Telecommunications

  • May 03, 2022

    FCC 'Tax' Critics See Hope In Courts' Nondelegation Revival

    Opponents of Congress' move decades ago directing the Federal Communications Commission to levy fees on phone companies to pay for telecom subsidies think the comeback of nondelegation doctrine in the courts could boost the chances of finally eliminating the charges.

  • May 03, 2022

    Qualcomm Settles Trade Secrets Suit Against Ex-Engineer

    Qualcomm Technologies Inc. has informed a California federal judge that it settled a trade secrets suit against a former engineer, resolving claims that he swiped confidential company know-how for a rival technology developer.

  • May 03, 2022

    Fed. Circ. Upholds PTAB Ax Of Sipco Patent

    The Federal Circuit has affirmed Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions to throw out numerous claims in a wireless communication device patent owned by a small patent licensing company called Sipco.

  • May 03, 2022

    Dish Wants Out Of Workers' Retirement Plan Fee Suit

    Dish Network urged a Colorado federal court to throw out a proposed class action lodged by former employees who claim the satellite television company saddled their 401(k) plan with excessive fees and risky investment options, arguing the suit simply rehashed claims made against other employers.

  • May 02, 2022

    Chancery Sends $55B Time Warner-Charter Deal Suit To Trial

    A nearly seven-year-old stockholder challenge to the $55 billion Charter Communications Inc.–Time Warner Cable Inc. merger in 2015 survived summary judgment challenges in Delaware's Chancery Court on Monday, with a vice chancellor finding sufficient evidence to justify going to trial on claims that a majority of the board of directors lacked independence in the deal.

  • May 02, 2022

    DC Wants Challenge Of FCC Internet Subsidy Use Booted

    The District of Columbia argued in federal court that a North Virginia telecom lacks jurisdiction to level claims the district skirted federal law when tapping one of its own agencies to provide network services for area public schools over the incumbent contractor.

  • May 02, 2022

    EU Alleges Apple Pay Locks Out Mobile Wallet Competitors

    European Union antitrust officials accused Apple on Monday of illegally locking out would-be competitors to Apple Pay on iPhones, kickstarting an enforcement proceeding based on company policies barring external access to the technology that powers "tap and go" payments.

  • May 02, 2022

    State Telecom Roundup: ISP Privacy Across The Country

    The Federal Trade Commission issued a report last year finding that internet service providers have been amassing and using their customers' information for much more than their clients agreed to, and many state legislatures are seeking to rein in ISP data practices, though almost all their efforts are in the early stages.

  • May 02, 2022

    FCC On Verge Of Settling Long-Running Racial Bias Suit

    A settlement has been reached in a suit by a Black attorney adviser who said the Federal Communications Commission passed her up for a promotion because of her race, but details are still being worked out, a Washington, D.C., federal judge heard Monday.

  • May 02, 2022

    High Court Wants To Hear More About Lanham Act's Reach

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday it wants to hear the Biden administration's take on the jurisdictional reach of U.S. trademark law, indicating some interest in an appeal over a $113 million jury verdict that an Oklahoma maker of radio control systems for construction equipment won in a trademark case against its former business partners in Europe.

  • April 29, 2022

    FBI Made 3.4M Warrantless US Data Searches, Report Says

    The FBI last year carried out nearly 3.4 million warrantless searches of Americans' electronic data that was collected as part of the federal government's foreign surveillance activities, the head of the intelligence community revealed in a report issued Friday. 

  • April 29, 2022

    ​​​​​​​Hagens Berman Wins $26.9M In Fees In Apple Warranty Row

    A California federal judge Friday awarded Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP nearly $27 million in attorney fees for reaching a $95 million settlement with Apple Inc. resolving claims the tech giant failed to honor warranties for iPhones and iPads.

  • April 29, 2022

    Wi-LAN Must Pay $4.1M In Atty Fees In Video Patent Suit

    Patent licensing firm Wi-LAN must hand over $4 million in attorney fees to Sharp and Vizio for dragging out two Delaware federal patent suits against the electronics makers over video display systems.

