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Legal Ethics

  • May 17, 2019

    Helping Manafort's Kid Get Skadden Gig No Crime, Craig Says

    Former Skadden partner Gregory Craig urged a D.C. federal court Friday to bar the government from introducing evidence that he helped line up a job at Skadden for the daughter of the now-jailed former chairman of the Trump campaign, Paul Manafort.

  • May 17, 2019

    'Crazy Expensive' Law Firm Wouldn't Return Calls, Jury Told

    The wife of a former U.K. attorney who hired Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP to pursue a failed privacy suit against the Daily Mail tabloid told a California jury Friday that the firm did little work, billed "crazy expensive" invoices and failed to return phone calls.

  • May 17, 2019

    Group Got $17M Secret Donation Ahead Of Kavanaugh Fight

    The Judicial Crisis Network received $17 million from an anonymous donor shortly before the fight to confirm Justice Brett Kavanaugh, according to two government watchdog groups that obtained the conservative judicial group's latest tax returns.

  • May 17, 2019

    CFPB Targets NY Debt Collection Firm Over Mass Suit Filings

    A New York debt collection law firm used high-volume litigation tactics such as automation to collect over 99,000 debts without proper attorney oversight, according to a complaint filed in New York federal court by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Constitutional Crisis? Not Quite, But Courts Could Be Tested

    Legal and political scholars agree we are not in a constitutional crisis … yet. But as tensions mount between the president and Congress, the role of the third branch of government could be both crucial and perilous.

  • May 17, 2019

    30K Attys In Calif. In Trouble Over Their Fingerprints

    Nearly 30,000 attorneys in California face escalating penalties this month for missing a deadline to submit new fingerprints to the State Bar in an unpopular push to discover attorneys convicted of crimes.

  • May 17, 2019

    Robinson Bradshaw Liable For Diversity Promises, Atty Says

    Law firms should be held liable for deceptive advertising when they lure minority and female attorneys by talking up their diversity and inclusion efforts and then fail to live up to their promises, according to a Thursday filing in a race bias suit against Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson PA.

  • May 17, 2019

    Prosecutors Evade Cop's Released Expunged Records Suit

    An internal affairs police officer at a New Jersey military base cannot sue a county prosecutor's office for releasing his expunged criminal records to a patrolman he had investigated because he did not file a tort claim notice within the requisite time frame, a state appeals court said Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    5th Circ. Wants Redo Of Law Funder's $3M Award Against Atty

    A Fifth Circuit panel has tossed nearly $3 million in damages a litigation financing firm won after an attorney it hired failed to disclose his close ties to a judge in an underlying divorce case, finding a Texas federal court erred in its calculations.

  • May 17, 2019

    Pa. Lawyer Says Ex-Partner Stiffed Him On $1.3M In Fees

    A Pittsburgh attorney is suing his former legal partner for some $1.3 million in fees he claims he's owed for hundreds of hours of work on a now-settled class action against First Commonwealth Bank.

  • May 17, 2019

    FEC Chair Rips Peers For Nixing Thornton Donation Inquiry

    The Federal Election Commission came up two votes shy of moving forward with an investigation into whether Boston-based Thornton Law illegally reimbursed partners for campaign donations, frustrating the commission's chair who worried that FEC inaction could spawn more unlawful activity.

  • May 17, 2019

    Hedge Funds Can't Split Trial In $15M Reed Smith Deal Suit

    A London judge on Friday ruled against bifurcating a trial brought by three insolvent hedge funds alleging Reed Smith LLP wrongly forwarded their portion of a $15.7 million settlement in another case to the U.S. to satisfy a separate court order.

  • May 16, 2019

    Law360's The Week In Discipline

    An Oregon attorney accused of using client cash to pay for big game hunting excursions and a Tennessee lawyer with a “chilling” contingency fee deal lead Law360's The Week In Discipline, which compiles sanctions and conduct charges that may have flown under the radar.

