Aerospace & Defense

  • November 07, 2019

    Texas Wrong Venue For Navy SEAL's Fee Suit, Calif. Atty Says

    A California attorney asked a Texas federal court to toss a malpractice suit accusing him of jacking up his defense fees for a Navy SEAL acquitted of murder, arguing that the court doesn’t have the authority to rule on the claims.

  • November 07, 2019

    Feds Wrongly Denying Army Vets Citizenship, Suit Says

    A group of four U.S. Army veterans lodged a challenge to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' policy of denying U.S. citizenship to veteran applicants who served less than 180 days on active duty, saying the policy is an illegal barrier to becoming a citizen.

  • November 07, 2019

    Pharma Supplier Inks $22M Deal With DOJ Over Inflated Prices

    Pharmaceutical supplier Fagron Holding USA LLC has agreed to pay $22 million to put to rest two whistleblower suits alleging its subsidiaries inflated average wholesale prices for compound prescription ingredients, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • November 07, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Walgreens, Xerox, New York Knicks

    Walgreens could go private in the largest leveraged buyout ever, Xerox has offered to buy HP for $33 billion, and Silver Lake Partners has expressed interest in buying stakes in the New York Knicks and New York Rangers. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • November 07, 2019

    Moving Co. Says DOD Unit Wrongly Denied $4M In Invoices

    A Maryland-based transportation company sued the federal government in the Court of Federal Claims for failing to reimburse it for more than $4 million in services, arguing an administrative mixup made the government refuse to pay the bill.

  • November 07, 2019

    Dems Drop Subpoena For Key Trump Impeachment Witness

    With their impeachment probe against President Donald Trump gaining steam, three Democrat-led House committees engaged in the inquiry abruptly withdrew a subpoena for testimony from a former White House deputy national security adviser who they had said was a key witness.

  • November 07, 2019

    Feds Say Security Co. Sold US Vulnerable Chinese Gear

    New York federal prosecutors on Thursday charged security technology company Aventura Technologies and its senior management with defrauding the U.S. government and private customers by selling them Chinese-made equipment with known cybersecurity vulnerabilities and passing it off as American-made.

  • November 06, 2019

    Contract Terms Justified $2.7M Arbitration Award, Judge Says

    A California federal court has upheld a nearly $2.7 million arbitration award for an engineering company that was subcontracted to build a warehouse for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, saying the arbitrator did not exceed his authority when issuing the award.

  • November 06, 2019

    Sens. Question NSA Official On Shuttered Call Data Program

    Senators on both sides of the aisle pushed a senior National Security Agency official on Wednesday on why lawmakers should reauthorize a controversial call data collection program the agency has suspended, as legislators seem poised to extend three surveillance authorizations but debate a fourth.

  • November 06, 2019

    Roger Stone Lied Because 'Truth Looked Bad' For Trump: DOJ

    A federal prosecutor came out swinging Wednesday during opening arguments in the criminal trial of former Trump adviser Roger Stone, asserting that the self-described political "dirty trickster" willfully and repeatedly lied to Congress "under oath to cover up his tracks" because "the truth looked bad for Donald Trump."

  • November 06, 2019

    Sen. Wyden Asks FCC To Mandate 5G Cybersecurity Options

    Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., urged the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday to help secure 5G networks against hackers and foreign governments by requiring wireless carriers to implement cybersecurity protections that are currently optional.

  • November 06, 2019

    Feds Ordered To Hand Over Docs To Ex-Theranos CEO

    A California federal judge Tuesday ordered the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to produce key evidence in the criminal case alleging former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes defrauded investors and patients with faulty blood-testing technology, finding that the U.S. Department of Justice indeed has "knowledge of and access to" the requested documents.

  • November 06, 2019

    Contractor Says It's Owed $1.4M For Army Blast Door Order

    A contractor that furnished blast doors for bunkers at a U.S. Army depot has alleged in Alabama federal court that it is owed $1.4 million for an unpaid order of 10 doors.

  • November 05, 2019

    Alleged Ex-CIA Leaker Attacks Spying Laws' Constitutionality

    A former CIA employee accused of spilling secrets to WikiLeaks is leveling a constitutional challenge against the Espionage Act and the federal larceny statute, urging a New York federal court to block the federal government from prosecuting him under the allegedly sweeping and vague statutes.

