Commercial Litigation UK

  • June 29, 2022

    SRA Fine Ceiling Jumps To £25,000

    A U.K. legal regulator can now fine solicitors and firms up to 1,150% more for misconduct under new rules designed to leave only the most serious cases in the tribunals, a move that has been derided by the trade association for solicitors.

  • June 29, 2022

    Dentons, Freshfields To Retain 90% Of Trainees In Fall Hires

    Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP and Dentons both said Wednesday that they are poised to retain about 90% of their trainees in fall 2022, as U.K. law firms continue to reveal how many of their newly qualified solicitors will be staying on.

  • June 29, 2022

    Neurim Loses 2nd Bid To Stop Sale Of Rival Drug Brand

    A judge rejected on Wednesday a second attempt by drugmaker Neurim to temporarily block rival Teva UK Ltd. from selling its generic version of a melatonin medicine amid a patent dispute.

  • June 29, 2022

    High-End Jeweler Sues Insurer Over $9M Cyber-Ransom

    A luxury British jeweler has sued a Lloyd's syndicate member to recover $9 million it spent after falling victim to a Russian ransomware attack that prompted press coverage of leaked celebrity clients and a rare apology from the hackers.

  • June 29, 2022

    Stryker Escapes Suit Over Defective Hip At Top UK Court

    Concerns expressed by regulators were not enough to help a consumer prove that Stryker's prosthetic hip was defective in the face of statistical evidence showing patients didn't fare worse with the medical device giant's product, Britain's highest court ruled on Wednesday.

  • June 29, 2022

    Pfizer Wants Glaxo's Cold Vaccine Patents Nixed In UK

    Pfizer has urged a London court to invalidate three of rival GlaxoSmithKline's patents for vaccines for a common cold virus as the two companies race to get their respective treatments to market.

  • June 29, 2022

    IT Pro Was 'Stupid' To Obey Jones Day Atty's 'Burn' Order

    An IT manager testified at a trial on Wednesday that he was "stupid" to comply with instructions from a senior Jones Day lawyer to destroy a secure messaging system in an alleged attempt to conceal evidence of corporate espionage from supermarket group Ocado.

  • June 29, 2022

    L'Oréal Blames Poor Security For Warehouse Theft

    French cosmetics giant L'Oréal and its insurers have sued a logistics and facilities company after they paid out for a hoard of stolen beauty products, saying that lapsed warehouse security systems at the firm's site were to blame for the heist.

  • June 28, 2022

    Ukraine Can Arbitrate Against Russia Over Sailor Detention

    Ukraine has snagged a key victory against Russia in arbitration over the 2018 detainment of Ukrainian naval vessels and service members after a Permanent Court of Arbitration tribunal rejected the Kremlin's jurisdictional objections, Ukraine's counsel at Covington & Burling LLP said Tuesday.

  • June 28, 2022

    Russian Vodka Brands Again Caught Up In $50B Award Fight

    Former shareholders of Yukos Oil Co. said Tuesday that a Dutch appeals court has revived their bid to seize the trademarks of two iconic Russian vodka brands, Stolichnaya and Moskovskaya, as they continue their yearslong effort to enforce $50 billion in arbitral awards against Russia.

  • June 28, 2022

    Denmark Asks Court To Keep $2.1B US Pension Tax Fraud Suit

    Several U.S. pension plans shouldn't be allowed to escape a suit from Denmark's tax agency claiming they committed a $2.1 billion fraud, the agency told a New York federal court, arguing the case doesn't impermissibly implicate foreign tax laws.

  • June 28, 2022

    Slater & Gordon Restructures UK Business Into 2 Units

    Slater & Gordon said Tuesday it would create separate units to focus on volume work and specialist legal services after disappointing financials for 2020 prompted a strategic review of the law firm's U.K. business.

  • June 28, 2022

    Restaurateur Gets 2 Years In 1st COVID Loan Fraud Case

    A former pizza shop owner was sentenced to two years in prison for seeking a COVID-19 relief loan after shuttering his business, marking the first successful criminal prosecution of Bounce Back loan fraud.

