Commercial Litigation UK

  • July 30, 2021

    Imprisoned Shipping Tycoon Loses Challenge To Travel Ban

    An appeals court rejected a bid by an imprisoned businessman on Friday to overturn an order requiring him to stay in Britain while he faces efforts to collect a $60 million judgment against him.

  • July 30, 2021

    Court Sets Terms For Pfizer Damages Over Axed Lyrica IP

    The money the National Health Service and generic drug companies can claim back from Pfizer over an invalidated epilepsy drug patent should be assessed based on how much money they would have made if subsidiary Warner-Lambert had not threatened any infringement proceedings, a judge ruled Friday in London. 

  • July 30, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. sue an Indian bank, eight insurers go after British construction giant John Wood, and Visa and MasterCard face new competition claims. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims filed in the U.K.

  • July 30, 2021

    Glencore Settles $1.6M Oil Tanker Suit With Insurers

    Allianz and four other insurers have settled a $1.6 million lawsuit brought by commodities and mining giant Glencore that was seeking to recoup damages for an oil tanker that ran aground after it changed course in 2013.

  • July 30, 2021

    Ex-SFO Official Says ENRC Was On Course For Charges

    A former Serious Fraud Office investigator testified Friday that Eurasian Natural Resources Corp. was heading toward criminal charges after a Dechert attorney revealed suspicions that the mining company had breached sanctions and bribed African officials.

  • July 30, 2021

    Bank Loses Privilege Fight Over PwC Report In Qatar Fight

    A private Luxembourg bank must give Qatar a report compiled by PricewaterhouseCoopers that examines allegations that it manipulated international financial markets to crash the Middle East country's economy, as a London court ruled Friday that the document is not legally privileged.

  • July 30, 2021

    Travel Agency Ruled Liable For Rape By Hotel Worker

    The U.K.'s top court ruled Friday that a travel agency is liable for the conduct of a hotel worker who sexually assaulted a tourist in Sri Lanka while she was on one of its package holidays.

  • July 29, 2021

    InterDigital Wins 1st 4G Patent Trial Against Lenovo In UK

    InterDigital scored a victory in its patent battle with Lenovo when a London judge ruled Thursday in the first of a series of trials that the Chinese tech giant infringed a valid standard-essential patent for 4G wireless technology.

  • July 29, 2021

    Broker Blames Marsh Takeover Of Rival For Employees' Flight

    An insurance broker has defended itself against a breach of contract lawsuit from a rival, saying it was legally entitled to poach 20 of its employees who were unhappy in their jobs after a major merger with Marsh.

  • July 29, 2021

    HSBC Says Data Gaps Make FX Rigging Suit Impossible

    HSBC argued at a London court Thursday that a lack of trading data means it is almost impossible for a U.K. currency firm to prove allegations the bank's traders routinely rigged foreign exchange markets in a bid to make dishonest profits.

  • July 29, 2021

    Eversheds Sutherland Hires 1st Chief Transformation Officer

    Eversheds Sutherland has tapped information technology leader Ronan Hanrahan as its first chief transformation officer.

  • July 29, 2021

    Victoria's Secret Gets Green Light For UK Liquidation

    Victoria's Secret's U.K. business move from administration into liquidation in June was valid, a London judge ruled on Thursday, after concerns were raised over a typographical error on the paperwork.

  • July 29, 2021

    Exiled Mining Tycoon Loses Bid To Retake Gold-Mining Biz

    An exiled Turkish tycoon has failed in his latest attempt to take control of his family's gold mining business, as a London court ruled that trustees appointed by the government following a failed coup had authorization to run the company.

  • July 29, 2021

    Paddington Bear Goes To The High Court Over IP Royalties

    A London company has asked the High Court in London to enforce the terms of a royalties agreement for merchandise connected to the intellectual property rights of Paddington Bear, the marmalade-loving children's book character.

