Telecommunications

  • August 07, 2020

    COVID-19 IP Catch-Up: Remdesivir Drama & Jury Trial Regret

    In this round of intellectual property updates tied to the ongoing pandemic, attorneys general put pressure on the federal government to make COVID-19 drugs more accessible, patent trials in Texas remain in the air, and one attorney expresses guilt for proceeding with an in-person jury trial.

  • August 07, 2020

    Broadband Scarcity Looms Over Virtual School Year

    As school districts hammer out plans to hold fall classes partially or fully online, educators and regulators are scrambling to get as many students connected to the internet as possible, highlighting the ongoing connectivity divide that threatens to further disadvantage low-income and rural learners.

  • August 07, 2020

    4th Circ. Sends TCPA Claims Against DirecTV To Arbitration

    The Fourth Circuit said Friday that a West Virginia woman must arbitrate claims that DirecTV violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act because she is bound by a contract she signed with AT&T before it acquired the satellite TV provider.

  • August 07, 2020

    TikTok Is The Tip Of The Iceberg For CFIUS' Data Concerns

    The daily commotion over TikTok is captivating, but attorneys should be aware of the bigger picture, which includes an aggressive stance from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States on personal data and increasingly heightened tensions between the U.S. and China.

  • August 07, 2020

    1st Circ. Says Citizens Can't Intervene In T-Mobile Fight

    The First Circuit upheld a lower court decision Friday that blocked two local residents of a coastal Massachusetts town from intervening in a case over a T-Mobile antenna installation in a church steeple, ruling that their local government represented the views of the concerned citizens adequately.

  • August 07, 2020

    DC Circ. Breathes New Life Into Copyright Royalty Hike Fight

    The D.C. Circuit doesn't completely see eye to eye with the Copyright Royalty Board's choice to hike the rates that streaming services must pay songwriters and publishers, but exactly how much it disagrees isn't clear — the panel sealed its Friday opinion vacating part of the ruling.

  • August 07, 2020

    Class Of 250,000 Workers Gets OK In AT&T 401(k) Fee Suit

    An ERISA suit accusing AT&T Services Inc. of wasting its workers' retirement savings on unreasonable fees and engaging in prohibited transactions will move forward as a class action after a California federal judge gave her blessing to a nearly 250,000-member class.

  • August 07, 2020

    Taxation With Representation: Wachtell, Skadden, Latham

    In this week's Taxation With Representation, Marathon Petroleum sells Speedway in a $21 billion deal, Teladoc Health and Livongo ink a $18.5 billion merger, and a $16.3 billion Siemens buy creates the world's biggest cancer care provider.

  • August 07, 2020

    Sony, Others Look To Revive Pirating Claim At 11th Circ.

    A host of music labels want the Eleventh Circuit to take a look at a ruling last month that trimmed their suit against telecommunications company Bright House Networks over its alleged failure to curb internet subscribers' pirating activity, according to a filing Thursday.

  • August 07, 2020

    Sinclair Investors Get Initial OK For $25M Failed Merger Deal

    A Maryland federal judge has given the initial nod to a deal worth nearly $25 million between Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. and shareholders that would end allegations the media giant botched a $3.9 billion merger with Tribune Media Co.

  • August 07, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen a U.K. insurance technology company take aim at PwC after an acquisition went south, a major cruise line sue to curb travelers' insurance claims, and the U.K.'s criminal investigator file for civil recovery from a real estate company. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • August 06, 2020

    Trump Order To Ban 'Transactions' With TikTok Co. In 45 Days

    President Donald Trump signed executive orders Thursday night that could ban all "transactions" with the owners of the popular Chinese short-form video app TikTok and social media platform WeChat, citing national security concerns.

  • August 06, 2020

    Apple, Intel Renew Fortress Patent Claims In Amended Suit

    Apple and Intel have filed a new and far more detailed complaint in California federal court in order to ease a judge's concerns that their original lawsuit was overly vague, accusing Fortress Investment Group LLC of orchestrating an anti-competitive patent aggregation scheme.