  • June 28, 2022

    Alcon Eye-Drop Patents Survive Invalidity Appeal

    A London appeals court on Tuesday upheld Alcon's patent for eye drops used to treat glaucoma, rejecting a generic-drug maker's argument that the intellectual property was obvious given earlier publications.

  • June 28, 2022

    Citi Beats UN Fund Manager's 'Fanciful' €10B Suit

    A judge dismissed a €10 billion ($10.5 billion) lawsuit on Tuesday filed by a money manager with purported ties to the United Nations against Citibank, finding the basis of his claims to be "entirely fanciful." 

  • June 28, 2022

    RBC Fights Ex-Director's 'Unclear' Whistleblowing Suit

    A former corporate crime prevention director for the Royal Bank of Canada in London was not pushed to resign after raising compliance concerns, the lender told a tribunal Tuesday as it fights what it calls an "unclear and unfocussed" whistleblowing claim.

  • June 28, 2022

    Wolters Kluwer Acquires Spain-Based Legal Tech Co.

    Information services company Wolter Kluwer NV is expanding its presence in Spain's legal market with its acquisition of legal practice management software Level Programs SL on Tuesday.

  • June 28, 2022

    Clifford Chance Recruits IP Pro From Ashurst

    Clifford Chance LLP has hired a new partner from Ashurst LLP in London as part of its plans to build out its offerings in technology and intellectual property.

  • June 28, 2022

    Insurers Can't Block €425M Venezuelan Suits Abroad

    A judge ruled Tuesday that Venezuela's €425 million ($448 million) dispute with two British insurers over a sunken vessel belongs in arbitration in the U.K., but refused to block the country from litigating the case abroad because of state immunity.

  • June 28, 2022

    Judge Should Have Recused In Trinidad Corruption Case

    The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council has ruled that a judge should have refrained from ruling in a corruption case against two insurance officials over the construction of a Caribbean airport because he had biases due to financial help he received from the country's attorney general.

  • June 28, 2022

    Samsung Unit Sues To Invalidate Novartis Syringe Patents

    Samsung's biotech business urged a London court to invalidate five of rival Novartis AG's patents related to syringe technology because they are "uninventive."

  • June 28, 2022

    Asbestos Co. Fights To Nix £5M Liabilities Claim

    An asbestos maker has said that a suit filed by three insurance giants seeking a £5 million ($6.1 million) payment over an injury claims settlement should not be allowed to move ahead because an earlier settlement agreement allows the company to offset the payment.

  • June 28, 2022

    Google May Face Antitrust Probe After Danish Job Biz Row

    A Danish job search company has urged European antitrust regulators to investigate Google for allegedly abusing its market position to unfairly dominate the job advertising space, accusing the tech giant of the same practice for which it has already been fined billions of euros.

  • June 27, 2022

    2nd Circuit Backs $100M Loan Default Ruling In UBS Suit

    The Second Circuit has sided with a lower court's ruling that energy holding company Greka Integrated Inc. must pay $100 million to UBS AG's London branch following Greka's failure to repay loans it owes to the bank.

  • June 27, 2022

    Ditching Live Testimony For Declarations Is Risky, Attys Say

    U.S. courts should move cautiously before embracing written statements at bench trials in lieu of live direct examination testimony, lawyers tell Law360, cautioning that their recent use in a high-stakes opioid trial doesn't mean the practice — which is standard in the U.K. — should be widely adopted at home.

Expert Analysis

  • New Clarity On Scope Of Banks' Quincecare Duty To Clients

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    A recent U.K. Privy Council decision clarified that a bank’s Quincecare duty to prevent banking fraud extends only to its customers, so third-party investors seeking protection may need to make alternative arrangements, say attorneys at Collyer Bristow.

  • Changes To UK Competition Rules Will Extend CMA Powers

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    Recent amendments to U.K. competition and consumer law regimes introduce changes to merger control and antitrust investigations that will result in the speedier resolution of cases and greater autonomy for the Competition and Markets Authority, say Bill Batchelor and Aurora Luoma at Skadden.