  • July 29, 2021

    EX-SFO Official Denies Dishonest Plot To Delete ENRC Emails

    A former SFO investigator testified Thursday that he had to "double delete" his emails because the agency lacked storage capacity, denying accusations that he tried to conceal communications with a Dechert attorney running an internal corruption probe into mining giant ENRC.

  • July 29, 2021

    Google Hit With £920M Antitrust Suit Over App Store Charges

    Google has been hit with a £920 million ($1.3 billion) lawsuit on behalf of more than 19 million Android users in Britain for allegedly abusing its market dominance by charging "excessive" commissions on app sales, Hausfeld & Co LLP said on Thursday.

  • July 28, 2021

    Romania Fights $2.9M Sanctions In Investor $356M Award Suit

    The Romanian government has urged a D.C. federal judge to deny a $2.9 million sanction request by Viorel and Ioan Micula, two Swedish food investors who say the country violated contempt orders by not following post-judgment discovery obligations.

  • July 28, 2021

    Attys Say No Duty Was Breached In Sheffield United Sale

    Two Shepherd and Wedderburn LLP partners have denied owing Sheffield United Football Club's ex-owner a duty of care after being roped into a lawsuit over the soccer club's sale to a Saudi prince.

  • July 28, 2021

    UK Rail Operator Hit With Antitrust Class Action

    Two rail travel campaigners have filed a proposed class action against the Thameslink rail service, saying that passengers have lost out because of the company's unfair pricing on the route through London.

  • July 28, 2021

    Ex-SFO Official Says He Was Unaware Of Peers' ENRC Chats

    A former Serious Fraud Office investigator testified Wednesday that he was kept in the dark by the agency's then director and an investigator about private meetings they had with a Dechert LLP attorney running an internal corruption probe into mining giant ENRC.

  • July 28, 2021

    Ukrainian Businessman Loses $82.5M Row With Ex-Partner

    A Ukrainian businessman cannot claw back $82.5 million spent buying a stake in a major industrial steel manufacturer, a London appeals court ruled on Wednesday, saying that the deal did not include interest in two luxury hotels and other assets.

  • July 28, 2021

    Chelsea FC Owner's Libel Case Over Putin Book Begins In UK

    A lawyer for Roman Abramovich fought claims Wednesday that the Chelsea Football Club owner's lawsuit against HarperCollins is an attack on free speech, arguing that a book chronicling the rise of President Vladimir Putin contains defamatory passages.

  • July 28, 2021

    Royal Mail Wins Appeal Over VAT Invoices

    Hundreds of businesses suing Royal Mail Ltd. to reclaim value-added tax dating from 1977 do not have the right to force the postal company to issue invoices, a London appeals court ruled on Wednesday.

  • July 27, 2021

    HMRC Sued For Handing Telecom Contract To Amazon

    HM Revenue & Customs violated European Union and basic procurement law when awarding contracts for telecommunication services to Amazon and a second provider, a British tech company told a London court.

  • July 27, 2021

    US Hedge Fund Loses Bid To Patent Trading Technology In UK

    A U.S. hedge fund lost its appeal Tuesday to force through a British patent for its program designed to beat other high-speed traders after a London judge ruled that the system couldn't be protected from copying under IP law.

Expert Analysis

  • The UK Bribery Act At 10, And What's Next

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    Lauded as a gold standard that put the U.K. in step with modern commercial practices, the Bribery Act turns 10 years old with just a few unmet goals, mostly at the prosecutorial end — and those charged with enforcement will likely face some real tests in the next decade, says Anneka Randhawa at White & Case.

  • UK Employment Case May Lead To New Discrimination Suits

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    The recent Maya Forstater case before the U.K. Employment Appeals Tribunal, concerning whether gender-critical beliefs are a protected characteristic, could provoke an influx of discrimination cases on the basis that philosophical beliefs could trump other protected characteristics, says Jules Quinn at King & Spalding.

  • An Underused Group Litigation Tool Could Help UK Claimants

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    Though the Financial Markets Test Case Procedure has only been used as a collective redress mechanism for the first time recently in Financial Conduct Authority v. Arch Insurance, hopefully it will be called on more often to resolve future post-Brexit issues and other pandemic cases, says Becca Hogan at Signature Litigation.

