Hospitality

  • March 05, 2021

    Duval Real Estate Leaders Hope NYC Will Loosen Restrictions

    New York City is primed to offer a new clean energy financing option for developers, and real estate leaders at Duval & Stachenfeld hope this will be part of a broader move to loosen regulations and encourage more development. This is the second in a five-part series of Q&A's with female real estate leaders during Women's History Month, a year into the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • March 05, 2021

    Judge Greenlights Beauty Salon's COVID-19 Coverage Suit

    A California federal judge permitted a beauty salon's proposed class action seeking COVID-19-related insurance coverage to proceed, ruling that it's "plausible" the salon experienced "direct physical loss" after not being able to use its property due to government closure orders.

  • March 05, 2021

    Panda Express Workers Forced To Strip At Seminar, Suit Says​​​​​​​

    Panda Express steered an employee to a seminar that resembled a "cult initiation ritual," where she was screamed at, forced to strip to her underwear and hug a nearly naked male colleague, according to a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles.

  • March 05, 2021

    Restaurant Avoids Sanctions In Slip-And-Fall Suit

    A Georgia appeals court on Friday overturned sanctions against a restaurant for allegedly destroying video evidence of a patron slipping and falling in a wrongful death suit, saying there's no evidence the video evidence still existed when the restaurant became aware the suit was impending.

  • March 05, 2021

    3 Firms Craft £2.3B Deal For Mobile Power Provider Aggreko

    Private equity firms I Squared Capital and TDR Capital will shell out £2.3 billion ($3.2 billion) for U.K.-based Aggreko, a mobile power provider on tap for the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, in a deal announced Friday that was built by law firms Kirkland & Ellis, Slaughter and May and Dickson Minto.

  • March 04, 2021

    COVID-19 Suit Against Carnival Sails Toward A 2022 Trial

    A Washington federal judge authorized a March 2022 trial date Thursday for a proposed class action against Holland America and parent company Carnival, which alleges the companies are liable for passengers' exposure to COVID-19 aboard a vessel that set sail a year ago.

  • March 04, 2021

    2nd Circ. Affirms Denial Of PPP Loan For NY Strip Club

    The Second Circuit on Thursday affirmed a New York federal court's denial of a Buffalo-area gentlemen's club's application for Paycheck Protection Program funding due to a provision that does not guarantee aid for "live performances of a prurient sexual nature."

  • March 04, 2021

    Hotels Say Expedia Shouldn't Join TravelPass Antitrust Suit

    Three hotel chains have urged a Texas federal judge to deny Expedia's bid to intervene in TravelPass' antitrust suit, which claims the chains conspired to keep it from bidding on search terms, saying TravelPass has already opposed releasing information about a private arbitration between the two booking companies.

  • March 04, 2021

    Alamo Drafthouse Gets OK To Tap $7M In DIP Funds

    Bankrupt movie theater chain Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas on Thursday got permission from a Delaware bankruptcy court judge to tap into the first $7 million of its Chapter 11 financing as it starts on the road to an asset sale it plans to close in May.

  • March 04, 2021

    Insurer Seeks $3M Aid In NJ Devils Arena Personal Injury Suit

    The insurer for Prudential Center says two Liberty Mutual units owe $3 million for the defense of a personal injury lawsuit brought by an electrician's apprentice who fell while pulling wire at the New Jersey Devils' hockey arena, according to a suit in Garden State federal court.

  • March 05, 2021

    Business Suits Over COVID Rules Likely To Fail, But Not Slow

    The many constitutional challenges to coronavirus restrictions that businesses have launched are unlikely to succeed, but their proliferation worries public health law experts, who say more are coming and even those that fail can undermine public health measures, now and for future pandemics.

  • March 03, 2021

    Marriott Beats Proposed Class Action Over Data Breach

    A Marriott guest's proposed class action related to a massive data breach cannot proceed because the complaint fails to properly allege facts about the hotel giant's cybersecurity or steps it could have taken to prevent the breach, a Maryland federal judge ruled on Wednesday.

  • March 03, 2021

    Racetrack Loses Bid In 1st Circ. To Revive Wynn RICO Suit

    The former owner of the shuttered Suffolk Downs racetrack was too far removed from the competition for a Massachusetts casino license to claim that it was injured when Wynn Resorts Ltd. was awarded the bid, the First Circuit ruled Wednesday in refusing to revive the lawsuit.

