Commercial Litigation UK

  • February 21, 2020

    DOL Judge Kills Ex-Morgan Stanley Atty Whistleblower Case

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge has thrown out a former Morgan Stanley attorney’s claims that he was pushed out of his job after he brought up ethical concerns, finding he isn’t protected by the retaliation provision of a U.S. anti-fraud law because he worked in Hong Kong.

  • February 21, 2020

    Ireland To Appeal State Aid Ruling Against Fiat, Luxembourg

    Ireland is appealing a European Court of Justice decision from last year finding carmaker Fiat received illegal state aid from Luxembourg, saying the decision is relevant to an ongoing Irish case, an Irish government representative confirmed Friday.

  • February 21, 2020

    Ukrainian Oligarch Fights Jurisdiction In $27M Fraud Case

    A Ukrainian oligarch is launching a bid to get High Court claims accusing him of pocketing $10.9 million from a business partner tossed out, arguing that English courts do not have jurisdiction to hear the case.

  • February 21, 2020

    AmTrust, Defunct Law Firm Sued For £2.7M By Landowner

    A landlord is suing his former law firm and its insurer AmTrust for £2.7 million ($3.4 million) over an alleged failure to bring legal action against Lloyds Bank over an interest rate hedge included in his mortgage for several properties.

  • February 21, 2020

    Europa Fund Unit Escapes Property Lease Dispute

    Property owner Greengate had the contractual right to pull the plug on two agreements over the management of a residential development in Northern England, a London judge ruled Friday, tossing a suit challenging the move.

  • February 21, 2020

    JMW Solicitors Bulks Up New London Office With 6 Partners

    Northern England-based JMW Solicitors said Friday that it has hired six partners specializing in commercial litigation and real estate and who serve sectors including insurance to join its newly established London office.

  • February 21, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen a premium payment card provider drag an exiled Ukrainian politician to court, an investment company sue Cuba for unpaid government debt and lenders offering unregulated finance take action against The Times newspaper. ​​​​​​​Here, Law360 looks at these claims and more. 

  • February 21, 2020

    Danske Shareholders Target Ex-CEO In 4th AML Lawsuit

    An investment recovery consultancy representing 155 Danske Bank institutional investors said Friday it has filed a complaint related to anti-money laundering lapses that seeks 2.7 billion Danish kroner ($390 million) in damages from the lender’s former chief executive.

  • February 20, 2020

    Houlihan Lokey Settles £3M Unpaid Fees Suit

    M&A specialist Houlihan Lokey has settled its £3 million ($3.87 million) claim against a Spanish grocer accused of failing to pay fees for debt restructuring advice.

  • February 20, 2020

    Small Business Disputes Body Teams Up With ADR Group

    A new body created to settle disputes between British banks and businesses said Thursday it has teamed up with a London-based charity specializing in alternative dispute resolution.

  • February 20, 2020

    Property Owners' Insurance Claim Goes After New Oil Co.

    Homeowners have amended an insurance suit over an oil spill on their property that allegedly caused hundreds of millions of pounds of damage, swapping in an oil distributor that purchased the supplier they originally targeted for negligence.

  • February 20, 2020

    Minibonds Victims Take Legal Fight To Compensation Scheme

    Law firm Shearman & Sterling has begun legal action on behalf of London Capital & Finance victims disputing a decision by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme to only award automatic compensation to around 159 shareholders.

  • February 20, 2020

    FCA Strips License From Adviser Tied To British Steel Scandal

    A financial adviser with links to the British Steel pensions scandal has appealed a Financial Conduct Authority ruling that last year saw it stripped of its regulatory permissions.

  • February 20, 2020

    MIB 'Exploring Options' After Supreme Court Appeal Denied

    The Motor Insurers’ Bureau said on Thursday it is considering its options after the U.K.’s top court denied an appeal over a landmark ruling, which could push up the costs of motor insurance for drivers across the country.

