Telecommunications

  • June 29, 2022

    FCC Republican Calls On Smartphone Giants To Dump TikTok

    A Republican on the Federal Communications Commission called on Apple and Google to pull the TikTok app from smartphones after a deluge of reports laying out the Chinese-owned app's data-snooping risks to Americans.

  • June 29, 2022

    Eastman Drops Suit To Keep Cell Records From Jan. 6 Panel

    Embattled former Trump attorney John Eastman has dropped his lawsuit seeking to block the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection from obtaining his cellphone records.

  • June 29, 2022

    Feds Scrap Trade Secrets Case Against Ex-ADI Worker's Wife

    Federal prosecutors in Boston dismissed charges against the wife of a former Analog Devices Inc. engineer after the husband largely beat a case alleging he stole company trade secrets to jump-start his own computer chip business.

  • June 28, 2022

    11th Circ. Reverses Amazon's Win In Porn Biz Trademark Suit

    Amazon must face a jury trial over claims that its Fire TV video streaming device violates the trademark rights of the owner of porn streaming service FyreTV, the Eleventh Circuit ruled in a published opinion Tuesday.

  • June 28, 2022

    Google, Apple Want Consumer Search Conspiracy Suit Gone

    Google and Apple are fighting to toss a consumer suit from the same attorneys, and with virtually identical allegations, as a Google Search advertiser accusing Google of paying Apple not to produce its own search engine, arguing that the consumers in the latest case can't show harm from using a free product.

  • June 28, 2022

    House Bill Would Stop FCC From Weeding Out Cannabis Ads

    House lawmakers tacked language onto a Federal Communication Commission spending bill for next year to block the FCC from trying to prevent broadcasters from running ads for cannabis products in states with legalized marijuana.

  • June 28, 2022

    JPML Centralizes Cell Tech IP Suits Against Tesla, GM, Others

    Neo Wireless' cellular patent suits against several carmakers, including Tesla and General Motors, were transferred to the Eastern District of Michigan Tuesday after the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation determined centralization will streamline the related litigation and boost convenience.

  • June 28, 2022

    Broadband Projects Likely Face Severe Workforce Shortages

    An agency chief at the U.S. Department of Commerce heading up a $42.5 billion effort to deploy broadband told industry leaders Tuesday that workforce shortages raise one of the biggest obstacles to using the money efficiently.

  • June 28, 2022

    Ga. Panel Revives T-Mobile's $11M Equipment Tax Refund Bid

    The Georgia Court of Appeals vacated a trial court's decision Tuesday that wiped out a roughly $11 million sales tax refund for T-Mobile, saying the court applied the wrong standard of review in finding certain broadband network equipment taxable.

  • June 28, 2022

    CFIUS Probing Ericsson's $6.2B Vonage Buy

    Swedish telecommunications giant Ericsson disclosed Tuesday that national security officials are reviewing its plans to buy New Jersey-based internet phone company Vonage for an enterprise value of about $6.2 billion.

  • June 27, 2022

    Chancery Nixes Aerojet CEO's Bid For Neutral Counsel

    Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings Inc.'s board chairman will preside over an upcoming meeting where shareholders will vote for directors, the Delaware Chancery Court ruled Monday, rejecting a bid from the chair's rival, the company's CEO, for neutral counsel to conduct the meeting.

  • June 27, 2022

    Mich. City Official OK To Block Facebook Critic, 6th Circ. Says

    A city manager in Michigan who maintained a personal Facebook page that identified him as a public official did not violate a critic's constitutional rights by blocking him, a Sixth Circuit panel ruled Monday, saying that maintaining the page was not part of his job description.

  • June 27, 2022

    Investigators Not FLSA Exempt In OT Suit, 11th Circ. Says

    Investigators who examined damaged telecommunications infrastructure did not have sufficient control over their business operations to be considered overtime-exempt administrative employees, the Eleventh Circuit held Monday.

  • June 27, 2022

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    The Delaware Chancery Court drew a step closer last week to filling an empty seat on the bench, a debt maven fought for control of a cosmetics company, and new cases came in involving cryptocurrency, building products, business software, and of course, private equity. Here's your weekly roundup of news from Delaware's Chancery Court.

