Trials

  • November 21, 2019

    3rd Circ. Nixes Ex-Atty's New Trial Bid Over Billing Scam

    The Third Circuit on Thursday shot down a disbarred immigration attorney’s bid for a new trial on charges of bilking two multinational companies out of hundreds of thousands of dollars for advertising services that were never provided, saying his purportedly newly discovered evidence would not likely lead to an acquittal.

  • November 21, 2019

    Pharma Co. Wins $16.7M At Trial Over Inflated Ad Costs

    A New York federal jury on Wednesday found that a Florida-based marketing company overcharged the U.S. arm of a large Mexican pharmaceutical and cosmetics company nearly $16.7 million when placing its ads on Spanish-language television across the country.

  • November 21, 2019

    MVP: Gibson Dunn's Scott Edelman

    Scott Edelman of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP's trial practice helped clear Korean ramen maker Ottogi Co. Ltd. of price-fixing allegations in a $500 million antitrust class action last December, making him one of Law360's 2019 Trial MVPs.

  • November 21, 2019

    Mortgage Fraudster Sees Sentence Reduced By 2 Years

    An Illinois federal judge cut a mortgage fraud scheme leader's prison sentence from 12 years to 10 years on Thursday after the Seventh Circuit ordered that he be resentenced in light of miscalculations over how much money he should repay lenders.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Guilty In Crypto Money Laundering Trial

    A Manhattan federal jury on Thursday found former Locke Lord LLP corporate partner Mark S. Scott guilty of helping "CryptoQueen" Ruja Ignatova, the fugitive head of the global OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, launder $400 million and lie to banks.

  • November 21, 2019

    Jury Says Ore. Owes Counties $1B For Lost Forest Income

    An Oregon state jury on Wednesday awarded $1 billion to 14 counties and more than 100 other government entities that alleged the state has failed to extract the maximum monetary value from forests in their jurisdictions, a portion of which goes to the local governments.

  • November 21, 2019

    Esformes Told To Pay $44.2M In Massive Health Fraud Case

    A Florida federal judge came in under prosecutors' goal Thursday when he ordered convicted nursing home mogul Philip Esformes to pay $44.2 million in restitution and forfeiture for orchestrating what the U.S. Department of Justice earlier billed as the largest health care fraud case it has ever prosecuted.

  • November 20, 2019

    Billionaire Grabbed Worker's Genitals, 2nd Witness Says

    A woman who worked at the offices of FilmOn told a Los Angeles jury Wednesday that she saw the company's founder Alki David walk up behind a female worker and grab her by the genitals, becoming the second witness to recount seeing the billionaire commit sexually battery on his accuser.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-Chicken Of The Sea Exec Admits Price-Fix Deal At Trial

    Two former Chicken of the Sea executives testified Wednesday that ex-Bumble Bee Foods CEO Chris Lischewski approached them about pricing, with one executive admitting he entered a price-fixing agreement with Lischewski and the other saying he lied about having been in a car accident to avoid the meeting.

  • November 20, 2019

    Zimmer Must Face Pa. Woman's Faulty Hip Implant Claims

    The Third Circuit has reversed the dismissal of a suit against Zimmer US Inc. over a woman's allegedly defective hip implant, saying it's up to a jury to decide whether she filed her claims too late.

  • November 20, 2019

    Calif. Court OKs Wheelchair Racer's $3.2M Injury Award

    A California appellate panel on Wednesday upheld a jury’s $3.2 million award in a suit accusing a marathon operator of causing an elite wheelchair racer’s injuries after he veered off course and crashed into a stopped car, saying evidence supported the jury’s finding of gross negligence.

  • November 20, 2019

    $12.4M NYC Bus Crash Award Slashed On Appeal

    A New York appellate court on Wednesday cut a $12.4 million jury verdict to $3.6 million in a suit accusing a New York City Transit Authority bus of negligently hitting a motorist and causing his spinal cord injuries, saying an award for pain and suffering was too high.

  • November 20, 2019

    HP's $176M Antitrust Trial Win Should Be Nixed, Quanta Says

    Facing a $176 million price-fixing verdict after a trial against Hewlett-Packard Co., optical disc drive maker Quanta Storage urged a Texas federal court Tuesday not to triple the verdict and, in fact, to reverse it altogether and grant Quanta a new trial.

