Hospitality

  • February 21, 2020

    Domino's Tells 6th Circ. No-Poach Claims Must Be Arbitrated

    Domino's Pizza has told the Sixth Circuit that a lower court was right to force a suit over no-poach provisions in its past franchise agreements into arbitration, saying the former driver's appeal has no support from the facts or the law.

  • February 21, 2020

    EU Fines Spanish Hotel Co. $7.2M Over Antitrust Violation

    The European Commission said Friday it has fined Spanish hotel group Melia Hotels International SA — Spain's largest hotel chain — €6.7 million ($7.2 million) for breaching European Union antitrust rules by restricting tour operators’ travel packages based on where consumers live.

  • February 21, 2020

    Hilton Retirees Defend Bid For Class Cert. In Pension Suit

    A group of Hilton retirees on Friday asked a D.C. federal judge to certify a class in their suit claiming they were cheated out of pension benefits through improper vesting rules, saying the hotel chain resorted to "the Rule 23 equivalent of schoolyard name-calling" in its opposition.

  • February 21, 2020

    Marriott Can't Duck Hotel Guests' Data Breach Claims

    A Maryland federal court on Friday kept alive multidistrict litigation stemming from hotel giant Marriott International Inc.'s massive data breach, finding that guests had adequately claimed injuries traceable to the company's failure to detect the historic hack or stop the theft of their personal information.

  • February 21, 2020

    Players Seek Class Cert. In Big Fish Casino Gambling Suit

    Consumers suing Big Fish Games over its slot machine phone games have asked for class certification and a preliminary injunction that would put those apps on ice, claiming new information from a legislative inquiry and news reports lays bare the "ruinous" and "predatory nature of defendants' practices."

  • February 21, 2020

    IRS Proposes Rules On Permitted Meal Expense Deductions

    The Internal Revenue Service clarified Friday that certain meals paid for separately from business entertainment activities can be deductible in proposed regulations to aiming to implement changes to the treatment of business entertainment expenses made in the 2017 federal tax overhaul.

  • February 21, 2020

    Whataburger Fights EEOC Sanctions Bid In Hiring Policy Suit

    Whataburger Restaurants LLC hit back Friday at a sanctions request by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in a suit accusing the fast-food chain of retaliating against an employee who refused to comply with a directive to hire white job applicants, denying that it withheld relevant discovery documents.

  • February 21, 2020

    ERISA Doesn't Preempt Hotel Benefits Ordinance, Seattle Says

    The city of Seattle has urged a Washington federal judge to throw out the ERISA Industry Committee's challenge to a city ordinance meant to ensure hotel workers have access to affordable health care, saying the group was trying to use ERISA "for its own ends."

  • February 20, 2020

    MGM Resorts Data Breach Exposes Guests' Personal Details

    Hotel and casino giant MGM Resorts International has admitted that it suffered a data breach last summer that exposed the personal details, including names and contact information, of what one cybersecurity researcher said was more than 10 million guests.

  • February 20, 2020

    NLRB Judge Says Burger Flipper Not Fired Due To Trans Bias

    A National Labor Relations Board judge has rejected allegations that an Oregon burger restaurant fired a worker because of protected group activity including complaints about alleged transgender bias, saying the evidence shows the worker was terminated for poor job performance and sanitary habits.

  • February 20, 2020

    Home Depot, INTA Ask High Court To Side With Booking.com

    A slew of outside groups are throwing their support behind Booking.com in its U.S. Supreme Court battle over trademarks, including The Home Depot, the International Trademark Association and other website owners with generic dot-com addresses.

  • February 20, 2020

    NLRB To Review Nixed Union Election Over Pro-Union Button

    The National Labor Relations Board on Thursday gave workers at a Las Vegas-area casino another shot at organizing after a regional director shut down their election win over suspicion that board officials told a worker to remove a pro-union button, saying the alleged misconduct deserves a closer look.

  • February 20, 2020

    Tribe's Alamo Restoration Suit Still Thin, Officials Say

    A Texas state commissioner and another official urged a federal judge Wednesday to reject a Native American tribal group's bid to revive a suit over its role in the Alamo's restoration, saying a revised complaint hadn't fixed the problems that led to the suit's dismissal last year.

