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Aerospace & Defense

  • May 17, 2019

    Helping Manafort's Kid Get Skadden Gig No Crime, Craig Says

    Former Skadden partner Gregory Craig urged a D.C. federal court Friday to bar the government from introducing evidence that he helped line up a job at Skadden for the daughter of the now-jailed former chairman of the Trump campaign, Paul Manafort.

  • May 17, 2019

    SF Picks Side Of Privacy With Ban On Facial Recognition Tech

    The debate over facial recognition is heating up as San Francisco prepares to enact the nation's first ban on the controversial technology, with privacy advocates praising the step and others warning against too harshly limiting a useful tool for guarding public safety.

  • May 17, 2019

    Gov't Must Provide Info In Challenge To 2-For-1 Rule Order

    The D.C. federal judge presiding over public interest groups' challenge to President Donald Trump's executive order requiring that for every new regulation, two rules must be eliminated, said Friday that federal agencies must do a better job complying with discovery.

  • May 17, 2019

    Trump’s Border Wall Faces Skeptical Calif. Judge

    A California federal judge appeared open Friday to blocking the Trump administration from repurposing defense funds to build a wall along the southern border, saying he doesn't know if it is right to let the government build the wall before legal challenges to it are resolved.

  • May 17, 2019

    Military Medical Malpractice Legislation Gives Victims Hope

    A recently floated bill that would allow active-duty military members to sue the federal government for medical malpractice is an encouraging first step in providing justice for victims who are barred from filing such cases because of a 70-year-old U.S. Supreme Court precedent, experts said.

  • May 17, 2019

    Constitutional Crisis? Not Quite, But Courts Could Be Tested

    Legal and political scholars agree we are not in a constitutional crisis … yet. But as tensions mount between the president and Congress, the role of the third branch of government could be both crucial and perilous.

  • May 17, 2019

    Don't Reduce Arbitration To 'Sham' Proceeding, 5th Circ. Told

    China’s state-run aerospace corporation again told the Fifth Circuit on Thursday to overturn the confirmation of a $70 million award over a soured joint venture, arguing that the prevailing companies' perspective would turn arbitrations into “sham proceedings.”

  • May 17, 2019

    CBP Outlines Futile Hunt For Wall Contract From Trump Tweet

    The American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts has received a declaration under oath from U.S. Customs and Border Protection outlining the agency's fruitless search for evidence of a supposed "115-mile long" border wall contract that President Donald Trump referenced in a tweet on Christmas Eve.

  • May 17, 2019

    8th Circ. Won't Rehear Honeywell's Retiree Health Care Win

    The Eighth Circuit has rejected Honeywell retirees' request to revisit a March panel ruling that gave Honeywell a green light to cut off health care benefits for workers who retired before they turned 65 years old.

  • May 17, 2019

    How Supreme Court Conservatives Have Shaped The FCA

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s latest False Claims Act ruling didn’t just decide how much time whistleblowers have to launch fraud cases — it added to a long line of FCA opinions written by right-leaning justices, who have authored virtually all of the high court’s modern FCA precedent.

  • May 17, 2019

    Prosecutors Evade Cop's Released Expunged Records Suit

    An internal affairs police officer at a New Jersey military base cannot sue a county prosecutor's office for releasing his expunged criminal records to a patrolman he had investigated because he did not file a tort claim notice within the requisite time frame, a state appeals court said Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Constitutional Group Backs Trump In Wall Funding Fight

    The American Center for Law and Justice has told a D.C. federal court that the Democrat-led House of Representatives has failed to plead its case for an injunction that would block funding for President Donald Trump’s long-promised border wall.

  • May 17, 2019

    Army Can't Toss Noncitizen Troops' Improper Discharge Suit

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge has refused to end a proposed class action accusing the U.S. Army of wrongfully discharging noncitizen soldiers without prior notice, ruling the dispute was not a "broad programmatic attack" on Army recruitment barred by sovereign immunity.

  • May 17, 2019

    Raytheon Tank-Sighting Design Suit Remains Intact For Now

    It seemed for a moment Friday that BAE Systems would escape a trade secrets suit aimed at its subsidiary over the design of a tank-sighting system for the military, but a Virginia federal judge changed her mind mid-hearing and decided to hold off.

