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Hospitality

  • March 21, 2019

    Ill. Residents Get Class Nod In Prerecorded Cruise Call Row

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday certified a class of state residents who claim the travel company behind Holiday Cruise Line blasted them with unwanted prerecorded calls marketing a free vacation but refused to allow call recipients who live outside the Prairie State to join the class. 

  • March 21, 2019

    Bar's Tent Collapse Settlement Fight Heads To State Court

    A Missouri federal judge has remanded a St. Louis bar’s suit that alleges its liability insurer and the attorney it hired improperly passed up a favorable settlement in an underlying case over a deadly tent accident, saying Thursday that the claims against the attorney were valid and could be heard in state court.

  • March 21, 2019

    DOI OKs Changes To Conn.'s Gambling Deal With Tribe

    The U.S. Department of the Interior has approved changes to Connecticut’s gambling agreement with the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, according to a notice to be published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, a move that could pave the way for a proposed $300 million casino project and resolve a related lawsuit.

  • March 21, 2019

    Atty Sanctioned For 'Repugnant' Claims About East Indians

    A California federal judge has sanctioned an attorney for his “repugnant” request to hold a hearing to purportedly demonstrate a pattern of noncompliance with the American with Disabilities Act among hotel owners of East Indian descent.

  • March 21, 2019

    End Dates For Tribal-State Gaming Deals OK, 9th Circ. Says

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday upheld a lower court’s order tossing a suit that claimed California wasn’t allowed to put expiration dates on its gaming agreements with tribes, saying that negotiating such dates is permitted by the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.

  • March 21, 2019

    Spirit Balks At Flyers' 2nd Circ. Bid To Revive Bag-Fee Suit

    Spirit Airlines told the Second Circuit on Thursday that federal law preempts a proposed class action alleging it defrauded consumers by concealing its carry-on bag fees on tickets sold through other online travel agents, saying passengers cannot invent and force a disclosure obligation.

  • March 21, 2019

    Hotel Chains Have To Face Search-Engine Antitrust Suit

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday refused to dismiss a proposed class action against Hyatt, Hilton, Marriott and other hotel giants over allegations the companies have an anti-competitive agreement to avoid advertising against each other via search engines.

  • March 21, 2019

    RICO Claim Tossed In Fla. Suit Against Timeshare-Exit Firm

    A Florida federal court on Thursday partly granted Aaronson Law Firm's motion to dismiss timeshare resort developer Club Exploria's suit alleging the firm encouraged customers to back out of their contracts, trimming several counts including one claiming violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

  • March 20, 2019

    What’s In A Judgeship? More Than Meets The Eye

    Figuring out what constitutes a manageable workload for the nation’s district judges is no simple task. Getting the judiciary the resources it needs is even harder.

  • March 20, 2019

    Swamped: How Magistrate Judges Salvaged Louisiana's Judicial Crisis

    The Western District of Louisiana is supposed to have seven district judges. But for a year, most of the courthouses were operating without a single Article III judge. As usual, magistrate judges picked up the slack.

  • March 20, 2019

    Fired Waiter Blasts Trump Critic Restaurateur's 'Glass House'

    A waiter cut loose from the Waverly Inn tossed a stone at the "glass house" of Graydon Carter, slamming the New York City restaurant's co-owner for criticizing President Donald Trump while purportedly mistreating his own workers, according to a proposed class action filed Wednesday in New York federal court.

  • March 20, 2019

    Burger King Franchisee Skirts Ill. Biometric Law, Worker Says

    The nation’s second-largest Burger King franchisee and its Illinois subsidiary got hit Tuesday with a lawsuit claiming its employees in the state were required to scan their fingerprints for timekeeping purposes in violation of the state’s Biometric Information Privacy Act.

  • March 20, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Morgan Stanley, AEW, Stockbridge

    Morgan Stanley has reportedly loaned $64.2 million for a San Diego hotel purchase, AEW Capital is said to be seeking a roughly $190 million sale of a Manhattan office building, and Stockbridge Capital has reportedly paid $183 million for an under-construction Silicon Valley building leased to 23andMe.