  • May 16, 2019

    Which States Are Best And Worst At Atty Discipline?

    Hawaii, Delaware and New Hampshire are the best states in the country when it comes to handling attorney discipline cases, according to a new paper from two researchers at Florida Atlantic University.

  • May 16, 2019

    Atty-Client Conduct Derailed Train Yard Injury Suit: Panel

    The Sixth Circuit on Wednesday snuffed a former Wisconsin Central Ltd. employee's suit seeking damages for a 2013 railway yard injury, saying the worker and his attorney's refusal to fully cooperate with a court-ordered medical review derailed the suit.

  • May 16, 2019

    US Can Enforce IRS Summons For Law Firm's Client Identities

    The U.S. can enforce an Internal Revenue Service summons for client information from the Taylor Lohmeyer Law Firm because the firm failed to show attorney-client privilege protected the information, a Texas federal court found.

  • May 16, 2019

    Disbarred Atty Can't Beat Prison Term Over 'Confused' Judge

    The Third Circuit on Thursday nixed a disbarred attorney’s bid to toss his revised 41-month prison term for his role in bogus investment schemes, rejecting his claims that a New Jersey federal judge was “confused” about its prior rulings and “unprepared” to conduct the resentencing hearing.

  • May 16, 2019

    Atty Off Hook For $400K Counterfeit Check, Texas Court Says

    A split Texas state appellate court ruled Thursday that an attorney who fell victim to a check-fraud scam should not be responsible for the nearly $400,000 he asked his bank to wire from his Cadence Bank account to an account in Japan.

  • May 16, 2019

    Ill. Atty Should Be Suspended Over Fake Docs, Panel Affirms

    An Illinois attorney conduct review panel on Wednesday upheld a four-month suspension recommendation for a lawyer accused of falsifying two agreements related to new cellphone towers a client wanted to build downstate.

  • May 16, 2019

    Judge's Complaint Of Blackmail Falls Short, Fla. Atty Says

    Prominent Fort Lauderdale attorney William Scherer asked a court Wednesday to dismiss a Palm Beach County judge’s suit accusing him of blackmailing her with intimate photographs during a custody dispute, arguing she failed to back up her allegations that he caused her “severe emotional distress.”

Expert Analysis

  • Key Takeaways From Roundup Verdicts So Far

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    On May 13, a California jury returned a $2 billion verdict against Monsanto in the third trial over allegations that its popular weedkiller Roundup causes cancer. The Roundup trials highlight the importance of issues including punitive damages, celebrity influence and the value of jury exercises, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Examining The Evidence On VIX Manipulation

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    An ongoing multidistrict litigation alleges manipulation of the formula used to determine the settlement price for derivatives based on the Chicago Board Options Exchange’s volatility index. But a review of trading data reveals how reasons other than manipulation can explain trading activity on any given day, say consultants with Analysis Group.

  • The Problem With 9th Circ. CFPB Leadership Structure Ruling

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    In Consumer Financial Protection Bureau v. Seila Law, the Ninth Circuit recently ruled that the CFPB’s single-director structure is constitutional. However, the opinion applies the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Humphrey’s Executor v. U.S. in a way that ignores that decision's fundamental holding, says Alan Kaplinsky of Ballard Spahr.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • To Guard Against Waiving Privilege, Don't CC The Boss

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    Argos Holdings v. Wilmington Trust, a recent New York federal court opinion, cautions that attorneys and companies should not simply assume that privileged communications may be shared with a company’s owner or affiliates without waiving attorney-client privilege, even when the company’s and the owner’s interests are completely aligned, say attorneys at Katten Muchin.

  • What Gov't Outsourcing Ruling Means For Investigations

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    A New York federal court's recent decision in U.S. v. Connolly is a warning to prosecutors against outsourcing their investigations to companies and outside counsel, but it should also be used by companies to determine the framework for internal investigations, says Rachel Maimin of Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

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    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.