Massachusetts

  • January 17, 2020

    GAO Denies Raytheon Protest Over $288M Ship Defense Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has denied Raytheon’s protest over a $287.6 million U.S. Navy contract for a ship self-defense system awarded to rival Lockheed Martin, saying the Navy had properly vetted both companies' bids.

  • January 17, 2020

    Ribbon Communications Investor Sues To Block $456M Deal

    An investor filed a lawsuit in Delaware federal court Thursday seeking to block Ribbon Communications Inc.’s proposed $456 million acquisition of ECI Telecom Group Ltd., claiming not enough information has been disclosed for stockholders to make an informed vote on the transaction.

  • January 17, 2020

    Facebook Must Turn Over App Data As Part Of Mass. Probe

    As part of an investigation launched in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook Inc. will have to turn over to the Massachusetts attorney general the names of any apps on its platform that may have misused user data, a state judge ruled Friday.

  • January 17, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Parents Could Be Headed For 3 Trials This Year

    The case against Lori Loughlin and other parents charged in the college admissions scandal known as “Varsity Blues” could be headed for as many as three trials later this year, a Massachusetts federal judge said in court Friday.

  • January 17, 2020

    Fintech Blank-Check Co. East Stone Readies $100M IPO

    East Stone Acquisition Corp. on Friday filed to raise up to $100 million in an initial public offering, as the special purpose acquisition company looks to fund a future combination with a fintech company. 

  • January 17, 2020

    US Chamber Wants To 'Neuter' Judges, Sens. Tell 1st Circ.

    Rhode Island and Massachusetts senators fired back against the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's arguments at the First Circuit that a climate change suit against Shell, ExxonMobil and other energy giants belongs in federal court, arguing that the chamber is self-interested and wants to "neuter the judicial branch" to benefit fossil fuel funders.

  • January 17, 2020

    GE Settles Hospitals’ Anesthesia Machine Monopoly Suit

    General Electric can put another anesthesia machine servicing monopolization case behind it after cutting a confidential deal with a pair of health care providers in Massachusetts federal court.

  • January 17, 2020

    CBD Co. Says Consumer Suit Relies On Flawed Testing

    A Florida maker of CBD supplements is asking a Massachusetts federal court to knock down a proposed class action over the potency of its products, arguing the suit doesn’t back up its claims with solid testing and fits a pattern of spurious litigation against similar companies.

  • January 17, 2020

    Boston Labor Atty Drops Out Of US Senate Race

    Shannon Liss-Riordan, a prominent plaintiffs-side employment lawyer who has pursued numerous high-profile class actions targeting companies like Uber and GrubHub, ended her campaign on Friday to unseat incumbent Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey.

  • January 16, 2020

    Exxon Says Mass. AG Timed Climate Suit With NY Trial

    ExxonMobil on Thursday suggested Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey timed the launch of her lawsuit accusing the oil giant of deceiving investors and consumers about business risks from climate change to coincide with a landmark climate fraud trial in New York. 

  • January 16, 2020

    States Sue Trump Administration Over Food Stamp Rollbacks

    More than a dozen states filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration Thursday alleging the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food stamp rollbacks violate federal law.

  • January 16, 2020

    Boston Scientific Plan Beats Ex-Worker's Severance Pay Suit

    A Minnesota federal judge has ruled that a Boston Scientific Corp. benefit plan didn't run afoul of ERISA when it determined a sales representative couldn't get severance after the company terminated him for allegedly damaging medical device products.

  • January 16, 2020

    Harvard Students Threaten To Boycott Paul Weiss Over Exxon

    A Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP recruitment event Wednesday was interrupted by a group of Harvard Law students, who sang, chanted and threatened the global firm with losing future recruits if it continues to represent ExxonMobil Corp.

  • January 16, 2020

    Strippers' Classification Suit Moved To Mass. Federal Court

    A proposed class action brought by more than 100 dancers alleging a chain of strip clubs violated labor laws by misclassifying them as independent contractors and deducting locker rental fees and "DJ fees" from their tips was removed to Massachusetts federal court Wednesday.

  • January 16, 2020

    Insys Wins OK For Ch. 11 Plan With Opioid Recovery Trust

    Bankrupt drugmaker Insys Therapeutics Inc. secured confirmation in Delaware on Thursday for a Chapter 11 liquidation and recovery trust that could initially make $160 million available for victims of an opioid epidemic whose potential claims could climb into the billions.

  • January 16, 2020

    Debevoise Helps As HarbourVest Wraps Up New $2.61B Fund

    Boston-based HarbourVest Partners, working with Debevoise & Plimpton, has closed its latest fund after receiving $2.61 billion from limited partners, with plans to target private equity, growth equity and venture capital investments in businesses based in North America, the firm said Thursday.

  • January 15, 2020

    Liberty Aims To Preserve Win In Pharmacy's Painkiller Suit

    Liberty Mutual on Wednesday urged the Third Circuit to uphold the dismissal of a mail-order pharmacy's putative class action accusing the insurer of refusing to cover topical pain-relief creams as an alternative to more abuse-prone opioid pills.

  • January 15, 2020

    5th Circ.'s ACA Punt Gets Lambasted At Supreme Court

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday came under withering fire from health care trade groups and bipartisan economic scholars at the U.S. Supreme Court for ducking a decision on the Affordable Care Act's constitutionality.