  • March 20, 2019

    Panama Unit Owners Can't Pause Row With Trump Hotel Cos.

    The owners of the majority of units in a Trump-branded Panamanian luxury hotel cannot pause their suit against two Trump hotel management companies pending the resolution of related arbitration proceedings, with a New York federal judge ruling that a stay was not necessary.

  • March 20, 2019

    Beckham's Miami MLS Team Can Proceed With Stadium Plans

    The Fort Lauderdale City Council gave Inter Miami CF the green light to start negotiating the nearly $60 million development of a training complex and community park facilities in the Florida town, as the club gears up to join Major League Soccer in 2020.

  • March 20, 2019

    Restaurant Franchise Giant Names Ex-Jones Day Atty As GC

    Flynn Restaurant Group LP, the largest franchise operator in the country and owner of Applebee's, Arby's, Taco Bell and Panera Bread Co. restaurants, has promoted an in-house attorney who previously worked at Jones Day to be its new general counsel.

  • March 20, 2019

    Jury Awards $6.5M To Family Of Baby Burned At Resort

    A Michigan family whose baby was burned by hot coffee at a California resort suffered $6.48 million in damages, a San Diego federal jury has found, attributing most of the fault to the resort and a small portion to the family's nanny.

  • March 20, 2019

    Fatburger Parent Co. Seeks To Ditch Shareholders' IPO Suit

    The parent company of fast food chain Fatburger on Tuesday urged a California federal judge to toss a putative class action accusing it of misleading investors ahead of its $20 million initial public offering, arguing that the shareholders failed to state a claim or show that they purchased stock in the IPO.

  • March 20, 2019

    Starbucks To Invest $100M In Food, Retail Tech Startups

    Starbucks will invest $100 million in a venture capital fund focused on technology startups in the food and retail industries, the company said Wednesday ahead of its annual shareholder meeting.

  • March 20, 2019

    'Seaport Hotel' Too Generic For Fidelity TM Claim, Omni Says

    The term “seaport hotel” is too generic for Fidelity Investments Inc. to claim trademark protection, a planned Omni hotel in Boston's swanky Seaport neighborhood argued Tuesday as it sought to put an end to a dispute between the existing and future establishments.

Expert Analysis

  • US Policy On Cuba Litigation Comes With Risks For Cos.

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    A newly effective embargo measure that allows U.S. claimants to sue the Cuban government in U.S. courts for confiscated Cuban property may soon be expanded to permit lawsuits against non-Cuban entities operating in Cuba. Attorneys at Greenberg Traurig LLP discuss key issues surrounding the policy change.

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • Liability For CEO Misconduct Expands After #MeToo

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    The Nevada Gaming Commission's recent $20 million fine against Wynn Resorts for failing to act after reports of its former CEO's alleged sexual misconduct demonstrates how #MeToo has altered the classic economic assessment for harassment claims, says Dove Burns of Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • DOJ's Wire Act Opinion Means Uncertainty For Tribal Gaming

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    While tribes may be split on the U.S. Department of Justice's new interpretation of the Wire Act, they should all note the DOJ's willingness to weigh in on otherwise established gaming laws, say Charles Galbraith and Julian SpearChief-Morris of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Debating DOJ And Wash. Attorney General No-Poach Briefs

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    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Washington state Attorney General’s Office have filed amicus briefs in three class actions challenging several fast-food restaurant chains' "no-poach" agreements. Jon Jacobs and Thomas Boeder of Perkins Coie LLP, alumni of these two organizations, explain the extent to which the two briefs conflict.

  • Ethical Social Media Marketing For Lawyers

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    Social media presents rich opportunities to reach prospective clients. Attorneys should not let those opportunities pass them by, but they should keep their ethical obligations in mind as they post, says Cort Sylvester of Nilan Johnson Lewis PA.