Commercial Litigation UK

  • March 19, 2020

    WTO Forms Panel To Hear EU-Turkey Drug Production Case

    The World Trade Organization has composed a panel of experts that will hear the European Union’s case against Turkey over rules that Brussels says are discriminatory against foreign drug companies, according to a WTO filing released Wednesday.

  • March 18, 2020

    Key Feature Remains Untested Amid Financial List's Success

    Four and a half years since its launch, the Financial List has lived up to its promise of putting expert judges on complex cases, but a notable feature remains unused and some challenges still have to be ironed out.

  • March 18, 2020

    Russian Businessman Wins Retrial In Bank Fraud Fight

    A British appellate court on Wednesday ordered a retrial of allegations that Bank Saint Petersburg fraudulently stripped a Russian maritime company of its assets, after concluding that the lower court’s standard for dishonesty had been set too high.

  • March 18, 2020

    COVID-19 Fears Cut Trump Dossier Author Off Stand Mid-Trial

    After learning his wife was being tested for coronavirus, ex-British spy Christopher Steele was released in the middle of his testimony Wednesday from a trial brought by three Russian bankers claiming he breached the U.K.’s data protection law by disseminating allegedly false information in his infamous Trump dossier.

  • March 18, 2020

    Lord Chancellor Insists English Courts Must Go On Sitting

    Law courts across England and Wales have a critical role to play and must go on sitting during the coronavirus pandemic, the government's secretary of state for justice said Wednesday.

  • March 18, 2020

    British Racing Legend Sues Accountant For Fund Losses

    A former British racing star is suing an accountant for £5 million ($5.79 million) in damages, saying the man he treated “like a son” frittered away money from a private equity fund on poor investments and holidays for himself.

  • March 18, 2020

    Google Must Weigh Secrets Against Defense In Antitrust Suit

    A London judge on Wednesday said Google must decide whether to show some of its business secrets to an independent expert or abandon parts of its defense to claims brought by a price-comparison website accusing the search-engine giant of abusing its dominance.

  • March 18, 2020

    UK Wine Merchant Closed For Misleading Investors

    A wine merchant has been shut down by England’s High Court for misleading investors and failing to deliver customers’ orders in an unregulated investment scheme, the Insolvency Services said on Wednesday.

  • March 18, 2020

    Johnny Depp's Libel Case May Be Delayed Amid Pandemic

    The beginning of a trial over Johnny Depp’s libel suit in London against the publishers of The Sun newspaper was thrown into doubt after the judge overseeing the case raised concerns Wednesday over the threat of COVID-19.

  • March 18, 2020

    Insurance Broker Dragged Into £2M Fire Claim Dispute

    A property company suing insurer Liverpool Victoria for a £2 million ($2.3 million) payout for fire damage to a building has added broker Movo to its claim for allegedly failing to exercise reasonable care and skill when arranging the policy.

  • March 17, 2020

    HSBC Money-Laundering Deal Relevant To Forex, Court Told

    A $1.26 billion penalty HSBC paid for failing to flag suspicious money transfers is relevant eight years later to proposed class action allegations that major banks rigged the foreign exchange market because it shows how HSBC has repeatedly abused its size, investors told a New York federal judge.

  • March 17, 2020

    Asset Manager Pushes For €15M ‘Incentive’ Fee Payout

    A London-based investment firm argued Tuesday to the Court of Appeal that it was entitled to €15.3 million ($16.8 million) in “incentive” fees for its management of securities held in trust by a Deutsche Bank subsidiary, even after the note issuers redeemed the bonds before they matured.

  • March 17, 2020

    Law Firm Disclosure Ruling On Trustee Docs Has Limits

    A recent Court of Appeal ruling that a trustee can’t use privilege to withhold documents requested by a beneficiary will have a limited impact due to a 2018 update to the U.K.’s data protection law, lawyers told Law360.

  • March 17, 2020

    Pandemic May Disrupt Discovery In Credit Suisse Forex Case

    Counsel for investors and Credit Suisse cited the COVID-19 pandemic Monday when they asked a New York federal judge to push their discovery deadlines in a suit over alleged foreign exchange market manipulation by nine weeks.

