Telecommunications

  • September 24, 2021

    Trump Fights Transfer Of Big Tech Censorship Suits To Calif.

    Former President Donald Trump is urging a Florida federal judge to dismiss requests by Twitter and YouTube to transfer his censorship suits against them to the Northern District of California, saying the forum selection clauses in their terms of service do not apply to governmental entities.

  • September 24, 2021

    DirecTV Arbitration Clause 'Pro-Consumer,' 4th Circ. Told

    DirecTV has urged the Fourth Circuit to overturn a lower court's decision to keep a proposed class action over robocalls out of arbiters' hands, saying its arbitration agreement has "pro-consumer" benefits and customers are well aware of what they are signing.

  • September 24, 2021

    States Go First In Google Display Ads Case

    The Texas-led state attorneys general lawsuit against Google will go through briefing on dismissal motions while the rest of the massive consolidated case remains paused, a New York federal judge ruled Friday in an attempt to impose some order on litigation over the search giant's display advertising business.

  • September 24, 2021

    Class Slams Cricket's Bid For Arbitration In False 4G Ad Suit

    Cricket Wireless can't attract customers with promises of contract-free service, then turn around and claim they're contracted to arbitrate their claims when sued by those same customers, a California federal court was told.

  • September 24, 2021

    9th Circ. Gives Go-Ahead To CRT Settlement

    The Ninth Circuit said that it will not reconsider settlements between makers and certain purchasers of cathode ray tubes and denied efforts to intervene by members of the purchasing class who were not part of the settlements.

  • September 24, 2021

    Del. Jury Says Comcast App Infringes 1 Of Tech Co.'s Patents

    A federal Delaware jury issued a verdict finding Comcast's Xfinity brand app indirectly infringes a small technology company's patent for a way of turning a remote control into a customer service "concierge device," but cleared Comcast of claims of infringing a related patent.

  • September 24, 2021

    Sen. Presses FCC To Step Up Action Against Spam Texts

    Amid proliferating spam texts, Sen. Richard Blumenthal on Friday urged the Federal Communications Commission to crack down on unwanted messages as regulators try to beat back the deluge of unsolicited phone traffic plaguing consumers.

  • September 24, 2021

    MVP: Wiley Rein's Joshua S. Turner

    Wiley Rein LLP partner Joshua S. Turner scored a huge win for the wireless industry by persuading the Ninth Circuit to uphold federal orders aimed at paving the way for thousands of "small cell" sites, landing him a spot among Law360's 2021 Telecommunications MVPs.

  • September 24, 2021

    Huawei CFO Admits Duping HSBC On Iran Dealings

    Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou on Friday entered into a deferred prosecution agreement with U.S. authorities and admitted to deceiving global lender HSBC about Huawei's business dealings with Iran.

  • September 24, 2021

    Saxena White Can't Lead FIFA Suit After Robbins Geller DQ

    A New York federal judge who disqualified Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP from securities litigation related to the FIFA corruption scandal on Thursday rejected Saxena White PA's request to take over the case, chastising the firm for seeking continued advice from Robbins Geller.

  • September 23, 2021

    Liberty Media Sued Over Slow-Mo Sirius Minority Squeeze-Out

    A Sirius XM Holdings Inc. stockholder sought damages for the company and its shareholders in Delaware's Chancery Court on Thursday in connection with controlling investor Liberty Media Corp.'s alleged ongoing plan for a slow-moving, $16 billion or more squeeze-out of minority shares, at Sirius' expense.

  • September 23, 2021

    Wireless Cos. Say Mo. City's Right-Of-Way Fee Too High

    The Wireless Internet Service Providers Association has told the Federal Communications Commission it supports Bluebird Network's petition for the agency to prevent what it considers an exorbitantly high fee that the city of Columbia, Missouri, charged Bluebird for rights of way.

  • September 23, 2021

    COVID-19 Relief Funds Must Be Tech-Neutral, States Told

    Recently released guidelines that detail how the Treasury Department will distribute billions of congressionally allocated COVID-19 recovery dollars have irked a subset of small wireless internet companies, which say the framework pushes states to choose costly fiber lines over wireless internet options.

