Aerospace & Defense

  • May 13, 2021

    Raytheon Balks At Hourly Rate In $8.5M ERISA Fee Ask

    Raytheon Co. has urged a Massachusetts federal judge to shrink what it calls a bloated $8.5 million fee request by attorneys who secured a $59 million settlement in a benefits class action, saying Wednesday that amount would equate to a staggering $3,800 hourly rate.

  • May 12, 2021

    9th Circ. Revives Charges Over DOD Contract Fraud Scheme

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday revived charges against a former military contracting officer over his alleged role in a bribery scheme, saying a law pausing the expiration of certain claims during wartime did not require fraud claims to be connected to a specific war.

  • May 12, 2021

    Senate Panel Greenlights TikTok Ban For Federal Devices

    The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee unanimously passed a bill that aims to prevent federal employees from downloading the controversial app TikTok onto government devices, according to a Wednesday statement from Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., a sponsor of the bill.

  • May 12, 2021

    Pentagon Removing Chinese Co. Xiaomi From Trump Blacklist

    The U.S. Department of Defense told a D.C. federal judge Tuesday it will soon reverse a Trump administration order placing Chinese electronics company Xiaomi Corp. on a blacklist over alleged military ties, a move that would allow U.S. investment in the firm to resume.

  • May 12, 2021

    Biden Orders IT Gov't Contractors To Report Data Breaches

    President Joe Biden created a new national review board for major cyberattacks and ordered IT sector government contractors to report data breaches as part of an executive order issued Wednesday after hacks on a major U.S. pipeline company and federal agencies.

  • May 12, 2021

    Repubs Say Admin. Made False Claims About Border Wall Halt

    Republican lawmakers on Wednesday said the Biden administration has made repeated false claims about the legality and status of its halt in border wall construction, urging the U.S. Government Accountability Office to take those issues into account as it reviews the pause.

  • May 12, 2021

    Biden Pick For EPA Water Chief Sounds Collaborative Tone

    President Joe Biden's pick to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's water office on Wednesday promised lawmakers her goal is to create an "enduring" method of determining the Clean Water Act's jurisdiction.

  • May 12, 2021

    EU Courts Told To Let Iranian Cos. Use Sanction Blocking Law

    Iranian banks and businesses should be allowed to ask European Union courts to invoke a blocking law if they think a company has cut ties over fears of violating U.S. sanctions, a legal adviser told the bloc's top court on Wednesday.

  • May 11, 2021

    Gov't May Lean On Private Sector To Stop Next Critical Hack

    Convincing private businesses to open up to the government about cybercrime could be key in preventing future hacks of U.S. critical infrastructure, a risk underscored by a ransomware attack that has shuttered one of the nation's largest fuel pipelines.

  • May 11, 2021

    Judge Weighs Effect Of Sanctions In Del. Venezuela Cases

    A Delaware federal judge weighing whether to grant seizure orders for Citgo's parent company to creditors owed hundreds of millions of dollars by Venezuela indicated Tuesday that he is considering whether U.S. sanctions on Caracas preclude him from issuing such an order.

  • May 11, 2021

    Atty Says Girardi Was Part Of Chiquita Terror-Funding MDL

    An attorney representing families of banana farmers accusing Chiquita Brands International Inc. of funding terrorist groups in South America said Tuesday that lawyers for other plaintiffs have failed to disclose that embattled lawyer Thomas Girardi has been part of the case.

  • May 11, 2021

    Activists Ask 9th Circ. For Enviro Review Of DHS Programs

    Conservation groups backed by an anti-immigration think tank asked the Ninth Circuit Tuesday to revive their claims that certain U.S. Department of Homeland Security immigration programs must undergo environmental review, arguing a review exemption leads to higher immigration numbers, which then drives ecological degradation.

  • May 11, 2021

    SBA Judge Revokes Ruling That Vet Lacked Small Biz Control

    A U.S. Small Business Administration's Office of Hearings and Appeals judge has found that a veteran had sufficient control over a real estate firm, reconsidering his earlier decision requiring the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to cancel a lease awarded to the company.

  • May 11, 2021

    3M's Expert Nixed From Earplug MDL Bellwether Case

    A Florida federal judge on Tuesday excluded opinions from one of 3M's expert witnesses in an upcoming bellwether trial over whether its combat arms CAEv2s earplugs were defective and caused damage to a veteran's hearing, saying the expert cannot base his opinion entirely on other experts' findings.

  • May 11, 2021

    Contractor Settles DOL Probe Alleging Unequal Pay, Hiring

    A Virginia-based oil and gas contractor has inked a $200,000 deal with the U.S. Department of Labor's federal contractor watchdog after the agency alleged it was underpaying female engineers and underrecruiting women and minority candidates for certain posts.

  • May 10, 2021

    FBI Outs Ransomware Cartel Behind Colonial Pipeline Hack

    The FBI on Monday pinned a ransomware attack that closed one of the country's largest pipelines on a criminal hacking group that has operated in Russia, while White House officials mulled how to boost cybersecurity at privately held critical infrastructure companies.