  • January 15, 2020

    Sprint/T-Mobile Deal Will Lead To High Prices, Court Hears

    An attorney for a coalition of states challenging the merger of T-Mobile and Sprint on Wednesday made a final pitch to the New York federal judge, saying that consumers across the country risk paying billions of dollars more for wireless services if the proposed deal goes through.

  • January 15, 2020

    Ex-Attys Can't DQ New Counsel In $350M Shire Deal

    The attorneys who used to represent a whistleblower failed Tuesday to get a Florida federal judge to disqualify the whistleblower’s new attorneys in their fight over a cut of the attorney fee award in a $350 million deal with biotech company Shire Pharmaceuticals PLC.

  • January 15, 2020

    GSK Seeks To Forgo Trial In First Zofran MDL Bellwether

    GlaxoSmithKline argued in court Wednesday to prevail on simply a paper record in the first trial in a multidistrict case over whether the company's anti-nausea medication Zofran caused birth defects, claiming a California mother cannot show she wouldn't have taken Zofran anyway, even with a birth defect warning.

  • January 15, 2020

    1st Circ. Affirms Dismissal For Mercedes-Benz In Defect Suit

    The First Circuit has affirmed a Massachusetts federal court's decision to toss a proposed class action accusing Mercedes-Benz of covering up a "catastrophic" radiator defect, saying the driver who filed the suit completely failed to reckon with the fact that his claims are time-barred.

  • January 15, 2020

    GE Deal With Owners Of Shatter-Prone Microwaves Gets OK

    A Connecticut federal judge on Wednesday signed off on General Electric Co.'s agreement to pay microwave buyers up to $300 apiece for microwave doors allegedly prone to shattering, in a deal that could reach more than $20 million in total.

  • January 15, 2020

    Liberty Withdraws From Commercial Insurance In Ireland

    U.S.-based Liberty Insurance said Wednesday it will pull its commercial liability and commercial property business from Ireland but said it remains committed to the Irish market.

  • January 14, 2020

    Noncompete Developments To Watch For In 2020

    This year, federal lawmakers and regulators are considering plans to restrict employers’ use of noncompete agreements, the Ninth Circuit is debating whether California law bars businesses from restraining each other, and judges are expected to grapple with new state reforms on restrictive covenants. Here, Law360 looks at key developments noncompete attorneys ought to be aware of.

Expert Analysis

  • Bias Case Gives Justices Chance To Rethink Title VII

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    If the U.S. Supreme Court decides to hear Peterson v. Linear Controls, its decision could resolve a circuit split and redefine the scope of Title VII's discrimination protections, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • The New Class Action Frontier Under Illinois Privacy Law

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    One year after a pivotal Illinois Supreme Court ruling broadened liability under the Biometric Information Privacy Act, companies in a wide variety of industries need to be vigilant of a rise in potentially financially ruinous class action filings, and there are several steps they can take to protect themselves from BIPA liability, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Top 10 Employment Law Developments Of The Decade: Part 1

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    In the first of two articles, Barbara Roth and Tyler Hendry at Herbert Smith highlight the decade's most significant labor and employment law changes, including the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2011 decision in Dukes to raise the class certification threshold, and the spread of state and local paid sick leave laws.

  • 3rd Circ. Sheds Light On Ch. 11 Liability Release Approval

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    In Millennium Lab, the Third Circuit recently upheld the Delaware bankruptcy court's authority to approve a Chapter 11 plan containing nonconsensual liability releases, offering guidance on the factors courts may consider in deciding whether to approve them, says Jane VanLare of Cleary.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • 2019 Trends In DOJ Health Care Enforcement

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    Last year, opioid-related enforcement was the U.S. Department of Justice's top priority, in addition to a sustained focus on the prosecution of private individuals and data-driven identification of health care fraud, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Reviewing 2019's White Collar Cases And Controversies

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    From the “Varsity Blues” investigation to the Mueller report, white collar criminal cases were at the forefront of the national dialogue last year. Attorneys at Keker Van Nest look back at the most significant white collar cases and trends from 2019 and highlight what to watch for in 2020.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • The Top FMLA And ADA Decisions Of 2019: Part 2

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    Linda Dwoskin and Melissa Squire at Dechert conclude their discussion of last year's most significant Family and Medical Leave Act and Americans with Disabilities Act decisions with a review of attendance point systems, safety-related job exclusions and FMLA fraud.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

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    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Opinion

    States Should Not Follow ABA On Attorney Conduct Rules

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    Because the American Bar Association's new rule on diversity continues to use the Model Rules of Professional Conduct as a cultural bludgeon, states should create independent codes limited to constitutionally valid purposes of attorney regulation, says Bradley Abramson of Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • DOJ Corporate Plea Deals Face Increased Judicial Resistance

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    As demonstrated by a recent trend among federal courts, defense counsel must be prepared for the possibility that complex corporate settlements with the U.S. Department of Justice may be derailed by judges, say Joshua Levy and Elizabeth Douglas of Ropes & Gray.

  • How Courts And Litigants Can Benefit From Special Masters

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    As we approach the first anniversary of the American Bar Association's adoption of guidelines for the appointment and use of special masters in civil litigation, retired U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin, now at Stroock, explains how special masters can help parties and courts with faster decision-making and subject matter expertise.

  • Uber Policy Calls For Refresher On ABA Confidentiality Rules

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    Uber's recent policy update allowing drivers to audio-record passenger rides is a reminder for lawyers to observe the highest standard of care in protecting client information under the American Bar Association's confidentiality model rule, says Paul Boehm at Williams & Connolly.