  • February 20, 2020

    SeaWorld's $65M 'Blackfish' Class Action Settlement Wins OK

    A California federal judge has preliminarily approved SeaWorld Entertainment Inc.'s $65 million settlement of a securities class action related to the controversial 2013 documentary "Blackfish," saying he will likely give his final approval to the deal because it is fair and reasonable.

  • February 20, 2020

    Sprint Chided For 'Victim Blaming' Defense In Junk Fax Suit

    Sprint is on the hook for violating a Connecticut junk fax law after a federal judge said he wasn’t impressed with the mobile giant’s “burden-shifting, blame-the-victim approach” to arguing that the motel suing it had no standing to do so.

  • February 19, 2020

    2nd Circ. Revives Cruise Worker's Deportation Relief Bid

    A Romanian citizen who worked on a Florida-based cruise ship got another shot to stay in the United States after the Second Circuit found on Wednesday that the brief time he spent in international waters may not count as a departure from the U.S.

  • February 19, 2020

    Calif. Court Says US Baseball Must Face Foul Ball Injury Suit

    A California appeals court is giving a young girl who was hit in the face during an amateur baseball game another swing at the U.S. Baseball Federation, ruling MLB's recent decision to extend safety netting at its own stadiums prevents the USBF from arguing it has no obligation to do the same.

  • February 19, 2020

    Fla. Court Affirms $12M Verdict Over Motel Guest's Murder

    A Florida appeals court on Wednesday upheld a jury's $12 million verdict in a suit accusing a motel and its lax security of causing a guest's murder by a neighborhood man, saying the motel can't fault the guest's companion, who left her at the motel locked out of their room.

  • February 19, 2020

    Okla. Tribes Say Two Others Don't Belong In Gaming Pact Suit

    A group of Native American tribes have urged an Oklahoma federal judge to reject a bid by two other tribes to take part in litigation against Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt, saying those two tribes don’t have the kind of conflict with the governor that would let them step into the suit over tribal-state gambling deals.

  • February 19, 2020

    $10M Deal To End Claims Motel 6 Helped ICE Gets Final OK

    Motel 6 must fork over $10 million to resolve former guests' claims that the budget motel chain shared their information with federal immigration authorities after an Arizona federal judge gave a final stamp of approval to the settlement agreement Tuesday.

  • February 19, 2020

    Resort Investors Can't Build On Mauritius Slavery Site

    The island nation of Mauritius has won its challenge against U.K. investors that wanted to build a luxury resort on a UNESCO World Heritage site commemorating escaped slaves' fight for freedom, with an international tribunal finding that the investors have no right to develop the property.

  • February 19, 2020

    Judge Dunks Ex-Knick's Defamation Suit Against Team Owner

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday threw out a suit by former New York Knicks forward Charles Oakley against the team’s owner and Madison Square Garden over his ejection from the arena, saying Oakley’s complaint fails to show how he was allegedly assaulted or defamed.

  • February 19, 2020

    Eckert Seamans Accused Of Dropping Client Like 'Hot Potato'

    A gaming company is claiming in Pennsylvania federal court that law firm Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC breached its contract and fiduciary duty by dropping the business "like the proverbial 'hot potato'" in favor of a rival with deeper pockets.

  • February 19, 2020

    Hospitality Group Of The Year: Proskauer

    Proskauer Rose LLP in 2019 guided Eagle Hospitality Real Estate Investment Trust in a complex $565 million initial public offering in Singapore and advised French hotel giant Accor on major deals in Australia and China, earning the firm a spot among Law360's 2019 Hospitality Groups of the Year.

  • February 18, 2020

    Restaurant Groups Can't Upend NYC Fair Workweek Law

    A New York judge on Tuesday held that New York City’s Fair Workweek Law requiring fast-food businesses to give employees a two-week advance notice of work schedules is valid, rejecting a challenge by several restaurant industry groups that claimed it was preempted by state law.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Complications That Can Derail A Class Action Settlement

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    As courts increase scrutiny of class action settlement agreements, approval hinges on avoiding common mistakes, such as inadequate forms of notice, lack of Article III standing and irrelevant cy pres recipients, say attorneys at Troutman Sanders.