  • April 29, 2022

    ITC Launches Probe Into Lenovo, Motorola Mobile Imports

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has started an investigation into Motorola-branded smartphone imports that are accused of infringing Maxell patents for touchpad and digital display technology.

  • April 29, 2022

    Philips' 3G Licensing Case Flops At Int'l Trade Commission

    A U.S. International Trade Commission judge has rejected efforts by Philips to take its legal bid to secure licenses for standard essential patents to the trade body, handing a win to Thales and other major importers of wireless modules.

  • April 29, 2022

    Lenovo Wants Changes To FCC's Plan For 60 GHz Band

    Lenovo is warning the Federal Communications Commission that it is "gravely concerned" about the agency's plans to update the rules governing the use of the 60 GHz band, saying that as proposed they would be bad news for virtual reality technology.

  • April 29, 2022

    Don't Miss It: Kirkland, Gibson Dunn Guide Week's Hot Deals

    With so much mergers and acquisitions news this week, you may have missed several deals announced in the last several days helmed by firms such as Kirkland & Ellis LLP and Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • April 29, 2022

    Epic Wants Play Store Changes Blocked To Protect Music App

    Epic Games asked a California federal court to protect its newly acquired online record store app Bandcamp from a coming Google expansion of Android apps required to use its Play Store payment system, warning that Google's mandatory commissions and other policies would badly damage Bandcamp.

  • April 29, 2022

    Feds Name Names In Case Against Ex-Motorola Engineers

    A federal court in Illinois has unsealed the names of the former Motorola engineers the government has accused of leaving their jobs for a Chinese rival and taking some source code and hardware designs with them, though prosecutors note they haven't been able to locate all of them yet.

  • April 29, 2022

    Schools, Libraries Oppose Changes To FCC Bid Process

    A large group representing schools and libraries has urged the Federal Communications Commission to abandon planned changes to a competitive bidding process for securing government connectivity funds, saying the changes would discourage bidders.

  • April 29, 2022

    Insurer Seeks Win In Sewage Exposure Coverage Suit

    Separate bacteria and pollution exclusions unambiguously foreclose coverage for a worker's claims that sewage exposure caused his severe infection, Berkley National Insurance Co. told a Massachusetts federal court, demanding full recovery of defense and settlement costs from two companies it agreed to defend per a reservation of rights.

  • April 29, 2022

    Attys Seek $5M Cut Of Buccaneers Junk Fax Settlement

    The legal team that got the Tampa Bay Buccaneers to settle a decade-old Telephone Consumer Protection Act class action for $19.75 million in March says it rolled the dice on the risky litigation and should be awarded fees and costs totaling more than $5 million.

  • April 29, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a sticky trademark case over honey, Google hit with a privacy lawsuit over British medical records, and EY sued over its audit work by the administrators of a health company. 

  • April 29, 2022

    Law360's 2022 Telecommunications Editorial Advisory Board

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2022 Telecommunications Editorial Advisory Board.

  • April 29, 2022

    InterDigital Can't Appeal Invalidation Of UK Wireless Patent

    A judge refused on Friday to allow InterDigital to appeal a decision invalidating one of its wireless technology patents, repeating his earlier conclusion that it lacks novelty.

Expert Analysis

  • How Attorneys Can Ethically Terminate A Client Relationship

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    As illustrated by Dentons’ recent request to withdraw from its representation of a casino mogul in Bartlit Beck v. Okada, terminating client relationships prematurely can be tricky and met with skepticism in the courts, but following certain best practices can make the process a little less painful for everyone involved, says Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight.

  • China's Strict Scrutiny Of Semiconductor Deals May Intensify

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    Chinese scrutiny of competition in its economically crucial semiconductor industry can be more stringent than that of the EU and U.S., a trend that is expected to continue and even intensify, and recent remedy cases offer some key insights for companies currently under merger review, say attorneys at Tian Yuan.

