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Aerospace & Defense

  • March 21, 2019

    Afghan Man Can’t Duck Counterclaims in Army Contract Suit

    An Afghan national suing an American man for breach of contract over their partnership on a joint venture in Afghanistan can’t escape counterclaims from his former business partner, a Tennessee federal judge has ruled.

  • March 21, 2019

    Marine Chief Says Hurricanes, Border Work Straining Budget

    Recent hurricanes, alongside deployments to the southern border and other unexpected events, have resulted in the U.S. Marine Corps facing unprecedented financial challenges and "unacceptable risk" to its combat readiness, Commandant Gen. Robert Neller said in a pair of internal memos, publicly leaked Thursday.

  • March 21, 2019

    Commerce Hit With FOIA Suit For Auto Tariff Report

    A conservative nonprofit on Wednesday asked a federal court to force the U.S. Department of Commerce to turn over a copy of the agency’s findings from its probe into whether imported cars threaten U.S. national security interests.

  • March 21, 2019

    GAO Axes Bid Protest In Army Cyberspace Deal

    The U.S. Army reasonably rejected MacAulay-Brown Inc.’s bid for a cyberspace operations deal after the Ohio-based company failed to meet certain technical and management-related requirements, the U.S. Government Accountability Office found Wednesday.

  • March 21, 2019

    O'Melveny Adds Ex-Obama Adviser As Privacy Co-Chair

    O'Melveny & Myers LLP has tapped a national security and counterterrorism adviser to former President Barack Obama as partner and co-chair of its data security and privacy group, the firm said in a press release Thursday.

  • March 21, 2019

    Retirees' Win Nixed In Honeywell Early Retirement Row

    An Eighth Circuit panel on Thursday handed Honeywell International Inc. a win in a proposed Employee Retirement Income Security Act class action, giving the company the go-ahead to cut off health care benefits for a group of Minnesota workers who retired before age 65.

  • March 21, 2019

    DOD Awards Boeing $4B Multiyear Fighter Jet Deal

    Boeing has won a $4 billion contract to supply 78 F/A-18 fighter jets to the Navy over the next several years, the U.S. Department of Defense announced, saying the use of a multiyear deal will save hundreds of millions of dollars over short-term agreements.

  • March 21, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Lion Air, Ferretti, KKR

    Lion Air is getting ready to go public in its homeland of Indonesia, yacht maker Ferretti is getting ready to go public once again, and KKR is raising its debut real estate fund focused on Asia and is looking to reap $1.5 billion in investments.

  • March 21, 2019

    EU Issues New Rules For Screening Foreign Investments

    The European Union published new rules Thursday for screening inbound foreign investments that go into effect next month, following the same overall structure of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

  • March 21, 2019

    Paving Co. Demands $7.4M Under Army Base Subcontract

    A California paving contractor sued a pair of construction companies, their joint venture and four insurance companies in Oklahoma federal court Wednesday over nearly $7.4 million in unpaid work done on an Oklahoma Air Force base construction project.

  • March 21, 2019

    EU Clears Spirit Aero's $650M Asco Deal After Fixes

    Europe’s competition watchdog approved Spirit’s $650 million acquisition of Asco after Spirit had offered commitments to alleviate the regulator's concerns, particularly for the supply of aerospace equipment.

  • March 20, 2019

    Gov't Says Continued Block Of DOD 'Trans Ban' Is Wrong

    A day after a D.C. federal court told the government it can't yet implement its contentious military transgender policy, the Trump administration on Wednesday asked it to pause its preliminary injunction, arguing that the U.S. Supreme Court has already stayed two "materially indistinguishable" injunctions.

  • March 20, 2019

    What’s In A Judgeship? More Than Meets The Eye

    Figuring out what constitutes a manageable workload for the nation’s district judges is no simple task. Getting the judiciary the resources it needs is even harder.

