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Legal Ethics

  • March 21, 2019

    Chancery Threatens Charter's Contractor With Arrests

    In a rare fire-and-brimstone ruling, a Delaware vice chancellor found the top officer of a cloud services contractor to Charter Communications Operating LLC in contempt late Thursday and gave the business until Monday to restore Charter’s access to a crucial sales force pay platform or face the prospect of court-ordered arrests.

  • March 21, 2019

    Bar's Tent Collapse Settlement Fight Heads To State Court

    A Missouri federal judge has remanded a St. Louis bar’s suit that alleges its liability insurer and the attorney it hired improperly passed up a favorable settlement in an underlying case over a deadly tent accident, saying Thursday that the claims against the attorney were valid and could be heard in state court.

  • March 21, 2019

    Atty Sanctioned For 'Repugnant' Claims About East Indians

    A California federal judge has sanctioned an attorney for his “repugnant” request to hold a hearing to purportedly demonstrate a pattern of noncompliance with the American with Disabilities Act among hotel owners of East Indian descent.

  • March 21, 2019

    Donziger Still Defying Court In $9.5B Ecuador Fight: Chevron

    Chevron Corp. told a New York federal judge Wednesday that new evidence proves attorney Steven Donziger flouted an order barring him from profiting off a fraudulent $9.5 billion judgment in an Ecuadorian environmental case, saying his “brazen” misdeeds warrant sanctions.

  • March 21, 2019

    NJ Housing Official Says Accused Rapist Defamed Her

    A New Jersey housing official who alleged she was raped by a campaign staffer who later got a lucrative job in Gov. Phil Murphy’s administration said Wednesday his denial of her sexual assault claim to prosecutors, lawmakers and the media amounts to defamation.

  • March 21, 2019

    5 Firms To Get $214M In $1.5B Syngenta MDL Corn Settlement

    Five law firms will receive $214 million in fees from the $1.5 billion Syngenta AG tainted corn settlement after a Kansas federal court adopted those same firms' recommendation on how to allocate some of the money.

  • March 21, 2019

    Law360's The Week In Discipline

    A West Virginia lawyer who billed for more than 30 hours of work in a 24-hour day and a New York attorney who sold shipping containers filled with worthless metal lead Law360's The Week In Discipline, which compiles sanctions and conduct charges that may have flown under the radar.

  • March 21, 2019

    RICO Claim Tossed In Fla. Suit Against Timeshare-Exit Firm

    A Florida federal court on Thursday partly granted Aaronson Law Firm's motion to dismiss timeshare resort developer Club Exploria's suit alleging the firm encouraged customers to back out of their contracts, trimming several counts including one claiming violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

  • March 20, 2019

    Ex-Partner Appeals To Pa. Panel For Carlson Lynch Database

    An expelled partner from Pittsburgh-based Carlson Lynch LLP asked the Superior Court of Pennsylvania on Wednesday to lift a temporary stay preventing him from accessing the firm’s database of investigative material.

  • March 20, 2019

    What’s In A Judgeship? More Than Meets The Eye

    Figuring out what constitutes a manageable workload for the nation’s district judges is no simple task. Getting the judiciary the resources it needs is even harder.

  • March 20, 2019

    Swamped: How Magistrate Judges Salvaged Louisiana's Judicial Crisis

    The Western District of Louisiana is supposed to have seven district judges. But for a year, most of the courthouses were operating without a single Article III judge. As usual, magistrate judges picked up the slack.

  • March 20, 2019

    Squire Patton Atty Says Judge Smeared Him In Arbitration DQ

    A Squire Patton Boggs partner disqualified from arbitrating a fee dispute between a Chesapeake Energy subsidiary and the U.S. arm of a Chinese state-owned oil company wants in on the case now before the Fifth Circuit on appeal, claiming the lower court wrongly and unfairly tarred his reputation.

  • March 20, 2019

    Justice Thomas Breaks 3 Years Of Silence At Hearings

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas asked a question at oral arguments for the first time in over three years Wednesday morning, breaking his silence in a Mississippi death penalty case where the lead prosecutor excluded virtually every potential African-American juror.

  • March 20, 2019

    SRA Money Laundering Compliance Probe Targets UK Firms

    The Solicitors Regulation Authority will launch a new probe to ensure law firms in England and Wales are in compliance with a recently enacted set of money laundering regulations, the body announced Wednesday.

  • March 20, 2019

    Former Firm Acting Like 'Jilted Lover,' Ill. Atty Says

    An Illinois attorney accused of stealing millions of dollars' worth of work from his former firm has told a state court the firm's principal is acting more like a "jilted lover" and hasn't investigated the claims in his lawsuit.

  • March 20, 2019

    Ex-GC To Tampa Agencies Charged With Domestic Violence

    A Florida attorney who has served as general counsel for the Tampa Port Authority and Tampa Sports Authority was arrested early Wednesday on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge for allegedly hitting a woman and later dragging her out of bed.

  • March 20, 2019

    SPLC Wants Sanctions For RICO Suit Over 'Hate Group' Label

    Two leaders of the Southern Poverty Law Center asked a D.C. federal court on Tuesday to hit the Center for Immigration Studies with sanctions for filing a frivolous lawsuit, accusing the nonprofit think tank, which advocates for restrictionist immigration policies, of hiding a weak defamation suit behind its wire fraud claims.

  • March 20, 2019

    2nd Circ. Upholds Ex-NY Dem Leader's Tax Dodge Guilty Plea

    The Second Circuit has upheld the guilty plea of a former attorney and local Democratic leader in New York to a nearly $1.4 million tax evasion scheme, rejecting his claims that he was unaware of the nature of the crime.

  • March 20, 2019

    Law360's Legal Ethics Editorial Advisory Board

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2019 Legal Ethics Editorial Advisory Board.

  • March 20, 2019

    BakerHostetler DQ'd From Opioid MDL Bellwethers

    An Ohio federal judge on Wednesday disqualified BakerHostetler from two bellwether cases in the multidistrict opioid litigation, citing confidential information that a firm partner viewed while working at the U.S. Department of Justice.

Expert Analysis

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Ethical Social Media Marketing For Lawyers

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    Social media presents rich opportunities to reach prospective clients. Attorneys should not let those opportunities pass them by, but they should keep their ethical obligations in mind as they post, says Cort Sylvester of Nilan Johnson Lewis PA.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Norton Rose Diversity Director Nina Godiwalla

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    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Nina Godiwalla, director of diversity and inclusion at Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • How 9th Circ. Approaches 'Related Claims' Insurance Disputes

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    Two recent Ninth Circuit decisions concerning errors and omissions professional liability insurance demonstrate that when construing "related claims" provisions, the court tends to favor close analysis of facts and policy language over broad standards or tests, say Nicholas Maxwell and Diana Gliedman of Anderson Kill PC.

  • 5 Mistakes Law Firms Make When Responding To RFPs

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    More and more corporations are now using requests for proposals to make data-driven decisions about which law firms to work with, so it is more important than ever for law firms to avoid common RFP mistakes, says Matthew Prinn of RFP Advisory Group.

  • Wadler V. Bio-Rad Poses Noteworthy Whistleblower Questions

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    Wadler v. Bio-Rad Labs — where the Ninth Circuit recently affirmed most of an $11 million jury verdict in favor of Sanford Wadler, the company's former general counsel — illustrates the unique and unusually significant risks presented by whistleblower retaliation claims from corporate gatekeepers, say Steve Pearlman and Pinny Goldberg of Proskauer Rose LLP.