Telecommunications

  • June 11, 2021

    AT&T Pushes Back Against Parts Of Biden Broadband Plan

    Communications giant AT&T is pushing back on elements of the Biden administration's infrastructure proposals, particularly a plan to partner with local governments, asserting support for municipalities could become politicized and broadband affordability hasn't reached a crisis level.

  • June 11, 2021

    WTO Ends Trump's Case Over China's Patent Rules

    The World Trade Organization quietly ended its investigation into China over its patent licensing rules on Friday, two years after the Trump administration put the case on ice in lieu of intellectual property negotiations with Beijing.

  • June 11, 2021

    House Lawmakers Float Bipartisan Big Tech Bills

    A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced a package of legislation in the U.S. House on Friday aimed at reining in large technology companies and restoring competition in digital markets, including a measure barring the tech giants from competing on their own platforms.

  • June 11, 2021

    Justices Urged To Nix 'Devastating' IPR Rulings In $44M Case

    Ultratec has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a series of 2019 Federal Circuit orders summarily affirming Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions that invalidated eight of its closed-caption patents, saying the decisions imperil a $44 million jury verdict it won against rival CaptionCall.

  • June 11, 2021

    FCC Orders Carrier To Repay AT&T, Verizon For Juicing Traffic

    The Federal Communications Commission has ordered a local phone carrier to repay millions of dollars it charged AT&T and Verizon for directing callers to highly trafficked conference calling services.

  • June 11, 2021

    Would Google Work As A Common Carrier? Experts Doubtful

    Conservative officials are trying a new way to rein in Big Tech, but experts from across the political spectrum wonder if the Ohio attorney general's lawsuit seeking to declare Google a common carrier can succeed legally or practically.

  • June 11, 2021

    NY's $15 Low-Income Internet Law Is Put On Hold

    A New York federal judge on Friday blocked the Empire State at least temporarily from enforcing a requirement for internet plans capped at $15 for qualifying low-income households, a plan that had triggered a legal challenge from across the telecom industry.

  • June 11, 2021

    Huawei Gets PTAB To Eye 2 Patents Involved In WDTX Suits

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has agreed to review whether two Brazos Licensing and Development communications patents are invalid, giving a boost to Huawei in its effort to fend off a dozen infringement suits from Brazos in the Western District of Texas.

  • June 10, 2021

    Bank Shakes TCPA Row After Facebook Autodialer Ruling

    A South Carolina federal judge has tossed a lawsuit accusing USAA Federal Savings Bank of violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by placing unwanted debt collection calls, finding that the dialing equipment the bank used didn't fit within the narrow autodialer definition recently laid out by the U.S. Supreme Court in a dispute involving Facebook. 

  • June 10, 2021

    Ill. City Goes After Netflix, Hulu Over Franchise Fees

    East St. Louis, Illinois, became the latest city to accuse Hulu and Netflix of illegally providing video service in its city limits by failing to comply with a state law and register as a franchise and pay fees for use of public rights-of-way.

  • June 10, 2021

    Google Poised To Escape Kids' Data Collection Suit

    A California federal judge indicated during a hearing Thursday that parents accusing Google and other companies of illegally collecting children's personal information through YouTube for targeted advertisements have so far failed to show that the plaintiffs' state law privacy claims aren't preempted by the federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.

  • June 10, 2021

    Ex-NHLer Fired For Podcast Joke Can't Sue For Discrimination

    An NHL-player-turned-NBC-analyst who was fired for making off-color comments about a female co-worker on a podcast cannot sue for sex discrimination simply because he's a man, a New York federal judge said Thursday.

  • June 10, 2021

    Rural ISP Accuses Tribal Rival Of Frequency Extortion

    A small internet and wireless service provider has accused the Round Valley Indian Tribes and its preferred ISP, All Tribal Networks, of leveraging an improperly issued Federal Communications Commission radio license to interfere with the rural ISP's wireless transmissions and poach its customers.

  • June 10, 2021

    'Hijacked' Telecom's Investors Enter Brawl For $1.3B Award

    Investors in a satellite communications service provider have chased a division of India's space agency to the Ninth Circuit in their desperate fight to save a $1.3 billion arbitral award before government officials can liquidate the company.

