Aerospace & Defense

  • January 21, 2022

    Texas Judge Blocks Vaccine Mandate For Federal Workers

    A Texas federal judge on Friday blocked the enforcement of President Joe Biden's mandate requiring all federal employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19 after finding that the president doesn't have authority to issue such a broad order, a ruling the federal government has already announced it's appealing.

  • January 21, 2022

    Ex-DOD Supplier Gets 10 Years For $7M Electrical Parts Scam

    A Wisconsin federal judge has sentenced a three-time convict and former military contractor to 10 years in prison for defrauding the U.S. Department of Defense by landing more than a thousand supply electrical parts contracts worth $7.4 million using fake bids, bogus identities and shell companies, as well as supplying defective parts.

  • January 21, 2022

    Air Force Must Face Air Cargo Pallet Maker's $132M Suit

    The federal claims court on Thursday shaved a contractor's $132 million lawsuit alleging the Air Force breached a prototype air cargo pallet deal, but said the company had done enough to pursue claims of a "government cabal effort" to steal its data.

  • January 21, 2022

    Texas Justices Revive Fatal Navy Helicopter Crash Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday revived a lawsuit against a military contractor accused of improperly maintaining a U.S. Navy helicopter that crashed and killed three service members, holding that courts can decide the case "without interfering with the military's judgment." 

  • January 21, 2022

    US, EU End WTO Battle Over Security Tariffs

    The United States and the European Union walked away from dueling cases over Trump-era national security tariffs on steel and aluminum and Brussels' retaliatory measures, following last year's breakthrough steel deal, according to World Trade Organization filings published Friday.

  • January 20, 2022

    Fed. Circ. Says Retired Military Can Serve On Records Board

    The Federal Circuit ruled Thursday that retired military members count as civilians for service on the Board for Correction of Naval Records, refusing to overturn a decision denying a veteran's bid to fix alleged errors in his separation records.

  • January 20, 2022

    4 Belarus Officials Charged With Piracy In Forced Jet Landing

    Four government officials in Belarus were indicted Thursday for conspiracy to commit aircraft piracy by a federal grand jury in New York for their role in allegedly diverting a plane in order to arrest a dissident Belarusian journalist who was on board.

  • January 20, 2022

    Gov't Looks To Shape Forced Labor Import Enforcement

    Importers and advocates will soon have a chance to sound off on a sweeping new trade law aimed at countering forced labor in China's Xinjiang region as the government opens the door for input on how best to enforce the statute.

  • January 20, 2022

    FCA OKs Proportionate Damages For Honeywell, DC Circ. Told

    The federal government has urged the D.C. Circuit to keep Honeywell on the hook for a "proportionate share" of False Claims Act damages related to allegedly defective body armor, saying that approach best fit the circumstances of the case.

  • January 20, 2022

    GAO Unclear If HHS Is Prepared For Full COVID Vax Duties

    A government watchdog aired doubts over the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' preparedness to take on Operation Warp Speed duties — which it previously shared with the U.S. Department of Defense — finding that HHS lacks a strategy for filling workforce personnel gaps.

  • January 20, 2022

    EPA Must Close PFAS Reporting Loopholes, Suit Says

    Three advocacy nonprofits hit the Environmental Protection Agency with a lawsuit in D.C. federal court Thursday, seeking to force the agency to close loopholes that exempt chemical plants and military bases from disclosing certain emissions of cancer-causing chemicals.

  • January 20, 2022

    MIT Prof Defeats China-Ties Case As Feds Reverse Course

    Federal prosecutors on Thursday formally dropped criminal charges against a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor accused of concealing his ties to China, saying new information had undermined the case.

  • January 19, 2022

    Biden Sets Cyber Standards For National Security Systems

    President Joe Biden signed a memo Wednesday aiming to improve the cybersecurity standards for a slew of national security systems like at the U.S. Department of Defense, building on an executive order from last year that set tech safety requirements for all federal agencies.

  • January 19, 2022

    The Hottest FCA Cases And Trends To Watch In 2022

    The False Claims Act litigation landscape at the dawn of 2022 is teeming with intrigue as the U.S. Supreme Court eyes one of the law's deepest circuit splits, lawyers ponder the paucity of enforcement involving pandemic relief spending, and prosecutors increasingly pursue fraud theories targeting private equity investors and lax cybersecurity.

  • January 19, 2022

    Kreindler Says 9/11 Case Leak Doesn't Warrant Sanctions

    Kreindler & Kreindler LLP has argued that it should not face sanctions over a former consultant's leak of a deposition from litigation over the 9/11 terrorist attacks, as Saudi Arabia argued the firm willfully violated the protective orders covering the case.

  • January 19, 2022

    US, UK Look To Resolve Lingering Security Tariff Dispute

    The U.S. and United Kingdom are aiming to settle a long-running fight over U.S. national security tariffs, the governments announced Wednesday, hoping to shift their focus to industrial overcapacity driven by China.

  • January 19, 2022

    Gov't Contractor Shelters In Ch. 11 Against $6M Judgment

    A multifaceted government contractor has moved to shield its business behind a Delaware bankruptcy action while simultaneously fighting more than $6 million in allied contractor judgments and battling to collect $20 million in unpaid federal agency claims.

  • January 19, 2022

    Crowell & Moring Rehires Senior US Prosecutor In LA

    Crowell & Moring LLP announced Wednesday that a senior federal corruption prosecutor had returned to the firm's Los Angeles office.

  • January 19, 2022

    Goodwin Nabs Cyber Pro To Boost Incident Response Arsenal

    Goodwin Procter LLP has continued to grow its data privacy and cybersecurity capabilities, adding a former federal cybercrime prosecutor and cybersecurity investigator with vast experience helping companies prepare for and recover from increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks.

