Trials

  • October 19, 2020

    Fidelity Blasted At Trial For 'Blindly Dumping' Donated Shares

    Fidelity Investments' charitable giving arm made false promises to philanthropists to secure their donation of stock and then exhibited "gross incompetence" by "blindly dumping" the shares, a California federal magistrate judge heard Monday during opening arguments in a closely watched bench trial over who controls gifts made to donor-advised funds.

  • October 19, 2020

    Regal Theaters Report Slammed In Trial Over $3.6B Merger

    A longtime movie industry on Monday executive branded as "wildly misleading" documents used to support Regal Entertainment Group's $3.6 billion sale to Cineworld Group in 2018, at the start of a four-day Delaware Chancery Court trial on stockholder demands for a 47% higher price.

  • October 19, 2020

    National General Unit Owes Policyholder $950K For Crash

    A Washington federal jury awarded $949,000 in a Zoom trial Friday to an Integon General Insurance policyholder who said the insurer refused to reimburse him for permanent vertigo from a crash caused by an underinsured driver.

  • October 19, 2020

    Ga. Justices Affirm $6M Award In Suzuki Brake Defect Case

    A trial court properly halved a $12.5 million verdict against Suzuki Motor Corp. for what jurors found was a defectively designed brake, the Georgia Supreme Court held Monday, affirming a $6 million judgment for a motorcyclist injured in a crash.

  • October 19, 2020

    Preparing The Next Generation Of Female Trial Lawyers

    To build the ranks of female trial attorneys, law firms must integrate them into every aspect of a case — from witness preparation to courtroom arguments — instead of relegating them to small roles, says Kalpana Srinivasan, co-managing partner at Susman Godfrey.

  • October 19, 2020

    Mentorship Is Key To Fixing Drop-Off Of Women In Law

    It falls to senior male attorneys to recognize the crisis female attorneys face as the pandemic amplifies an already unequal system and to offer their knowledge, experience and counsel to build a better future for women in law, says James Meadows at Culhane Meadows.

  • October 19, 2020

    What BigLaw Can Do To Actually Retain Female Attorneys

    Even as BigLaw firms are recruiting women into their ranks in larger numbers, their presence in leadership and equity partnerships remains stubbornly low. Here’s a look at why this is happening — and what firms can do.

  • October 19, 2020

    Female Attorneys Gain Ground In Battle For Clerkships​

    More female attorneys are landing highly sought-after U.S. Supreme Court clerkships, and the experience can turbocharge their careers.

  • October 19, 2020

    These Firms Have The Most Women In Equity Partnerships

    At most U.S. law firms, equity partnerships are still overwhelmingly male, but women at some firms are starting to shake up that reality and smash the glass ceiling that has prevented them from advancing to the uppermost ranks. Here are this year’s Ceiling Smashers — the firms that are outpacing their peers as the legal industry works toward closing the gender gap in its top ranks.

  • October 19, 2020

    Wearing Natural Hair In BigLaw

    In this video, four Black women share their thoughts about wearing natural hair as BigLaw attorneys. In order of appearance, the attorneys are: Rukayatu Tijani, founder of Firm for the Culture and a former BigLaw associate; Delilah Clay, legislative & regulatory advisor at Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP; Rachel Boyce, associate at Cooley LLP; and Crystal Nwaneri, associate at Fenwick & West LLP.

  • October 19, 2020

    Avenatti Judge Splits Calif. Fraud Trial As Start Likely Delayed

    The California federal judge overseeing Michael Avenatti's embezzlement case on Monday severed the trial in two, saying the wire fraud charges should be tried separately from the bank and tax fraud charges, and noted that the coronavirus will likely delay the December trial until early next year.

  • October 19, 2020

    Visa, Black Card Spar Over Virus Safety In $600M IP Fight

    The credit card loyalty program Black Card has called on a federal judge to let its $600 million licensing contract dispute with Visa go before a Wyoming jury next month as planned, citing Judge Rodney Gilstrap's decision to hold a jury trial in Texas in July.

  • October 19, 2020

    Targa Must Repay $129M In Failed Crude Processing Deal

    Midstream resource management company Targa Channelview LLC will have to return $129 million plus interest that energy company Vitol Americas Corp. paid it to build a crude oil storage and processing facility, after a Texas state court ruled that Targa breached a construction agreement.

