Telecommunications

  • October 19, 2020

    High Court Urged To Block Robocall Barrage In Facebook Suit

    A man suing Facebook over allegedly unsolicited text messages is pushing the U.S. Supreme Court to declare that the Telephone Consumer Protection Act broadly encompasses any device that can automatically dial numbers, arguing that adopting a narrower reading would "unleash the torrent of robocalls" that the law is intended to stop.

  • October 19, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Google's IP Win On Balloon-Based Internet

    The Federal Circuit on Monday backed a California federal judge's decision that Google's Project Loon, which uses floating balloons in the stratosphere to provide wireless internet, does not infringe a patent owned by Space Data Corp.

  • October 19, 2020

    Judge Assails 'Unreasonable' Arguments In DSL Patent Case

    A Delaware federal judge appeared to be running thin on patience on Monday when he slammed a broadband equipment maker for putting forth an "unreasonable" number of invalidity defenses in a patent fight over high-speed DSL communication technology.

  • October 19, 2020

    Trump Tells DC Circ. TikTok Ruling Undermines His Authority

    The Trump administration has told the D.C. Circuit that a trial judge's order temporarily blocking the government from banning new downloads of video-sharing app TikTok from U.S. app stores erroneously second-guessed President Donald Trump's "sensitive national security judgments" and his assessment that personal data of Americans was being collected by the Chinese government.

  • October 19, 2020

    Preparing The Next Generation Of Female Trial Lawyers

    To build the ranks of female trial attorneys, law firms must integrate them into every aspect of a case — from witness preparation to courtroom arguments — instead of relegating them to small roles, says Kalpana Srinivasan, co-managing partner at Susman Godfrey.

  • October 19, 2020

    Mentorship Is Key To Fixing Drop-Off Of Women In Law

    It falls to senior male attorneys to recognize the crisis female attorneys face as the pandemic amplifies an already unequal system and to offer their knowledge, experience and counsel to build a better future for women in law, says James Meadows at Culhane Meadows.

  • October 19, 2020

    What BigLaw Can Do To Actually Retain Female Attorneys

    Even as BigLaw firms are recruiting women into their ranks in larger numbers, their presence in leadership and equity partnerships remains stubbornly low. Here’s a look at why this is happening — and what firms can do.

  • October 19, 2020

    These Firms Have The Most Women In Equity Partnerships

    At most U.S. law firms, equity partnerships are still overwhelmingly male, but women at some firms are starting to shake up that reality and smash the glass ceiling that has prevented them from advancing to the uppermost ranks. Here are this year’s Ceiling Smashers — the firms that are outpacing their peers as the legal industry works toward closing the gender gap in its top ranks.

  • October 19, 2020

    Wearing Natural Hair In BigLaw

    In this video, four Black women share their thoughts about wearing natural hair as BigLaw attorneys. In order of appearance, the attorneys are: Rukayatu Tijani, founder of Firm for the Culture and a former BigLaw associate; Delilah Clay, legislative & regulatory advisor at Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP; Rachel Boyce, associate at Cooley LLP; and Crystal Nwaneri, associate at Fenwick & West LLP.

  • October 19, 2020

    ISPs Blast Pentagon's Spectrum-Sharing Proposal For 5G

    Members of the broadband industry sternly warned the Pentagon against a proposal for the government to own and operate its own 5G network, saying Monday it should "reject experimental spectrum-sharing schemes" that could amount to "central government planning."

  • October 19, 2020

    Apple, Epic Warned Against Atty 'Nastiness' In Antitrust Fight

    A California federal judge repeatedly warned Apple and Epic Games Inc.'s counsel Monday that she'll sanction attorneys for any "nastiness" as their antitrust fight heads toward a May bench trial, and also aired concerns the public has maxed out the court's Zoom license and posted bootlegged videos of some hearings online.

  • October 19, 2020

    Full DC Circ. Won't Undo Royalty Ruling For Streaming Cos.

    The full D.C. Circuit has rejected an independent songwriter's bid to reconsider its reversal of the Copyright Royalty Board's decision that would have made Spotify, Apple and other streaming services pay artists significantly higher royalties.