  • January 18, 2022

    India's High Court Sinks Devas Forced Liquidation Dispute

    A government-owned space agency division in India can liquidate a satellite company that it alleges was created to defraud the government, after the Supreme Court of India ruled that the division's incentive to kill a related $1.3 billion arbitral award is irrelevant.

  • January 18, 2022

    Gov't Urges 11th Circ. To Lift Contractor Vax Mandate Block

    The federal government urged the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday to overturn an injunction blocking its COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal contractors from going into effect, saying the mandate was a legitimate use of the president's delegated authority over procurement issues.

  • January 18, 2022

    FAA's 5G Dispute Highlights Spectrum Policy Breakdown

    A dispute between wireless carriers and the commercial airline industry has delayed by weeks the conversion of certain airwaves to carry 5G service, and policy experts say the saga underscores the pressing need for better federal spectrum coordination.

  • January 18, 2022

    Investors Sue Pawnshop Co. After CFPB Enforcement Action

    Pawnshop company FirstCash Holdings Inc. and two of its executives face investor claims that they hurt shareholders after the CFPB accused the company of violating federal laws protecting military members and their families from unfair lending practices.

  • January 18, 2022

    DOD Says Navy Vax Challengers Jumped Gun On Lawsuit

    The U.S. Department of Defense has urged a Texas federal judge to toss a lawsuit alleging its COVID-19 vaccine mandate violates the religious beliefs of members of the Navy's Special Warfare Command, saying the suit was premature and filed in the wrong state.

  • January 18, 2022

    Fed. Circ. Switches To Video Arguments For February

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday said it will switch remote oral arguments from phone to video starting in February, nearly two years after the COVID-19 pandemic forced it to go virtual.

Expert Analysis

  • Corporate Boards Need Not Fear 7th Circ. Boeing Decision

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    The Seventh Circuit’s recent decision in Seafarers Pension Plan v. Bradway, over Boeing shareholders' rights to bring federal derivative suits over the 737 Max aircraft, may encourage creative Securities Exchange Act claims to avoid exclusive forum provisions, but boards of Delaware corporations still have tools to avoid duplicative litigation, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Gov't Contractor Takeaways From Biden's Clean Energy Order

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    Attorneys at Covington discuss how President Joe Biden's recent net-zero emissions pledge and related executive actions are changing the landscape of federal procurement, creating new opportunities and challenges for government contractors.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

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    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • Aviation Watch: Resolving The FAA-FCC Fight Over 5G

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    Concerns over interference with aircraft altimeters are delaying the U.S. rollout of 5G wireless technology, and it may take special action by the Biden administration to resolve the standoff between the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Aviation Administration over the issue, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Takeaways From White Collar Criminal Enforcement In 2021

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    White collar criminal prosecutions were up in 2021, with recent high-profile fraud trials, the Biden administration's enforcement priorities and the continuing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic potentially reversing the previous trend of slumping white collar prosecutions, say attorneys at Keker Van Nest.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

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    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • What Attys Can Learn From Harvard Professor's Conviction

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    The recent conviction of Harvard professor Charles Lieber, on charges of lying about ties to China, highlights the perils that even highly educated white collar targets face in an FBI interview without counsel present, and it provides urgent lessons for attorneys on guiding their clients through stressful circumstances, say Jack Sharman and Tatum Jackson at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonpublic Info, Brand Names, Prejudice

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Roke Iko at MoFo discusses three decisions from the U.S. Government Accountability Office and the Federal Circuit, which shed light on the risks of involving former government employees with nonpublic information in the proposal process, requirements for brand-name justification, and when a presumption of prejudice exists.

  • How Congressional Oversight May Shift In 2022 And Beyond

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    Congressional oversight priorities are likely to be shuffled in 2022 and 2023 given the likelihood that this year’s midterm elections will politically realign one or both chambers, with Democrats seizing on a sense of investigative urgency into issues like emergency loans and government contracts, and Republicans deepening scrutiny of the current administration, say Aaron Cutler and Ari Fridman at Hogan Lovells.

  • Recent Bias Suits Against Law Firms And Lessons For 2022

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    2021 employment discrimination case filings and developments show that law firms big and small are not immune from claims, and should serve as a reminder that the start of a new year is a good time to review and update salary, promotion and leave policies to mitigate litigation risks, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • How To Create A Corporate Culture Of Compliance

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    A positive culture can make the difference between a compliance program that sees ethical decision making in a company's everyday operations and check-the-box procedures that do not reflect underlying values or affect the daily conduct of employees, says Howard Weissman at Miller Canfield.

  • Navy Vaccine Religious Exemption Ruling Warrants Scrutiny

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    A Texas federal court’s recent order, relying on the Religious Freedom Restoration Act to enjoin the Navy from disciplining service members who refused the COVID-19 vaccination on religious grounds, ignores U.S. Supreme Court precedent and raises serious questions about the scope of the First Amendment's free exercise clause, says George Chuzi at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • Associate Hiring Outlook At Law Firms Is Bright For 2022

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    After a year of extraordinary signing bonuses, nearly instantaneous offers and flexible work arrangements, strong demand for talented law firm associates will continue into 2022 — with some differences between East and West Coast markets — and junior attorneys should take steps to capitalize on the opportunity, say Ru Bhatt and Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • A Look At What's Ahead For Antitrust Enforcement In 2022

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    Attorneys at Paul Weiss discuss how recent significant changes in antitrust agency leadership and policies might play out in 2022, in areas from merger control to international transactions to labor issues.

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