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Aerospace & Defense

  • January 16, 2019

    Maxar Faces Stock-Drop Suit Over Inflated Assets, Tech Lies

    Maxar Technologies Inc. has been slapped with a proposed shareholder class action accusing the Colorado space technology company of using its $2.4 billion acquisition of a space imaging business to inflate its assets and hiding problems with one of the vendor’s satellites, causing dramatic stock plunges when the truth came out.

  • January 16, 2019

    Gov't Shutdown Stymies Dormitory Co.'s Fed Contract Case

    A dormitory services company's unfair treatment suit against the U.S. government slowed to a crawl in the Court of Federal Claims when the presiding judge asked the parties whether she should stay the case in light of an appropriations lapse due to the government shutdown.

  • January 16, 2019

    Relaxed Rules Offer Little Clarity On Expanded Drone Flights

    The Federal Aviation Administration's loosening of restrictions on certain drone flights won't spur more drones to take to the skies until regulators draft additional rules to track and identify unmanned aircraft, ensuring the regulatory landscape will remain murky as technology continues to outpace the legal landscape, experts say.

  • January 16, 2019

    9th Circ. Won't Stop Deportation For $50 Given To Terrorists

    The donation of approximately $50 by a Nepalese man to a terrorist organization bars his qualification for obtaining asylum or for ducking deportation, the Ninth Circuit has decided.

  • January 16, 2019

    UK Nat'l Security Official To Lead New Financial Crime Agency

    A high-ranking U.K. national security official with a background in implementing controversial data collection efforts will take the reins of a new economic crime-fighting department, the National Crime Agency said Wednesday.

  • January 15, 2019

    Google, Amazon Urged To Keep Face ID Tech From Feds

    Dozens of advocacy groups joined together Tuesday to push Microsoft, Google and Amazon to refrain from selling face surveillance technology to the federal government, arguing that such a move would undermine public trust in their businesses and hand the government sweeping new power to target immigrants and minorities.

  • January 15, 2019

    Gov't Hits Tetra Tech With FCA Suit Over Navy Cleanup Work

    The federal government has accused a Tetra Tech unit of billing the U.S. Navy for radiation remediation services at a former Navy shipyard in San Francisco that it did not actually perform, in violation of the False Claims Act.

  • January 15, 2019

    Attys Say Wartime Law Can't Save One 'Fat Leonard' Case

    A defense lawyers' group has urged a San Diego judge to toss charges against a retired U.S. Navy captain caught up in the “Fat Leonard” bribery scandal, saying a law meant for wartime fraud shouldn't be used to preserve a case brought years too late.

  • January 15, 2019

    11th Circ. Jettisons NASA Worker’s Army Base Injury Award

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday vacated an injury award in a suit blaming the federal government for injuries a NASA civilian employee suffered in an auto collision due to a U.S. Army base security guard’s alleged negligence, saying the government is immune to liability under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

  • January 15, 2019

    India Space Unit Says Due Process Dooms $563M Award

    The marketing arm of India’s space program has doubled down on its bid to dismiss a telecommunications company’s suit seeking to confirm an award of more than $562.5 million stemming from a canceled satellite-leasing deal, contending in Washington federal court that exercising jurisdiction over the action would flout the state-owned company’s due process.

  • January 15, 2019

    Barr Walks Back Anti-False Claims Act Whistleblower Views

    U.S. attorney general nominee William Barr on Tuesday walked back previous comments about the False Claims Act's whistleblower provisions' being an "abomination" and unconstitutional, saying he would "diligently enforce" the law if confirmed to lead the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • January 15, 2019

    Brazil Says Aviation Insurers Have Been Swapping Info

    Brazil’s antitrust authority has launched an investigation into whether American International Group Inc. and 10 other companies in the aviation and aerospace insurance industry affected competition in the country by sharing sensitive pricing information.

  • January 14, 2019

    'National Emergency' Would Be Rife With Legal Challenges

    President Donald Trump would face a tangle of property, contract and environmental obstacles if he followed through on his proposal to circumvent Congress and authorize the building of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border by declaring a national emergency, experts say.

  • January 14, 2019

    DOT Proposal Would Loosen Rules On Some Drone Flights

    The U.S. Department of Transportation on Monday unveiled highly anticipated proposed rules allowing drones to fly over people and at night without special waivers, advancing the federal government's years-long effort to establish safety and security regulations for the expanded commercial use of drones.

  • January 14, 2019

    House Intelligence Wants Details About Wall Justification

    The House Intelligence Committee hasn’t received any recent information from the Trump administration corroborating its “inflammatory claims” about the need for a wall on the Mexican border, the chairman said, asking the White House and the Intelligence Community to turn over the purported evidence behind the demand.