  • Navigating EU Sanctions Blocking After Bank Melli V. Telekom

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    The European Union Court of Justice’s Bank Melli v. Telekom decision portends more stringent enforcement of the EU sanctions blocking statute as the Office of Foreign Assets Control expands its extraterritorial reach — so companies with both U.S. and EU nexus should make sure they understand their conflicting obligations, says Kevin Gaunt at Hunton.

  • The Key To Turning Solid Briefs Into Winning Briefs

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    Even a well-written brief can omit key facts, make tone-deaf legal arguments or ignore practical implications, so lawyers drafting motions and appeals should incorporate feedback processes akin to moot courts and jury research, says Andrew Nichols at Charis Lex.

  • Walter Dellinger's Little-Known, Outsize Impact On Legal Aid

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    The late Walter Dellinger’s pro bono work distinguishes him forever, but his greatest moment involved a little-known U.S. Supreme Court case, Brown v. Legal Foundation of Washington, which helped preserve one of the largest sources of legal aid funding — and Dellinger’s arguments were as magical as the program he helped save, says David Lash at O'Melveny.

  • Why I'll Miss Arguing Before Justice Breyer

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    Carter Phillips at Sidley shares some of his fondest memories of retiring Justice Stephen Breyer both inside and out of the courtroom, and explains why he thinks the justice’s multipronged questions during U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments were everything an advocate could ask for.

  • What To Expect From FTC Unfair, Deceptive Acts Rule Plans

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently announced its intent to begin three new rulemakings on unfair or deceptive acts or practices, potentially establishing a framework to expand its regulatory and enforcement leverage, so nearly every business operating in interstate commerce should take steps to prepare, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Recent Rulings Show Lawyer Criticism Of Judges Is Perilous

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    Although many lawyers may believe the First Amendment broadly protects their opinions and good faith criticism of judges, recent sanctions decisions from courts across the country suggest lawyers are at greater risk of discipline for criticizing judges than they have been in the past, says John Harris at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Breyer's Role In Courthouse Design Sets A Judicial Template

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    As U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer prepares to retire, his pivotal role two decades ago in the design of the award-winning John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse in Boston demonstrates how the judiciary can engage in civic architecture and specifically the design of courthouses, says Kate Diamond at HDR.

  • Suit Over Google Design Tricks Hints At New Liability Frontier

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    A recent lawsuit filed by the D.C. attorney general in state court, alleging that Google used so-called "dark patterns" to deceive users into sharing geolocation data, signals greater liability over online product design, so attorneys should mitigate risk by proactively embedding themselves in their clients' businesses, products and services, says Wayne Unger at Gilson Daub.

  • What Commerce's Anti-Dumping Rules Mean For Importers

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    The U.S. Department of Commerce's recent updates to its anti-dumping and countervailing duty regulations could potentially accelerate scope and circumvention determination timelines, which is laudable but also raises some questions and concerns for importers and their counsel, say William Isasi and Cynthia Galvez at Covington.

  • Opinion

    Time To Nix Antitrust Policies That Fueled Blocked Nvidia Deal

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    Antitrust authorities were wise to block Nvidia's purchase of Arm Holdings, but if regulators want to deter future consolidation in the wireless communications industry, they shouldn’t revive policies that endanger the viability of licensing-based business models, says Jonathan Barnett at the University of Southern California.

  • How To Comply With New Multiline Telephone System Rules

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    For organizations with multiline telephone systems, certain considerations can ease compliance with new legislation enhancing 911 emergency services requirements despite a number of complex new issues, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • 3 Safe Passages To Avoid Sanctions Double Binds

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    The Court of Justice of the European Union's recent judgment in Bank Melli v. Telekom Deutschland shines light on safe passages through which businesses may navigate challenges posed by conflicting international sanctions and sanctions-blocking measures, say Thomas Grant at Cambridge University and Scott Kieff at George Washington University Law School.

  • BigLaw Must Nix All-Or-Nothing Work Model To Retain Talent

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    Record numbers of workers quitting in the “Great Resignation,” paired with the growing success of nontraditional and freelance legal services, show that BigLaw’s management committees must reconsider rigid billable hour expectations and be open to part-time and noncontinuous work arrangements, says Hui Chen at Hui Chen Ethics.

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