  • August 06, 2020

    Liberty Broadband To Buy Telecom Co., Evite Owner For $8.7B

    Spectrum shareholder Liberty Broadband said Thursday it has agreed to purchase GCI Liberty, the parent company for Alaska's largest communications provider and digital event planner Evite, in a stock-for-stock transaction that values GCI Liberty at $8.7 billion, with guidance from Morris, Baker Botts, Skadden and Debevoise.

  • August 06, 2020

    Lenovo Attacks DOJ Brief In InterDigital Case As Unhelpful

    Lenovo has pushed back against a Justice Department statement supporting InterDigital in a licensing dispute over standard-essential patents, arguing that attacks on its antitrust allegations merely reflect what the agency's leadership wants the law to be.

  • August 06, 2020

    Senate Clears Bill Banning TikTok From Gov't Devices

    The U.S. Senate passed legislation banning the use of the TikTok video app on government devices Thursday, as lawmakers ratcheted up pressure on Chinese technology firms allegedly tied to China's Communist Party.

  • August 06, 2020

    Canada Clears WESCO's $4.5B Anixter Deal With Conditions

    WESCO International Inc. cut a deal with Canada's competition enforcer Thursday to unload a pair of businesses in order to address concerns raised by the company's $4.5 billion purchase of Anixter International Inc.

  • August 06, 2020

    Android Users Accuse Google Of Spying To Build Next TikTok

    Google LLC is monitoring Android smartphone users without their knowledge and harvesting their data, which the search giant intends to use to create a competitor to the short-form video app TikTok, according to a putative privacy class action filed in California federal court Wednesday.

  • August 06, 2020

    FCC's Starks Fears Mobile Cos. Still Slacking On Data Privacy

    If AT&T or Verizon had a role in the auctioning off of any of the so-called bidstream data that allowed a consumer data firm to track Black Lives Matter protesters, the Federal Communications Commission's Geoffrey Starks wants to know about it.

  • August 06, 2020

    OECD To Consider Exemptions For New Tax System In Report

    An international consortium of tax officials negotiating a new global taxing system will consider whether to remove prescription drugs from the scope of taxation, as well as an expanded list of exemptions including fishing and agriculture, financial technology and shipping.

  • August 06, 2020

    FCC's Carr Welcomes Input On Trump's Social Media Order

    The only member of the Federal Communications Commission to speak in favor of President Donald Trump's call to crack down on perceived social media bias said Thursday that he's looking forward to hearing public input when his agency takes up the issue.

  • August 06, 2020

    FCC Expands Authority To Regulate, Lower Prison Call Rates

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday asked for public input on an effort to rein in the rates prisons and jails may charge for out-of-state calls and also declared that it has authority to cap ancillary fees that further jack up prisoners' phone bills.

  • August 06, 2020

    Charter Sues Va. Tax Chief Over Right-Of-Way Fees

    A regional Charter unit is taking the Virginia tax commissioner to federal court over public right-of-way fees that the company claims are superseded by federal law, arguing that the levy causes double-dipping because Charter already pays franchise fees to the Old Dominion.

  • August 06, 2020

    FCC Dem Warns C-Band Framework Creates New Problems

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday set auction procedures for its upcoming mid-band spectrum auction, but one agency Democrat warned that the massive airwaves sale scheduled for December still faces very real hurdles.

  • August 06, 2020

    Philips Seeks Info On TCL Sales in Phone Patent Battle

    Philips urged a London judge Thursday to order TCL Corp. to provide information on its worldwide sales so it can begin to assess financial damages for its infringement claims.

Expert Analysis

  • Unusual TikTok Review Calls CFIUS Processes Into Question

    Author Photo

    The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States has departed from established processes in its national security investigation of TikTok, with comments from across the Trump administration casting doubt on the interagency committee's confidentiality, apolitical nature and focus, says Paul Marquardt at Cleary.

