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Trials

  • May 17, 2019

    Helping Manafort's Kid Get Skadden Gig No Crime, Craig Says

    Former Skadden partner Gregory Craig urged a D.C. federal court Friday to bar the government from introducing evidence that he helped line up a job at Skadden for the daughter of the now-jailed former chairman of the Trump campaign, Paul Manafort.

  • May 17, 2019

    'Crazy Expensive' Law Firm Wouldn't Return Calls, Jury Told

    The wife of a former U.K. attorney who hired Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP to pursue a failed privacy suit against the Daily Mail tabloid told a California jury Friday that the firm did little work, billed "crazy expensive" invoices and failed to return phone calls.

  • May 17, 2019

    Geico Can't Escape Driver's $1M Punitive Damages Award

    A California appellate court on Friday affirmed a jury's $1 million punitive damages award against Geico General Insurance Co. over its unreasonable delay in paying an injured policyholder the full limits of his policy following a serious car crash. 

  • May 17, 2019

    ​​​​​​​Fla. Motorcyclist Scores $3.8M Verdict Over Debilitating Crash

    A Florida state jury awarded approximately $3.83 million on Thursday to a motorcyclist T-boned by a Geico customer after the insurer refused to settle the claim within coverage limits, according to the motorcyclist's lawyers.

  • May 17, 2019

    Airplane Broker Can't Slip 7-Year Sentence For Skimming

    The Eleventh Circuit said Friday that the lower court did not err in ordering a 90-month prison sentence, and more than $600,000 in restitution, for a former airplane salesman convicted of skimming from his employer.

  • May 17, 2019

    Esformes Seeks New Trial, Says Feds Violated His Rights

    Nursing home mogul and convicted fraudster Philip Esformes has urged a Florida federal judge to grant him a new trial, arguing that the prosecution infringed his due process rights by using hollow charges of Medicare violations to influence the jury with weeks of evidence about unhappy patients at his facilities.

  • May 17, 2019

    Inconsistent Jury Answers Nix Conn. Town’s Injury Trial Win

    A split Connecticut appellate panel on Friday ordered a new trial in a suit accusing a town of causing a man’s injuries when he fell from a municipal retaining wall, saying the jury’s findings were inconsistent and should have been ruled invalid as a matter of law.

  • May 17, 2019

    Platinum Exec Says Co-Founder Misled Investors

    A former Platinum Partners executive on Friday told a New York federal jury that the firm’s co-founder and others misled potential investors about the financial health of Platinum’s main fund while the hedge fund manager was struggling to pay back tens of millions of dollars to its limited partners.

  • May 17, 2019

    Jury Backs Pizza King Mario Sbarro In Steakhouse Wage Suit

    A New York federal jury has found in favor of pizza restaurateur Mario Sbarro and his son in a suit brought by tipped workers for a now-closed steakhouse who claimed the Sbarros failed to pay them minimum and overtime wages as the business struggled to survive.

  • May 17, 2019

    'Pepe The Frog' Case Against InfoWars Heads To Trial

    A copyright lawsuit filed by the creator of Pepe the Frog — a cartoon that's become an online symbol for the controversial "alt-right" movement — is headed for a jury trial in California federal court after a judge refused to rule that the far-right website InfoWars made fair use of the character.

  • May 17, 2019

    J&J Hit With $80M Verdict In Philly Mesh Case

    A Philadelphia jury returned $80 million in damages against a Johnson & Johnson unit on Friday in the latest trial over chronic pain and other complications caused by its pelvic mesh implants.

  • May 17, 2019

    American Researchers To Be Added To Nobel-Related Patents

    Two American scientists will be added to patents involved in Nobel Prize-winning cancer research, a Boston federal judge ruled Friday, handing a victory to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Foley Hoag LLP.

  • May 16, 2019

    Ala. Hospital, Doc Owe $30M After Gunshot Victim Waits, Dies

    A jury awarded $30 million Thursday to the family of an Alabama man who died while waiting in a hospital’s emergency department for a surgeon to show up and treat his gunshot wound, according to his family's lawyers.