  • October 19, 2020

    Texas Justices To Weigh Church's Liability In Flash Fire Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court has granted two petitions for review in a case over whether the Catholic Diocese of El Paso can be held responsible for a flash fire that broke out in a festival booth on its grounds and injured several minor 4-H volunteers.

  • October 19, 2020

    NJ Justices Won't Halt Trial For Jury Selection Challenge

    The New Jersey Supreme Court has refused to further delay a criminal trial to evaluate defense objections to a hybrid system of selecting juries via remote and in-person proceedings amid the COVID-19 pandemic, putting off any high court review until afterward.

  • October 19, 2020

    MVPs: Irell's Lisa Glasser & Jason Sheasby

    Irell & Manella LLP's Lisa Glasser and Jason Sheasby secured three nine-figure patent verdicts for their financial services and tech clients in the past year, making the duo Law360 Trials MVPs for 2020.

  • October 16, 2020

    In Their Own Words: Being A Woman In BigLaw

    Firms are recruiting more women than previously to their ranks, but still have trouble retaining them at the same rate as men. Law360 asked three female attorneys who left BigLaw about how firms could better serve the women who work there. Here's what they have to say.

  • October 16, 2020

    Law360's Glass Ceiling Report: What You Need To Know

    While law firms continue to tout efforts to close the gender gap in their ranks, parity is still a distant goal, our annual survey shows.

  • October 16, 2020

    Glass Ceiling Report: How Does Your Firm Measure Up?

    Law firms have long struggled to clear the barriers women face in the legal industry, particularly when it comes to accessing the top ranks. Law360's 2020 Glass Ceiling Report looks to shed light on the progress firms have made and where they aim to be.

  • October 16, 2020

    2nd Circ. Affirms Atty's Conviction For Helping Bribe Witness

    The Second Circuit on Friday upheld a New York federal court's conviction of a Queens criminal defense attorney accused of helping to bribe a witness in a murder trial, ruling that evidence accidentally obtained through a wiretap of a colleague was properly included in prosecutors' case.

  • October 16, 2020

    Energy Drink Rivals' Design Trial Closes On Colorful Note

    Counsel for the maker of Bang energy drink sang and strummed his guitar for a Florida federal judge Friday, putting a final note on a trial over alleged trade dress infringement by rival Monster Energy Co. almost as colorful as the vibrant can designs at issue.

  • October 16, 2020

    3 Things To Know After Busy WDTX Patent Judge's 1st Trial

    Now that the first patent jury trial before Western District of Texas Judge Alan Albright has ended with a complete verdict for the defense, here's what attorneys say litigants gearing up for future trials in the burgeoning patent hotspot of Waco can learn from the case.

  • October 16, 2020

    Consumer Slams ViSalus Trial Redo Bid In $925M TCPA Row

    A federal jury verdict finding that health supplement marketer ViSalus made over 1.8 million automated telemarketing calls in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act must be upheld, the lead plaintiff in a long-running robocall dispute told an Oregon federal judge Thursday.

  • October 16, 2020

    Texas Court Says Expert Report Flawed In Spinal Surgery Suit

    A Texas appellate panel said an expert opinion submitted by a woman suing a physician for botching a spinal surgery was inadmissible since it didn't adequately explain how the doctor caused the woman's injuries, and instructed the trial court to determine whether the report can be fixed.

  • October 16, 2020

    Ed Sheeran Copyright Trial Postponed Until Spring

    A Manhattan federal judge has postponed a looming copyright trial over whether Ed Sheeran's song "Thinking Out Loud" infringed Marvin Gaye's iconic "Let's Get It On," citing a strain on judicial resources amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Expert Analysis

  • Guest Feature

    5 Ways Firms Can Avoid Female Atty Exodus During Pandemic

    Author Photo

    The pandemic's disproportionate impact on women presents law firms with a unique opportunity to devise innovative policies that will address the increasing home life demands female lawyers face and help retain them long after COVID-19 is over, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • Highlights From 'SEC Speaks' 2020

    Author Photo

    At its recent virtual SEC Speaks conference, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission emphasized efforts to adapt enforcement to emerging risks amid the pandemic, and warned companies not to use COVID-19 to cover up past mistakes or newly discovered ones, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • ITC Vs. Court Remedies For Trade Secret Theft Abroad

    Author Photo

    Recent cases illustrate that companies facing misappropriation of their trade secrets outside the U.S. should carefully choose between obtaining significant damages in district courts and timely exclusion orders in the U.S. International Trade Commission, say Charles Sanders and Nathanial McPherson at Latham.