  • October 19, 2020

    Altaba Must Reserve $800M For Canadian Data Breach Claims

    A Delaware vice chancellor ruled Monday that former Yahoo owner Altaba must set aside roughly $800 million to cover potential liability for data breach claims asserted in Canadian lawsuits before it can distribute roughly $5.6 billion to stockholders as part of its $40 billion wind-down plan.

  • October 19, 2020

    Microsoft Gets PTAB To Whittle Down 2 Siri Tech Patents

    Microsoft has notched partial victories in an ongoing patent battle over Siri digital voice assistant technology patents, with the Patent Trial and Appeal Board wiping out 17 of 18 claims in one patent and trimming 42 of 71 claims off another.

  • October 19, 2020

    Ex-Fox News Guest Drops Wigdor Suit Over Seth Rich Claims

    Former Fox News commentator Ed Butowsky on Monday dropped a suit that claimed Wigdor LLP founding partner Douglas H. Wigdor falsely accused him of peddling a conspiracy theory about the death of a Democratic National Committee employee.

  • October 19, 2020

    House Dems Say Pai's Section 230 Rulemaking Is Political

    House Democrats on Monday criticized FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's move to "clarify" interpretations of a rule that governs when websites' efforts to moderate user-posted content leaves them exposed to potential legal liability, characterizing the chairman's move as an attempt to aid the president before the election.

  • October 19, 2020

    Speedcast Creditors Blast Ch. 11 Sale Plan As Unfair

    Secured creditors of Australian communications satellite company Speedcast International Ltd. have asked a Texas bankruptcy judge to reject the company's Chapter 11 plan, saying Speedcast is attempting to sell off their collateral without compensation.

  • October 19, 2020

    MVP: DLA Piper's Edward Smith

    DLA Piper's Edward "Smitty" Smith steered public interest elements of the blockbuster merger between T-Mobile and Sprint, helping the telecom giants formulate mobile plans and other initiatives to reach communities in need and earning him a spot as one of Law360's 2020 Telecommunications MVPs.

  • October 16, 2020

    In Their Own Words: Being A Woman In BigLaw

    Firms are recruiting more women than previously to their ranks, but still have trouble retaining them at the same rate as men. Law360 asked three female attorneys who left BigLaw about how firms could better serve the women who work there. Here's what they have to say.

  • October 16, 2020

    Law360's Glass Ceiling Report: What You Need To Know

    While law firms continue to tout efforts to close the gender gap in their ranks, parity is still a distant goal, our annual survey shows.

  • October 16, 2020

    Glass Ceiling Report: How Does Your Firm Measure Up?

    Law firms have long struggled to clear the barriers women face in the legal industry, particularly when it comes to accessing the top ranks. Law360's 2020 Glass Ceiling Report looks to shed light on the progress firms have made and where they aim to be.

  • October 16, 2020

    Myriad Section 230 Bills Show Agreement Still Out Of Reach

    Lawmakers in both parties have recently shown interest in narrowing a federal internet liability shield now protecting social media platforms from lawsuits over user-posted content, but experts say they are still far from a clear-cut compromise.

  • October 16, 2020

    No Overhaul Likely After House Antitrust Tech Report

    A House panel released its findings earlier this month from a yearlong investigation into Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google with a report from Democrats calling for sweeping legislative changes aimed at loosening the grip they found dominant tech platforms wield over the economy. But reactions to the report suggest more subtle shifts might have a better chance of moving ahead.

  • October 16, 2020

    FCC Asks For National Security Review Of 2 Telecoms

    The Federal Communications Commission has asked the national security community to review whether Pacific Networks Corp. and China Unicom Americas present a risk if allowed to continue operating in the U.S.

  • October 16, 2020

    FTC Gets Court To Halt Allegedly Fake Inmate Calling Plans

    A California federal court has temporarily blocked two companies from doing business after the Federal Trade Commission claimed they were falsely advertising unlimited inmate calling plans that they could not actually provide, the agency announced Friday.

