We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Telecommunications

  • May 17, 2019

    Structural Remedies In Spotlight In Facebook Privacy Probe

    In the wake of Facebook's revelation that it expects to pay a multibillion-dollar fine to resolve the Federal Trade Commission's pending probe of its privacy practices, experts mull what the agency should include in a settlement for it to truly have teeth.

  • May 17, 2019

    Calif. Man Who Threatened FCC Chair's Kids Gets 1.5 Years

    A California man who threatened to kill the children of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai was sentenced Friday morning to 20 months in prison, the U.S. Department of Justice has announced.

  • May 17, 2019

    Group Questions T-Mobile's Lifeline Pledge, Drawbacks

    In a letter to the Federal Communications Commission Thursday, an Oklahoma phone company expressed doubt that T-Mobile would maintain a commitment to the Lifeline program for low-income consumers, citing the company’s track record of limited participation.

  • May 17, 2019

    Call Blocking May Come With Cost, Advocacy Org Cautions

    A Federal Communications Commission plan to allow carriers to block robocalls could mean those carriers could pass along charges for the blocking services, whether customers want it or not, an advocacy group said Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Rep. Asks FCC's Pai To Clarify Whether He 'Withheld' Info

    Rep. Anna Eshoo has demanded that the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission share information about a probe into mobile location tracking with his Democratic colleagues and suggested he correct statements that portrayed he didn’t know of their requests.

  • May 17, 2019

    FCC Challenger Loses At DC Circ. Over One-Day Delay

    A Hawaii-based telecom carrier appealed a subsidy dispute with the Federal Communications Commission one day too late, the D.C. Circuit ruled Friday, leading the agency's general counsel to call out the incident as a cautionary tale for attorneys.

  • May 17, 2019

    PG Rating For 'Dating Naked' Show Not Clear To FCC Either

    The oversight board that issues TV parental ratings needs to better explain how a show with constant nudity like "Dating Naked" gets the same PG rating as a show with mild innuendo like "The Big Bang Theory," the Federal Communications Commission advised after considering complaints from unhappy parents and concerned organizations.

  • May 17, 2019

    Broadband Mapping Bill Reflects Cable Group's Strategy

    A bipartisan group of senators have proposed a "more granular" approach to mapping the nationwide availability of broadband service in a bill that appears to mirror a strategy already floated by the cable industry.

  • May 17, 2019

    Texas Justices Side With Time Warner In Utility Fees Row

    The Texas Supreme Court said Friday that San Antonio's municipal utility charged discriminatory utility pole attachment fees to Time Warner Cable Texas LLC by collecting lower fees from AT&T Inc. despite billing both companies the same price for access.

  • May 16, 2019

    Trump's Telecom Salvos Plunge China Talks Into The Unknown

    The prospects for a sweeping U.S.-China trade deal were looking dim even before President Donald Trump dealt a pair of blows to Beijing's mighty telecom sector on Wednesday, a move that injected even more uncertainty into the already-fraught negotiations.

  • May 16, 2019

    Industry Must Push FCC To Fix TCPA Litigation Mess: O'Rielly

    While the Federal Communications Commission is keenly aware of the class action litigation "mess" that has been caused by widespread uncertainty over how to interpret the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, businesses "caught up in the TCPA spider web" need to step up pressure on the agency to act, Commissioner Michael O'Rielly urged Thursday.

  • May 16, 2019

    Network Security 'Emergency' Order Clouds Telecom Plans

    A new executive order from the Trump administration intended to shore up security vulnerabilities in communications networks writes a blank check to the U.S. Department of Commerce that can be used to target a host of technologies, countries and carriers, and its broad language has left many in industry unclear on how it will affect their business.

  • May 16, 2019

    Canada Says National Wireless Giants May Need More Rivals

    Canada is mulling a controversial regulatory change under which its major wireless players would share their networks with smaller operators, and the country’s antitrust authority advised Thursday that the move might drum up competition and lower prices, but also come with serious drawbacks.

  • May 16, 2019

    Carriers Tell FCC They've Stopped Selling Location Data

    Four of the country's largest phone companies, AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon, told the Federal Communications Commission in letters made public Thursday that they have stopped selling customers' location data to third-party companies and that the data would not be sold in the future.

  • May 16, 2019

    Dems Unveil Infrastructure Plan With Broadband Focus

    Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee want to put $40 billion toward expanding internet access across the country as part of a $120 billion-plus infrastructure bill they've proposed.

  • May 16, 2019

    Ill. Atty Should Be Suspended Over Fake Docs, Panel Affirms

    An Illinois attorney conduct review panel on Wednesday upheld a four-month suspension recommendation for a lawyer accused of falsifying two agreements related to new cellphone towers a client wanted to build downstate.

  • May 16, 2019

    House's Clyburn Forms Task Force On Rural Broadband

    House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., formally announced the creation of a new rural broadband task force Thursday in an attempt to help close the digital divide that continues to plague large parts of rural America.

  • May 15, 2019

    Ore. Rep. Fears 'Unregulated' App World May Hurt Consumers

    Rep. Greg Walden expressed alarm Wednesday at one side effect of crackdowns on companies that sell intimate location data from cell phones, suggesting that parties seeking such data will now rely on the largely unregulated app ecosystem.

  • May 15, 2019

    Telecom Cos.' Claims Over 911 Call Fee Cap Must Go To Trial

    AT&T and other telecom companies' counterclaims against a South Carolina county, arguing that federal law caps the number of emergency call fees a business must pay per month, must be determined at trial, a South Carolina federal judge has ruled.

  • May 15, 2019

    Whistleblower Says Dish Can't Exit $3.3B Bidding Credit Suit

    Dish Network shouldn’t be allowed to duck a suit accusing it of using sham companies to buy spectrum from the Federal Communications Commission at a $3.3 billion discount, a whistleblower has told a D.C. federal court, saying its defense is “predicated on a myth."

Expert Analysis

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

    Author Photo

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

    Author Photo

    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • High Court Clarifies Standards For Antitrust Claims

    Author Photo

    The primary practical implication of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling Monday in Apple v. Pepper is that the court's Illinois Brick precedent remains an obstacle to federal antitrust claims for damages, but that its scope arguably has been limited, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

    Author Photo

    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • What's At Stake In Battle Over TCPA Constitutionality

    Author Photo

    As courts across the country grapple with whether the Telephone Consumer Protection Act passes First Amendment scrutiny, the eventual outcome is likely to permanently shift the contours of free speech jurisprudence, one way or another, say Eric Troutman and Petrina McDaniel of Squire Patton Boggs.

  • State Net

    State Lawmakers Stepping Up Fight Against Insurance Fraud

    Author Photo

    Insurance fraud costs insurers and their policyholders tens of billions of dollars a year. With insurance fraud-related bills introduced in 40 states and enacted in 14 so far this year, state lawmakers seem to agree with the industry that fraud is a major problem, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

    Author Photo

    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • Opinion

    NAFTA Update A Step Backward For US Investors

    Author Photo

    Under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, U.S. investors would lose the robust international law protections and dispute resolution mechanisms that they have relied on for years in the North American Free Trade Agreement, say Ian Laird and Melissa Morris of Crowell & Moring.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

    Author Photo

    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

    Author Photo

    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.