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Trials

  • September 21, 2018

    Jury Finds Overstock.Com Guilty Of $3M Escheat Holdback

    A Delaware jury took little more than a hour to find Overstock.com guilty of concealing nearly $3 million in abandoned gift card balances from Delaware’s revenue agency, after a six-day whistleblower trial that could lead to a treble damages sanction.

  • September 21, 2018

    Jury Awards $9.1M In Cyclist's Crash Suit Against LA, Caltrans

    A California jury on Thursday awarded $9.1 million in a suit accusing the city of Los Angeles and Caltrans of failing to properly maintain a section of a Southern California coastline highway, causing a cyclist’s crash that resulted in significant brain damage.

  • September 21, 2018

    Judge Probes NCAA VP On Athlete Pay Rules At Trial

    A California federal judge on Friday repeatedly questioned an NCAA vice president on the specifics of its pay rules during a landmark antitrust trial over the association's limits on student compensation, pointing to apparent discrepancies between financial aid limits the NCAA has imposed on its various conferences.

  • September 21, 2018

    Ex-Platinum Partners Exec Dies Ahead Of $1B Fraud Trial

    Former Platinum Partners honcho Uri Landesman, charged for his role in a purported $1 billion securities fraud scheme, died, his lawyer said Friday, ahead of a January trial of hedge fund executives accused of duping bondholders of defunct offshore driller Black Elk.

  • September 21, 2018

    USPTO Disputes Order To Issue Patents In Stalled Apps Case

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has urged a judge to stay an order directing it to issue patents to an inventor claiming his applications have been improperly stalled, arguing the court has no authority to make that order, while the inventor says the court clearly has the power.

  • September 21, 2018

    Fracking Co. Wins $1M In Contract Row With Gas Wells Owner

    A Pennsylvania federal jury on Thursday awarded fracking services company Stingray $1.65 million in damages for gas well owner EQT Production's breach of contract, although the jury found that both companies breached their arrangement and also awarded EQT $676,250 from Stingray.

  • September 21, 2018

    Texas Court Affirms Defense Verdict In Botched Surgery Suit

    A Texas appellate panel on Thursday affirmed a jury’s decision to clear a doctor in a suit accusing him of botching a woman’s hysterectomy and causing serious injuries, rejecting the woman’s argument that the trial judge erred by refusing to strike two potential jurors.

  • September 21, 2018

    Cadwalader Asks For Court's Help With Settlement Talks

    A week before trial is scheduled to begin, Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft told a New York state court on Friday that there is still the potential to settle a legal malpractice suit brought by Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder but that the court must step in to ensure decision makers will be at the table.

  • September 21, 2018

    Fitness Device Co. Seeks Treble Damages In $6.8M IP Row

    The company behind TRX exercise equipment Thursday told a California federal court it should get treble damages on a 2017 $6.8 million patent and trademark infringement verdict against Woss Enterprises LLC, saying Woss continues to sell infringing products.

  • September 20, 2018

    Fla. Justices Restore Bad Faith Finding Against Geico

    A sharply divided Florida Supreme Court on Thursday reinstated a jury's $9.2 million verdict against Geico for bad faith in the insurer's handling of a claim against a policyholder for a deadly car crash, in a decision that could have a significant effect on insurance cases in the state.

  • September 20, 2018

    7th Circ. Will Not Rehear Suit Against GSK Over Atty's Suicide

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday refused to reconsider its decision to overturn a $3 million verdict blaming GlaxoSmithKline for the suicide of a Reed Smith partner who had been taking a generic version of its Paxil drug.

  • September 20, 2018

    OSU Exec Defends Amateurism Amid Coach Salary Scrutiny

    Ohio State University athletic director Eugene Smith defended NCAA rules limiting student compensation during a landmark antitrust trial Thursday in California federal court, testifying that paying athletes would force the department to cut certain sports, while conceding that the school's coaches collectively earn more than $30 million in salaries and benefits annually.

  • September 20, 2018

    Houston Pill Mill Doc, Clinic Chief Each Get 35 Years In Prison

    A Houston doctor and the owner of the pain management clinic where she worked were each sentenced to 35 years in prison by a federal judge in Texas on Thursday for their roles in running what prosecutors called the “most prolific hydrocodone pill mill in Houston.”

  • September 20, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Revises Axing Of $140M Fairchild IP Verdict

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday made a handful of modifications to a July panel decision that vacated a $140 million jury verdict against Fairchild Semiconductor in a chip patent case brought by Power Integrations but declined to rehear the case as a full court.

  • September 20, 2018

    Florida High Court Reinstates $20M Tobacco Verdict

    The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday reinstated a $20 million tobacco jury verdict in favor of the daughter of a lifelong smoker, ruling that the state appeals court that overturned it imposed an improper cap on damages awards for adult children of smoking victims in wrongful death suits.

  • September 20, 2018

    Ice Miller Adds Bankruptcy Pro From Wollmuth Maher

    Ice Miller LLP has brought in bankruptcy specialist John Giampolo to join the firm as a partner in its bankruptcy litigation group out of New York City.