  • March 20, 2019

    Swamped: How Magistrate Judges Salvaged Louisiana's Judicial Crisis

    The Western District of Louisiana is supposed to have seven district judges. But for a year, most of the courthouses were operating without a single Article III judge. As usual, magistrate judges picked up the slack.

  • March 20, 2019

    Pointed Questions Suggest Longer FCA Time Limit Is Likely

    An extended time limit for False Claims Act cases where the government doesn't intervene, seemingly supported by the justices at arguments for a pending U.S. Supreme Court case, marks a significant potential expansion of already-high FCA-related risks and costs for federal contractors, attorneys said.

  • March 20, 2019

    $283M NCI Sale Not Motivated By Retirement, Chancery Says

    Investor claims that advanced age and retirement concerns motivated NCI Inc.’s controlling stockholder and founder to cash out through an allegedly unfair and inadequate $283 million go-private sale don’t “hold water,” Delaware’s chancellor said Wednesday in dismissing a challenge of the transaction.

  • March 20, 2019

    Raydon Workers Fight Bid To Nix Suit Over $60.5M Stock Sale

    Raydon Corp. workers want a Florida federal judge to preserve a lawsuit accusing two executives of selling company stock to the employee retirement plan for the inflated price of $60.5 million, urging the judge Tuesday to torpedo a bid from the bank that oversaw the stock sale to toss the proposed class action.

  • March 20, 2019

    S. Korean Oil Cos. To Pay $126M For Bid-Rigging Scheme

    Two South Korean petroleum and refinery companies have agreed to plead guilty and pay $126 million in criminal fines and civil damages for rigging bids on defense fuel supply contracts, the U.S. Department of Justice’s antitrust chief said Wednesday.

  • March 20, 2019

    Sailors' Supreme Court Win Buoys Hopes For Tort Victims

    The U.S. Supreme Court handed a victory to sailors who claim they developed mesothelioma in a decision that potentially broadens the liability of manufacturers of so-called bare metal products to which other companies later added asbestos.

  • March 19, 2019

    DOD Still Can't Implement 'Transgender Ban,' Judge Rules

    A D.C. federal judge told the government Tuesday that it can't implement its contentious military transgender policy even though other courts have lifted an injunction against it, because the plaintiffs that challenged the ban in Washington, D.C., still have time to ask for a rehearing.

Expert Analysis

  • US Policy On Cuba Litigation Comes With Risks For Cos.

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    A newly effective embargo measure that allows U.S. claimants to sue the Cuban government in U.S. courts for confiscated Cuban property may soon be expanded to permit lawsuits against non-Cuban entities operating in Cuba. Attorneys at Greenberg Traurig LLP discuss key issues surrounding the policy change.

  • Assessing Compliance Risk Under DOJ China Initiative

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's China Initiative should be a signal to Chinese companies, multinational companies with Chinese subsidiaries, and U.S.-based investors in Chinese companies — it's time to design and implement strong anti-corruption and anti-bribery programs, says Jean Chow-Callam of FTI Consulting Inc.

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • How China's Version Of CFIUS Will Expand Security Reviews

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    China's foreign investment security review regime shares many characteristics with the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. And as tensions rise between the two countries, China, like the U.S., is set to scrutinize more deals, says Guogang Li of the Tahota Law Firm.

  • Keeping Up With DOD Cybersecurity Compliance Demands

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    The Defense Contract Management Agency recently updated its contractor purchasing system review guidebook, assuming obligations beyond those imposed by the defense federal acquisition regulation supplement clause. Contractors should be aware of the new requirements which will likely show up in future contracts or modifications to existing contracts, say attorneys at Covington & Burling LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Aviation Watch: Is The 737 MAX Safe To Fly?

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    The Federal Aviation Administration is often criticized for being a captive of the industries it regulates, but last week's FAA order grounding Boeing's 737 MAX aircraft resulted from presidential pressure. When such considerations override the agency's professional judgments, the traveling public suffers, says Alan Hoffman, a retired product liability attorney and private pilot.