  • January 14, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Etihad, Viacom, Saudi Aramco

    Etihad Airways reportedly plans to raise its stake in Indian carrier Jet Airways, Viacom is discussing a deal to sell off a majority stake in some of its operations in China and Saudi Aramco is likely to help fund its SABIC deal with a roughly $10 billion bond sale.

  • January 14, 2019

    Microsoft Wins $1.8B Navy Software Support Deal

    The U.S. Navy has awarded Microsoft Corp. a $1.76 billion sole-source deal to provide enterprise software and support services under a streamlined U.S. Department of Defense information technology acquisition program, the DOD announced Friday.

  • January 14, 2019

    Supreme Court Again Refuses To Hear KBR Burn Pit Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused for the second time to hear a dispute over KBR’s liability for servicemembers’ illnesses allegedly caused by toxic burn pit fumes and unclean water at overseas military bases, an issue a circuit court had ruled involved a “political question” immune from review.

  • January 11, 2019

    The Firms That Dominated In 2018

    Law360's top four Firms of the Year notched a combined 32 Practice Group of the Year awards after successfully securing wins in bet-the-company matters and closing high-profile, big-ticket deals for clients throughout 2018.

  • January 11, 2019

    Law360 Names Practice Groups Of The Year

    Law360 congratulates the winners of its 2018 Practice Group of the Year awards, which honor the law firms behind the litigation wins and major deals that resonated throughout the legal industry in the past year.

Expert Analysis

  • Arbitrators And Mediators Should Reflect Society's Diversity

    James Jenkins

    Alternative dispute resolution providers have made great strides toward diversity, but recent statistics show there is still work to be done. There are certain steps ADR providers can take to actively recruit more women and minority candidates to serve as arbitrators and mediators, says James Jenkins of the American Arbitration Association.

  • Why AFAs Are Key To The Future Of Legal Practice

    Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul

    Alternative fee agreements can help align law firm and client interests, increase efficiency and eliminate corporate extortion, among other benefits. They are the best thing to happen to the practice of law in decades, says Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP.

  • Domestic Sourcing Requirement Doesn’t Fit DOD’s Gloves

    Scott Freling

    A recent Government Accountability Office decision found that a nonavailability exception applied to a Defense Department solicitation for leather combat gloves even though the type of leather at issue was available domestically. The decision sheds light on the regulatory nuances regarding domestic sourcing, say attorneys at Covington & Burling LLP.

  • Opinion

    Eyeballs Are Better Than Border Walls

    Stephen Pazan

    My rough calculations suggest “extreme vetting” of U.S. visa applicants could be as good as building a wall, and the human and economic costs would be much less, says Stephen Pazan, special counsel at Barket Epstein Kearon Aldea and LoTurco LLP and a former consular officer with the U.S. Department of State.

  • Circuits Left To Develop FCA Discovery Case Law

    Andy Liu

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in two major False Claims Act cases, both involving the government’s knowledge or suspicion of violations allegedly resulting in knowingly false claims. Nichols Liu LLP attorneys consider the implications for the materiality standard and FCA cases going forward.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Barron Reviews 'The Clamor Of Lawyers'

    Judge David Barron

    Can lawyers lead a revolution? According to "The Clamor of Lawyers: The American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession" — a slim but elegant volume by Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer — they can and they did, says First Circuit Judge David Barron.

  • Handling Corporate Congressional Probes In The Trump Era

    John Hellerman

    President Donald Trump’s approach to crisis communications has changed the game enough to demand companies' consideration of a whole new set of options. John Hellerman of Hellerman Communications and Bill Pittard of KaiserDillon PLLC discuss whether corporations can successfully use similar tactics.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 2

    Peter Jarvis

    Lawyer-directed nonrecourse litigation funding is more likely to protect a lawyer's exercise of independent professional judgment than traditional means of litigation finance, and furthermore enables worthwhile cases that otherwise could not be funded, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Axis V. Northrop Highlights Premature Exhaustion Risks

    Caroline Meneau

    A California federal court's decision in Axis v. Northrop reminds insureds to consider excess insurers' coverage positions when negotiating coverage with lower-level insurers. Insureds should also be wary of settlements that could be construed as disgorgement of ill-gotten assets, say Caroline Meneau and David Kroeger of Jenner & Block LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 1

    Peter Jarvis

    Contrary to what the New York City Bar Association concluded in an ethics opinion last year, lawyer-directed nonrecourse commercial litigation funding does not violate New York rules on sharing fees with nonlawyers, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.