  • June 10, 2021

    Biden Admin. Walks Foreign Investment Tightrope With TikTok

    The Biden administration hasn't yet said whether TikTok's Chinese owner will need to sell the video-sharing platform's U.S. operations, but the move to rework Trump-era executive orders that sought to ban the app hints at an effort to strike a balance between an open investment environment and the protection of sensitive personal data.

  • June 10, 2021

    Cloud Co. Sued In Del. For $2.7M Arbitration Award Payment

    A Singapore-based cloud services company repeatedly sanctioned in Delaware for cutting off employee payment systems and squeezing companies to pay bogus, multimillion-dollar bills now faces a new Chancery Court suit to enforce a $2.7 million arbitration award filed by a third corporate victim.

  • June 09, 2021

    EU Probe Finds That Big Tech Dominates Smart Device Sector

    When it comes to the rapidly expanding Internet of Things, companies are finding it hard to compete with tech behemoths, like Apple and Google, who already have their only vertically-integrated "ecosystems" to operate on, the European Commission said Wednesday.

  • June 09, 2021

    VirnetX Attacks Apple's PTAB Win At Fed. Circ.

    VirnetX has urged the Federal Circuit to throw out a Patent Trial and Appeal Board ruling from last year that invalidated network security patents that, months later, earned the company a $576 million judgment against Apple in the Eastern District of Texas.

  • June 09, 2021

    NLRB Remands Claim Dish Banned Worker's Discipline Talk

    The National Labor Relations Board sent back to a regional official a dispute over whether Dish Network LLC violated federal labor law by prohibiting a worker from discussing his suspension during a workplace investigation, rejecting the company's bid to dismiss the claim.

  • June 09, 2021

    Retirees Want Redo On Partial Toss Of AT&T Benefits Suit

    Two AT&T retirees suing over the company's decision to deny them retroactive retirement benefits have asked a New York federal judge to reconsider last month's decision striking those claims, arguing that they weren't properly notified about a key plan update.

  • June 09, 2021

    Verizon, AT&T Join Forces Against NJ Town Over Nixed Permit

    The three largest U.S. wireless carriers hit a small New Jersey township in the New York City region with a federal lawsuit Wednesday challenging the municipality's denial of permission for a cell tower that a local college wants built.

  • June 09, 2021

    Calif. Judge Won't Put Hold On Texas' Investigation Of Twitter

    A California federal judge has shut down Twitter's bid for an injunction halting Texas' probe into the social media platform's moderation practices, echoing Attorney General Ken Paxton's argument that the company is unlikely to succeed with its appeal of last month's axing of its suit over the investigation.

  • June 09, 2021

    Fiber Co. Says It Will Defer To Tribes' Wireless Projects

    A fiber network company is asking the Federal Communications Commission to release it from obligations to build out gigabit-speed broadband in certain parts of Colorado, saying that it doesn't want to stymie two tribes' efforts to construct their own wireless networks.

  • June 09, 2021

    Biden Axes Trump TikTok Curbs Amid Broader Data Review

    President Joe Biden on Wednesday revoked Trump-era executive orders that sought to ban TikTok, WeChat and other apps from the U.S. market and issued his own order to review multiple foreign-controlled apps that could pose a security risk to the data of users in America.

  • June 08, 2021

    PTAB Nixes Screen Display Patent Samsung Found To Infringe

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has invalidated as obvious an Irish company's screen display patent challenged by Samsung, which is seeking a new trial in a parallel federal court case.

Expert Analysis

  • A Gov't Contractor's Road Map To Biden Cybersecurity Order

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    Following President Joe Biden's recent executive order to improve U.S. cybersecurity, Justin Chiarodo and Sharon Klein at Blank Rome highlight how four key elements will particularly affect government contractors and their suppliers, and what contractors should expect as they prepare to operate in a new compliance environment.

  • A Biz Strategy Model To Improve Lateral Atty Hiring Diversity

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    Quantitative comparison tools commonly used by companies in evaluating merger targets will allow law firms to assess lateral hire candidates in a demographically neutral manner, help remove bias from the hiring process and bring real diversity to the legal profession, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University.