  • Sheeran Ruling Raises Burden For Copyright Plaintiffs

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    In requiring proof of access, rather than proof of the possibility of access, the U.K. High Court’s decision in Ed Sheeran’s recent copyright case will provide some security to those in the music industry, say David Fink and Armound Ghoorchian at Venable.

  • J5 Warning Highlights Growing Risk Of NFT-Related Crime

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    As NFTs increase in popularity, so does the risk of such assets being used by those looking to exploit them for criminal gain, as illustrated by the Joint Chiefs of Global Tax Enforcement's recent warning of the possible dangers, says Syed Rahman at Rahman Ravelli.

  • Litigants Eager To Prove The Song Remains The Same

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    Recent lawsuits against Ed Sheeran and Dua Lipa, alleging their hit songs infringed others' copyrights, suggest that, despite the difficulty of proving musical plagiarism has occurred, the appetite for this type of litigation may be growing, says Nick Eziefula at Simkins.

  • ECJ Ruling Strengthens German Patent Owners' Rights

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    Following the European Court of Justice's recent ruling in Phoenix Contact, it is expected that German courts will issue more preliminary injunctions in patent cases, making Germany, and particularly Munich, an even more attractive venue for patent enforcement, says Sandra Mueller at Squire Patton.

  • Court Decisions Render Paris Less Appealing For Arbitration

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    The Paris Court of Appeal recently set aside two arbitral awards on the grounds that the tribunals lacked jurisdiction due to incompatibility with EU law, so investors seeking to minimize obstacles in the recognition or enforcement of awards may not choose Paris as their seat for investor-state arbitration, says Tomas Vail at Vail Dispute Resolution.

  • Coca-Cola Case Offers Anti-Bribery Compliance Lessons

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    A recent Southwark Crown Court bribery case involving a former Coca-Cola manager and three companies highlights the importance of robust compliance procedures and the need for companies to be aware of the actions of employees and third parties in day-to-day operations, say attorneys at Kennedys.

  • Where Data Class Actions Stand Post-Lloyd

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    Although last year's U.K. Supreme Court decision of Lloyd v. Google was a win for data controllers and a significant setback for claimant law firms and litigation funders, it did not close the door on class actions for data breaches or rule out the possibility of using antitrust collective proceedings instead to bring opt-out privacy claims, say attorneys at Travers Smith.

  • What EU Corporate Sustainability Plan Means For Contracts

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    The EU's proposed directive on corporate sustainability due diligence would have a significant impact on contractual assurances in relation to human rights and environmental impacts, says Francois Holmey at Carter-Ruck.

  • When Investment Funds Are Not As Green As They Suggest

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    With the growing demand for funds that offer sustainable investment, there is increasing potential to discover that funds have misled investors, which in certain situations could result in a claim for legal redress for misselling, say attorneys at Keller Lenkner.

  • Cayman Courts Are Reluctant To Strike Out Proceedings

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    Applications to strike out proceedings have become increasingly common in the Cayman Islands, but as a recent case demonstrates, it is difficult to fulfill the required criteria, and they should therefore be filed sparingly, says Conal Keane at Appleby.

  • Latest Song Copyright Rulings Clarify What's Protectable

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    Recent copyright infringement decisions in favor of musicians Ed Sheeran, Katy Perry and Led Zeppelin should help turn the tide against frivolous music copyright lawsuits, says Gerald Sauer at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Force Majeure Lessons From 2 COVID Rulings

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    Without a general legal principle of force majeure in English law, two recent High Court cases highlight the importance of careful drafting to mitigate pandemic risk and show how courts may reach different legal conclusions depending on contract construction, say Ryland Ash and Henry Stockley at Watson Farley.

  • UK Ruling Is A Win For Fraud Victims At Banks' Expense

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    The U.K. Court of Appeal's decision in Philipp v. Barclays holds banks potentially liable for executing any payment that is suspected to be fraudulent, heightening already significant pressure on banks to identify and prevent fraud, say attorneys at Signature Litigation.

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