  • California Judicial Reference Can Benefit Litigants Right Now

    Author Photo

    Judicial reference proceedings as an alternative to litigating in California state court offer several advantages to parties, including the ability to get a case moving amid pandemic-induced backlogs and the right to appeal a judgment in court, say Charles Correll and George Morris at King & Spalding.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

    Author Photo

    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

  • Why Online Mediation May Be Here To Stay

    Author Photo

    Videoconferenced mediation offers several advantages and helps cases settle faster and more cordially, making it hard to imagine going back to logistically difficult in-person dispute resolution after COVID-19 restrictions are gone, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC.

  • The Constitutional Risks In Pandemic-Era Criminal Jury Trials

    Author Photo

    Virtual voir dire and other pandemic-prompted modifications to jury selection risk curtailing the Sixth Amendment's guarantee that juries represent a fair cross-section of the community, making criminal convictions vulnerable to constitutional attack, say Karin Portlock and Vinay Limbachia at Gibson Dunn.

  • Clients Have The Power To Promote Wellness At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    Law firm clients can play a role in lowering mental distress in the legal profession by seeking lawyer wellness data from firms and factoring those responses into outside counsel hiring decisions, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna.

  • Rebuttal

    Size Premia Are Alive And Kicking In Small-Co. Stock Pricing

    Author Photo

    Contrary to a recent Law360 guest article that claimed it's time to let go of size premia when valuing small firms, new research demonstrates the market does consider company size when pricing stocks, and that pricing is related to the quality of the firm, say Roger Grabowski and Anas Aboulamer at Duff & Phelps.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Courts Should Welcome Well-Crafted Amicus Briefs

    Author Photo

    A Seventh Circuit judge's recent order granting leave for three organizations to file amicus curiae briefs in Prairie Rivers Network v. Dynegy Midwest Generation is a reminder that relevant, nonduplicative amicus briefs can provide courts with helpful perspective, important facts and legal arguments, says Lawrence Ebner at Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Key Takeaways From Groundbreaking Virtual Civil Jury Trial

    Author Photo

    The nation's first online jury trial with a binding verdict — Griffin v. Albanese Enterprise in Florida’s Fourth Judicial Circuit Court — recently provided crucial insights into how to better prepare for virtual voir dire and trial, says Kevin-Khristián Cosgriff Hernández at Delphi Litigation.

  • What Hiring Law Firms Should Consider Instead Of Grades

    Author Photo

    With law schools forgoing traditional grading due to the pandemic, hiring firms that have heavily weighted first-year grades during the on-campus interview process should turn to metrics that allow a more holistic view of a candidate, says Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Evidence Ruling Highlights Spoliation Claim Concerns

    Author Photo

    A Colorado federal court recently denied the plaintiff’s motion for spoliation of evidence in Bragg v. Southwest Health, reminding counsel of their duty to discuss with clients the specifics of what information they allege is missing from the provided discovery, says Deena Duffy at Spencer Fane.

  • Pandemic-Era Civil Jury Trials Require Constitutional Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    Courts should carefully consider the constitutional rights of litigants before restarting civil jury trials amid the pandemic, because inadequate remote voir dire procedures and evidentiary handicaps due to health safety measures could amount to the denial of a fair trial by an impartial jury, say attorneys at Rumberger Kirk.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Schroeder Reviews 'Collegiality'

    Author Photo

    Mark Barringer's new book, "Collegiality and the Constitution," is an engaging, vibrant work of judicial history in Texas' Eastern District, and reveals an atmosphere of civility and respect among all those involved in the business of the court, says U.S. District Judge Robert W. Schroeder III.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!