Telecommunications

  • November 15, 2019

    Warrantless GPS Tracking Paused Since Carpenter, Sen. Says

    The federal government hasn't collected cellphone location or GPS data without a warrant since the U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark Carpenter decision last year, the head of the intelligence community has disclosed to a Democratic senator who's pushing Congress to ban such warrantless data grabs.

  • November 15, 2019

    Pope Francis Calls For 'Balance' In Encryption Debate

    Pope Francis has waded into the debate over government access to encrypted communications, challenging tech firms in a Thursday speech to strike a "fitting balance" between protecting privacy and helping law enforcement track down child predators.

  • November 15, 2019

    Satellite Cos. Sweeten C-Band Sale With Donation Pledge

    Satellite operators continued trying to sell the Federal Communications Commission on their plan to privately sell off valuable midband spectrum, releasing new details Friday about how they would reimburse taxpayers to avoid the perception of an industry windfall and how their plan would increase rural broadband access.

  • November 15, 2019

    House, Senate Reach Deal To Unite Robocall Legislation

    House and Senate committee leaders announced late Friday that they had reached a deal to square two versions of anti-robocall legislation that passed overwhelmingly earlier this year, readying the bill for White House approval.

  • November 15, 2019

    Fiber Optic Co. Investors Qualify For Class Action, Judge Says

    Investors who claim a Houston-based fiber optics manufacturer inflated its stock prices by covering up declines in overall sales should be granted class certification, a Texas magistrate judge found Wednesday.

  • November 15, 2019

    Huawei Owes Fees For 'Rank Gamesmanship' In Patent Loss

    Chinese tech giant Huawei must pay attorney fees for its $13 million patent infringement loss after U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap on Friday upbraided the company for "rank gamesmanship," finding the smartphone maker needlessly litigated a host of issues only to withdraw them at the eleventh hour.

  • November 15, 2019

    Wireless Cos. Counter Utilities' Attack On 6 GHz Sharing

    The wireless industry is pressing lawmakers to back a Federal Communications Commission plan to open up the 6 GHz band to unlicensed use by wireless broadband providers, charging that utilities and other key public services using the band are wrong to attack the proposal.

  • November 15, 2019

    FCC Lifeline Reforms Could Gut Program Or Spill Data: Dems

    The Federal Communications Commission has released a set of reforms intended to tighten a subsidized internet and phone program, but agency Democrats said they’re concerned the updates could defang the program or cause a data breach.

  • November 15, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Says Judge Wrongly Axed Data Patent As Abstract

    The Federal Circuit on Friday reversed a lower court’s decision that claims in a data transmission patent belonging to Dutch telecommunications company Koninklijke KPN are invalid, saying the patent does not cover an abstract idea.

  • November 15, 2019

    High Court To Hear Google-Oracle Smartphone War

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to tackle a yearslong copyright battle between Google and Oracle over smartphone software, setting the stage for a potential landmark decision on intellectual property.

  • November 14, 2019

    Facebook Says Gov't Demands For User Data At All-Time High

    Facebook said Wednesday that it received more requests from governments around the world for access to user data in the first half of 2019 than ever before, and insisted that it continues to push back on overbroad demands and doesn't provide officials with "back doors" to encrypted data. 

  • November 14, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Upholds CalTech Patents In Apple Challenges

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday refused to disturb decisions from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board that upheld parts of two Wi-Fi patents the California Institute of Technology has accused Apple of infringing.

  • November 14, 2019

    Munger Tolles Blasts DOJ's DQ Bid In Sprint-T-Mobile Suit

    Munger Tolles & Olson LLP, the firm helping a contingent of states challenge Sprint and T-Mobile's planned merger, told a New York federal court on Thursday that the U.S. Department of Justice's bid to disqualify it comes too late and is devoid of merit.

  • November 14, 2019

    Amazon Sues Co. For Going After Best Buy In Tablet Dispute

    Amazon.com Inc. confronted a patent holder Wednesday that's accusing Best Buy of patent infringement for selling Amazon Fire tablets, contending for the second time this week that any litigation over its technology must be directed at the online retail giant and not its retail customers.

