Telecommunications

  • July 19, 2019

    Kids' Data Again In Spotlight As FTC Revisits Privacy Rule

    The Federal Trade Commission has called for what could be a multiyear review of its child privacy rules, a process that could upend compliance plans for website operators and app developers and bring a wider range of service providers and personal information under the law, attorneys say. 

  • July 19, 2019

    PTAB Backs Comcast, Axes By-Voice Video-Ordering Patent

    Comcast Cable Communications LLC demonstrated that many claims of a Silicon Valley-based company’s patent covering a system that lets TV viewers order videos online using voice commands are invalid, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board has found.

  • July 19, 2019

    Targeted Ransomware Attacks Soar, Symantec Reports

    The number of targeted ransomware attacks has skyrocketed in the past year as new attackers have increasingly emerged, cybersecurity giant Symantec Corp. said in a recent report.

  • July 19, 2019

    O'Rielly To Broadcasters: Don't 'Screw Up' New Kid Vid Rules

    FCC Commissioner Michael O'Rielly warned broadcasters to not "screw this up" as they take advantage of newfound flexibility in airing mandated children's TV programming, saying that shirking those responsibilities could result in heavier regulations later.

  • July 19, 2019

    Bosch Urges FCC To Give High-Frequency Use Another Look

    German conglomerate Bosch has called on the Federal Communications Commission to reconsider how it approaches experimental use of ultra-high frequency bands, saying the agency missed an opportunity to boost high-tech sector growth by opening up more unlicensed spectrum.

  • July 19, 2019

    Qualcomm's Profitability No National Security Issue, FTC Says

    The Federal Trade Commission has fired back against efforts by Qualcomm and the U.S. Department of Justice to pause a blockbuster antitrust ruling forcing the chipmaker to retool its business model, arguing that reining in Qualcomm’s anti-competitive conduct outweighs any vague national security concerns the pair alluded to.

  • July 19, 2019

    FCC Mulling Customer Opt-Outs For Wireless Carriers' Texts

    The Federal Communications Commission is considering whether to allow cell service customers to opt out of all texts from their providers after an AT&T customer complained the carrier wouldn’t stop sending frequent, unwanted messages about his data usage and bills.

  • July 18, 2019

    'Repealer' Cathode Ray Tube Buyers Oppose Separate Trials

    Indirect purchasers of television and computer component cathode ray tubes from nine states, who were excluded from a $576.8 million price-fixing settlement with Toshiba, Panasonic and LG, have urged a California federal court to throw out a bid from other buyers seeking two separate trials next year.

  • July 18, 2019

    2.2M Clinical Pathology Patients Added To AMCA Data Breach

    A Texas-based medical testing company has added itself to the list of companies swept up in debt billing collector American Medical Collection Agency's massive data breach, an incident that has already affected Quest Diagnostics Inc. and LabCorp.

  • July 18, 2019

    Facebook, WhatsApp Score Messaging Patent Victory

    Facebook and its popular messaging platform WhatsApp landed a victory this week when the U.S. Patent Trial and Appeal Board invalidated many of the patent claims on electronic messaging held by a competing media company, finding those claims to be unpatentable over prior art.

  • July 18, 2019

    Feds Want 'Breathtaking' ACLU Border Search Case Nixed

    An American Civil Liberties Union lawyer said requiring warrants for cellphone searches at the border would do little to impede the work of immigration officials while a government attorney said the "breathtaking" ACLU ask would undermine the nation's security, in dueling arguments before a federal judge Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: AB InBev, AT&T, Axalta

    AB InBev is reportedly mulling selling off assets after the company scrapped a planned Hong Kong offering of its Asia Pacific unit, AT&T is looking at options for its Puerto Rican business, and Axalta Coating Systems is exploring a sale.

  • July 18, 2019

    Alcatel-Lucent Can't Get Farmland Assessment, NJ Panel Says

    Alcatel-Lucent USA can’t seek a farmland assessment on a wooded portion of its North American headquarters property in New Jersey because the company did not respond to a municipal tax assessor's records request, a state appeals court ruled Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    NTIA Asks FCC To Update Network Servicing Rules

    The National Telecommunications and Information Administration asked the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday to launch a rulemaking to update the rules surrounding its Telecommunications Service Priority program, which lets certain registered groups get priority when telecom carriers are renovating or temporarily taking down their service lines.

  • July 18, 2019

    Inconsistent Tech, Trade Policies Hamstring Trump Admin

    The Trump administration's trade negotiations with China have bogged down as administration officials appear split over whether to treat state-affiliated technology firms like Huawei as threats to avoid or as partners to cut deals with, experts agreed Thursday during a Washington, D.C., panel.