  • Rebuttal

    Most Courts Follow 1st Circ. Generic-Delay Ruling's Standard

    Author Photo

    Contrary to a recent Law360 guest article arguing that most courts have criticized or rejected the First Circuit's reversal of class certification in the 2018 Asacol pay-for-delay cases, most courts have in fact followed it, recognizing that precedent requires serious scrutiny of plaintiffs' proposed proof, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • Analyzing Upward And Downward Trends In Legal Tech

    Author Photo

    Advances in legal technology are often accompanied by bombastic overstatements, but it is important to separate the wheat from the chaff by looking at where various technologies stand on the hype curve, says Lance Eliot at Stanford Law School.

  • Opinion

    ABA's New Guidance On Litigation Funding Misses The Mark

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association should revise its recently approved best practices on third-party litigation funding as they do not reflect how legal finance actually works and could create confusion among lawyers, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • 3 Cases Spotlight Shareholder Interest In Public Co. Diversity

    Author Photo

    Recent derivative claims filed in a California federal court over diversity and inclusion shortcomings at Oracle, Facebook and Qualcomm demonstrate shareholder willingness to hold directors and officers accountable for public companies' failure to deliver on environmental, social and governance commitments, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • New IT Restrictions For Gov't Contractors Bring M&A Hurdles

    Author Photo

    Prohibitions taking effect next week on the use of certain Chinese telecommunications technology by government contractors will have an immediate impact on M&A involving companies that do business with the federal government, and will require prospective buyers' careful consideration in four areas, say attorneys at Covington.

  • What Firms Should Ask Before Hiring Attorneys From Gov't

    Author Photo

    In the final year of any presidential administration, there is an undeniable appetite on the part of large law firms for government-savvy legal talent, but firms need to first consider how they will actually utilize their new star hire, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • The Ethics Of Using Chatbots For Legal Services

    Author Photo

    Delegating legal work to robots involves several risks, including running afoul of statutes dictating unauthorized practice of law, but with the right precautions, law firms can lawfully employ artificially intelligent chatbots that can imitate human conversations, say attorneys at Haynes and Boone.

  • Market Rebound May Curb Securities Class Actions, Damages

    Author Photo

    The stock market's dramatic recovery from its pandemic-prompted plunge may provide securities class action defendants an opportunity to rely on the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act’s rarely invoked bounce-back provision to ward off stock-drop claims, or sharply limit available damages, say John Schreiber and John Tschirgi at Winston & Strawn.

  • Opinion

    ABA Must Seize Opportunity To Respond To Bar Exam Chaos

    Author Photo

    The challenges of administering bar exams this year have put the future of the profession in jeopardy, but the American Bar Association at its ongoing annual meeting can adopt a resolution that would urge jurisdictions to take emergency actions with respect to licensure of new attorneys, says Nicholas Allard, former president of Brooklyn Law School.

  • Opinion

    Recent Decisions Helpfully Narrow TCPA Scope

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court's recent Telephone Consumer Protection Act decision in Gerrard v. Acara Solutions adds to a growing line of cases holding that phone calls or text messages related to offers of employment may not be directly subject to the harsher provisions of the TCPA, says Myriah Jaworski at Beckage.

  • How High Court IPR Time-Bar Ruling Affects PTAB Practice

    Author Photo

    Given the uncertainty surrounding the scope of the U.S. Supreme Court's holding in Thryv v. Click-to-Call, that Patent Trial and Appeal Board rulings on inter partes review timeliness cannot be appealed, parties should effectively argue procedural bars — or risk losing IPRs, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • How Pandemic Is Affecting The Pace Of Judicial Opinions

    Author Photo

    The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way judges work, but how has it impacted the volume of work product they generate? Ben Strawn and Omeed Azmoudeh at Davis Graham investigate using data from the PACER federal courts registry.

  • Trade Secret Litigation Is Poised To Take Off Amid Downturn

    Author Photo

    Companies can expect an explosion in trade secret claims amid the current economic downturn due to robust trade secret laws that favor plaintiffs, pandemic-related workplace changes and the need to address lawsuits urgently, says Patrick Dempsey at Therium.

  • High Court TCPA Case May Curb Robocall Class Actions

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently granted certiorari in a Telephone Consumer Protection Act case, Facebook v. Duguid, that has the potential to transform the statutory definition of autodialer and make it much more difficult for plaintiffs to prevail in robocall cases, says David Poell at Sheppard Mullin.

Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!