  • May 17, 2019

    Trade Org Backs Steel Tariff Challenge At High Court

    Advocacy organization the National Foreign Trade Council urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday to review President Donald Trump’s use of a Cold War-era law to set tariffs on steel and aluminum, saying the move was unconstitutional and has severely damaged the U.S. economy.

  • May 17, 2019

    Trump Cuts National Security-Driven Tariff On Turkish Steel

    President Donald Trump lowered tariffs on Turkish steel to their original 25% rate late Thursday, citing the reduction in steel imports from Ankara over the past year.

  • May 17, 2019

    Trump Agrees To Nix Metal Duties On NAFTA Partners

    President Donald Trump struck a deal to lift the national security-based steel and aluminum tariffs on Canada and Mexico Friday, removing a major hurdle to passing the renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement through Congress.

  • May 17, 2019

    White House Delays Car Tariffs With Call For Negotiations

    President Donald Trump confirmed on Friday that his administration considers imports of cars, trucks and auto parts a threat to national security, but declined to set tariffs on the goods for now, opening a six-month window to negotiate a compromise with major suppliers.

  • May 16, 2019

    Trump's Telecom Salvos Plunge China Talks Into The Unknown

    The prospects for a sweeping U.S.-China trade deal were looking dim even before President Donald Trump dealt a pair of blows to Beijing's mighty telecom sector on Wednesday, a move that injected even more uncertainty into the already-fraught negotiations.

  • May 16, 2019

    EU Says US Fears Over Defense Co-Op Pact Are Overblown

    European Union leaders have pushed back against U.S. concerns over a fledgling EU defense cooperation deal, including concerns about American defense contractors potentially losing access to EU defense markets that have drawn threats of retaliation from the U.S.

Expert Analysis

  • Inside The New FCA Cooperation Credit Guidelines

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    The recently issued U.S. Department of Justice cooperation credit guidelines provide False Claims Act litigators important information about factors the government considers before awarding cooperation credit or moving to intervene and dismiss a qui tam relator's suit, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Cybersecurity Enforcement Shouldn't Be Left To FCA Relators

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    The denial last week of a contractor's motion to dismiss a False Claims Act case in the Eastern District of California wrongly looks to whistleblowers for cybersecurity enforcement and may allow cybersecurity to become the qui tam bar’s next feeding ground, say Robert Metzger and Stephen Bacon at Rogers Joseph O'Donnell.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Gov't Contractors Fighting Suspensions Face Uphill Battle

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    The recent dismissal of JBL System Solutions v. Williams in the Eastern District of Virginia highlights the inherent problems in challenging an agency decision and has potentially sweeping implications for government contractors subject to negative responsibility determinations, say Dismas Locaria and Emily Unnasch at Venable.

  • Opinion

    High Court Got It Right On FCA Time Limits

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    Monday’s 9-0 decision in Cochise Consultancy v. U.S. showed again that the U.S. Supreme Court isn't easily tempted to undermine the central purpose of the False Claims Act — holding fraudsters accountable when they pick the public’s pocket, says Scott Oswald of The Employment Law Group.

  • Recent IRS Guidance Puts Multifamily Housing Back On Track

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    April guidance from the Internal Revenue Service, saying rental projects may set aside units for specified groups such as military veterans without violating the general public use requirement for tax-exempt bond financing, addresses a disconnect in the rules that has stopped many projects cold, says Alexis Baker of Squire Patton Boggs.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • Maritime Opinion Offers Hope For 'Bare Metal' Defense

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    In Air and Liquid Systems v. DeVries, the U.S. Supreme Court recently cast doubt on the "bare metal" defense against manufacturer liability in a maritime tort context. But both the majority and dissenting opinions provide a road map to using this defense in other situations, say John Vales and Stephen Turner of Dentons.

  • US Artificial Intelligence Regulation Has A Long Way To Go

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    Governments in Europe and Asia have begun guiding artificial intelligence toward a safe and ethical future, while the United States is currently behind the curve in formulating legislation on appropriate AI guidelines, say Peter Scoolidge and Jasmine Weg of Scoolidge Peters.