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Trials

  • March 21, 2019

    Experian Gets $3M Verdict In FCRA Case Slashed To $490K

    A man who convinced a jury to impose $3 million in punitive damages against Experian for misreporting his credit history saw an Alabama federal judge on Thursday cut the award to $490,000 to bring it closer in line with the $5,000 he won in compensatory damages.

  • March 21, 2019

    Most Of $4.4M Award Upheld In Fatal Texas Crash Suit

    A Texas appeals court on Thursday trimmed a $4.4 million award down to $4.2 million in a suit accusing a motorist of negligently hitting a motorcyclist and causing his death, saying the bulk of the award was supported by the evidence.

  • March 21, 2019

    Qualcomm Can Seek Claim Apple Forfeited FRAND Rights

    A California federal judge has allowed Qualcomm to pursue its counterclaim in an antitrust suit that Apple forfeited rights to favorable licensing terms for smartphone technology.

  • March 21, 2019

    2nd Circ. Says NY Judge Botched Marriage Fraud Trial

    The Second Circuit tossed the marriage fraud convictions of two Indian nationals and an American woman, ruling Thursday that they didn’t get a fair trial because the judge had a solo meeting with some of the jurors and gave the entire jury an inappropriate instruction.

  • March 21, 2019

    NYC Subway Fall Victim's $3.2M Injury Award Trimmed

    A New York appellate panel on Thursday reduced a $3.2 million jury verdict in a stairway slip-and-fall case against the New York City Transit Authority by $525,000, finding the awards for past and future pain and suffering were unreasonably high.

  • March 21, 2019

    Trader-Pastor Gets 5 Years For Hack-Based Insider Trading

    A former hedge fund manager turned Slavic Baptist pastor on Thursday was sentenced to five years in prison, following his conviction at trial for a purported $30 million scheme to trade on nonpublic information gleaned from hacked, unpublished press releases.

  • March 21, 2019

    Law360's Tort Report: Personal Injury & Med Mal News In Brief

    A plane crash that killed four partners in the same injury defense firm and proposed tort reform legislation in Kentucky lead Law360’s Tort Report this week, an occasional feature that compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news items that may have been missed.

  • March 21, 2019

    Equistar Asks Redo To Prove $5M Damages For Faulty Pumps

    Equistar Chemicals LP was wrongly prohibited from presenting evidence to a jury that would have shown its damages stemming from faulty ethane pumps were $5.1 million, as it argued, and not the $37,500 it was awarded, its counsel told a Texas appellate court on Thursday.

  • March 20, 2019

    Primate Trainer Gets $315K Defamation Award Reinstated

    A Texas appeals court on Wednesday reinstated a $315,000 jury verdict for the owner of a San Antonio tax preparation business who said she was the subject of an online defamation campaign stemming from her work as a primate trainer, overturning a trial court’s decision to throw out the verdict.

  • March 20, 2019

    What’s In A Judgeship? More Than Meets The Eye

    Figuring out what constitutes a manageable workload for the nation’s district judges is no simple task. Getting the judiciary the resources it needs is even harder.

  • March 20, 2019

    Swamped: How Magistrate Judges Salvaged Louisiana's Judicial Crisis

    The Western District of Louisiana is supposed to have seven district judges. But for a year, most of the courthouses were operating without a single Article III judge. As usual, magistrate judges picked up the slack.

  • March 20, 2019

    Justices Urged To Ignore BNSF's $10.7M Death Award Appeal

    A woman whose husband was killed at an Oklahoma railroad crossing urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday not to review her $10.7 million award against BNSF Railway Co., saying the case doesn't present the federal preemption issue the rail giant claims it does.

  • March 20, 2019

    Ex-Diplomat Tells Jury Alleged Forced Labor Was Aboveboard

    An attorney for a former Chinese diplomat accused of using workers from his home country as forced labor in U.S. construction projects made his final pitch to a Brooklyn jury Wednesday, arguing there was a legitimate employment arrangement with the supposed victims.