  • March 17, 2020

    Ex-Zurich Worker Fights For Axed Law Firm Intimidation Suit

    A former Zurich Insurance employee seeking permission to appeal the dismissal of his intimidation and deceit claims against DAC Beachcroft LLP is accusing the judge who tossed his suit of participating in a “cover-up scheme” against him.

  • March 17, 2020

    FCA, New BOE Boss Resist Being Drawn Into RBS Unit Suit

    A Northern Ireland court will be asked in May to decide whether Andrew Bailey, the former head of the Financial Conduct Authority, and the financial watchdog will have to defend a multimillion-pound lawsuit alongside the Royal Bank of Scotland in a claim brought by a victim of the lender’s controversial restructuring unit.

  • March 17, 2020

    ITV Given 6 Months To Fund Troubled Pension Scheme

    The U.K. Pensions Regulator gave television broadcaster ITV a six-month window Tuesday to uphold a court ruling requiring it to provide financial support to a troubled pension scheme.

  • March 17, 2020

    9th Circ. Rules Lloyd’s Must Cover Store In Privacy Suit

    The Ninth Circuit has sided with a California-based women’s accessory store in its dispute with Lloyd’s of London, ruling the insurer must provide coverage in a separate suit alleging the retailer collected and sold customers’ personal information.

  • March 17, 2020

    UK Retailer Laura Ashley Succumbs To Coronavirus Downturn

    U.K. fashion and home décor retailer Laura Ashley said Tuesday it was going into insolvency administration in the face of plummeting sales as the coronavirus pandemic keeps shoppers home.

  • March 17, 2020

    Metro Bank Hit With Fresh Lawsuit By Iranian Customers

    Metro Bank is facing fresh legal action after U.K. law firm Ronald Fletcher Baker LLP accused the lender of unlawfully restricting or closing bank accounts with links to Iran.

  • March 17, 2020

    English Courts Stay Open Despite Coronavirus Restrictions

    The U.K. justice department has decided to keep the courts in England and Wales operating but restricted new jury trials amid Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s new policy of encouraging “social distancing” to drive down the infection rate of COVID-19 across the country.

  • March 16, 2020

    Calif. Financier Seeks Sanctions For 'Abusive' Opposing Atty

    A California attorney and financier urged a California federal judge to sanction a U.K. racehorse auctioneer company and throw out its suit, arguing that its attorney lied under oath and used "abusive," "hardball tactics" to try to extort settlements based on frivolous claims.

  • March 16, 2020

    Coronavirus: The Latest EU Court Closures And Restrictions

    UPDATED April 3, 2020, 10:56 AM GMT | As courts across the region take measures to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, some are restricting access and altering their procedures. Here is a roundup of changes.

  • March 16, 2020

    The Biggest UK IP Cases To Watch In 2020

    Intellectual property litigators in the United Kingdom have no shortage of high-profile cases to watch for in 2020, ranging from a pending Supreme Court decision on whether English courts can set global licensing rates for multinational patent portfolios to a dispute about whether links to online radio stations can breach music copyrights. Here’s a look at some of the major IP fights in the U.K. worth paying attention to in 2020.

  • March 16, 2020

    Trustee Gets OK To Make Payouts In PrivatBank Case

    A London judge gave a trustee for $375 million worth of securities the all-clear on Monday to meet the terms of an arbitration award and pay certain investors that have an interest in the deal, assuaging fears that doing so could have opened the trustee up to legal action.

Expert Analysis

  • 8 Ways ICSID Proposal Would Change Arbitration

    Author Photo

    The International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes recently proposed extensive rule revisions. These updates come at a troubling time for investor-state arbitration, which faces increasing backlash from nongovernmental organizations and criticism from populist politicians, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • UK Corporations Face Growing Risk Of Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Recent years have seen an increased focus on class action litigation in U.K. courts, with a rise in high-profile and high-value claims being brought against corporate defendants. Furthermore, various factors suggest that the trend is likely to continue, say attorneys at Herbert Smith Freehills LLP.

  • Goldman Sachs Decision Raises Bank Failure Questions In UK

    Author Photo

    Depending on your political beliefs, the U.K. Supreme Court's recent judgment in Goldman Sachs v. Novo Banco either illustrates the benefits of remaining in the European Union or highlights the dangers of not breaking free from it, says Ben Pilbrow of Shepherd and Wedderburn LLP.