  • March 03, 2021

    Ex-Head Chef Says Calif. Hotel Wrongly Fired Him Over Injury

    The former executive chef of a posh California hotel and marina has lodged a state court lawsuit accusing the hospitality business of wrongfully terminating him after he suffered a work-related injury that required him to take legally protected medical leave.

  • March 03, 2021

    The Halal Guys Sue The Halal Girls In TM Battle Of The Sexes

    The Halal Guys filed suit against the Halal Girls on Tuesday in New York federal court, accusing the competing halal restaurant of infringing its trademarks and exploiting its international brand.

  • March 03, 2021

    Feds Say 'Tiger King' Animal Welfare Act Claim Is Valid

    The U.S. government has urged an Oklahoma federal judge to preserve an Animal Welfare Act claim in its suit against the zoo featured in Netflix's hit series "Tiger King," saying the zoo owner is violating the AWA by exhibiting animals without a valid license.

  • March 03, 2021

    Domino's Drivers Strike $3M FLSA Settlement With Franchisee

    A Domino's Pizza Inc. franchise owner will pay $3 million to more than 3,000 delivery drivers who claimed the owner shorted them on minimum wage by failing to reimburse expenses, after a North Carolina federal judge approved the settlement Wednesday.

  • March 03, 2021

    AIG, Other Insurers Slammed With $500M NY Casino Virus Suit

    An AIG unit and more than a dozen other insurers were the latest to be hit with a suit claiming they wrongly denied coverage for some $500 million in losses to the Resorts World Casino New York City and a Miami Hilton after COVID-19 prompted government shutdowns.

  • March 03, 2021

    Great Wolf Lodge Says Zurich Owes For COVID-19 Losses

    Resort chain Great Wolf Lodge claims in Illinois state court that Zurich American Insurance Co. wrongfully denied it coverage for business losses its 17 nationwide resorts have sustained during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • March 03, 2021

    4 Firms Build $6.25B Sale Of Venetian Hotel In Las Vegas

    Las Vegas Sands Corp. said Wednesday that it has agreed to sell its Las Vegas real estate and casino businesses as part of a larger plan to refocus its efforts on Asia, in a two-part deal that totals $6.25 billion and was developed by four law firms.

  • March 03, 2021

    Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas Hits Ch. 11 With Plans For Sale

    Movie theater chain Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas filed for Chapter 11 protection in Delaware bankruptcy court Wednesday with nearly $123 million in debt and a plan for a sale to a pair of investment firms, saying the strain of COVID-19 closures had become too great.

  • March 02, 2021

    Ex-MillerCoors VP's COVID-19 Release Bid Put On Ice

    An Illinois federal judge refused Monday to shorten a former MillerCoors LLC executive's 42-month sentence for stealing more than $8 million from his employer, agreeing with the government he should not be granted compassionate release over COVID-19 concerns because he already contracted the virus and appears to be doing fine.

  • March 02, 2021

    ClubCorp Must Face Suit Over Fees Charged During Pandemic

    A California federal judge on Tuesday refused to toss or send to arbitration a suit claiming that ClubCorp USA Inc. wrongly forced thousands of private club members to continue paying membership fees during the pandemic, saying there was a factual dispute over whether the members were notified about any arbitration agreements.

  • March 02, 2021

    Pest Control Workers Say Starbucks Can't Ax Exposure Suit

    A former Starbucks employee and two pest control contractors have urged a New York federal judge to reject the coffee chain's bid to toss their suit over exposure to toxic pesticides, arguing that Starbucks' summary judgment bid mischaracterizes their claims.

  • March 02, 2021

    Black Franchisees Pan McDonald's 'Old-Fashioned Racism'

    Two Black McDonald's franchisees have shot back at the fast-food giant's bid to toss their proposed class action alleging bias against Black franchise operators, telling an Illinois federal judge that McDonald's attempt to silence their claims is rooted in "old-fashioned racism."

Expert Analysis

  • Ethics Tips For Attorneys Telecommuting Across State Lines

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    Attorneys working remotely from jurisdictions in which they are not admitted should take precautionary steps to avoid engaging in unauthorized practice of law, say John Schmidt and Michael Seaman at Phillips Lytle.