  • Warnings And Guideposts From EU Sanctions Blocking Case

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    An advocate general's recent opinion in Bank Melli Iran v. Telekom Deutschland, a European Union sanctions blocking case, highlights serious new international regulatory compliance risks but also presents helpful guidance for navigating conflicting EU and U.S. rules, say Thomas Grant at Cambridge University and Scott Kieff at George Washington University.

  • 2 UK Pension Cases Guide On 3rd-Party Due Diligence

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    The U.K. Court of Appeal's recent decision in Adams v. Options UK, and upcoming hearing in Financial Conduct Authority v. Avacade, highlight important precautions self-invested personal pension operators should take when dealing with unauthorized third parties, says Paul Ashcroft at Wedlake Bell.

  • Lifting US Sanctions On Iran Would Increase Financial Activity

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    If recent talks for the U.S. to rejoin the Iran nuclear deal pan out, financial activity between formerly sanctioned entities and European counterparties will likely increase, and demand for certain types of legal work may shift, say Kartik Mittal and Stephanie Limaco at Zaiwalla.

  • UK Ruling Shows Tool For Taming Multijurisdictional Disputes

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    In PJSC National Bank Trust v. Mints, the U.K. High Court imposed costs on the prevailing party for failure to notify the court of related proceedings, demonstrating an approach that judges may use to mitigate the risk of discordant outcomes in multijurisdictional litigation, say Thomas Grant at Cambridge University and Scott Kieff at George Washington Law School.

  • A Bumpy Road To Normality After UK Pandemic Support Ends

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    As U.K. government relief measures that have shored up businesses amid the pandemic taper off, parties that cannot resolve restructuring or insolvency issues through commercial bargaining will influence the types of matters appearing before courts for years, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Opinion

    High Court Int'l Discovery Case Fits Mootness Exception

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    Even if the underlying arbitration in Servotronics v. Rolls Royce concludes before the U.S. Supreme Court decides the case, the court should recognize an exception to mootness and resolve the circuit split on whether a U.S. discovery statute applies to international commercial arbitration, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • 3 Lessons For UK Litigators In Virtual Trials

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    UK litigators should note several best practices for adapting to the hurdles, and capitalizing on the benefits, of virtual trials, and expect the new hearing format to persist beyond the end of the pandemic, say Christopher Boyne and Emma Laurie-Rhodes at Debevoise.

  • RETRACTED: Considering The Future Of The Serious Fraud Office

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    Editor's note: This guest article has been removed due to the authors' ongoing involvement in the case discussed.

  • Justices Will Bring Welcome Resolution In Int'l Discovery Row

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision this week to review Servotronics v. Rolls-Royce — a case concerning use of a U.S. discovery statute in aid of private international arbitration — will result in greater certainty as to the statute's scope and allow domestic parties to better defend themselves from foreign discovery requests, say Dan Ward and Elena Davis at Ropes & Gray.

  • ITC Seems Unlikely To Stay Investigations For Parallel IPRs

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    The U.S. International Trade Commission's recent order denying Ocado's attempt to stay a dispute with AutoStore pending resolution of its inter partes review petitions signals that an ITC complainant's patents are effectively shielded from IPR challenges, at least under current Patent Trial and Appeal Board practice, say attorneys at Reichman Jorgensen.

  • Opinion

    How London Could Become Europe's Arbitration Hub

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    Trade, historical and geographical advantages give London the post-Brexit opportunity to strengthen its position as the leading arbitration-friendly jurisdiction in the region and become the hub for European parties in dispute, says Leigh Crestohl at Zaiwalla.

  • Analyzing Cost Issues After Top Court MasterCard Ruling

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    The U.K. Supreme Court recently directed MasterCard v. Merricks back to the Competition Appeal Tribunal after clarifying the tests for class action certification, likely resulting in a green light for the action and a review of the regime-specific costs and funding models of the opt-out class action, says Andy Ellis at Practico.

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