  • The Final Word On No Oral Modification Clauses In The UK

    Author Photo

    The U.K. Supreme Court's recent decision in Rock v. MWB came down on the side of commercial certainty, establishing that "no oral modification" clauses mean exactly what they say. Nonetheless, the decision may lead to some problematic cases, say Kathryn Rowe and Peter McMaster QC of Appleby Global.

  • 5 Global Merger Control Developments You Need To Know

    Author Photo

    Merger news from the first half of 2018 reflects a global trend toward alignment of enforcement on the national level and on the regional level, say attorneys with Latham & Watkins LLP.

  • Time For M&A Parties To Take Gun-Jumping Rules Seriously

    Author Photo

    The European Commission last week imposed a €124.5 million ($152.3 million) fine on Altice, which dwarfs previous gun-jumping fines by any other antitrust authority worldwide. While the rules on gun jumping may not yet be clear, what is already evident is the increasing focus of European and other regulators on procedural misdemeanors, say attorneys with Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLP.

  • Litigation Funding Is On The Rise In Europe

    Author Photo

    The rising popularity of litigation funding across Europe is a positive force for litigation and arbitration proceedings, but its growth and influence should be carefully managed, say Klaus Oblin and Florian Wettner of IR Global.

  • EU's ICO Response Lags Behind Its Potato Regulation

    Author Photo

    Recently, a multitude of regulators within the European Union have issued warnings on initial coin offerings of cryptocurrency tokens. However, until they start applying existing rules to ICOs or successfully develop new rules, the industry will remain relatively unregulated, say Bob Penn, Sarah Lewis, Matthew Fisher, Danilo Santoboni and Ulrike Schuster of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • The Outlook For Anti-Suit Injunctions After Brexit

    Author Photo

    It remains to be seen whether, after Brexit, the U.K. will issue anti-suit injunctions in relation to proceedings in EU member states. Much will depend on whether the U.K. adopts the common law approach or Lugano Convention, or negotiates a new agreement with the EU, say Nicholas Greenwood and Nicola Kelly of Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • Roundup Warning Label Ruling Less Surprising Than It Seems

    Author Photo

    A California federal court's recent decision in National Association of Wheat Growers v. Zeise, which blocked the state from requiring Monsanto to put Proposition 65 warning labels on its Roundup products, may seem surprising at first blush. But a deeper look at the broader historical context of Proposition 65 offers a different perspective, say Shannon Oldenburg and Malcolm Weiss of Hunton & Williams LLP.

  • The Volkswagen Scandal: Catalyst For Class Action Change?

    Author Photo

    The sheer scale and global nature of the Volkswagen diesel emissions scandal has led to discussions about how such high-volume consumer cases are handled, with some commentators suggesting that the case represents a turning point in how class action litigation is viewed and handled, particularly in Europe, say Noah Wortman, global head of class action services at Goal Group, and attorneys with Hausfeld LLP.

  • A New Era In Global Securities Litigation: Part 3

    Author Photo

    In addition to the Netherlands, the U.K. and Germany have also experienced rapid proliferation of collective actions in the recent past. As collective action vehicles in Europe develop, issues with enforcement and implementation have emerged, say attorneys with Dechert LLP.

  • What Europe's Coty Decision Means For Companies

    Author Photo

    The European Court of Justice ruled last month that suppliers of luxury goods can, under certain circumstances, prohibit their authorized distributors from selling on a third-party internet platform. The judgment defines an important line for companies producing branded goods, and for online marketplaces, say Jacques-Philippe Gunther and Susanne Zuehlke of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP.

  • Will The UK Open Its Doors To US-Type Class Actions?

    Author Photo

    While the U.S. has a long history of class action litigation, there are still many unknowns in the U.K. as to what the courts are looking for in order to certify a class. The recent filing of a lawsuit against Google will hopefully provide guidance on whether private group consumer redress will be successful on the other side of the Atlantic, says Lauren McGeever of Epiq Systems Inc.

  • A GDPR Primer For US-Based Cos. Handling EU Data: Part 2

    Author Photo

    In the final part of this series about the General Data Protection Regulation, attorneys at Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP explain the stringent restrictions placed on cross-border data transfers to countries outside of the European Union, various compliance mechanisms and penalties, and potential deviations in implementation among EU member states.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Commercial Litigation UK archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!