Telecommunications

  • January 27, 2022

    Justices Asked To Mull Circuit Split On Lanham Act's Reach

    Hetronic Germany GmbH is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on a $113 million trademark fight over radio control systems against a former U.S. partner, in a case that may address for the first time whether the Lanham Act's scope extends outside the U.S.

  • January 27, 2022

    Breyer's Departure Opens Door For More Reliable Privacy Vote

    Retiring U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer has had a mixed record on defending individuals from warrantless government searches and unwanted robocalls, presenting an opportunity for the "wild card" to be replaced with a jurist who's more solidly on the side of protecting privacy and civil liberties. 

  • January 27, 2022

    The Term: Breyer's Legacy And The Nomination To Come

    Justice Stephen Breyer on Thursday formally announced he would be retiring at the end of the Supreme Court term. Here, The Term breaks down the legacy he will leave behind and takes a look at what lies ahead for his potential successor with two special guests.

  • January 27, 2022

    Attys Seek $150K Fee Award In Cannabis Cos.' TCPA Deal

    A class of Washington state residents who received unsolicited commercial text messages from two cannabis companies has moved to secure $150,000 in attorney fees after striking a deal to settle their Telephone Consumer Protection Act claims for $618,000 in store vouchers.

  • January 27, 2022

    Breyer Retiring As Supreme Court Lurches Right

    Justice Stephen Breyer is retiring from the U.S. Supreme Court at a time when his conservative colleagues on the bench seem intent on dismantling landmark precedents on abortion, affirmative action and the administrative state, to name a few. Can his successor preserve his liberal legacy?

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Says Bid To Nix EEOC Suit 'Wasted Everyone's Time'

    A California federal judge forcefully rejected a now-defunct cellphone company's push Thursday to get a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sexual harassment lawsuit thrown out, labeling the motion a "baseless" waste of time.

  • January 27, 2022

    Apple Can't Hide Behind Privacy In Epic Fight, 9th Circ. Told

    Nearly 40 law, business and economics academics urged the Ninth Circuit on Thursday to upend Apple's win over Epic Games' allegations that the technology giant's App Store policies are anti-competitive, arguing the judge wrongly accepted Apple's justifications that restrictions on third-party app distribution are necessary to protect users.

  • January 27, 2022

    FCC Kicks Off Study For Broadband 'Nutrition Labels'

    The Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously Thursday to begin considering new rules that would require broadband providers to display easy-to-understand labels to allow consumers to comparison shop for broadband services, similar to nutrition labels on foods.

  • January 27, 2022

    Fed. Court Should've Dropped NJ Cable Fight, 3rd Circ. Told

    The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities told the Third Circuit on Thursday that a federal court should have stepped away from the regulator's battle with cable company Altice USA Inc. over customer billing, but stayed in the fight after misapplying the test for determining when abstention is appropriate.

  • January 27, 2022

    Quinn Emanuel Links Up With Top Saudi Litigator

    Top international trial firm Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP has announced its association with a Saudi litigator as it looks to gain a foothold in major markets globally, saying the lawyer has broad experience representing clients in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

  • January 27, 2022

    Facebook Data Antitrust Suits Get New Judge

    A string of cases in California federal court accusing Facebook of monopolizing social media markets through its use of consumer data have been reassigned to a new judge thanks to the recent elevation of Judge Lucy H. Koh to the Ninth Circuit.

  • January 27, 2022

    Privacy Groups Push 'Fourth Amendment Not For Sale' Bill

    Consumer privacy advocates are urging lawmakers to advance a bill to prevent law enforcement and intelligence agencies from buying Americans' private data from telecom providers.

  • January 27, 2022

    Axiata To Buy $606M Stake In Indonesian TV, Broadband Co.

    Malaysian telecommunications company Axiata Group Berhad will acquire Indonesian television and broadband operator PT Link Net in a two-part transaction that first sees the buyer paying about 8.72 trillion Indonesian rupiah ($606.2 million) for a stake of more than 66%, the companies said Thursday.

  • January 27, 2022

    FCC Revokes China Unicom's Right To Operate In US

    The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday to block China Unicom from continuing to operate communications networks in the U.S., citing national security risks based on the company's ties to the Chinese government. 

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Jackson Back In Spotlight As High Court Contender

    The upcoming vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court quickly threw the spotlight back on D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, a former clerk for Justice Stephen Breyer whose stature as a likely successor to the retiring justice was suddenly raised Wednesday.

  • January 27, 2022

    Deals Rumor Mill: Nvidia, Unilever, Kim Kardashian's Skims

    Nvidia will ditch its $40 billion purchase of U.K. semiconductor company Arm, activist billionaire Nelson Peltz has amassed a stake in European consumer goods giant Unilever, and Kim Kardashian's Skims brand has achieved a $3.2 billion valuation. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • January 27, 2022

    Biden At His Side, Justice Breyer Announces Retirement

    Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer joined President Joe Biden at the White House Thursday to formally announce his retirement, kicking off a rush among Democrats to confirm a new member of the court to replace the oldest serving justice.

  • January 27, 2022

    EU Clears Facebook's Kustomer Deal, But Rivals Get Access

    European Union antitrust officials announced Thursday that they will permit Facebook parent company Meta Platforms Inc. to buy customer service management provider Kustomer, assuaged by commitments to guarantee 10 years of access to rival providers.

  • January 26, 2022

    Democrats Plan Swift Confirmation Of Breyer Successor

    The U.S. Senate's Democratic leaders pledged Wednesday to move swiftly to confirm a successor for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, who is expected to formally announce his retirement Thursday.

