Georgia

  • November 28, 2023

    Justices Wary Of Ga. Retrial Law: 'An Acquittal Is An Acquittal'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed dubious Tuesday that a Georgia law allowing for the re-prosecution of all criminal charges in certain cases with contradictory jury verdicts, including partial acquittals, passes constitutional muster, bombarding the state's solicitor general with questions on how the law fits into the nation's tradition of respecting jury verdicts.

  • November 28, 2023

    Insurer Says No Defense For Contractor In Stormwater Suit

    An insurer told a Georgia federal court that it owes no coverage to a home construction company for an underlying lawsuit accusing it of performing defective work that led to pooling stormwater, with the insurer claiming myriad policy exclusions bar any liability for the claims.

  • November 28, 2023

    Law Firm Leaders Cautiously Optimistic Heading Into 2024

    Major U.S. law firms are steadfast in their commitment to the pursuit of further growth despite ongoing economic uncertainty. Here’s what the leaders of four Leaderboard firms have to say about how the legal industry is preparing for next year.

  • November 28, 2023

    The 2023 Law360 Pulse Leaderboard

    Check out the Law360 Pulse Leaderboard to see which first-in-class firms made the list this year.

  • November 28, 2023

    Barnes & Thornburg Adds Sports Atty From Nelson Mullins

    Barnes & Thornburg LLP is growing its litigation team, announcing Tuesday that it is bringing in a Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP sports law and Title IX expert as a partner in its Atlanta office.

  • November 27, 2023

    Zuckerberg Rejected Mental Health Filter Policy, States Say

    Meta Platforms Inc. knows its platforms are used by millions of underage children and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg personally shot down a proposed policy to ban image filters found to be harmful to social media users' mental health, according to a newly unsealed version of states' lawsuit filed last week.

  • November 27, 2023

    Trump Can't Subpoena Jan. 6 Docs In Election Criminal Case

    The D.C. federal judge overseeing Donald Trump's criminal election-interference case denied the former president's bid to subpoena records from the investigation into the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol Building, saying Monday that Trump's "vague" motion resembled a "fishing expedition."

  • November 27, 2023

    Young Thug Lyrics Will Prove Up RICO Case, Ga. Jury Hears

    Rapper Young Thug's songs are the key to understanding that he and five others carried out a racketeering operation under the Young Slime Life name, a Georgia prosecutor told a jury in long-awaited opening arguments Monday.

  • November 27, 2023

    Ga. Hotel Sex Trafficking Suit Settles Before Trial

    A group of women who said they were for years victims of sex trafficking at Atlanta-area hotels agreed to settle on the eve of trial after suing hotel owners and operators they said ignored the crimes happening at their properties.

  • November 27, 2023

    Georgia Tax Preparer Gets 2 Years For False Returns

    A Georgia tax preparer has been sentenced to two years in federal prison for filing false income tax returns for his clients to ensure inflated refunds that helped him earn more than $1.2 million in fees, according to federal prosecutors.

  • November 27, 2023

    Justices Urged To Enforce Time Limit For IP Damages

    A music publisher said Monday the U.S. Supreme Court should overturn a lower court ruling that held an artist is not time-barred from recovering additional damages in a copyright suit over recorded songs.

  • November 27, 2023

    Ga. DA Fights 'Unreasonable' Fees Bid After Sanctions Ruling

    A Georgia prosecutor is contesting an attorney fee request related to her being sanctioned by a federal court in October for abusing the scheduling of a criminal trial she was prosecuting in order to avoid a deposition in a sex discrimination suit against her.

  • November 27, 2023

    Trump Downplays NY Judge's Safety Risk After Threats

    Donald Trump's lawyers on Monday said safety concerns don't justify a New York state judge's gag orders against the former president in the state attorney general's civil fraud trial, arguing that threats made by others don't present an "imminent" danger and should not result in his loss of First Amendment rights.

  • November 27, 2023

    Air Force Looks To Nix Black Worker's Race, Age Bias Suit

    The U.S. Air Force urged a Georgia federal court to toss a Black man's suit alleging he was passed over for a promotion in the military branch in favor of a less-experienced, younger, white man, arguing he didn't properly serve the suit.

  • November 22, 2023

    Triple Trouble: Justices Set To Scrutinize 3-Strikes Circuit Split

    One of the most heavily litigated laws at the U.S. Supreme Court — three-strikes sentencing instituted under a Reagan-era clampdown on street violence and drugs — returns to the high court Monday, but this visit will be anything but ordinary, occurring amid an eruption of circuit court conflicts and presenting the prospect of a jolt to the nation's criminal defense docket.

  • November 22, 2023

    Up Next At High Court: SEC Courts, Repeat Offender Sentences

    The U.S. Supreme Court returns Monday from a long holiday weekend to hear arguments over the proper standard to apply when sentencing a repeat felony offender under the Armed Career Criminal Act and the constitutionality of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's in-house courts system.

