Florida

  • January 27, 2022

    3M Hit With $110M Verdict In Fla. Military Earplug Bellwether

    A Florida federal jury on Thursday sided with two service members who say they suffered hearing damage from using 3M earplugs, awarding the men $110 million in damages, the largest verdict in the sprawling multidistrict litigation's bellwether series to date, according to attorneys for the plaintiffs.

  • January 27, 2022

    Fla. High Court Says Arbitration Provision Runs With Land

    The Florida Supreme Court affirmed a ruling that sent a pair of homeowners to arbitration in their suit against U.S. Home Corp., finding Thursday that they are bound by an arbitration provision in the deed issued by the developer to the original owners of the house.

  • January 27, 2022

    Fla. Senate Lets Businesses Seek Damages Over Local Laws

    The Florida Senate pushed through approval of a controversial bill Thursday that would give businesses a cause of action to sue local governments for monetary damages if they can prove newly enacted ordinances have had enough of an adverse impact on their bottom lines.

  • January 27, 2022

    11th Circ. Upholds Geico's Win In $1M Crash Coverage Fight

    The Eleventh Circuit sealed Geico's summary judgment win in a $1 million dispute over coverage for a car crash after it found that the insurer's policyholders didn't buy uninsured motorist insurance.

  • January 27, 2022

    The Term: Breyer's Legacy And The Nomination To Come

    Justice Stephen Breyer on Thursday formally announced he would be retiring at the end of the Supreme Court term. Here, The Term breaks down the legacy he will leave behind and takes a look at what lies ahead for his potential successor with two special guests.

  • January 27, 2022

    Fla. Judge Gives Cancer Patients Win Against Aetna

    A Florida federal judge granted two cancer patients a win Thursday in their proposed class suit against Aetna claiming they were wrongfully denied coverage for proton beam radiation therapy under their employer-issued health plans.

  • January 27, 2022

    Breyer Retiring As Supreme Court Lurches Right

    Justice Stephen Breyer is retiring from the U.S. Supreme Court at a time when his conservative colleagues on the bench seem intent on dismantling landmark precedents on abortion, affirmative action and the administrative state, to name a few. Can his successor preserve his liberal legacy?

  • January 27, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Lennar, Jubao Xie, Calmwater Capital

    Lennar Homes has reportedly dropped $22.5 million on 25.3 acres in South Florida, developer Jubao Xie is said to be seeking $187 million with the sale of the world's tallest Holiday Inn and Calmwater Capital is said to have loaned $34 million for a Queens, New York, warehouse.

  • January 27, 2022

    All Pa. Counties Join $26B Opioid Deal Over DAs' Objections

    All 67 Pennsylvania counties have signed on to a $26 billion, multistate settlement with three distributors and one manufacturer of opioid drugs, the state's attorney general's office announced Thursday, despite the district attorneys of its two largest counties opposing the deal.

  • January 27, 2022

    Aon Says 2021 Disasters Propelled High Insurable Losses

    Hurricane Ida and other major storms that hit the U.S. in 2021 resulted in the third-costliest year on record for the insurance industry, according to a report from professional services company Aon, which warns that climate change threatens to increase risks.

  • January 27, 2022

    Robinhood Defeats Investors' 'Meme Stock' Claims

    Robinhood on Thursday defeated claims that it wrongly blocked investors from buying "meme stocks" during last year's market volatility, with a Florida federal court finding the stock-trading platform acted within the scope of its customer agreement.

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Jackson Back In Spotlight As High Court Contender

    The upcoming vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court quickly threw the spotlight back on D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, a former clerk for Justice Stephen Breyer whose stature as a likely successor to the retiring justice was suddenly raised Wednesday.

  • January 27, 2022

    Miami's Meland Budwick Adds Former Prosecutor

    Miami law firm Meland Budwick PA snagged a former federal prosecutor and investment banker as a new partner for its litigation practice.

  • January 27, 2022

    Biden At His Side, Justice Breyer Announces Retirement

    Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer joined President Joe Biden at the White House Thursday to formally announce his retirement, kicking off a rush among Democrats to confirm a new member of the court to replace the oldest serving justice.

  • January 26, 2022

    Democrats Plan Swift Confirmation Of Breyer Successor

    The U.S. Senate's Democratic leaders pledged Wednesday to move swiftly to confirm a successor for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, who is expected to formally announce his retirement Thursday.

  • January 26, 2022

    Fla. Judge Vacates Arbitration Award Over Deposition Texting

    A Florida federal judge has vacated an arbitration award and threatened to grant NuVasive Inc. a default win in its suit against medical device distributor Absolute Medical after learning that the company's president texted another defendant repeatedly during a remote deposition in the arbitration proceeding.

  • January 26, 2022

    Feds Say Crypto Exchange Founder Stole $1M In Client Funds

    Federal authorities on Wednesday unsealed charges against the founder and former operator and chief executive officer of a major cryptocurrency exchange in Miami, accusing him of a complex scheme to steal customers' funds.

  • January 26, 2022

    Insurer Must Turn Over Underwriting Manuals In Fla. Case

    A Florida-based insurance company must turn over some of its underwriting manuals in a property damage suit, a state appeals court ruled Wednesday, saying it had no reason to believe the documents weren't relevant to the dispute.

  • January 26, 2022

    Chinese Investors Fight Proposed Axing Of EB-5 Fraud Suit

    A group of Chinese investors has urged a Florida district court to reject a magistrate's recommendation to permanently toss the investors' allegations that the developers of a Miami Beach hotel helped defraud them of millions they thought they were contributing to the project as part of a federal investment visa program.

  • January 26, 2022

    4 Cruise Lines Oppose Jury Demand In Havana Docks Case

    Four major cruise lines have asked a Florida federal court to refuse a former Cuban port owner's demand for a jury trial in its case claiming they violated federal law by docking ships in Havana, saying a magistrate judge wrongly recommended that the jury demand is viable.