  • November 20, 2019

    NYU Workers Press 2nd Circ. To Revive ERISA Suit

    A class of New York University workers have urged the Second Circuit to revive their ERISA case against the university, challenging a number of decisions at the lower court, including whether a former federal judge who later joined Cravath should have presided over the case.

  • November 20, 2019

    Sprint, T-Mobile Don't Want DQ Bid To Delay Merger Trial

    Sprint and T-Mobile told a New York federal court that they share the Justice Department's concerns about Munger Tolles & Olson LLP representing the contingent of states suing to block their merger, but asked that the trial not be postponed even if the firm gets disqualified.

  • November 20, 2019

    Feds Say Houston Doc Billed $69M For Unneeded Treatments

    A Houston-area doctor unnecessarily treated his patients for lead poisoning even though they had low levels of the heavy metal in their systems and improperly billed the government, seeking more than $69 million in reimbursements, prosecutors told a federal judge Wednesday.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-Locke Lord Atty Got $50M From 'CryptoQueen,' Jury Told

    Former Locke Lord LLP partner Mark S. Scott was “obsessed” with money and was paid $50 million by "CryptoQueen" Ruja Ignatova, the fugitive head of the global OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, for helping her launder $400 million, prosecutors told a Manhattan jury Wednesday.

  • November 20, 2019

    Door Maker Wins Another $7M In Long-Running Antitrust War

    Door part manufacturer Steves and Sons Inc. has secured an additional $7 million in damages against industry supplier Jeld-Wen Inc. for overcharges Steves said it was forced to pay Jeld-Wen despite last year's $185 million antitrust verdict against the supplier.

  • November 20, 2019

    Pa. Justices Reopen Time For 'Thousands' Of Risperdal Suits

    A split Supreme Court of Pennsylvania reopened the door for thousands of mass tort cases against Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. on Wednesday, when it threw out two dates by which lower courts said patients should have known the potential link between the antipsychotic drug Risperdal and abnormal breast growth in children.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-JPMorgan Trader Found Guilty Of Forex Price-Fixing

    A Manhattan federal jury on Wednesday convicted onetime JPMorgan forex trader Akshay Aiyer of scheming to fix currency prices to boost his earnings, delivering a guilty verdict on a count of conspiring to restrain trade in violation of the Sherman Act.

  • November 20, 2019

    Atty, Doc's Emergency Juror Care Doesn't Merit Retrial

    A doctor accused of malpractice doesn't have to go through a retrial after he and his defense attorney helped a juror receive medical care when the juror became ill during the closing arguments in a medical malpractice trial, an Illinois appellate court said Tuesday.

  • November 20, 2019

    IP Fight Over Tire Repair Kit Settles Before Trial Redo

    TEK Global and Sealant Systems International have reached a settlement in their long-running fight over a patent on tire repair kits sold to General Motors and others, just months after the Federal Circuit ordered a new trial on the validity of TEK's patent.

  • November 20, 2019

    Enbridge Loses $45M Leaky Water Line Verdict On Appeal

    An Enbridge Inc. unit didn't present enough evidence to support a $45.4 million verdict against a concrete product maker over a leaky water line that caused a pipeline spill that cost $40 million to remediate, an Illinois appellate panel said Tuesday.

  • November 20, 2019

    MVP: Boies Schiller's Karen Dunn

    Karen Dunn's successful defense of Uber this year in a $124 million trial against Boston taxi companies claiming the ride-hailing giant operated illegally has earned the Boies Schiller Flexner LLP partner a place as one of Law360's Trials 2019 MVPs.

  • November 19, 2019

    Ex-Orrick Atty Tapped As SF Court's 1st Black Female Judge

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday nominated Judge Teri L. Jackson, a former Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP attorney and a San Francisco County trial judge overseeing litigation against Pacific Gas and Electric Co., to the First District Court of Appeal, according to a statement from the governor’s office.

Expert Analysis

  • How To Hire Lateral Partners More Effectively

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    Although lateral partner hiring is the preferred method of inorganic growth among law firms, the traditional approach to vetting does not employ sufficient due diligence by the hiring firm, says Michael Ellenhorn at executive search firm Decipher Competitive Intelligence.