  • January 26, 2022

    Wash. AG's Antitrust Probe Ends 'Sold By Amazon' Program

    Washington state's attorney general announced Wednesday that an investigation by his office shut down an Amazon program that allegedly violated antitrust laws by setting minimum prices for certain third-party products sold on the retailer's platform.

  • January 26, 2022

    FCC Updates Political Ad Record-Keeping Rules

    The Federal Communications Commission has officially updated its record-keeping and political programming rules for companies that hold broadcast licenses, the first serious tweaks that the agency has made in this area in 30 years.

  • January 26, 2022

    FCC Proposes Updates To Telecom Equipment Certification

    The Federal Communications Commission is proposing updates to its rules for certifying radio frequency equipment, which is designed to ensure devices operate without causing harmful interference.

  • January 26, 2022

    Rep. Says Transparency Bills Can Lead To Privacy Gains

    While lawmakers are stalled in advancing sweeping consumer privacy reforms, Rep. Lori Trahan, D-Mass., said her colleagues would be served by passing more incremental legislation that imposes transparency requirements on Big Tech companies.

  • January 26, 2022

    Meet The Possible Nominees For Justice Breyer's Seat

    President Joe Biden has promised to nominate the first-ever Black woman to the nation's highest court. Here we look at the contenders for Justice Stephen Breyer's seat, including one notable front-runner.

  • January 26, 2022

    Digital 9 Infrastructure Raises $128M Through Share Sale

    Digital 9 Infrastructure has raised £95.2 million ($128.4 million) through a sale of new shares, according to an announcement on Wednesday from the U.K. real estate investment trust.

Expert Analysis

  • How AI Can Transform Crisis Management In Litigation

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    Attorneys should understand how to use rapidly advancing artificial intelligence technology to help clients prepare for potential catastrophic events and the inevitable litigation arising from them, from predicting crises before they occur to testing legal theories once they arise, say Stratton Horres at Wilson Elser and David Steiger.

  • Scope, Circumvention, New Shippers: Key Rule Changes

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    William Isasi and Rishi Gupta at Covington suggest practices international trade practitioners should adopt in response to changes in U.S. Department of Commerce procedures for requesting scope and circumvention inquiries and new shipper reviews, especially in light of the newly retroactive application of some agency determinations.

  • Supervisor Relationships Are Key To Beating Atty Burnout

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    In order to combat record attorney turnover and high levels of burnout, law firm partners and leaders must build engaging relationships with supervisees, fostering autonomy and control, enabling expression of values, and building a sense of community and belonging, says Anne Brafford at the Institute for Well-Being in Law.

  • Opinion

    FTC Rulemaking Risks Expansion Of Unfair-Method Bounds

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    The Federal Trade Commission's plan to issue rules defining unfair methods of competition under Section 5 of the FTC Act arguably exceeds the commission's power, and isn't justified, because the current case-by-case approach to promoting competition through adjudication is preferable, says Sean Gates at Charis Lex.

  • Germany's Google Controls Illustrate Global Antitrust Trend

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    Germany's recent move to rein in Google with extended restrictions on anti-competitive behavior provides an example of the new aggressive stance regulators around the world are adopting as tech giants grow their power in the digital economy, says Andrea Pomana at ADVANT Beiten.

  • What To Expect From Merger Guideline Modernization

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's and Federal Trade Commission's recent request for comment on amending the merger review guidelines provides perhaps the clearest indication yet of where guideline revisions might focus, including on structural presumptions, the role of market definition and the effect of transactions on labor, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • 4 Consequences Of Gov't Contractor Antitrust Violations

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    Along with criminal penalties, significant collateral repercussions can follow a government contractor's conviction for antitrust violations, so vigilant compliance strategies are a must as the U.S. Department of Justice turns its attention to this area, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

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    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • Import Best Practices Under New Uyghur Forced Labor Law

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    Rachel Alpert and Grace Signorelli-Cassady at Jenner & Block discuss key provisions of the recently enacted Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, and offer compliance strategies that may position importers to demonstrate their supply chains are free from forced labor when the act's provisions presumptively barring many Chinese imports go into effect in June.

  • 5 Global Digital Markets Regulatory Issues To Watch In 2022

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    Francesco Liberatore at Squire Patton lays out the key regulatory developments that will affect global digital markets this year, from new enforcement measures aimed at electronic communications services in the European Union to increased cooperation between antitrust officials in the U.S., U.K. and EU.

  • When Fair Notice Precludes Punitive Damages

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    The ongoing pandemic has done little to slow the continued proliferation of novel theories of tort liability, but even when courts approve, the U.S. Constitution's requirement of fair notice may prohibit punitive damages, says Mitchell Morris at Butler Snow.

  • Aviation Watch: Resolving The FAA-FCC Fight Over 5G

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    Concerns over interference with aircraft altimeters are delaying the U.S. rollout of 5G wireless technology, and it may take special action by the Biden administration to resolve the standoff between the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Aviation Administration over the issue, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Opinion

    FTC Should Rethink Market Issues In Facebook Case

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    The Federal Trade Commission's antitrust prosecution of Meta Platforms, formerly Facebook, may have survived the initial litigation stage this week, but the case still does not embrace the markets it purports to fix, says David Reichenberg at Cozen O'Connor.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • New Anti-Dumping Rules Both Clarify And Complicate

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    The U.S. Department of Commerce's recent regulatory changes concerning anti-dumping and countervailing duty proceedings refine the process and helpfully eliminate steps for petitioners, but also create new hurdles for nonpetitioning parties, say William Isasi and Jordan Bakst at Covington.

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