  • January 26, 2022

    Rep. Says Transparency Bills Can Lead To Privacy Gains

    While lawmakers are stalled in advancing sweeping consumer privacy reforms, Rep. Lori Trahan, D-Mass., said her colleagues would be served by passing more incremental legislation that imposes transparency requirements on Big Tech companies.

  • January 26, 2022

    EPA Declines To Switch Up Ethylene Oxide Risk Calculation

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday proposed sticking with a Trump-era plan for assessing risks posed by ethylene oxide pollution, refusing requests for the agency to use a different risk calculation model that was developed by Texas environmental regulators.

  • January 26, 2022

    Meet The Possible Nominees For Justice Breyer's Seat

    President Joe Biden has promised to nominate the first-ever Black woman to the nation's highest court. Here we look at the contenders for Justice Stephen Breyer's seat, including one notable front-runner.

  • January 26, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Bank Hapoalim, Amazon, Ansca Homes

    Bank Hapoalim has reportedly loaned $33.2 million for a Brooklyn multifamily project, Amazon is said to be leasing 202,000 square feet in Los Angeles and Ansca Homes is reportedly hoping to rezone 10.2 acres in South Florida.

  • January 26, 2022

    'Just Do Your Job': Justice Breyer's Legacy Of Pragmatism

    With the coming retirement of Justice Stephen Breyer, the U.S. Supreme Court loses not only a core member of its liberal bloc, but also a judicial thinker who cares deeply about making the law work on a practical level, those who worked with him said.

Expert Analysis

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: 2021 MDLs In Review

    Author Photo

    The most notable trend in multidistrict litigation in 2021 was a 25% decrease in the number of new petitions for MDL proceedings — but a deeper dive into the numbers suggests that, on the whole, MDLs are thriving, and continuing to have a major impact, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • How AI Can Transform Crisis Management In Litigation

    Author Photo

    Attorneys should understand how to use rapidly advancing artificial intelligence technology to help clients prepare for potential catastrophic events and the inevitable litigation arising from them, from predicting crises before they occur to testing legal theories once they arise, say Stratton Horres at Wilson Elser and David Steiger.

  • Supervisor Relationships Are Key To Beating Atty Burnout

    Author Photo

    In order to combat record attorney turnover and high levels of burnout, law firm partners and leaders must build engaging relationships with supervisees, fostering autonomy and control, enabling expression of values, and building a sense of community and belonging, says Anne Brafford at the Institute for Well-Being in Law.

  • Make-Whole Claim Lessons From Hertz Bankruptcy Ruling

    Author Photo

    After the Delaware bankruptcy court's recent decision in Wells Fargo v. Hertz, courts may continue to hear the assertion that early payoff premiums constitute unmatured interest, which could shape best practices in formulating make-whole clauses to avoid such arguments, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

    Author Photo

    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • 6 Months On, Liability Lessons From Surfside Condo Collapse

    Author Photo

    The collapse of the Champlain South Tower in Surfside, Florida, and the ongoing litigation that has followed serve as a wakeup call to engineers and contractors, who should review best practices for communicating warning signs and negotiating liability-limiting contract clauses, says Adrien Pickard at Shapiro Lifschitz.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

    Author Photo

    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

    Author Photo

    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • How State High Courts Are Ruling On Consent To Jurisdiction

    Author Photo

    Recent state supreme court decisions from New York, New Mexico, Pennsylvania and Georgia implicate whether a corporate defendant will be subject to suit for claims unconnected to a state merely for registering to do business there, and the tension between the Georgia Supreme Court's decision and settled precedent means the issue may be before the U.S. Supreme Court soon, say Jayne Risk and Neal Kronley at DLA Piper.

  • 5 Privacy Law Predictions For 2022

    Author Photo

    To prepare for increased state, federal and international privacy regulation and enforcement this year, companies should focus on sufficient data security measures, fair and transparent use of artificial intelligence and biometrics, and integration of new contractual clauses into cross-border data transfer agreements, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Recent Bias Suits Against Law Firms And Lessons For 2022

    Author Photo

    2021 employment discrimination case filings and developments show that law firms big and small are not immune from claims, and should serve as a reminder that the start of a new year is a good time to review and update salary, promotion and leave policies to mitigate litigation risks, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • Opinion

    After NetChoice Ruling, Duty Of Care Is Best Section 230 Fix

    Author Photo

    A Texas federal court's recent ruling in NetChoice v. Paxton, halting enforcement of the state's new social media law, illustrates why restoring a duty of care is likely the only constitutional way to adequately reform the overly broad online liability protection provided by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, says Neil Fried at DigitalFrontiers Advocacy.

  • Associate Hiring Outlook At Law Firms Is Bright For 2022

    Author Photo

    After a year of extraordinary signing bonuses, nearly instantaneous offers and flexible work arrangements, strong demand for talented law firm associates will continue into 2022 — with some differences between East and West Coast markets — and junior attorneys should take steps to capitalize on the opportunity, say Ru Bhatt and Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Roundup

    The Most-Read Legal Industry Guest Articles Of 2021

    Author Photo

    Popular legal industry guest articles this year included commentary on the admissibility of video depositions, an unusual U.S. Supreme Court citation, the perils of lawyer perfectionism, and more.

  • Opinion

    Fla. Construction Defect Bill Would Hurt Consumer Interests

    Author Photo

    Florida legislation seeking to amend the state's construction defect laws would weaken consumer protections, increase litigation costs and negatively affect alternate dispute resolution, and should be vigorously opposed by anyone who supports consumer rights for homeowners, homeowners associations and condominiums, says Patrick Howell at Becker.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!