  • How Curbs On Russia And Belarus Trade Will Affect Tech Cos.

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    Attorneys at Kirkland examine how the Biden administration's newly authorized Russian sanctions, restrictions on dealings with companies in Belarus and other likely measures will affect the technology sector and how companies should respond to the changes.

  • Smaller Firms Need Employee Wellness Programs, Too

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    As we emerge from the pandemic, small and midsize firms — which offer an ideal setting for companywide connection — should follow in the footsteps of larger organizations and heed the American Bar Association’s recommendations by adopting well-being initiatives and appointing a chief wellness officer, says Janine Pollack at Calcaterra Pollack.

  • Opinion

    Antitrust Reform Should Focus On Targeted Solutions

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    Antitrust law can and should be updated to reflect the needs of our modern economic landscape by addressing specific areas where meaningful problems exist, but some proposals, like the call to overturn the consumer welfare standard, go too far, says Trace Mitchell at NetChoice.

  • How Ad Disputes Between Cos. Fuel Consumer Class Actions

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    Whether companies are bringing or defending claims of false advertising against competitors, they should recognize and anticipate the additional legal risk that may accrue from follow-on consumer actions, says Ross Weiner at Risk Settlements.

  • What Semiconductor Shortage Means For Patent Drafting

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    Since a critical shortage in the global supply of semiconductors could lead to an increase in U.S. capacity, semiconductor-related patent owners should consider directing more patent claims to manufacturing processes, manufacturing tools and intermediate structures, say Darren Smith and David Ben-Meir at Norton Rose.

  • Opinion

    CFAA And The High Court's Fight Against Overcriminalization

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    When confronted with a notoriously broad and somewhat out-of-date statute like the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, it is important for the judiciary to continue to protect defendants from prosecutors' tortured or extreme readings of these criminal laws — and that's what the U.S. Supreme Court did this month in Van Buren v. U.S., say Harry Sandick and Jacob Chefitz at Patterson Belknap.

  • Warnings And Guideposts From EU Sanctions Blocking Case

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    An advocate general's recent opinion in Bank Melli Iran v. Telekom Deutschland, a European Union sanctions blocking case, highlights serious new international regulatory compliance risks but also presents helpful guidance for navigating conflicting EU and U.S. rules, say Thomas Grant at Cambridge University and Scott Kieff at George Washington University.

  • Stop Networking, Start Relationship Marketing

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    USA 500 Clubs' Joe Chatham offers four tips for lawyers to get started with relationship marketing — an approach to business development that prioritizes authentic connections — and explains why it may be more helpful than traditional networking post-pandemic.

  • 7th Circ. Decision Highlights Difficulties Of 'No Harm' Cases

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    The Seventh Circuit's recent decision in Markakos v. Medicredit showcases the judiciary's struggle with whether it is usurping Congress' authority by questioning statutory penalties for "no harm" consumer protection violations, and highlights the need to resolve a growing circuit split on this issue, says Jason Stiehl at Loeb & Loeb.

  • What Attorneys Should Know About Fee Deferral

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    Milestone Consulting’s John Bair explores contingency-fee structuring considerations for attorneys, laying out the advantages — such as tax benefits and income control — as well as caveats and investment options.

  • Predictions On Pandemic's Lasting Impact On Legal Education

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    The pandemic accelerated the pace of technological change for legal education, and some of the changes to how law school courses are taught and on-campus interviews are conducted may be here to stay, says Leonard Baynes at the University of Houston.

  • Lawyer Perfectionism Is A Disease We Can Control

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    The pursuit of perfection that is prevalent among lawyers can lead to depression, anxiety and other mental health impacts, but new attorneys and industry leaders alike can take four steps to treat this malady, says Liam Montgomery at Williams & Connolly.

  • Opinion

    Gov't Must Resolve Uncertainty Over 'Twilight' Cell Towers

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    The Federal Communications Commission and Native American tribes are in disagreement over what to do with so-called twilight cell towers that predate environmental and historical preservation regulation, and the Biden administration should address this question as soon as possible, says Bozana Lundberg at Thompson Hine.

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