminary injunction motion in a suit the musician filed last week claiming the band is freezing him out without good cause. 

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Facebook Is Not An Illegal Monopoly

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    A close look at Facebook’s evolving privacy policies reveals no evidence of exclusionary conduct — a requirement under U.S. antitrust laws for culpability — contrary to a recently published law review article's argument, says Kristen Limarzi of Gibson Dunn.

  • ABA Rules For Departing Attys Set Unprecedented Limits

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    Groundbreaking rules from the American Bar Association impose new standards on how law firms can govern departing lawyers’ contact with clients, placing major restrictions on this ubiquitous practice, say Amy Richardson and Hilary Gerzhoy at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Parsing A Unique Int'l Class Of Goods Via Ivanka Trump's TMs

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    Recent questions raised about Ivanka Trump’s voting machine trademarks in China illustrate a basic difference in the American trademark system, as well as an unusual international class of goods that requires a unique filing strategy, says Jane Shay Wald of Irell.

  • Why Justices Declined Review Of Scientist's Defamation Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent certiorari denial allowing climate scientist Michael Mann’s defamation case to proceed against the Competitive Enterprise Institute and others was solidly grounded in precedent, since the defendants' statements against Mann could reasonably be viewed as relying on facts, says Phillip Zisook of Schoenberg Finkel.

  • Legal Lessons From Esports Sponsorship Deals

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    Riot Games’ recent global partnerships with Louis Vuitton, OPPO and Red Bull may provide a potential template for other companies, leagues and players seeking to form similar agreements, and they should serve as a reminder of how carefully constructed such deals will need to be, say James Chang at Pillsbury and Sean Gilbert and Neil Thakur at Teknos Associates.

  • Nissan Ex-CEO Illustrates Do's And Don'ts Of Image Repair

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    Lawyers can draw a number of useful lessons about reputation management from the efforts of former Nissan executive Carlos Ghosn — who recently escaped house arrest in Tokyo — to restore his sullied reputation, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • 3 Concerns If Your Witness Becomes Flippant At Deposition

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    In light of a recent Delaware Supreme Court case in which a litigator was rebuked for failing to control his evasive witness during a deposition, attorneys should consider when they may be held responsible for client misconduct and what to do if a client crosses the line, says Philip Sechler of Robbins Russell.

  • Managing Money Laundering Risk In The Art Trade

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    The Office of Foreign Assets Control's recent declaration that a Lebanese art dealer's gallery was used to conceal Hezbollah financing is a reminder to the art community of the need for strict compliance with U.S. criminal anti-money laundering laws, say Nicole Horowitz and Brendan Hanifin of Ropes & Gray.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • Tribune Ruling Charts Course For Bankruptcy Safe Harbor

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    In upholding the dismissal of fraudulent conveyance claims against former shareholders of the bankrupt Tribune Company, the Second Circuit may have laid out a path for parties looking to stay within a crucial Bankruptcy Code safe harbor provision, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • Proving Printed Publication As Prior Art In IPR Proceedings

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    Recent decisions from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board show that petitioners in inter partes review proceedings must attend to evidence of public availability in establishing that proffered documents qualify as printed publication prior art, say Paul Ragusa and Daniel Rabinowitz of Baker Botts.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • To Improve Instagram Copyright Issues, Look To Music World

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    The music industry may offer a model for adapting the copyright law landscape to new concerns from photographers and other content creators engendered by Instagram’s wide-reaching platform, including a more seamless and accessible registration process, says Qian Julie Wang of Robins Kaplan.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

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    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.