Trials

  • August 11, 2020

    Strip Club Hit With $354K Verdict In Pioneering Zoom Trial

    The nation's first fully remote jury trial with a binding verdict ended with a $354,000 award for a strip club dancer who said she was beaten by the club's bouncers, although the judge and other court personnel expressed doubts Tuesday about whether Zoom teleconference proceedings can really replace in-person trials.

  • August 11, 2020

    VidAngel Wants 9th Circ. To Erase Movie Studios' $62M IP Win

    Movie-sanitizing service VidAngel has asked the Ninth Circuit to erase a $62 million verdict against it in a copyright-infringement suit brought by major Hollywood movie studios such as Disney and Warner Bros., saying there were errors at trial.

  • August 11, 2020

    Pa. Panel Won't Revive J&J Mesh Patient's Injury Claims

    A Pennsylvania appeals court on Tuesday rejected arguments that improperly admitted testimony from a woman's treating physician led a jury to erroneously clear a Johnson & Johnson unit in a lawsuit over alleged injuries from a pelvic mesh implant.

  • August 11, 2020

    Drugmakers Say Resellers Trying To Duck Bellwether Status

    A class of indirect resellers accusing a group of generic-drug makers of a price-fixing conspiracy don't want their cases to proceed to trial first in multidistrict litigation, the drugmakers told a Pennsylvania federal court in a Monday filing.

  • August 11, 2020

    W.Va. Doctor Illegally Prescribed Opioids, Jury Finds

    A West Virginia doctor charged in a wave of arrests last year by a federal opioid task force was convicted Monday of prescribing opioids to two patients without a legitimate medical need.

  • August 11, 2020

    Feds Drop Appeal Of $15M Brain Injury Verdict, Ink $10M Deal

    The federal government will drop its Sixth Circuit appeal of a $15 million bench verdict in a suit accusing a Tennessee military hospital of causing a newborn baby's permanent and severe brain damage, in exchange for paying a lower $10 million settlement, according to court papers filed Tuesday.

  • August 11, 2020

    Fears Of Virus And Distracted Jury Won't Stop Asbestos Trial

    A California judge declined Tuesday to postpone an impending San Francisco jury trial in an asbestos suit against Honeywell International and others, overruling defense attorneys' concerns that in-person trials amid the COVID-19 pandemic are unsafe and that remote jurors can be inattentive as they juggle home life and jury service.

  • August 11, 2020

    Fluoride Risk Question Headed Back To EPA After Trial

    Following a bench trial over the risks of adding fluoride to drinking water, a California federal judge told the challengers to file a new administrative petition with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency so it can consider the substance's risks with the benefit of new evidence.

  • August 11, 2020

    Iconix Ex-CEO Tells Judge Fraud Charges Destroyed His Rep

    Former Iconix Brand Group Inc. CEO Neil Cole was given a tentative 2021 trial date Tuesday after telling a Manhattan federal judge that his reputation has been ruined by accounting fraud charges and he has now been "unemployable" for five years.

  • August 11, 2020

    Texas Doc At Center Of $200M Referral Fraud Gets 5½ Years

    The anesthesiologist at the center of a $200 million hospital referral fraud scheme has been sentenced to five and a half years in federal prison and ordered to pay more than $82 million in restitution, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • August 11, 2020

    Ex-Theranos CEO's Criminal Trial Moved To 2021 Due To Virus

    A California federal judge on Tuesday delayed former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' criminal jury trial from October to March in light of challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic, but he shortened the parties' proposed pretrial briefing schedule by about two weeks.

  • August 11, 2020

    Texas Jury Says Apple Owes $506M Over 4G LTE Patents

    In the country's first in-person jury trial over patents since the COVID-19 pandemic led to nationwide court closures, a Texas federal jury on Tuesday said Apple should pay PanOptis and related companies more than $506 million for willfully infringing patents covering 4G LTE technology. 

  • August 10, 2020

    Roku's Trial Delay Request OK'd By 'Surprised' Texas Judge

    U.S. District Judge Alan D. Albright on Monday again delayed a patent jury trial involving Roku because of the coronavirus pandemic, noting his surprise this time that Roku's attorneys had asked for the case to start in October because of persistent safety concerns.