  • November 05, 2019

    2nd Stopgap Funding Bill Planned Amid Border Wall Fight

    Congress and the White House are planning a second stopgap funding bill to keep the government open while negotiators work on thorny questions related to President Donald Trump's border wall, a leading senator and administration official said Tuesday.

  • November 05, 2019

    Trump Casts Long Shadow Over Roger Stone's Jury Selection

    Several D.C. residents called for jury duty in the criminal trial of President Donald Trump's former adviser Roger Stone acknowledged Tuesday they have strong feelings about the president and would find it hard to be impartial if chosen, citing allegations of corruption inside the Trump White House.

  • November 05, 2019

    Turkish Bank's Bid To Dodge Arraignment Vexes Judge

    A Manhattan federal judge on Tuesday puzzled over a Turkish bank’s request to make a special appearance in court — rather than face a formal arraignment — to address charges of violating U.S. sanctions against Iran, as the government called the bank’s request “strange.”

  • November 05, 2019

    Boustani In On Loan Scam, 2nd Ex-Credit Suisse Banker Says

    A former Credit Suisse Group investment banker on Tuesday took the witness stand in the trial of Privinvest Group executive Jean Boustani over a complex purported $2 billion fraud and kickback scheme involving Mozambican maritime projects, telling jurors he agreed to take bribes from Boustani in exchange for smoothing over loan deals.

  • November 05, 2019

    Atty Says Ex-Fox Guest's Defamation Suit Served Too Late

    A former Fox News guest commentator suing a lawyer for allegedly orchestrating a campaign suggesting the financier and Trump supporter pushed a bogus murder conspiracy story on the cable news network waited too long to serve the complaint, the lawyer told a Texas federal court.

  • November 05, 2019

    China's Meddling Proves Networks Need Tech Purge, Pai Says

    The Federal Communications Commission's quest to weed out technology vendors lacking proper security is gaining steam partly because the public is beginning to realize that China is a real, rather than exaggerated, threat to American consumers' online privacy and free expression, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said Tuesday in New York.

  • November 05, 2019

    Grassley Won't Undo Trump's Metal Duties In Tariff Reform Bill

    Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, said Friday that his bill to curb the White House’s authority to impose national security tariffs will not attempt to remove the steel and aluminum tariffs the Trump administration has already put in place.

  • November 05, 2019

    DOJ Launches Gov't Procurement Antitrust 'Strike Force'

    The U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday that it has launched an interagency “strike force” to root out bid rigging and other antitrust violations that undermine competition in government procurement and program funding.

  • November 05, 2019

    Shredding Co. Can't Protest Contract It Couldn't Have Won

    The Court of Federal Claims has rejected a Kentucky-based business's challenge to the cancellation of a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs contract for document-shredding services at several medical clinics, saying the company didn't show it was harmed by the action.

  • November 05, 2019

    Pillsbury, Skadden Guide Kaman's $330M Deal For Bal Seal

    Kaman, which makes aircraft components, said Tuesday it agreed to buy Bal Seal Engineering for $330 million in cash in a deal steered by Skadden and Pillsbury.

  • November 04, 2019

    GAO Says DISA Properly Revisited Bids In $173M IT Deal Row

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office rejected a protest over a $173.1 million Defense Information Systems Agency cybersecurity support deal, saying DISA had properly reevaluated competing proposals following an earlier dispute before once again awarding the deal to the original contractor.

Expert Analysis

  • Coast Guard Cybersecurity Guidance Puts Shippers On Notice

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    Recent cyberattacks have spurred the U.S. Coast Guard to publish a marine safety information bulletin and a marine safety alert addressing vulnerabilities of shipboard computer systems, potentially triggering significant legal obligations for owners and operators, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

  • What 2 Recent OFAC Cases Say About Compliance Priorities

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    Findings of violation issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control earlier this month to U.S. companies DNI Express Shipping and Southern Cross Aviation are illustrative of the continued focus, by OFAC and other agencies, on completeness and accuracy in both responsive and voluntary disclosures, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • 2 Insurance Coverage Issues Raised By Cyber Warfare

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    As politics and cyberrisks become increasingly intertwined, policyholders and insurers alike would benefit from more certainty in relation to the cyber insurance war exclusion, and from more options in the market that would cover a cyberattack on the U.S. power grid, says Thomas Hunt of Robert M. Currey & Associates.