  • November 14, 2019

    Split 9th Circ. Won't Revive IPhone Buyers' Class Cert. Bid

    A split Ninth Circuit panel affirmed a district judge's decision to deny class certification on claims that Apple violated antitrust laws by locking iPhone buyers into voice and data plans with AT&T, agreeing Wednesday that an expert's damages report failed to show the buyers had enough in common.

  • November 14, 2019

    Barr Urges FCC To Block Chinese Telecom Giants

    U.S. Attorney General William Barr unequivocally named Chinese telecom giants Huawei Technologies Co. and ZTE Corp. as threats to national security in a letter to the Federal Communications Commission posted Thursday, urging FCC Chairman Ajit Pai to proceed with a rule cracking down on the companies.

  • November 14, 2019

    GOP Miffed As House Satellite TV Bill Advances

    Despite complaints from House Republicans that they were given little chance to help shape the legislation, a bill renewing the statute governing satellite TV programming was cleared Thursday to go before the full Energy and Commerce Committee.

  • November 14, 2019

    Copyright Professors Raise Alarm Over Charter Piracy Case

    Law professors from Stanford, Harvard and other elite schools are sounding the alarm over a potential ruling against Charter Communications in a copyright case filed by record labels, saying it could force internet service providers to take draconian actions against users.

  • November 14, 2019

    2 Firms Get $3M Payday In Google, Huawei Faulty Phone Suit

    Two law firms will be walking away with $3 million of the $9.75 million deal they negotiated with Google and Huawei to end claims that the companies sold faulty smartphones prone to battery and startup issues.

  • November 13, 2019

    3rd Circ. Needn't Weigh Robocall Exemption Ax, Feds Say

    The federal government is rallying against a Florida utility's bid for the Third Circuit to review a ruling that found a controversial carveout to the Telephone Consumer Protection Act's robocall ban to be unconstitutional, arguing that the holding is consistent with several other appellate decisions on the issue.

  • November 13, 2019

    Cell Tower Co. Sues Mass. Town Over Rejected Permit

    A wireless infrastructure company hit a Massachusetts town with a complaint in federal court Wednesday, alleging the town violated the Telecommunications Act by denying the company a permit to build a cell tower.

  • November 13, 2019

    Satellite Law Renewal Hits Speed Bump In Senate

    The Senate Commerce Committee bumped discussion of a law governing satellite TV carriage agreements on Wednesday, as members pitched a dozen provisions to add to what had been a planned "clean" reauthorization of the law.

  • November 13, 2019

    Justices May Nix Ruling That OK'd Bias Suit Against Comcast

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed to lean toward reversing a Ninth Circuit decision allowing a studio’s $20 billion racial bias suit to proceed against Comcast Corp. because, in the words of some justices, the appeals court adopted a seemingly “wrong” standard for proving illegal discrimination in contracting.

  • November 13, 2019

    Groups Ask FCC To Reconsider Rural Health Care Order

    The Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband Coalition was one of several groups that have asked the Federal Communications Commission to reconsider aspects of an order that changed the parameters for a program that funds internet connections for health care providers, saying that the new structure could actually discourage health providers from taking advantage of the program.

  • November 13, 2019

    Apple Says App Store 'Revolutionized' Developer Market

    Apple Inc. has hit back against developers suing over the company's App Store practices, telling a California federal court that the alleged anti-competitive conduct has not harmed consumers, but rather has revolutionized the way software applications are distributed.

Expert Analysis

  • What To Know Before Moving Your Supply Chain Out Of China

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    U.S. companies moving their supply chains to avoid Chinese tariffs should be aware of the complexities of U.S. Customs and Border Patrol country-of-origin determinations and the scope of U.S. Department of Commerce authority to impose tariffs on Chinese goods that originate outside of China, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Engaging With International Carcinogen Evaluations

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    Defense-oriented attorneys and corporations should be aware of the International Agency for Research on Cancer's list of chemicals, pharmaceuticals and other exposures slated for review over the next five years, and begin preparing for eventual hazard evaluations by IARC working groups, say Eric Lasker and John Kalas of Hollingsworth.