  • September 23, 2021

    Senators Advance Bill Shielding AGs' Antitrust Venue Choices

    A Senate panel advanced legislation Thursday to prevent companies from moving states' antitrust lawsuits to more favorable venues, as part of a congressional response to Google's effort this year to move the Texas attorney general's suit against the tech giant to California.

  • September 23, 2021

    Netflix, Hulu Win Challenge To Calif. City's Video Fees

    A California city can't impose video service fees on Netflix and Hulu because they don't provide live, on-demand services similar to television and don't operate infrastructure in public rights-of-way, a Los Angeles court found.

  • September 23, 2021

    Senate Dems Tell Biden To Solidify Rosenworcel's FCC Post

    Two dozen Democratic senators are throwing their support behind having Federal Communications Commission acting Chair Jessica Rosenworcel lead the agency permanently, telling President Joe Biden in a letter that he must elevate her to accomplish his broadband-expansion agenda.

  • September 23, 2021

    MTV Beats Trademark Suit Over 'Floribama Shore'

    A Florida federal judge ruled Wednesday that the MTV reality show "Floribama Shore" didn't violate the trademark rights of an oyster bar called the Flora-Bama, rejecting the case on First Amendment grounds.

  • September 22, 2021

    Tech Giants List Preferred Changes To FCC's 60 GHz Rules

    Tech giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon all agree that it's time to update the Federal Communications Commission's rules governing the use of the 60 GHz band, but they've got their own suggestions on what exactly should change.

  • September 22, 2021

    Texas Law Barring 'Viewpoint' Social Media Bans Challenged

    Two technology industry groups filed a federal suit Wednesday challenging a new Texas law that prohibits social media companies from banning users based on their "viewpoint," saying the law unconstitutionally restricts the platforms' speech rights.

  • September 22, 2021

    China Says FCC Can Mitigate Device Risk With Cyber Regime

    Chinese manufacturers and the Chinese government are asking the Federal Communications Commission to forgo plans for a blanket ban on products made in countries that have been deemed a national security threat and instead craft a more narrowly focused compliance regime aimed at addressing U.S. national security concerns.

  • September 22, 2021

    UK Antitrust Enforcer Will Mull Music Streaming Probe

    The United Kingdom's competition enforcer says it will consider taking a hard look at the music streaming market at its October meeting, after receiving a request that it do so from government officials.

  • September 22, 2021

    House Dems Push For Tax Breaks For Municipal Broadband

    House Democrats are aiming to offer a new tax credit for municipal broadband services as part of the sweeping $3.5 trillion legislation encompassing major portions of President Joe Biden's domestic agenda.

  • September 22, 2021

    FCC Defends SpaceX Satellite Plans At DC Circ.

    The Federal Communications Commission denied claims that it failed to properly assess the risks to internet and broadcast service interference and violated federal environmental law when it gave SpaceX permission to deploy thousands of broadband satellites closer to Earth than initially planned, saying the accusations by Dish Network and Viasat at the D.C. Circuit are meritless and warrant dismissal.

  • September 22, 2021

    YouTuber Accused By Feds Of $30M Cable TV Piracy Scheme

    Three men, including a YouTuber with nearly 800,000 subscribers, were charged in Pennsylvania federal court for allegedly masterminding a $30 million scheme to pirate cable television and other copyrighted material and resell it, according to an indictment unsealed on Tuesday.

  • September 22, 2021

    T-Mobile Wants Data Hack Suit Delayed Until JPML Ruling

    T-Mobile has asked a Georgia federal judge to put on ice a proposed class action over its massive consumer data breach until a judicial panel decides whether to consolidate it with nearly 30 similar suits filed around the country.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Attorney Ethics Considerations For Litigation Funding

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    The growth of the litigation finance industry has generated questions on the obligations of counsel when their clients are seeking outside capital to fund litigation, which litigators must understand when providing information to a third-party funder and discussing legal strategy with a client, says Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

  • How ABA Opinion Shifts Alternative Biz Structure Landscape

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    A recent American Bar Association opinion approving lawyers' passive investment in nonlawyer-owned firms eliminates a hurdle for law firms wishing to scale their practice through alternative business structures, but aspiring investors should follow a few best practices, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Deepika Ravi at Harris Wiltshire.