  • Crisis Messaging To Protect Law Firm Brand And Bottom Line

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    When crises occur, such as data security incidents or gender bias suits, a well-prepared law firm has a thoroughly tested communications plan at the ready, which ensures the firm is the most proactive news source, prevents the crisis from escalating and notifies stakeholders about mitigation efforts, says Zach Olsen at Infinite Global.

  • The Escalating Sanctions Against Venezuela, Russia And Iran

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    The past few weeks saw a flurry of activity demonstrating that imposition and enforcement of economic sanctions against Venezuela, Russia and Iran — and by extension China — continues to be a key driver for the Trump administration in confronting foreign policy challenges, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Unpacking The OFCCP's Proposed Audit Compliance Letters

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    If implemented, the new compliance review scheduling letters proposed by the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs will demand more detailed data at the commencement of an audit than ever sought before, say attorneys at Jackson Lewis.

  • Perspectives

    What You Should Know About Courtroom Closures

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    At attorney Greg Craig’s trial in D.C. federal court this week, the courtroom was cleared so prospective jurors could answer sensitive questions. Even seasoned litigators were left wondering about the nature of this subtle, yet significant, issue involving Sixth Amendment public trial rights, says Luke Cass at Quarles & Brady.

  • Next US Move Against Iran Could Block Humanitarian Aid

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    If the U.S. government uses its anti-money laundering authority under the USA Patriot Act to further isolate Iran, the consequences are likely to extend far beyond the purported aim of ensuring the exclusion of Iranian banks from the international financial system, says Jeremy Paner at Ferrari & Associates.

  • A Look At The SBA's All Small Mentor-Protégé Program

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    The U.S. Small Business Administration’s growing All Small Mentor-Protégé Program can benefit protégés and mentors alike, but, as a recent case before the SBA’s Office of Hearings and Appeals illustrates, the rules for joint-ventures bidding remain confusing, says Ambika Biggs of Hirschler Fleischer.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Seaweed Scientist's Odyssey

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    In the early 1980s, I was working on my Ph.D. in marine biology and ecology. As part of an international team of scientists studying oil spill impacts on marine ecosystems, I saw a niche opportunity to combine science and law, says Andrew Davis of Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Mistakes Vs. Falsehoods In Trade Controls Submissions

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    Federal regulators have dramatically increased the number of economic sanctions enforcement actions this year — with many investigations focusing on whether companies have made false statements in submissions. There are seven key steps that companies can take to keep trade submissions accurate and reduce criminal liability, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: RFP Detail, Presumptions, Data Rights

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Locke Bell of Morrison & Foerster discusses three July decisions — a U.S. Government Accountability Office reminder that proposals must be well written, a U.S. Court of Federal Claims decision depicting the presumption in favor of agency fairness and an example of the GAO’s unwillingness to decide third-party data disputes.

  • Opinion

    Clients Benefit From Law Firm Expense Growth

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    Although there continue to be corporate clients who are seduced by the idea that cheapest is always best when it comes to outside counsel, there are many negative implications on service delivery that result from myopically focusing only on cost reduction at the expense of quality and innovation, says Keith Maziarek at Katten Muchin.

  • How New Executive Order Strengthens Venezuela Sanctions

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    Tuesday’s executive order extending economic sanctions against Venezuela by prohibiting transactions with the Venezuelan government will be, in its practical application, very similar to the complete embargoes the U.S. maintains against entire countries such as Cuba, Iran, Syria and North Korea, says Grant Leach and Cortney Morgan of Husch Blackwell.

  • Opinion

    Changing Ethics Rules Is Key To Law Firm Innovation

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    As demonstrated by the California bar proposal to allow nonlawyers to invest in law firms, we can change the legal ethics rules in a way that protects clients while permitting firms to innovate and serve clients better, say Todd Richheimer of ​​​​​​​Lawfty and Peter Joy of Washington University Law School.

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