  • Comcast Bias Suit A Bad Way To Make Law, Arguments Show

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    Oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in Comcast v. National Association of African American-Owned Media highlighted the case's flaws, including that it concerns the dismissal of a complaint that omitted a key fact and was tainted by dubious insinuations, says R. Scott Oswald of The Employment Law Group.

  • Texas Could Take Page From Mass.'s Judicial Selection Book

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    As Texas and other states review their judicial election processes, they would be well served by taking guidance from Massachusetts' Governor’s Council system, which protects the judiciary from the hazards of campaigning, says Richard Baker of New England Intellectual Property.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McKeown Reviews 'Conversations With RBG'

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    Reading Jeffrey Rosen’s "Conversations With RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law" is like eavesdropping on the author and his subject while they discuss how the restrained judicial minimalist became the fiery leader of the opposition, says Ninth Circuit Judge M. Margaret McKeown.

  • AI Bill Emphasizes Transparency And Consumer Control

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    The Filter Bubble Transparency Act introduced in the Senate last month is the latest of growing congressional efforts to regulate artificial intelligence, and the first substantive federal bill aimed at curbing companies' algorithmic control of content on internet platforms, say Adam Aft and Yoon Chae of Baker McKenzie.

  • Where A Litigator's Advice Can Improve Agreement Drafting

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    Transactional attorneys should consider consulting with litigation counsel when drafting certain contractual provisions — choice of law, choice of forum, attorney fees and others — that could come into play in a broad range of substantive disputes, says Adrienne Koch at Katsky Korins.

  • Opinion

    Flat-Fee Legal Billing Can Liberate Attorneys

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    Replacing hourly billing with flat-fee arrangements, especially for appellate work, will leave attorneys feeling free to spend as much time as necessary to produce their highest quality work, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Spoliation Rule Remains Ambiguous Despite Amendments

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    Although the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended to provide a uniform standard of culpability for spoliation, cases with similar facts are still reaching differing results because the rule does not specify how a court should evaluate a party's intent, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton.

  • SEC's Fraud Enforcement Shows Quality, If Not Quantity

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    Over the course of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recently ended fiscal year, the regulator's Division of Enforcement fulfilled its promise to emphasize quality over quantity in cases alleging misrepresentations of financial performance by covering a wide swath of accounting, disclosure, internal control and auditor independence issues, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • New Regulatory Concerns For Behavioral Telehealth Providers

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    With demand for telebehavioral health services trending upward, regulators are paying more attention, but states' inconsistent legislation in this area has created some ambiguity for providers, says Amy Lerman of Epstein Becker.

  • 5 Trends Influencing RFPs For Law Firms

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    Requests for proposals, the standard tool of companies evaluating law firms, are becoming better suited to the legal industry, says Matthew Prinn of RFP Advisory Group.

  • SEPs In The Wake Of Qualcomm: 4 Defense Issues

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    As the recent Federal Trade Commission v. Qualcomm case demonstrates, standard-essential patents can present unique challenges, but by carefully establishing short-term and long-term strategies, SEP implementers can put themselves in a stronger position for defending against SEP enforcement, say attorneys at Sterne Kessler.

  • Ill. High Court Ruling Shows 3 Trends In Tech Crime Litigation

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent decision in Illinois v. Austin, in favor of protecting state citizens’ privacy rights, may shed light on how crime fueled by technology, such as the distribution of so-called revenge porn, will be addressed and litigated in the near future, says Mark Sableman of Thompson Coburn.

  • NPE Cases May Be Contrary To ITC's Mission

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    Recent cases at the U.S. International Trade Commission, involving the nonpracticing entities Neodron's and Data Scape's seeming attempts to force companies to pay higher patent fees and ban imports, suggest that the ITC may be straying from its core purpose of protecting domestic industries and consumers, says Derek Dahlgren of Rothwell Figg.