  • May 10, 2021

    Jury Convicts Parts Buyer Of Violating Iran Trade Embargo

    A Texas federal jury has convicted an Iranian national on a slew of counts, including violating a trade embargo with Iran, for obtaining, or attempting to obtain, $2.6 million worth of parts that federal prosecutors have deemed "military sensitive," the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • May 10, 2021

    Lockheed Martin Beats Army Contractor's Sex Bias Suit

    A U.S. Army contract worker who accused Lockheed Martin Corp. of refusing to hire her after taking over a contract doesn't have enough evidence to keep her gender discrimination case in court, a Texas federal judge ruled.

  • May 10, 2021

    Gov't Can Seek $43M From Taylor Energy For Oil Spill Cleanup

    A Louisiana federal judge has found that the U.S. Coast Guard is immune from Taylor Energy's suit challenging the government's ability to demand $43 million for costs related to cleaning up an undersea oil spill that leaked into the Gulf of Mexico for over 15 years.

  • May 10, 2021

    Willkie Adds Ex-McDermott Cybersecurity Lead To DC Office

    Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP announced Monday that it has hired McDermott Will & Emery LLP's former global head of its privacy and cybersecurity practice.

  • May 10, 2021

    Auto Industry Wants Help In Biden's $50B Semiconductor Plan

    Three leading U.S auto industry groups representing the major motor vehicle companies, workers and parts suppliers urged leaders in Congress on Friday to include a priority for the industry in a $50 billion proposal by President Joe Biden to strengthen domestic semiconductor production.

  • May 10, 2021

    Data-Driven Scrutiny Of Federal Deals May Yield False Flags

    The U.S. Department of Justice's increased focus on data analytics to address collusion in government contracting may expose contractors to the risk of being falsely flagged for anti-competitive behavior under data models that have not been trained on public procurements.

  • May 10, 2021

    Rolls-Royce Denies $120M Exclusivity Breach In Goodrich Suit

    Rolls-Royce Holdings PLC hit back at claims that it denied Goodrich Corp. $120 million in sales by offering a spare parts service directly to airline operators, amid a dispute over a joint venture that went south.

  • May 10, 2021

    Trump Appointee Expected To Get Plea Deal In Riot Case

    A federal prosecutor indicated Monday that the government is expected to offer a plea deal to a former Trump U.S. Department of State appointee facing charges for participating in the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

  • May 07, 2021

    Justices' Snub Has Military Rape Claimants Eyeing Congress

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision not to review a former West Point cadet's case alleging rape, and the contentious doctrine that gives the government immunity over injuries related to military service, could have service members looking more to Congress to carve out exceptions, despite Justice Clarence Thomas' continued calls to revoke the doctrine.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Congress Should End High Court's Military Immunity Doctrine

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    Passing legislation to override the widely derided U.S. Supreme Court precedent that precludes members of the military from suing the U.S. should be a major priority for Congress, especially in light of the court's recent refusal to review a former West Point cadet's case alleging rape, says Carol Thompson at the Federal Practice Group.

  • What UK's New Merger Controls Mean For Private Equity

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    Expansive notification and approval requirements under the U.K.’s new merger control regime — the National Security and Investment Act — along with a lack of clarity about when they go into effect, pose unique challenges for private equity sponsors, as well as their investors and portfolio companies, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Opinion

    Federal Minimum Wage Should Be Indexed For Local Markets

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    The Biden administration should implement an indexed minimum wage based on the average wages in each local labor market instead of mandating a $15 federal minimum wage in all metro areas, which could grossly distort service sector compensation and discourage bidding on federal contracts, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

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    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • How Biden's First 100 Days Will Affect Gov't Contractors

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    Joseph Berger and Thomas Mason at Thompson Hine examine the significant opportunities for government contractors arising from actions during the first 100 days of the Biden administration, which set the stage for unprecedented investment in national infrastructure, domestic manufacturing, research and development, clean energy, pandemic response and economic recovery.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • How $15 Minimum Wage Order May Affect Gov't Contractors

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    Attorneys at Arnold & Porter examine the potential impacts of President Joe Biden’s minimum wage increase for federal government contractors and discuss whether contractors will be able to recover additional labor costs associated with the increase.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Scope, Evaluation Criterion, Privity

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Sandeep Nandivada and Markus Speidel at MoFo look at April U.S. Government Accountability Office and U.S. Court of Federal Claims decisions concerning proposed labor categories outside the scope of vendor schedule contracts, use of unstated evaluation criterion, and whether co-prime contractor privity supports standing to protest.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Biden Admin.'s Climate Strategy Should Include Insurance Innovations

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    To successfully meet the Biden administration's climate-related goals, the federal government must fill gaps in state regulation of environmental insurance, and help create an insurance framework that incentivizes and facilitates carbon impact reduction in four key areas, say Michael Hill and Paul Tetenbaum at Blue Dot Climate Insurance.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Economic Sanctions And Export Controls: A Q1 Update

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    Attorneys at Kirkland discuss first-quarter developments in U.S. export controls and economic sanctions and what they may indicate about the Biden administration's national security and foreign policy agenda. 

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

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