  • May 16, 2019

    NY Tribe, Town Look To Avoid Trial In Gambling Dispute

    The Cayuga Nation and the New York village of Union Springs told a federal judge Wednesday they don't want a bench trial in the tribe's suit challenging the village's anti-gambling ordinance, saying pleadings should be finished so the court can rule on the legal issues at the case’s core.

  • May 16, 2019

    EEOC Wins $3.3M Verdict Against Strip Club In Race Bias Suit

    A Mississippi federal jury has sided with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and found that a strip club in the state had discriminated against five black dancers, awarding more than $3.3 million in damages.

  • May 16, 2019

    Texas Appeals Court Awards Equistar Nothing In Pumps Suit

    A Texas appellate court said Thursday that neither Equistar Chemicals nor pump-maker ClydeUnion can recover any damages in a dispute over allegedly faulty ethane pumps, wiping out a lower court's $151,000 award to ClydeUnion because of a litigation cost offset.

  • May 16, 2019

    Feds Urge High Court To Pass On 'Bridgegate' Appeal

    Federal prosecutors on Wednesday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a bid from a former appointee of ex-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to review her "Bridgegate" conviction for orchestrating a politically motivated traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge, saying it's backed by sufficient evidence.

  • May 16, 2019

    Disbarred Atty Can't Beat Prison Term Over 'Confused' Judge

    The Third Circuit on Thursday nixed a disbarred attorney’s bid to toss his revised 41-month prison term for his role in bogus investment schemes, rejecting his claims that a New Jersey federal judge was “confused” about its prior rulings and “unprepared” to conduct the resentencing hearing.

  • May 16, 2019

    Allergan Wins Just $48.5K At Trial Over Imprimis False Ads

    A California federal jury on Thursday ordered Imprimis Pharmaceuticals to pony up just $48,500 to competitor Allergan after finding the compound drug company cost Allergan business by using false advertisements to trick doctors into thinking its eye-treatment drugs used FDA-approved ingredients — far short of the millions Allergan sought.

  • May 16, 2019

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Who Killed Wife Fights Her Estate's Civil Suit

    The former Fisher Phillips employment partner sentenced to life in prison for the murder of his wife told a Georgia appellate court on Thursday that his wife’s estate had no standing to bring a wrongful death action, arguing that he reserves that right, since he is the surviving spouse.

Expert Analysis

  • Key Takeaways From Roundup Verdicts So Far

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    On May 13, a California jury returned a $2 billion verdict against Monsanto in the third trial over allegations that its popular weedkiller Roundup causes cancer. The Roundup trials highlight the importance of issues including punitive damages, celebrity influence and the value of jury exercises, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • What Gov't Outsourcing Ruling Means For Investigations

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    A New York federal court's recent decision in U.S. v. Connolly is a warning to prosecutors against outsourcing their investigations to companies and outside counsel, but it should also be used by companies to determine the framework for internal investigations, says Rachel Maimin of Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • Traders At Risk Of DOJ Wire Fraud Charges For Spoofing

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    In U.S. v. Vorley, the U.S. Department of Justice has charged two commodities traders with wire fraud, based on an alleged spoofing scheme. The DOJ's approach could greatly expand potential criminal liability for spoofing activity, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • Biker TM Case Sets New Bar For First Amendment Protection

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    A California federal court recently refused to allow forfeiture of motorcycle club trademarks in U.S. v. Mongol Nation, a case that is part of a trend challenging the government's use of trademark regulation as infringing upon free speech, say Rebecca Fewkes and Eric Ball of Fenwick & West.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

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    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Defending Securities Act Claims In Texas State Court: Part 3

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    Litigating federal Securities Act class actions in Texas state courts is still a new frontier in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 Cyan decision. In the final part of this series, attorneys at Haynes and Boone discuss class certification defenses and obtaining early summary judgments.