  • September 20, 2018

    Groupon Says $82M Verdict In IBM Patent Suit Was Too High

    Groupon Inc. asked a Delaware federal court on Wednesday to toss what it claims was a "runaway jury verdict" awarding $82.5 million to IBM Corp. after finding Groupon infringed four e-commerce patents dating back to the early days of personal computing.

  • September 19, 2018

    Award Slashed By $1M In Delta HIV Bias Suit

    A Nevada federal judge on Wednesday slashed a jury’s award for an ex-Delta Air Lines Inc. employee with HIV who alleged that the company failed to accommodate his medical condition and wrongfully fired him over it, reducing the $1.3 million award to meet the Americans with Disabilities Act’s $300,000 statutory limit.

  • September 19, 2018

    11th Circ. Puts A Lid On Appeal In Starbucks Hot Coffee Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday affirmed a jury verdict clearing Starbucks Corp. of allegations that a barista negligently served coffee that gave a customer severe burns, rejecting arguments that the jury should have heard about other customer complaints regarding Starbucks' lids.

  • September 19, 2018

    Mass. Doc Dodges Prison After Giving Patient Info To Drug Co.

    A Massachusetts gynecologist will not spend time behind bars for disclosing her patients’ private medical information to a sales representative at Warner Chilcott, then lying about it to federal agents, a federal judge decided Wednesday after prosecutors recommended she spend nearly two years behind bars.

Expert Analysis

  • Cloud Computing Clearly The Future For Small Firms

    Holly Urban

    While in-house technology investments on the scale and complexity needed to compete with large firms remain cost prohibitive for small and midsize law firms, cloud-based services offer significant cost savings and productivity gains with little to no capital investment, says Holly Urban of Effortless Legal LLC.

  • Leveraging Today's Lateral Associate Market

    Darin Morgan

    With the Milbank/Cravath pay scale once again equalizing compensation at many Am Law 100 firms, there is even more pressure for firms to differentiate themselves to top lateral associate candidates. This presents strategic considerations for both law firms and lateral candidates throughout the recruitment process, says Darin Morgan of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Opinion

    What I Learned As Lehman's Bankruptcy Lawyer

    Andrew Rossman

    I have spent nearly 10 years fighting in court for the rights of Lehman Brothers’ creditors. This arduous legal journey has yielded insights into weaknesses in our financial system and bankruptcy laws that could allow catastrophic losses to happen again, says Andrew Rossman of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Stanford's Jeff Fisher Talks Supreme Court

    Jeffrey Fisher

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Stanford Law School professor Jeffrey Fisher discusses his motivation for teaching, arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and what the court might look like if Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed.

  • Genetic Data Holds Opportunities And Risks For Litigants

    Kirk Hartley

    A recently published research paper concludes that a significant proportion of patients with malignant mesotheliomas carry inherited mutations in cancer-associated genes. Well-informed lawyers on both sides of the aisle can effectively use such data to materially alter the outcome of cases, say Kirk Hartley and David Schwartz of ToxicoGenomica.

  • NJ Trial Court Error Resulted In Years Of Litigation

    Lawrence Shapiro

    The New Jersey Appellate Division's reversal in Torah v. Aryeh should serve as a warning for trial judges faced with proceedings arising from an arbitration award. When statutes are involved, their language must be strictly followed, and although arbitration is preferred to litigation, it cannot be coerced or compelled, say Lawrence Shapiro and Nicole Miller of Ansell Grimm & Aaron PC.

  • Calif.'s New Rules For Lawyers Move Closer To ABA Model

    Mark Loeterman

    The first comprehensive overhaul of California's Rules of Professional Conduct in nearly 30 years becomes operational on Nov. 1. Some of the new rules mirror the model language used by the American Bar Association, but many continue to reflect California’s unique approach to certain ethical questions, says Mark Loeterman of Signature Resolution LLC.

  • Know The Limits To Atty Public Statements During A Trial

    Matthew Giardina

    The balancing act between protecting attorneys’ speech rights and ensuring unbiased adjudications was highlighted recently in two cases — when Michael Cohen applied for a restraining order against Stephanie Clifford's attorney, and when Johnson & Johnson questioned whether a Missouri talc verdict was tainted by public statements from the plaintiffs' counsel, says Matthew Giardina of Manning Gross & Massenburg LLP.

  • Series

    Winner's Playbook: Behind The Scenes Of The AmEx Case

    Evan Chesler

    In June, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a pivotal antitrust decision in Ohio v. American Express. Three partners at Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP who represented AmEx explain how one of the most significant antitrust enforcement actions in recent history led to a landmark precedent for two-sided platforms.

  • In Calif., Questions Remain On Law Firm Conflict Waivers

    Richard Rosensweig

    In Sheppard Mullin v. J-M Manufacturing Co., the California Supreme Court ruled last month that a law firm's failure to disclose a known conflict with another current client did not categorically disentitle the firm from recovering fees. But the court didn’t provide hoped-for guidance on how to write an enforceable advance conflict waiver, says Richard Rosensweig of Goulston & Storrs PC.