  • February 19, 2020

    3 Takeaways From $50B Yukos Oil Decision

    A Dutch appeals court has revived $50 billion in arbitral awards issued to former Yukos Oil Co. shareholders who accused Russia of dismantling the company to crush a political rival of President Vladimir Putin. Here are three takeaways from the blockbuster decision.

  • February 19, 2020

    Resort Investors Can't Build On Mauritius Slavery Site

    The island nation of Mauritius has won its challenge against U.K. investors that wanted to build a luxury resort on a UNESCO World Heritage site commemorating escaped slaves' fight for freedom, with an international tribunal finding that the investors have no right to develop the property.

  • February 19, 2020

    Insurer, Builder Deny Responsibility For Flawed Property Work

    Insurer CNA is hitting back at a lawsuit brought by the owners of a multimillion-pound home over botched work on their property extension, denying that it owes the homeowners anything in the dispute.

  • February 19, 2020

    NatWest Sues Guarantors For Remaining $1.7M Shipping Debt

    NatWest Markets has sued two guarantors for approximately $1.7 million to cover the financial shortfall left from a mortgaged cargo vessel that was sold after a Greek shipping company had to pay the RBS investment arm more than $13.3 million.

  • February 19, 2020

    LC&F Seeks Costs After Forcing Trustee To Bow Out

    Counsel for scandal-plagued London Capital & Finance asked a London judge Wednesday for an award of its legal costs after it succeeded in removing Global Security Trustees Ltd. as the collapsed bond firm's trustee because of concerns over conflicts of interest.

  • February 19, 2020

    Crypto Soccer Exchange Faces $2.2M Bill In Old Tokens Fight

    A Swiss businessman has accused a U.K.-based soccer stock exchange and cryptocurrency group of defrauding him out of $2.2 million after they failed to issue his oil company with new digital tokens.

  • February 19, 2020

    UK Top Court Lets Investors Pursue $323M Romanian Award

    The U.K.'s top court on Wednesday allowed two Swedish food investors to resume their efforts to enforce a $323.6 million arbitral award against Romania, concluding a lower court exceeded its power when it paused the litigation while a European court considers whether the award is illegal.

  • February 18, 2020

    Alleged Ponzi Scheme Operators Ordered To Pay £8.6M

    A judge Tuesday ordered two men charged in connection to an alleged forestry investment scam to pay more than £8.6 million ($11 million) under a deal they previously reached to resolve civil proceedings brought by liquidators for the companies they allegedly defrauded.

  • February 18, 2020

    Moldova Tells DC Circ. To Reject $58M Energy Award

    Moldova is urging the D.C. Circuit not to enforce a $58 million arbitral award issued to a Ukrainian energy company following a dispute over an energy supply agreement, arguing that the order was premature because the award is likely to be set aside by Europe's highest court.

  • February 18, 2020

    Credit Suisse Hit With Costs In Ex-Director's Suit

    A judge ordered Credit Suisse to pay some of a former employee's costs on Tuesday after he largely fended off a bid to pare down his £46 million ($60 million) lawsuit over his imprisonment in Romania on espionage charges while working for the lender.

  • February 18, 2020

    HMRC Back At UK Top Court Over Foreign Unit Dividend Fight

    The U.K.'s tax authority told the Supreme Court on Tuesday that multinational corporations alleging they were overtaxed on dividends paid by their foreign subsidiaries could have discovered the mistake far earlier, as the government continues to battle with companies over the controversial provision.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    AI Can't Accurately Predict Case Length And Cost — Yet

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    A recent Law360 guest article argued that artificial intelligence can precisely estimate the length and cost of a new case, but several limitations will likely delay truly accurate predictions for years to come, says Andrew Russell at Shaw Keller.

  • Surefire Marketing Methods To Build Your Legal Practice

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    Attorneys who take the time and the risk to showcase their talents through speaking, writing and teaching will find that opportunities will begin building upon themselves, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Mandatory Mediation May Lie Ahead For England And Wales

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    The U.K. Court of Appeals' decision in Lomax v. Lomax, among other recent developments, show significant judicial support for compulsory mediation of appropriate civil and commercial cases in England and Wales, say Margarita Michael and Grace Spurgeon of O'Melveny.

  • Some Clarity On Inventor-Employee Compensation In The UK

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    The recent U.K. Supreme Court decision in Shanks v. Unilver swept away a perception that some employers are simply too big to pay inventor compensation under the U.K.’s statutory compensation provisions, and may offer some hope to prospective employees, say attorneys at Haseltine Lake.

  • Key Risks And Developments For UK Law Firm Culture In 2020

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    In 2020, law firms throughout the U.K. will be increasingly reshaped by rapid changes in societal expectations and advances in technology, say Helen Rowlands and Niya Phiri of Clyde & Co.

  • The Outlook For Autonomous Vehicles In The UK And US

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    As both the U.K. and U.S. governments continue to develop regulatory frameworks for autonomous vehicles, manufacturers can take certain steps to avoid litigation and manage risk, say attorneys at FaegreBD.

  • PayPal Case Illustrates Difficulty Of Avoiding CMA Penalties

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    The U.K. Competition and Markets Authority's recent fine against PayPal for violating U.K. merger control rules — despite the company's attempts to put safeguards in place — demonstrates how rigid the CMA can be when it comes to initial enforcement orders, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Huawei Case Might Mean UK Forum Sets Global FRAND Rates

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    The U.K. Supreme Court’s eventual opinion in Unwired Planet v. Huawei will decide whether English courts are a proper forum for determining global fair license terms for standard-essential patents, and there are several reasons to question the English courts' creation of this approach, says Thomas Cotter of the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Perspectives

    Artisanal Miners' Roadblocks To Justice: Is A Path Clearing?

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    Efforts to give small-scale gold miners, who face displacement, pollution and violence at sites around the world, access to fair and functioning justice systems have met with apathy from politicians and fierce resistance from powerful business lobbies, but there are signs that this may be changing, says Mark Pieth, president of the Basel Institute on Governance.

  • Norwich Pharmacal Orders Remain Vital In The Internet Age

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    Norwich Pharmacal orders, which can require third parties to reveal vital information despite duties of confidentiality, have proven to be a versatile remedy in a wide range of cases over the decades. Today, they remain relevant because websites provide platforms for anonymous wrongdoing, says Simon Bushell of Signature Litigation.

  • Latest Mastercard Ruling Is A Milestone For UK Class Actions

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    A London appeals court recently revived a £14 billion proposed class action against Mastercard for charging high credit card fees, which represents a fillip for consumers in the ultimate David vs. Goliath contest but is not a slingshot to success just yet, say attorneys at FaegreBD.

  • UK Confiscation Order Ruling Is A Win For Prosecutors

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    Prosecutors will be glad that an English appeals court's recent judgment in Fulton v. Regina joins other Proceeds of Crime Act decisions in confirming that a court does not need to show leniency or resolve ambiguities in favor of an offender when making a confiscation order, says Nick Barnard of Corker Binning.

  • UK Antitrust Watchdog Proposals Would Bolster Enforcement

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    The U.K. Competition and Markets Authority's proposals for reshaping competition enforcement and consumer protection would shift the historical balance in U.K. competition policy, increasing regulatory burden on companies while weakening judicial scrutiny of CMA actions, says Bill Batchelor of Skadden.

  • Proposed Arbitration Law May Be A Misstep For India

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    A proposed Indian law, which could have the effect of excluding non-Indians from acting as arbitrators, is threatening to undermine the country's ambition to become an important seat of international arbitration, says Sarosh Zaiwalla of Zaiwalla & Co.

  • UK Patent Law: Hot Topics Of 2018 And What's Ahead

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    English courts have been active in the past year, grappling with patent topics like plausibility and equivalents, and 2019 promises to be another exciting year as English patent lawyers await developments on obviousness, insufficiency and employee inventor compensation, says Jin Ooi of Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

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