  • June 27, 2022

    Apple Rival Blasted For 'Defective And Unnecessary' Brief

    A California federal judge took a would-be Apple App Store competitor to task for a "procedurally defective" bid to tweak a ruling that tossed chunks of its monopolization lawsuit over Apple policies locking rivals out of the iPhone.

  • June 27, 2022

    Federal Agencies Ink Deal To Tout Broadband Funding

    The Federal Communications Commission has reached a deal with a federal grantmaking agency to trumpet the availability of funds to develop broadband in areas that need better coverage around the U.S.

  • June 27, 2022

    Google Fights App Users' Class Cert. Bid In Antitrust Row

    A month after announcing a settlement to resolve app developers' antitrust claims, Google wants to escape allegations that its policies inflate the cost of apps on its Play Store, accusing a group of consumers seeking class certification of "misconstruing evidence and brushing aside competitive realities."

  • June 27, 2022

    Cable Group Wants Retransmission Conditions On Tegna Deal

    A major cable TV trade group has called on the Federal Communications Commission to prevent Tegna's potential new owners from wielding too much leverage in broadcast retransmission talks if their proposed $8.6 billion takeover of the broadcasting giant succeeds.

  • June 27, 2022

    Justices Sit Out Apple's PTAB Standing Saga

    Justices on the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal from Apple on the issue of standing to appeal Patent Trial and Appeal Board rulings, even though the case had received endorsement from tech companies and lawmakers including Sen. Patrick Leahy.

  • June 27, 2022

    AT&T Says $450M Phone Sharing IP Suit Is 6 Years Too Late

    AT&T Inc. has urged a New York federal judge to reject a patent-holding company's $450 million infringement suit over phone number sharing technology, arguing that the suit is too stale and that the patent covers nothing more than an abstract idea.

  • June 24, 2022

    Dems Call For FTC Probe Of Mobile Tracking By Apple, Google

    Four members of Congress on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate how Apple and Google track mobile phone users, saying they're particularly concerned about third parties' ability to access this location data in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.  

  • June 24, 2022

    DOJ Approves Dish And T-Mobile's Network Shutdown Deal

    The U.S. Department of Justice has signed off on an agreement between T-Mobile and Dish that updates the terms related to Dish's use of the telecommunications giant's wireless network, the companies indicated in Thursday filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • June 24, 2022

    Broadcaster Outcry Intensifies Over Rising FCC Reg Fees

    Broadcasters have long complained they foot too much of the bill for the Federal Communications Commission's operations, but when the agency unveiled its plan to pay for its 2022 budget, including new fees on regulated industries, the complaints were hotter than usual.

  • June 24, 2022

    Judge Asks DOJ If Meadows Is Immune From Jan. 6 Subpoena

    A D.C. federal judge is seeking clarity from the U.S. Department of Justice whether former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows is entitled to any level of immunity from a subpoena issued by the House select committee investigating last year's deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol.

  • June 24, 2022

    FCC Chair 'Committed' To Return Of Net Neutrality

    The head of the Federal Communications Commission said Friday that she fully backs a reinstatement of net neutrality rules that passed during the Obama era but that a Republican-led commission later repealed.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Now's The Time To Address Archaic Law School Curricula

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    With law school enrollments jumping significantly ahead of a potential recession and more students graduating than the market can absorb, law schools should turn to creative solutions to teach students how to negotiate, work with clients, specialize and use technology to practice their craft more efficiently, says University of Colorado adjunct professor Jason Mendelson.

  • The Unique Nature Of COVID-Era Patent Procurement Trends

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    Data shows the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting patent procurement differently than past financial crises, with newly filed applications slowing in number while pending applications are maintained and not abandoned, say Michael Sartori and Sarah Hassan at Baker Botts.

  • Lessons From Lawyer Fee-Sharing Agreements Gone Wrong

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    The recent fee-sharing dispute between Edelson and Girardi Keese is a reminder that lawyers who do not strictly follow the applicable rules may risk a disciplinary complaint, lose their share of the fee, or wind up in costly litigation with co-counsel, says David Grossbaum at Hinshaw.