  • November 22, 2023

    Gov't Wants New Jersey Man Jailed 51 Months For PPP Fraud

    Georgia prosecutors said they plan to seek a 51-month sentence for a New Jersey man when he is sentenced Tuesday for his involvement in a multistate Paycheck Protection Program fraud scheme that allegedly swindled more than $3 million from the federal government.

  • November 22, 2023

    Florida Tribe Seeks To Overturn EPA Water Permit Decision

    A Native American tribe has asked a federal court for a quick win in its lawsuit challenging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's approval of Florida's effort to take over a Clean Water Act permitting program, saying the tribe's waters are outside the state's regulatory jurisdiction.

  • November 22, 2023

    Georgia Man Sentenced For Pandemic Unemployment Fraud

    A Georgia man has been sentenced to nearly four years in federal prison for impersonating unemployment applicants to file fraudulent unemployment claims for more than $200,000 in benefits at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a Wednesday press release from federal prosecutors.

  • November 21, 2023

    Ga. Appeals Pauses Release Of PFAS Deal Details

    The Georgia Court of Appeals on Monday delayed the release of the terms of a settlement between the city of Rome, Georgia, and chemical companies over the alleged discharge of toxic "forever chemicals" into the city's drinking water.

  • November 21, 2023

    Jurisdiction Woes Kill Claims In Fugees Fraud Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Monday cut a New York law firm from a lawsuit alleging it helped ex-Fugees rapper Prakazrel Samuel "Pras" Michel fraudulently sell his music catalog and warned the entire case may be dismissed if plaintiffs can't show it belongs in his courtroom.

  • November 21, 2023

    Ga. Judge Won't Jail Trump Co-Defendant Over Social Posts

    A Fulton County judge on Tuesday declined to revoke the bond of one of former President Donald Trump's co-defendants in the Georgia election interference case, rejecting a bid by District Attorney Fani Willis, who personally argued he should be jailed over recent social media posts about witnesses in the case.

  • November 21, 2023

    Special Master Appointed In Ga. Sports Gaming IP Feud

    A Georgia federal judge on Tuesday appointed a special master to oversee a dispute over whether a Peach State fantasy sports company stole trade secrets and infringed patents owned by another sports technology firm.

  • November 21, 2023

    Ex-Prosecutor's Sex Bias Case Narrows Focus To Ga. DA

    A former Georgia state prosecutor is zeroing in her discrimination and retaliation suit on the Chatham County District Attorney and dismissing charges against all other defendants in the wake of an October court order finding the district attorney defaulted in the case.

  • November 20, 2023

    Ga. Judge OKs Settlement In Dollar General, Worker OT Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Monday approved a settlement between Dollar General and employees who alleged the retail chain automatically deducted meal and rest breaks from their pay regardless of whether they were able to take the breaks.

Expert Analysis

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

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    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Ga. Appeal Shows Benefits Of Questioning Jury Instructions

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    A Georgia Court of Appeals’ October decision, holding a trial court erred in using pattern jury instructions that refer to a long-repealed standard of evidence, underscores the importance of scrutinizing language in established jury instructions and seizing the opportunity to push back against outdated patterns, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Young Thug Case Spotlights Debate Over Lyric Admissibility

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    A Georgia court’s recent ruling, allowing prosecutors to use some of rapper Young Thug’s lyrics in his conspiracy trial, captures the ongoing debate about whether rap lyrics are admissible, with courts often stretching the boundaries of the federal evidence rules, say Amy Buice at Smith Gambrell and Emily Ward at Continuum Legal Group.

  • A Look At Successful Bid Protests In FY 2023

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    Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin look beyond the statistics in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s recent annual report on bid protests, sharing their insights about nine categories of sustained protests, gained from reading every fiscal year 2023 decision in which the protester had a positive result.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Questions Awaiting Justices In 'Repugnant' Verdicts Hearing

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    In McElrath v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the double jeopardy clause bars retrial when a jury reaches a so-called repugnant, or logically contradictory, verdict — with the ultimate resolution resting on how this narrow issue is framed, say Brook Dooley and Cody Gray at Keker Van Nest.

  • How Justices Could Rule On A Key Copyright Statute

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    Attorneys at Manatt discuss how the U.S. Supreme Court may choose to address a fundamental accrual issue in Warner Chappell Music v. Nealy, which precedents the court may look to in analyzing the issue and the challenges copyright claimants may face going forward.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 1st Tax Easement Convictions Will Likely Embolden DOJ, IRS

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    After recent convictions in the first criminal tax fraud trial over allegedly abusive syndicated conservation easements, the IRS and U.S. Department of Justice will likely pursue other promoters for similar alleged conspiracies — though one acquittal may help attorneys better evaluate their clients' exposure, say Bill Curtis and Lauren DeSantis-Then at Polsinelli.

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