  • August 10, 2020

    Kingston Can't Slash $7.5M Jury Verdict In USB Patent Case

    A California federal judge has rejected challenges related to a jury's finding that Kingston Technology Co. Inc.'s USB flash memory device with a "swiveling" cover infringed a patent owned by Pavo Solutions LLC and declined to slash the jury's $7.5 million award.

  • August 10, 2020

    Pandemic Prompts 2-Month Delay In Apple, VirnetX Rematch

    Citing the ongoing spread of the coronavirus in Texas, a federal judge ordered a two-month delay Monday in VirnetX's hotly anticipated retrial against Apple over two patents related to the program VPN On Demand.

  • August 10, 2020

    Judge Needs More Before Ruling On Fraudster's Virus Release

    A D.C. federal judge said Monday he doesn't have enough for an "informed" ruling on a request for COVID-19-related release from the ex-owner of an Afghanistan marble mining company who is serving 4½ years in prison for defrauding the U.S. government on a $15.8 million loan.

  • August 10, 2020

    Whistleblowers Who Won $1.7M Get Dropped Claims Revived

    The Tenth Circuit has ruled that four former Afghanistan investigators for defense contractor Vectrus who won $1.7 million over claims they were retaliated against for reporting malfeasance will keep their awards and receive a new chance to bring claims that were dismissed before trial.

  • August 10, 2020

    9th Circ. Nixes Pre-Trial Repatriation Order In Fraud Case

    An indicted health care executive doesn't have to repatriate up to $7.2 million that he may have put in African banks before his fraud case goes to trial, the Ninth Circuit ruled Monday, finding that an order requiring him to do so violated his rights.

  • August 10, 2020

    Chubb Unit Says It Doesn't Owe $8M For Settlement Refusal

    Counsel for a Chubb Ltd. primary insurer told a panel of Fifth Circuit judges in oral arguments Monday that his client shouldn't have to pay a Zurich North America excess carrier nearly $8 million in a coverage dispute over a mutual policyholder's settlement of a fatal crash lawsuit.

  • August 10, 2020

    5th Circ. Backs Win For Energy Tech Firm In Trade Secret Row

    The Fifth Circuit has affirmed a lower court ruling that Petroleum Analyzer Co. LP hadn't wrongly used proprietary oil and gas technology developed by a competitor, saying there's no evidence the company swiped a trade secret.

  • August 10, 2020

    Opioid Cos. Say NY Trial Shouldn't Be Livestreamed

    Opioid companies on Monday told a New York state judge that the trial and upcoming hearings over the state's claims that they fueled the opioid crisis shouldn't be livestreamed, saying since courts transitioned to virtual proceedings because of the coronavirus pandemic, not one court has used livestreaming to ensure public or press access.

  • August 10, 2020

    Ex-SEC Examiner Wants Bench Trial Over Feds' Protest

    A former compliance examiner accused of stealing information from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sought a rare criminal bench trial over prosecutors' objections on Monday, saying it is the only way to hold a speedy trial during the pandemic.

  • August 10, 2020

    Fla. Panel Revises Disney Tax Ruling To OK Valuation Method

    A property valuation method a Florida appeals court previously held as illegal in a Disney property tax dispute does not violate state law, the appellate court said in a revised opinion.

  • August 07, 2020

    Ohio Court Upholds $50M Verdict In Police Brutality Case

    An Ohio appeals court on Thursday upheld a $50 million jury verdict in favor of a man who said he was detained without probable cause, beaten and kept in a storage closet for four days by East Cleveland police.

  • August 07, 2020

    Md. Doc Must Face Retrial In Unwanted Genital Exam Suit

    A Maryland appeals court has ordered a new trial in a suit accusing a physician of performing an unnecessary genital exam of a patient, saying the trial judge misinterpreted another judge's summary judgment ruling in favor of the patient, which should have triggered a trial solely on damages for one claim.

Expert Analysis

  • How ITC Arrived At Proportional Discovery In IP Investigations

    Author Photo

    A review of post-2015 discovery orders reveals that the International Trade Commission has followed trends toward proportional discovery in patent-infringing import investigations by considering the cost-benefit calculus associated with requested information, say Joshua Hartman and Hayley Ostrin at Adduci Mastriani.

  • Lesser-Known Litigation Funding Best Practices For Attorneys

    Author Photo

    Following the American Bar Association's recent publication of third-party litigation funding guidance, Jiamie Chen and Dai Wai Chin Feman at Parabellum Capital outline some additional considerations, including the ethical limitations on single-case funding and the futility of economic prenegotiations between attorneys and their clients.

  • Opinion

    ADA Protects Lawyers With Disabilities, But We Must Do More

    Author Photo

    As an attorney with cerebral palsy, Danielle Liebl at Reed Smith says that while the 30-year-old Americans with Disabilities Act has protected her against discrimination, the legal industry must do more to accommodate lawyers with disabilities and make them more comfortable in self-identifying.

  • Perspectives

    Legal Deserts Threaten Justice In Rural America

    Author Photo

    Many small towns and rural counties have few lawyers or none at all, which threatens the notion of justice for all Americans and demands creative solutions from legislators, bar associations and law schools, says Patricia Refo, president of the American Bar Association.

  • Analyzing Upward And Downward Trends In Legal Tech

    Author Photo

    Advances in legal technology are often accompanied by bombastic overstatements, but it is important to separate the wheat from the chaff by looking at where various technologies stand on the hype curve, says Lance Eliot at Stanford Law School.

  • Special Masters Can Ease COVID-19 Criminal Case Backlog

    Author Photo

    As courts resume criminal jury trials amid the pandemic, there are several ways special masters can assist overtaxed federal judges in efficiently and expeditiously navigating pretrial issues, say former Third Circuit Judge Thomas Vanaskie and Geoffrey Johnson at Stevens & Lee.

  • Opinion

    ABA's New Guidance On Litigation Funding Misses The Mark

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association should revise its recently approved best practices on third-party litigation funding as they do not reflect how legal finance actually works and could create confusion among lawyers, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Opinion

    Courts Are Right To Scrutinize Food Labeling Suits

    Author Photo

    While putative class action filings against the food and beverage industry over often baseless allegations around food labeling persist during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is fortunate that judges are dismissing many of these cases based on a lack of any plausible theory of deception, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • What Firms Should Ask Before Hiring Attorneys From Gov't

    Author Photo

    In the final year of any presidential administration, there is an undeniable appetite on the part of large law firms for government-savvy legal talent, but firms need to first consider how they will actually utilize their new star hire, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • How Federal Patent Tutorial Video Influences Jurors

    Author Photo

    The Federal Judicial Center's patent tutorial video is intended to provide unbiased explanation to jurors, but the recent research of Alexis Knutson and ​Jeffrey Jarman at Tsongas Litigation Consulting reveals that the video influences the perception of the patent process in subtle but meaningful ways.

  • The Ethics Of Using Chatbots For Legal Services

    Author Photo

    Delegating legal work to robots involves several risks, including running afoul of statutes dictating unauthorized practice of law, but with the right precautions, law firms can lawfully employ artificially intelligent chatbots that can imitate human conversations, say attorneys at Haynes and Boone.

  • FIFA Ruling Brings New Risks For Development Bank Projects

    Author Photo

    After the Second Circuit's recent decision upholding FIFA officials' bribery convictions, foreign businesses with multilateral development bank-sponsored projects whose financing emanates from the U.S. must ensure they are not violating U.S. wire fraud statutes, even if commercial bribery is legal in the foreign country, says Joshua Ray at Rahman Ravelli.

  • Houston Rockets' Virus Coverage Claims Face Key Hurdles

    Author Photo

    The NBA's Houston Rockets' recent insurance coverage claims for interruption losses due to COVID-19 may not survive summary judgment or trial because of clearly worded policy requirements and the absence of direct physical damage, say Glenn Jacobson and Mark Binsky at Abrams Gorelick.

  • Opinion

    ABA Must Seize Opportunity To Respond To Bar Exam Chaos

    Author Photo

    The challenges of administering bar exams this year have put the future of the profession in jeopardy, but the American Bar Association at its ongoing annual meeting can adopt a resolution that would urge jurisdictions to take emergency actions with respect to licensure of new attorneys, says Nicholas Allard, former president of Brooklyn Law School.

  • How Pandemic Is Affecting The Pace Of Judicial Opinions

    Author Photo

    The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way judges work, but how has it impacted the volume of work product they generate? Ben Strawn and Omeed Azmoudeh at Davis Graham investigate using data from the PACER federal courts registry.

Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!