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Trials

  • November 13, 2018

    MillerCoors Wants To Drain Pabst, Jury Told In $400M Spat

    MillerCoors is trying to pour Pabst Brewing Co.'s business down the drain by raising prices under its exclusive agreement to brew Pabst's beers, Pabst said Tuesday during opening statements in the Wisconsin trial over its $400 million contract suit, while MillerCoors said the allegations of a malevolent plot are "perfectly false."

  • November 13, 2018

    Express Scripts, Pharmacy Drama Ends With Last-Minute Deal

    On the first day of trial for a whirlwind breach of contract case between HM Compounding Services LLC and Express Scripts Inc. that has involved attorneys running for the door and significant discovery misconduct, the outstanding claims quickly wrapped up and the parties told a Missouri federal judge Tuesday that they had settled the case.

  • November 13, 2018

    Ky. Court Won't Disturb Jury Award In Murder Plot Case

    A Kentucky appeals court has ruled that the wife of a slain former county sheriff can't modify a jury's $28,000 award in a suit accusing a former Harlan County deputy sheriff and a political rival of wrongful death, saying the evidence supported the jury's decision.

  • November 13, 2018

    Texas Contractor CEO Didn't Rip Off NASA, Jury Says

    A Texas federal jury has delivered an acquittal in a criminal fraud case accusing the CEO of a NASA contractor of falsely representing hours worked and costs, according to the executive’s lawyer.

  • November 13, 2018

    Tata Encouraged 'Expats Versus Locals' Culture, Jury Hears

    A California federal jury considering class claims that Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. discriminates against non-South Asians heard taped deposition testimony Tuesday from a former Tata senior human resources manager, who said that the company prioritizes visa holders and the culture was “expats versus locals.”

  • November 13, 2018

    Man Acquitted Of Conspiring On Bribery With Texas Lawmaker

    A man accused of conspiring with a now-convicted former Democratic Texas state senator to bribe a county official to secure a medical services contract at a prison has been cleared of wrongdoing by a federal jury.

  • November 13, 2018

    Aveo Withheld FDA Rec From Investors, Ex-CFO Testifies

    Defendant David Johnston took the witness stand Tuesday in Boston federal court and told jurors the government was correct that his former company, Aveo Pharmaceuticals Inc., chose not to tell investors about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's recommendation for a new clinical trial for its flagship kidney cancer drug, Tivo.

  • November 13, 2018

    Ex-CEO Accused Of Tipping Oriole Reaches $1.5M SEC Deal

    The former CEO of a medical optics firm accused of passing insider information to a former Baltimore Orioles player reached a $1.5 million deal with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, according to papers filed in California federal court Tuesday.

  • November 13, 2018

    Jury Awards $260M After Man's Death In Crash

    A Texas jury has awarded $260 million over an accident in which a man was killed when his van ran into the side of a tractor-trailer positioned across all four lanes of a highway, according to the victim's parents' lawyers.

  • November 13, 2018

    Ex-Merrimack Analyst Gets 6 Months For Insider Trading

    A former biostatistician at Merrimack Pharmaceuticals Inc. was sentenced to six months in prison and one year of supervised release Tuesday after he maintained his innocence on insider trading charges in Boston federal court. 

  • November 13, 2018

    Doormaker Flouting $185M Antitrust Verdict, Court Told

    A Virginia federal court must force a North Carolina-based doormaker to comply with a $185 million jury verdict finding it violated antitrust law, rival Steves and Sons Inc. argued Monday in its continued push to make the company lower its prices.

  • November 13, 2018

    High Court Won’t Hear $3M Disgorgement Challenge

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday it will not review a First Circuit ruling that an ex-CEO at a behavioral health company who supposedly pursued a merger out of self-interest must disgorge $3 million to shareholders, even though a Massachusetts federal jury initially found the investors weren’t financially harmed.

  • November 12, 2018

    NCAA Argues Fans ‘Overwhelmingly Oppose’ Paying Athletes

    The NCAA defended its rules limiting athlete compensation in a landmark antitrust California federal bench trial on Friday, arguing that college sports fans value amateurism and “overwhelmingly oppose” paying student athletes.

  • November 9, 2018

    Ex-Platinum Insider Dodges Upcoming $1B Fraud Trial

    A former Platinum Partners marketing and investor relations staffer charged over an alleged $1 billion securities fraud scheme has secured a deferred prosecution deal with the government and had his case severed on Thursday from four executives accused of deceiving the hedge fund’s investors.

  • November 9, 2018

    Express Scripts Rightfully Nixed Pharmacy Contract

    HM Compounding Services LLC clearly breached its contract with Express Scripts Inc. by refusing to collect copayments from customers, a Missouri federal judge has ruled, giving the pharmacy benefit manager a boost just days before trial.