  • Using Multiple-Attorney Depositions After Finjan Ruling

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    The recent patent case, Finjan v. Cisco Systems, in which a California federal court prohibited two-attorney questioning in a deposition where the parties failed to agree to it in advance, indicates that it may be better to ask permission than forgiveness when employing this deposition strategy, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • MGA Ruling Guides On Time Limits For Trade Secret Claims

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    A California state appeals court recently upheld a trial court’s dismissal of MGA Entertainment’s Bratz doll trade secret claims against Mattel, demonstrating that new claims uncovered during discovery can trigger the statute of limitations under California's Uniform Trade Secrets Act, says Stephen Moses of Ferber Law.

  • Key Takeaways From Ex-Alstom Exec's FCPA Conviction

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    In U.S. v. Hoskins, a Connecticut federal court last week convicted a foreigner who did not work for a U.S. company of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations, presenting valuable lessons about the scope of FCPA liability and how to effectively withdraw from a bribery scheme, say Sunil Shenoi and Kim Nemirow at Kirkland.

  • Opinion

    Proposal To Reform NY Court System Is Not Affordable

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    New York Chief Judge Janet DiFiore's proposed reform of the state's courts is flawed because it will dramatically increase judges' salaries and retirement benefits even though New York already has the most expensive court system per capita in the United States, says Michael Friedman, former president of the Albany County Bar Association.

  • Texas Could Take Page From Mass.'s Judicial Selection Book

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    As Texas and other states review their judicial election processes, they would be well served by taking guidance from Massachusetts' Governor’s Council system, which protects the judiciary from the hazards of campaigning, says Richard Baker of New England Intellectual Property.

  • Revised USPTO Trial Practice Guide Leans Pro-Patent Owners

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    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office recently released its updated Trial Practice Guide, which includes several policy changes that tip the scales toward patent owners and make the PTAB less attractive than district courts for litigating patent validity, says Brian Berliner of O’Melveny.

  • Opinion

    What Headlines Missed About ‘Cartel’ Traders’ Trial 1 Year Ago

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    In U.S. v. Usher, a Manhattan federal jury acquitted three British forex traders known as "the cartel" of antitrust allegations one year ago, but some common myths about the case, perpetuated by flashy headlines, still need to be debunked, say White & Case's Samuel Feldman and Mark Gidley, who represented one of the defendants.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McKeown Reviews 'Conversations With RBG'

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    Reading Jeffrey Rosen’s "Conversations With RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law" is like eavesdropping on the author and his subject while they discuss how the restrained judicial minimalist became the fiery leader of the opposition, says Ninth Circuit Judge M. Margaret McKeown.

  • A Better Specific Jurisdiction Test For Cross-Border Discovery

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    The Second Circuit's nonparty jurisdictional criteria for Section 1782 discovery purposes in a foreign proceeding — laid out in its recent Application of Antonio Del Valle Ruiz decision — is murky, difficult to apply and inequitable; I propose a simpler, fairer test, says Gilbert Samberg of Mintz.

  • Teaching Witnesses To Avoid Cross-Examination Traps

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    It’s common for inexperienced witnesses to become ensnared in their own responses during cross-examination, so they should be coached in advance on how to break down each question-and-answer scenario into three distinct phases, says Jeff Dougherty of Litigation IQ.

  • Opportunities Abound In Patent Litigation Funding At The ITC

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    The recent funding of a patent infringement claim brought by the University of California Santa Barbara demonstrates the advantages of the U.S. International Trade Commission as a venue, where creative intellectual property owners and litigation financers may find lucrative opportunities, despite a few hurdles, say Matt Rizzolo and Hyun-Joong (Daniel) Kim of Ropes & Gray.

  • Opinion

    Flat-Fee Legal Billing Can Liberate Attorneys

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    Replacing hourly billing with flat-fee arrangements, especially for appellate work, will leave attorneys feeling free to spend as much time as necessary to produce their highest quality work, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Perspectives

    Acquitted Conduct Should Not Be Considered At Sentencing

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    Congress should advance the Prohibiting Punishment of Acquitted Conduct Act, which seeks to explicitly preclude federal judges from a practice that effectively eliminates the democratic role of the jury in the criminal justice system, says Robert Ehrlich, former governor of Maryland.

  • Spoliation Rule Remains Ambiguous Despite Amendments

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    Although the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended to provide a uniform standard of culpability for spoliation, cases with similar facts are still reaching differing results because the rule does not specify how a court should evaluate a party's intent, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton.