Aerospace & Defense

  • November 13, 2019

    Israeli-Owned Co. To Pay $2.8M Over US Military Contract

    An American subsidiary of an Israeli construction company will pay the U.S. government $2.8 million and abandon $16 million in potential administrative claims, ending False Claims Act allegations that its Israeli parent actually did the work on a military port contract meant for U.S.-based companies.

  • November 13, 2019

    Jurors Set To Determine Trump Pal Roger Stone's Fate

    A 12-member jury will begin deliberations Thursday in former Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone's criminal trial after prosecutors made their final pitch Wednesday afternoon.

  • November 13, 2019

    F-35 Still Way Behind DOD Goals For Mission Availability

    Despite notable progress on long-running sustainment issues, the U.S. Department of Defense still needs to dig out of a “big hole” to get the F-35 fighter jet to the expected level of mission readiness, a government watchdog told lawmakers Wednesday.

  • November 13, 2019

    Chad Wolf Becomes 5th Head Of DHS Under Trump

    President Donald Trump's pick for the acting head of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security was sworn in on Wednesday afternoon to become the fifth person to hold the position in less than three years.

  • November 12, 2019

    Trump Can't Take Wall Money From Military, 9th Circ. Told

    The Sierra Club, along with California and a number of other states, urged the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday to block President Donald Trump from using $2.5 billion in defense funds to construct a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border, arguing the president's decision to take the money was unconstitutional.

  • November 12, 2019

    10th Circ. Finds No Harm From Terror Watchlist Placement

    A Utah imam's placement on the federal terrorist watchlist had not substantially interfered with his travel or reputational rights, meaning he hadn't been unconstitutionally denied due process, the Tenth Circuit ruled Tuesday.

  • November 12, 2019

    Justices Tilting Toward Border Agent Who Killed Mexican Teen

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday appeared wary of allowing the parents of a Mexican teen fatally shot along the U.S.-Mexico border to sue the border agent who killed him.

  • November 12, 2019

    United Partially Beats Pilots' Military Leave Benefits Suit

    United Airlines Inc. beat part of a class action accusing it of denying sick time, vacation time and full pension payments to pilots on military leave, with an Illinois federal judge letting it escape two out of three of the suit’s claims Tuesday.

  • November 12, 2019

    Feds' Deal For Posting 3D-Printed Gun Plans Ruled Unlawful

    A federal judge in Washington state struck down as unlawful on Tuesday a Trump administration settlement last year that cleared the way for private groups to distribute online blueprints and instructions for manufacturing firearms with 3D printers.

  • November 12, 2019

    9th Circ. Backs Boeing's $200M Win In Ukraine Space Co. Row

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Tuesday backed up The Boeing Co. in a suit against its Ukrainian partners in a defunct satellite launching project, affirming a $200 million judgment and ending nearly a decade of litigation that stretched across the U.S., Sweden, Russia and the U.K.

  • November 12, 2019

    Mulvaney Drops Suit And Will Ignore House Subpoena

    Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney dropped his attempt to join a lawsuit over congressional subpoenas related to the impeachment inquiry Tuesday and told a D.C. federal judge he will instead rely on President Donald Trump’s order not to testify.

  • November 12, 2019

    Justices Won’t Hear Corps Contractor's Mistaken Bid Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to clarify federal agencies' responsibilities around a potentially mistaken contract bid after Army Corps of Engineers contractor Zafer Construction alleged it heavily underbid a hospital renovation deal due to incorrect drawings provided by the Corps.

  • November 12, 2019

    WikiLeaks 'A Gift' To Trump Campaign, Gates Tells Stone Jury

    Former Trump campaign honcho Rick Gates testified Tuesday that the organization was thrilled to learn from Roger Stone about WikiLeaks’ plan to dump stolen emails to damage Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton, bolstering prosecutors’ case that Stone lied to Congress about not speaking to anyone in the campaign about the controversial anti-secrecy group.

  • November 12, 2019

    Sinclair, Mar-A-Lago Member Settle Suit Over 'Spy' Report

    Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. has reached a settlement to resolve a $50 million defamation lawsuit from a Chinese billionaire who is a member of President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club over a news report detailing allegations that he is a spy for China.

  • November 12, 2019

    High Court Allows Sandy Hook Families To Sue Remington

    The Supreme Court rejected a bid by Remington on Tuesday to review a ruling by Connecticut state courts that allowed the families of Sandy Hook shooting victims to sue the gunmaker.

  • November 08, 2019

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To Top Attorneys From 76 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360's 2019 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

  • November 08, 2019

    Fund Lost Millions In Mozambique Loan Fraud, Jury Told

    A former portfolio manager at AllianceBernstein on Friday testified of how the hedge fund lost millions of dollars from its stake in a Mozambican government-backed loan, which prosecutors say was tainted by a bribery scheme led by Privinvest executive Jean Boustani.

  • November 08, 2019

    Facebook Enters Uncharted Legal Waters With Spyware Suit

    Facebook's new suit accusing an Israeli spyware company of compromising the phones of WhatsApp users includes a novel argument under federal anti-hacking law and presents a new wrinkle in the debate over government access to encrypted messages.

  • November 08, 2019

    Roger Stone Atty, Key Witness Clash Over WikiLeaks Contacts

    A star witness in Roger Stone's criminal trial lashed out at an attorney for the former Trump campaign adviser over the assertion that he misled Stone into believing he had personal connections with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, whose group released emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee's computer system.

  • November 08, 2019

    Frost Brown Lands Former Federal Contractors' GC

    Frost Brown Todd LLC has gained a member with 20 years of in-house and general counsel experience working mainly on government contracts for its Pittsburgh office, the firm has announced.

  • November 08, 2019

    New Ethics Framework May Draw AI Firms To DOD

    The Pentagon's increasing interest in using artificial intelligence has led to ethical conflicts with commercial technology firms, but a newly proposed ethics framework could help address those companies' concerns about their technology being wrongly weaponized or misused by the military.

  • November 08, 2019

    Taxation With Representation: Shearman, Skadden, Pillsbury

    In this week’s Taxation with Representation, Canada’s pension board acquires a California-based energy company for $6.1 billion, Stryker acquires Wright Medical Group for $4 billion, and aircraft component producer Kaman buys Bal Seal Engineering for $330 million.

  • November 08, 2019

    Cannabis Blank Check Co. Among 2 IPOs Raising $450M

    Two blank check companies, including one seeking to acquire cannabis-related businesses, debuted in public markets Friday after pricing initial public offerings totaling $450 million, sustaining an otherwise tepid IPO market that is seeing few operating companies go public.

  • November 08, 2019

    Saudi Citizens Charged With Smuggling Gun Parts Out Of US

    Federal prosecutors have accused three men of transporting firearm parts from the U.S. to Saudi Arabia in violation of federal laws that require a license to export goods, according to court filings.

  • November 07, 2019

    DOJ Points To Records Stone Told Congress He Never Had

    Federal prosecutors doubled down Thursday on their characterization of Roger Stone as a liar, pointing to a stream of emails and text messages between the former Trump adviser, top campaign aides and associates of Stone about his anticipation of the release of more hacked emails ahead of the 2016 presidential election to damage Hillary Clinton's candidacy.

Expert Analysis

  • What To Consider Before Filing For A Rule 57 Speedy Hearing

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    Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 57 and its state counterparts provide a method for expediting claims for declaratory judgment that warrants closer attention than it has historically received from litigants and courts, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • COFC Case Reveals Longevity Of Online Copyright Claims

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    The recent U.S. Court of Federal Claims copyright case APL v. U.S. highlights how even a long-forgotten webpage last modified over a decade ago can still support a copyright lawsuit if a single viewer accessed the page within three years of filing a claim, says Eric Goldman of Santa Clara University School of Law.

  • Adapting To Gov't Contractor Rules Banning Chinese Telecom

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    The U.S. government's revised Federal Acquisition Regulation, which prohibits federal agencies from acquiring telecommunications equipment and services produced by certain Chinese companies, applies across a strikingly broad range of contract values and types, say David Fletcher and Julia Fox at Perkins Coie.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Critical Info, Timeliness, Classification

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Alissandra Young of Morrison & Foerster looks at three August U.S. Government Accountability rulings — covering agency decisions to withhold proprietary data from prospective offerors, the GAO's strict timeliness rules regarding challenges to improprieties of solicitations, and agency classification of a procurement.

  • How The Wayback Machine Can Strengthen Your Case

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    The Wayback Machine, which archives screenshots of websites at particular points in time, can be an invaluable tool in litigation, but attorneys need to follow a few simple steps early in the discovery process to increase the odds of being able to use materials obtained from the archive, says Timothy Freeman of Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Growth In Global Export Controls Could Harm Tech Industry

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    Recently proposed Chinese export control legislation demonstrates how current nationalist trends are throwing up fences at a time when the world’s technology development is more interwoven across borders than ever, say Reid Whitten and Julien Blanquart at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Draft Civil Procedure Jurisdictional Rule Needs A Tweak

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    The Judicial Conference Advisory Committee’s proposed addition to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 7.1 needs to be amended slightly to prevent late-stage jurisdictional confusion in cases where the parties do not have attributed citizenship, says GianCarlo Canaparo at The Heritage Foundation.

  • Compliance Monitor May Help With CFIUS Approval

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    The ability of a Chinese company to gain approval from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. for acquisition of a U.S. tech company may not hinge as much on the extent to which the technology is critical to national security as it will on convincing the government that the technology can be protected, says ​​​​​​​J. Keith Ausbrook at Guidepost Solutions.

  • New Best Practices Under E-Discovery Spoliation Rule

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    The amended Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(e) provides explicit criteria for imposing sanctions when electronically stored information has been lost during discovery, but courts are still not consistently applying the new rule, with some simply ignoring it in favor of inherent authority, say Matthew Hamilton and Donna Fisher at Pepper Hamilton.

  • How Law Firms Can Create Content Decision Makers Will Read

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    According to our recent survey, the one simple attribute that attracts both in-house counsel and C-suite executives to content is utility, but it’s also clear that both groups define utility differently and prefer different content types, says John Corey of Greentarget.

  • Expecting A Pizza Delivered By Drone? It May Take A While

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    While companies eyeing commercial drone delivery operations may be encouraged by recent Federal Aviation Administration moves to grant regulatory exemptions for a Google-linked drone firm, corporate citizenship requirements and rules designed for manned aviation will be stumbling blocks for many businesses, says Mary-Caitlin Ray of Crowell & Moring.

  • Appellate Lessons From Fed. Circ. EchoStar Unit IP Case

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    The Federal Circuit’s recent decision in the patent case between Elbit Systems Land and EchoStar unit Hughes Network Systems demonstrates the challenges an appellant faces when seeking to reverse a jury verdict in a patent case but offers three takeaways on appellate preservation for litigants in district court, says Asim Bhansali of Kwun Bhansali.

  • After Calm Summer, Expect CFIUS Landscape To Erupt

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    The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States is likely to shake up enforcement this fall by proposing regulations that impose new burdens on a broad set of potential investors, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Government Contracting's Organic Cybersecurity Evolution

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    Even as government contract practitioners are inundated with new federal cybersecurity regulations and enforcers, cybersecurity enforcement is developing through the existing, fundamental mechanisms of bid protests, False Claims Act litigation, and suspension and debarment, say Jerald Howe and Kristin Grimes at Leidos.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Finance Can And Should Protect Its Reputation

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    This month’s controversy surrounding alleged financial misrepresentations by Burford Capital underlines the need for litigation financiers to unite in educating the public about the value of litigation finance, lest opportunists use cases like this to disparage the industry as a whole, says Charles Agee at Westfleet Advisors.

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