  • November 9, 2018

    Prof Wants To Put Ex-Colleague On Secret Email Probation

    A request by former Columbia University professor Enrichetta Ravina to have an ex-colleague's emails secretly scanned for disparaging remarks about her has the university scrambling for more time to brief a Manhattan federal judge, according to court filings.

  • November 9, 2018

    Atlanta Transit Rider Awarded $18.8M For Brain-Damaging Fall

    A Georgia jury on Thursday found that Atlanta's transit system's negligence was responsible for a fall by a disabled passenger who was getting off a bus that left her in a permanent vegetative state, and awarded the rider $18.75 million.

  • November 9, 2018

    Four Duck Boat Crash Victims Settle Midtrial For $8.25M

    Four of the dozens of victims of a Seattle “duck boat” crash at the heart of an ongoing trial have reached an $8.25 million settlement with amphibious vehicle tour company Ride the Ducks International and its Seattle licensee, the individuals' attorney announced Friday.

  • November 9, 2018

    Fairchild Owes Rival $24M For Tech Patent Infringement

    A Delaware jury awarded Power Integrations Inc. more than $24 million in damages Friday after finding that competitor Fairchild Semiconductor International willfully infringed its patents for frequency jitter technology and induced third parties to infringe the patents as well.

  • November 9, 2018

    Real Estate Co. Must Pay $28.8M After Ripping Off Plans

    A Texas federal judge has ordered a real estate company to pay $28.8 million to an architectural design firm after a jury found that the property business violated the Digital Millennium Copyright Act 11,516 times by ripping off floor plan designs.

Expert Analysis

  • It’s Time For Law Firms To Start Talking About Gen Z

    Eliza Stoker

    Since the oldest members of Generation Z aren’t even finished with law school yet, law firm management is in a unique position to prepare for their entrance into the legal workforce, says Eliza Stoker of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • ​The New Reality Of Patent Trials Post-Halo

    Jeremy Taylor

    ​Jury verdicts following the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2016 Halo decision suggest that previous patent litigation strategies are no longer working for trial-bound cases, say attorneys with Baker Botts LLP.

  • Should Juries Try To Predict FDA Drug Labeling Decisions?

    Alan Klein

    The U.S. Supreme Court's review of Merck v. Albrecht promises to shape the way decisions of regulatory agencies — such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s rejection of a drug manufacturer’s proposed label warning — can be interpreted by juries, say Alan Klein and Matthew Decker at Duane Morris LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Yale's Linda Greenhouse Talks Journalism

    Linda Greenhouse

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Yale Law School lecturer and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Linda Greenhouse discusses her coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, the conservatives' long game and trends in journalism.

  • Opinion

    Celebrate Veterans By Improving Their Access To Justice

    Linda Klein

    Attorneys should think beyond the Veterans Day parades and use their time and talents to help the many veterans facing urgent legal issues, says Linda Klein of Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC.

  • Opinion

    Time To Reclaim Wellness For All Lawyers

    Leesa Klepper

    The decision last month by Baker McKenzie’s global chairman to step down due to exhaustion indicates that the legal profession needs to mount a broader wellness effort to address long hours, high stress, frequent travel and the daily demands of practice, says Leesa Klepper, director of Thrivewell Coaching.

  • Roundup Verdict Points To Jury Realities In Product Cases

    Matthew Gatewood

    A California jury was recently asked to determine whether the popular herbicide Roundup causes cancer. The case demonstrates how jurors often must draw conclusions on unresolved scientific issues, and how manufacturers that ignore complaints about product risks will struggle to overcome the image of corporate irresponsibility at trial, say attorneys with Eversheds Sutherland LLP.

  • 5th Circ. Weighs In On Sentencing Enhancements

    Mario Nguyen

    ​​Escaping sentencing enhancements​ is​ highly unlikely, and the defendant convicted of bank fraud in U.S. v. Miller is no exception​.​ But​ ​t​he Fifth Circuit’s opinion clarifies some legal standards and provides insight into the application of ​these ​enhancements​, says Mario Nguyen of Locke Lord LLP.

  • Opinion

    Defendants Can't Be Held To Impossible Discovery Standards

    Michelle Hart Yeary

    In a classic case of overreaching, plaintiffs in the Abilify multidistrict litigation recently sought sanctions against the defendant for not preserving emails from more than a decade before the start of the legal action. But their "everything plus the kitchen sink" approach couldn’t mask the lack of merit in any of their arguments, says Michelle Hart Yeary of Dechert LLP.

  • Protecting Law Firm Talent At Both Ends

    Susan Blakely

    By 2030, it is possible that 75 percent of lawyers practicing in the U.S. will be millennials. A broadened focus on retention and advancement of all young lawyers is therefore a logical step forward but it fails to address another major retention issue that law firms should explore, says Susan Smith Blakely of LegalPerspectives LLC.