  • Rebuttal

    AI Can't Accurately Predict Case Length And Cost — Yet

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    A recent Law360 guest article argued that artificial intelligence can precisely estimate the length and cost of a new case, but several limitations will likely delay truly accurate predictions for years to come, says Andrew Russell at Shaw Keller.

  • Don’t Bet On Constitutionality Of Daily Fantasy Sports In NY

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    A New York state court's recent decision in White v. Cuomo that daily fantasy sports are unconstitutional means that while the services may continue to legally operate, they face an uncertain future until the state’s highest court weighs in or the Legislature amends the constitution, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Airbnb Model Sheds Light On Tech Co. Tax Issues In UK

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    A look at Airbnb's tax structures, which are being investigated by HM Revenue & Customs, provides insight into whether multinational tech companies trade through permanent establishments in the U.K., and should be taxed accordingly, says Zoe Wyatt at Andersen Tax.

  • 3 Rulings Show When Litigating Wage Claims Is Worth It

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    Recent decisions from New York federal courts demonstrate when wage and hour defendants may benefit from litigation, rather than an early settlement offer designed to avoid fee-shifting provisions that favor prevailing plaintiffs, says Valerie Ferrier at Martin Clearwater.

  • Lawyers Can Build Trust Through The Spoken Word

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    As attorneys, we may prefer the precision of written communication, but a phone call or an in-person conversation builds trust by letting others see and hear our authentic selves, rather than something constructed or scripted, says mediator Sidney Kanazawa of ARC.

  • Opinion

    Legal Prediction Is Demanding But Not Impossible

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent decision in Balducci v. Cige incorrectly concluded that predicting the length and cost of a case is nearly impossible, and overlooked artificial intelligence's ability to do so, says Joseph Avery with Claudius Legal Intelligence.

  • 3 Employee-Friendly Updates In NY’s 2021 Budget Proposal

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    Reflecting an aggressive effort to pass pro-employee laws, several provisions in New York’s 2021 budget proposal would expand paid sick leave benefits, increase disclosure requirements for state contractors, and alter classification standards for gig economy workers, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Malpractice Landscape Is Becoming Riskier For BigLaw

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    A recent survey of lawyers’ professional liability insurers revealed an increase in malpractice claims against law firms, suggesting clients will demand more accountability in the coming decade, say Gerald Klein and Amy Nguyen at Klein & Wilson.

  • High Court May Interpret TCPA Autodial Rules Narrowly

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    In Barr v. AAPC, perhaps the most important free speech case in decades, the U.S. Supreme Court will likely require a narrow interpretation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act's automatic dialing system restrictions and protect the public against unwanted robocalls without exposing legitimate messages to liability, say Eric Troutman and Daniel Delnero of Squire Patton.

  • Perspectives

    Book Review: A Lawyer Reflects On Defending Guilty People

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    In her new book, "Guilty People," Abbe Smith successfully conveys that seeing ourselves in people who commit crime may be the first step to exacting change in our justice system, says U.S. District Judge Diane Humetewa of the District of Arizona.

  • 4th Circ. Insurance Ruling Highlights Risks Of Broker Errors

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    The Fourth Circuit's recent decision in Old White Charities v. Bankers Insurance reminds policyholders to read their insurance applications carefully, because courts may hold them accountable even if an error is made by a broker, says Tae Andrews of Miller Friel.

  • Alphabet's Missteps Offer Crisis Management Case Study

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    Corporate strategy and communications surrounding the recent resignation of Alphabet's chief legal officer provide a remarkable example of what companies should not do in a crisis, says Jolie Balido at NewStar Media.

  • How Emotional Intelligence Can Benefit Transactional Attys

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    By investing in self- and social-awareness skills, transactional lawyers can make the negotiation process more productive and pleasant while also increasing post-deal stability, say Frank Williamson at Oaklyn Consulting and Mike Harrell at Latitude Advisors.

  • Colo. Wage Rules Present Big Employer Compliance Hurdles

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    Colorado’s new Overtime and Minimum Pay Standards Order contains the most sweeping revisions to the state’s wage standards in over 20 years, but certain aspects of the employee-friendly rules fail to address the administrative, financial and resource burdens imposed on employers, say Martine Wells and Craig Finger at Brownstein Hyatt.

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