  • March 20, 2019

    Monsanto Jury Told $63B Co. Should Pay Up Over Roundup

    Monsanto should pay a California man for failing to warn about its weedkiller Roundup's cancer risks, his attorney told a federal jury during opening statements in the trial's second phase, declining to put a number on punitive damages but noting that Bayer recently acquired Monsanto for $63 billion.

  • March 20, 2019

    AT&T-Time Warner Trial Sets Poor Example, Delrahim Says

    The D.C. Circuit’s handling of the AT&T-Time Warner trial last summer doesn’t set an ideal example for how courts should analyze mergers for anti-competitive harms, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division head said Wednesday, prompting criticism from one Federal Communications Commission member who said the DOJ's current benchmarks "stink."

  • March 20, 2019

    Greenberg Traurig Trio Launch Boutique 'Firm For The 2020s'

    Three former Greenberg Traurig LLP partners, including Marc L. Mukasey, who currently represents President Donald Trump in a New York state investigation into his charity, have launched their own trial and government investigations boutique, saying in a Wednesday announcement that it is geared to be a "firm for the 2020s."

  • March 20, 2019

    Insys Founder's Atty Seeks Mistrial Over Addiction Testimony

    An attorney for Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor asked a judge for a mistrial in Boston federal court Wednesday, saying a witness should not have been allowed to testify about how a heavy prescriber of Insys' fentanyl spray was also addicted to opioid painkillers himself.

  • March 20, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Upholds SRI's Patents But Slashes $57M Trial Win

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday affirmed that two of SRI International Inc.’s cybersecurity patents hold up under the U.S. Supreme Court’s Alice test, but cut Cisco Systems Inc.’s $57 million bill for infringing them back down to $24 million.

  • March 20, 2019

    NCAA Can't Strike Parts Of Athletes' Closing Argument In MDL

    A California federal judge has denied the NCAA's bid to strike portions of student-athletes' closing argument in multidistrict litigation over whether they can get paid to play, saying the facts the class cited in the closing are admissible.

  • March 20, 2019

    Jury Awards $6.5M To Family Of Baby Burned At Resort

    A Michigan family whose baby was burned by hot coffee at a California resort suffered $6.48 million in damages, a San Diego federal jury has found, attributing most of the fault to the resort and a small portion to the family's nanny.

Expert Analysis

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Trial Counsel's Role On A Mass Tort Virtual Law Team

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    Trial counsel’s contribution to the virtual law team throughout the life cycle of a mass tort litigation rests in the key skill of viewing the case through the eyes of the ultimate audience for the defense, the jury, say attorneys at Covington & Burling LLP and Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • How Per Se Rule Will Die In Criminal Antitrust Cases

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    When the issue of the per se rule for criminal Sherman Act trials reaches the U.S. Supreme Court in the near future, the justices will take different approaches, but the rule will fall, says former federal prosecutor Robert Connolly.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • Opinion

    US Antitrust Law Supports An FTC Win Against Qualcomm

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    Though general propositions of antitrust appear to pose serious threats to the Federal Trade Commission's case against Qualcomm in the Northern District of California, a closer look shows how Qualcomm's use of its patents has distorted the competitive process, says Thomas Cotter of the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Opinion

    March Madness: The NCAA's Tax Exemption

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    With last week's California federal court decision in NCAA Grant-in-Aid Cap Antitrust Litigation, it is clear that the NCAA is a multibillion-dollar entertainment business and does not deserve to be tax-exempt, says Ronald Katz of GCA Law Partners LLP.

  • Ethical Social Media Marketing For Lawyers

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    Social media presents rich opportunities to reach prospective clients. Attorneys should not let those opportunities pass them by, but they should keep their ethical obligations in mind as they post, says Cort Sylvester of Nilan Johnson Lewis PA.