  • LeClairRyan Bankruptcy Highlights Pass-Through Tax Issue

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    A Virginia bankruptcy court's recent ruling in the case of defunct law firm LeClairRyan shows there may be serious tax consequences for pass-through entity partners who give up their ownership interest without following operating agreement exit provisions and updating bankruptcy court filings, say Edward Schnitzer and Hannah Travaglini at Montgomery McCracken.

  • Enforcement Trends To Watch After SEP Remedies Withdrawal

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    Patent holders and implementers will need to consider several key issues in light of the new case-by-case federal enforcement stance following the withdrawal of the 2019 policy statement on standard-essential patents and the recent decision not to implement a new policy statement, say Alexander Okuliar and John Lanham at MoFo.

  • 8 Steps To Creating A Legal Ops Technology Road Map

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    Legal departments struggling to find and implement the right technologies for their operations should consider creating a road map that summarizes their approach to technology changes, provides clearly defined metrics for success, and serves as the single source of truth for stakeholders, says Melanie Shafer at SimpleLegal.

  • Awaiting Critical Bankruptcy Decision For Surety Industry

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    The recent oral argument in Argonaut Insurance v. Falcon V offers the Fifth Circuit an opportunity to create a rule for multilateral contracts in bankruptcy and exposed the common misconception that a surety assumes the risk of the principal's nonperformance when it issues a bond, say Lisa Tancredi at Womble Bond and Laura Murphy at Travelers.

  • The Importance Of Data And Data Analysis In Litigation

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    Understanding, analyzing and effectively presenting large data sets is an increasingly important skill in litigation as it allows plaintiffs to dramatically scale up the scope of cases and is often critical to defeating motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment, says David Burnett at Motley Rice.

  • Suits Against Google Signal Increased 'Dark Patterns' Scrutiny

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    Recent lawsuits brought against Google by attorneys general in multiple states illustrate a growing trend of pushback against dark patterns — design tricks that harmfully manipulate consumer behavior — so companies should ensure their current and future marketing practices do not put them at risk, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Navigating The Void Left By Withdrawn SEP Policy Statement

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    While the withdrawal of the 2019 policy statement on standard-essential patents and the decision not to implement a new policy statement leave both SEP holders and implementers without guidance as to how the agencies will view these disputes, we can gain some insights by examining how we got here, says Ryan Richardson at Sterne Kessler.

  • How Cos. Can Track Infrastructure Act Projects — And Funds

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    As federal funds from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act begin to flow to thousands of infrastructure projects across the nation, savvy contractors can determine which types of funded projects are likely to offer the best opportunities, and then follow the flow of federal money into those projects, says Nena Lenz at Fredrikson & Byron.

  • Steps Companies Can Take To Mitigate Privilege Labeling Risk

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    Although Google prevailed on a recent privilege labeling sanctions motion, an important takeaway from the decision is that companies should assess their in-house procedures and employee training programs regarding privileged communications to mitigate risks of the potential appearance of bad faith privilege claims, say Gareth Evans at Redgrave and e-discovery attorney James Hertsch.

  • What Litigation Funding Disclosure In Delaware May Look Like

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    A standing order issued by Delaware's chief federal judge requiring litigants to disclose whether their cases or defenses are being financed by third parties is unlikely to have onerous effects but may raise questions regarding potential conflicts of interest and access to justice, say Cayse Llorens and Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

  • How In-House Legal Leaders Can Drive Corporate Growth

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    Today, more executives are seeking legal leaders who are strategic, adaptable thinkers, making it essential that in-house counsel get out of their comfort zone of legal advice and take several steps to contribute toward revenue growth and raise their profile, says Tim Parilla at LinkSquares.

  • Attorneys Should Tread Carefully On Job Counteroffers

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    Promises of more compensation to keep attorneys from leaving their jobs have become commonplace in today's hot job market, but lawyers should weigh their options carefully as accepting a counteroffer can negatively affect their reputation, says Leeron Molloy at VOYlegal.

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