  • UK Focus On Int'l Data Transfers Shows Appetite For Reform

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    Recent U.K. public consultations on international transfers of personal data and structural amendments to the country's General Data Protection Regulation illustrate the post-Brexit appetite for reform and signal changes to the international data transfers regime, say Kate Brimsted and Tom Evans at BCLP.

  • What Telehealth Regulation May Look Like After COVID-19

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    The majority of regulatory flexibilities around telehealth authorized due to COVID-19 may disappear with the end of the public health emergency, but several bills pending in Congress could bring permanent change, especially when it comes to mental health and audio-only services, says Suzanne Joy at Holland & Knight.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: HPE Counsel Talk Effective Board Oversight

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    Governance teams can more effectively shape board oversight of environmental, social and governance issues by ensuring organizationwide agreement on the most relevant issues, building a materiality framework that reflects stakeholder input, and monitoring the integration of ESG into operations, say Rishi Varma and Derek Windham at Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

  • Bankruptcy Courts' Equitable Discretion May Be In Danger

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    The Eighth Circuit’s recent equitable discretion decision in VeroBlue sends a warning to practitioners and the bench that courts' overuse of this bankruptcy doctrine in dismissing post-plan confirmation appeals may result in elimination of the useful tool altogether, say Brian Shaw and Mark Radtke at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Opinion

    Justice Gap Demands Look At New Legal Service Models

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    Current restrictions on how lawyers structure their businesses stand in the way of meaningful access to justice for many Americans, so states should follow the lead of Utah and Florida and test out innovative law firm business models through regulatory sandboxes, says Zachariah DeMeola at the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System.

  • Privacy Now Looms Large In Antitrust Enforcement

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    Recent moves by the Biden administration as well as court decisions indicate that privacy is likely to play an increasingly important role in antitrust litigation, both as a justification used to defend against allegations of anti-competitive conduct, and as an element of product quality that can be restricted or diminished as a result of anti-competitive conduct, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • FCC's Reassigned Numbers Data Won't Help TCPA Class Cert.

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    The Federal Communications Commission's reassigned numbers database, which goes live Nov. 1, is poorly suited to overcome the challenges of class certification endemic to wrong-number cases because it was not designed to assist in identifying wrong-number calls or call recipients after the fact, says Debra Aron at Charles River Associates.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Leidos GC Talks Social Responsibility

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    Recent criticisms of corporate commitments to stakeholders such as employees and communities — implicitly opposing environmental, social and governance initiatives — are fundamentally flawed and display a serious misunderstanding of contemporary investor priorities and dynamics, says Jerald Howe at Leidos.

  • Lessons In Crisis Lawyering 20 Years After 9/11

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    Dianne Phillips at Holland & Knight recounts her experiences as in-house counsel at a liquefied natural gas company in the tumultuous aftermath of Sept. 11, 2001, and details the lessons she learned about lawyering in a crisis, including the importance of careful forethought and having trusted advisers on speed dial.

  • Rebuttal

    Adoption Of Extended M&A Valuation Models Seems Unlikely

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    A recent Law360 guest article says courts would make appraisals of companies' stock more explicit and transparent by using projections of 25 years or more in discounted cash flow models, but there are several reasons the courts wouldn't, and shouldn't, adopt these projections, says Nicholas Walter at Wachtell.

  • What 9th Circ.'s Tinder Ruling Means For Class Settlements

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent opinion in Kim v. Allison, rejecting a precertification settlement of class claims that Tinder committed age discrimination, offers important insights for class action litigants and counsel on that court's shift toward increasingly stringent scrutiny of such settlements, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • How UK Data Breach Ruling May Rein In Insurance Claims

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    The recent U.K. High Court ruling in Warren v. DSG Retail, which held that claimants can only pursue personal data claims provided for in data protection legislation, narrows the basis upon which claims can be made following a data breach, and could make lower-cost recovery of after-the-event insurance premiums a thing of the past, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Opinion

    In War On Arbitration, Consumers And Companies Both Lose

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    Amazon.com's recent decision to end arbitration and face the risk of consumer class actions, in the face of plaintiffs firms ramping up mass arbitration proceedings, portends the loss of a vital form of alternative dispute resolution, hurting both consumers and corporate defendants, says Sherman Joyce at the American Tort Reform Association.

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