  • 6 Ways Legal Employers Can Help Pandemic-Weary Parents

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    Parenting during the pandemic has introduced a series of competing personal and professional obligations for attorneys and professional staff, and even organizations that are supportive of their parent employees can take steps to do better, says Meredith Kahan at Saul Ewing.

  • COVID-19 Insurance Issues To Watch In Civil Law Countries

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    A recent decision from a Spanish court of appeals shows that COVID-19 business interruption coverage disputes may not have outcomes that would be expected in common law countries, say Miguel Torres at Martínez-Echevarría & Rivera Abogados and José Umbert at Zelle.

  • Remote Working Tips For Lawyer Trainees And Their Firms

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    The prospect of joining a law firm during the pandemic can cause added pressure, but with a few good practices — and a little help from their firms and supervising attorneys — lawyer trainees can get ahead of the curve while working remotely, say William Morris and Ted Landray at King & Spalding.

  • What Biden's Ethics Pledge Means For Gov't Revolving Door

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    Attorneys at Nossaman look at how President Joe Biden’s ethics pledge goes beyond those of his predecessors by imposing post-employment shadow lobbying and golden parachute restrictions on his administration’s appointees — and how a House bill proposing expansion of federal ethics law could affect enforcement.

  • A Wake-Up Call For Commercial Landlords Seeking Rent

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    A Massachusetts state court's recent decision in UMNV 205-207 v. Caffé Nero clearly distinguishes between the common law doctrines of frustration of purpose and impossibility, and shows that courts may apply these doctrines to discharge tenants' rent obligations during the pandemic despite initial litigation results favoring landlords, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Opinion

    Punishing Bar Exam Policies On Menstrual Products Must Go

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    Law graduates across the states are sitting for the grueling two-day bar exam this week despite menstruation-related barriers, such as inadequate menstrual product and bathroom access, which could be eradicated with simple policy tweaks, say law professors Elizabeth Cooper, Margaret Johnson and Marcy Karin.

  • Mitigating BIPA Suit Risk Under Alternative Liability Theories

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    A recent Illinois federal court decision allowing a suit to proceed against Enterprise Leasing and its parent company for violating the state's Biometric Information Privacy Act shows why even companies that don't directly use biometric data must take proactive contractual measures to mitigate alternative liability exposure, says David Oberly at Blank Rome.

  • It's Time For Law Firms To Start Loving And Leveraging Data

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    The volume and diversity of data managed by law firms today — from client files to internal financial records — may seem daunting, but when properly organized, good data can help practitioners stay competitive by providing sharper insight into firm resources and cost of work, say Jaron Luttich and Barry Wiggins at Element Standard.

  • A Tough Road Ahead for Democrats' Ambitious Policy Agenda

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    While Democrats in Congress are well on their way to enacting an initial COVID-19 relief bill, they will face challenges when pivoting to President Joe Biden's Build Back Better goals for job creation and economic revitalization, say Russell Sullivan and Radha Mohan at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • Keys To Protecting Clients During Law Firm Dissolution

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    Whether a law firm dissolution is amicable or adversarial, departing attorneys should take steps to maintain their legal and ethical responsibilities toward clients, and beware client confidentiality pitfalls when joining new firms, say John Schmidt and Colin Fitzgerald at Phillips Lytle.

  • Opinion

    Time For Federal Action To Ban Noncompetes

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    Now, more than ever, workers should have the freedom to work, so the pro-worker Biden administration should follow some states' lead and end the use of noncompetes, says Gerald Sauer at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Biz Interruption Insurance Considerations After Texas Storms

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    Businesses that have suffered losses from the snow and utility interruptions in Texas should consider the broad range of commercial property insurance policy triggers that may apply, says Micah Skidmore at Haynes and Boone.

  • Pandemic Restriction Challenges Face Uphill Battle In Calif.

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    A California appellate court's recent decision in Midway Venture v. San Diego illustrates the steep and narrow path to challenging the state's pandemic-related public health restrictions, even when those restrictions infringe on activities protected by the First Amendment, say Christopher Wheeler and Brookes Degen at Farella Braun.

  • Overcoming TM Maintenance Filing Hurdles Amid Pandemic

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    As the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office carefully scrutinizes claims for excused nonuse of marks in commerce arising from pandemic-related business shutdowns, registrants can rely on several filing strategies when facing maintenance deadline obstacles, says Jake Neu at Bradley Arant.

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