Expert Analysis

  • Guest Feature

    5 Ways Firms Can Avoid Female Atty Exodus During Pandemic

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    The pandemic's disproportionate impact on women presents law firms with a unique opportunity to devise innovative policies that will address the increasing home life demands female lawyers face and help retain them long after COVID-19 is over, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • ITC Vs. Court Remedies For Trade Secret Theft Abroad

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    Recent cases illustrate that companies facing misappropriation of their trade secrets outside the U.S. should carefully choose between obtaining significant damages in district courts and timely exclusion orders in the U.S. International Trade Commission, say Charles Sanders and Nathanial McPherson at Latham.

  • FCC Radio Spectrum Reallocation Could Impair Vehicle Safety

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    A proposed Federal Communications Commission rule change would allocate radio spectrum currently reserved for vehicle signals to the cable industry, which could negatively impact car safety applications due to interference with vehicle communications, say Gretchen Stoeltje and Greg Winfree at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute.

  • SEP Users Should Jettison Antitrust For Patent, Contract Law

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    Because the recent holdings in Federal Trade Commission v. Qualcomm and Continental Automotive Systems v. Avanci demonstrate antitrust's flaws in resolving disputes over licensing rates for standard-essential patents, users should employ contract and patent law for more flexibility in negotiations and litigation, say Erik Puknys and Michelle Rice at Finnegan.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

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    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

  • Why Online Mediation May Be Here To Stay

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    Videoconferenced mediation offers several advantages and helps cases settle faster and more cordially, making it hard to imagine going back to logistically difficult in-person dispute resolution after COVID-19 restrictions are gone, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC.

  • Clients Have The Power To Promote Wellness At Law Firms

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    Law firm clients can play a role in lowering mental distress in the legal profession by seeking lawyer wellness data from firms and factoring those responses into outside counsel hiring decisions, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Courts Should Welcome Well-Crafted Amicus Briefs

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    A Seventh Circuit judge's recent order granting leave for three organizations to file amicus curiae briefs in Prairie Rivers Network v. Dynegy Midwest Generation is a reminder that relevant, nonduplicative amicus briefs can provide courts with helpful perspective, important facts and legal arguments, says Lawrence Ebner at Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • 4 Compliance Tips Amid Increased Ransomware Scrutiny

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    In light of two new U.S. Treasury Department advisories signaling increased oversight of ransomware payments, victim companies and their third-party response teams considering making payments should follow certain due diligence and compliance best practices, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • High Court Oracle-Google Copyright War May Benefit Artists

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    After Wednesday's U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in the Google v. Oracle copyright dispute, artists have reason for optimism, because the law favors reining in the overly expansive transformativeness test and keeping fair use determinations within the province of judges rather than unpredictable juries, says Sandra Aistars at Antonin Scalia Law School.

  • 11th Circ. Ruling Threatens Class Rep Incentive Awards

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    Following the Eleventh Circuit's recent finding in Johnson v. NPAS Solutions that incentive awards improperly confer a benefit on class representatives, litigants should expect more challenges to such settlement provisions and closer scrutiny from courts, say Peter Morrison and Zack Faigen at Skadden.

  • Nigerian Oil Spill Ruling Shows Limits Of UK Class Actions

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    The High Court of Justice of England and Wales recently required thousands of Nigerians suing Shell in London over an oil spill to provide individual evidence of damage and individual defenses in Jalla v. Shell, illustrating how U.K. class action claimants must truly have a common interest, say attorneys at Signature Litigation.

  • What Hiring Law Firms Should Consider Instead Of Grades

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    With law schools forgoing traditional grading due to the pandemic, hiring firms that have heavily weighted first-year grades during the on-campus interview process should turn to metrics that allow a more holistic view of a candidate, says Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Methodology, Conflict, Corrective Scope

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Caitlin Crujido at MoFo looks at three recent U.S. Government Accountability Office decisions that shed light on the viability of the highest technically rated, reasonably priced offeror methodology, organizational conflict of interest issues when an awardee evaluates its own performance under a separate contract, and challenges of protesting the scope of corrective actions.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Schroeder Reviews 'Collegiality'

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    Mark Barringer's new book, "Collegiality and the Constitution," is an engaging, vibrant work of judicial history in Texas' Eastern District, and reveals an atmosphere of civility and respect among all those involved in the business of the court, says U.S. District Judge Robert W. Schroeder III.

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