  • July 18, 2019

    Uber Leans On Mass. Official Blessing As Cabbie Trial Opens

    Uber Technologies Inc. told a Massachusetts federal judge Thursday that the fact it was allowed to operate without regulations defeats a $248 million suit by Boston-area cab companies accusing it of running an illegal, unregulated taxi service, as a trial began in a packed courtroom.

  • July 18, 2019

    Comcast Must Face Whistleblower Suit Over Balloon Fight

    A whistleblower suit that a former Comcast employee filed after a workplace fight over a popped balloon may proceed, a New Jersey appellate panel said Thursday, finding the lower court shouldn't have struck down the case based on credibility determinations without first finding facts and reaching required legal conclusions.

  • July 18, 2019

    Vodafone Wins EU Approval For Liberty Global Deal

    The European Union on Thursday approved Vodafone’s $22 billion purchase of Liberty Global’s cable networks in Germany and central Europe after the company offered concessions to ease competition concerns in May.

  • July 18, 2019

    Qualcomm Fined €242M For Predatory Pricing In EU

    The European Union's competition watchdog fined Qualcomm €242 million ($272 million) Thursday for abusing its dominance by selling chipsets below cost to force a rival chipmaker out of the market, the latest antitrust setback for the technology giant buffeted by enforcers around the world.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    3 Times Justice Stevens Boosted Privacy Rights

    When it came to privacy rights, the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens repeatedly sided with individuals over governments during his 34 years on the high court. Here, Law360 revisits three of his most notable privacy rulings, including his finding that people have a constitutional right to share political opinions anonymously. 

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hear Justice Stevens In 5 Memorable Moments On The Bench

    Justice John Paul Stevens was known for being collegial and kind, but he also wasn’t one to mince words. Listen to a few of the justice’s most memorable words from the bench, in majority opinions, sharply worded dissents and at oral argument.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Things FTC Competition Bureau Looks For In White Papers

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    Most written advocacy to the Bureau of Competition is of an extremely high quality, but sometimes we notice that there’s some room for improvement, says Daniel Francis, an associate director at the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Competition.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • 5 Takeaways From DOJ Focus On Chinese Trade Secret Theft

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    Since its official announcement of the China Initiative eight months ago, the U.S. Department of Justice has publicized the initiation of six new cases that include references to both trade secrets and China. These shed some light on DOJ and U.S. business priorities, says Sara O’Connell at Pillsbury.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Prosecuting SEPs For Driverless-Car Communications Tech

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    Effective prosecution of standard-essential patents for autonomous vehicle communication requires familiarity with the technical standards for this nascent technology and experience addressing subject matter eligibility and means-plus-function claim limitation issues, says Todd Baker of Oblon McClelland.

  • When FCPA Violations Turn Into Private Securities Cases

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    In recent cases like Doshi v. General Cable Corp., plaintiffs attorneys have tried to use company disclosures of government investigations or settlement agreements with regulators to craft private claims for corporate bribery. There are a few things companies might consider to limit their exposure to such claims, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • PE Leaders' Many Hats Complicate D&O Policies

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    Divergent outcomes in two recent Delaware Superior Court cases came down to the wording of insurance policies, highlighting coverage issues for private equity directors and officers serving in multiple capacities, say insurance practitioners from Hiscox and Bailey Cavalieri.

  • FDIC Action Suggests New Focus On Bank TCPA Violations

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    Recently, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation announced its first public enforcement decision and order against a bank for alleged violations of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, signaling that primary banking regulators are joining the Federal Communications Commission and Federal Trade Commission in ramping up TCPA enforcement, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Rethinking The Tech-First Approach To Law Firm Solutions

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    When a lawyer complains about some workflow inefficiency they are having, the knee-jerk reaction of many firms is to look for a technology-based workaround. This overlooks the importance of human psychology and behavior, which may be the root of the problem, says Ryan Steadman of Zero.

  • Top 10 Techniques For Crafting A Dazzling Brief

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    Legal writing often falls flat not because it’s unorganized, but because it’s technically unsound and riddled with gaffes that cheapen and degrade it. Avoiding the most common mistakes will keep judges interested and, most importantly, make them trust you, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • M&A Checklists Should Include State-Level Antitrust Review

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    In light of recent lawsuits, every M&A attorney in the country should be aware that state attorneys general can and will use state antitrust laws to block the anti-competitive effects of nationwide mergers when local-market effects warrant action, say Seth Belzley and David Kully of Holland & Knight.