Hospitality

  • October 15, 2021

    Carmen Electra, Models Slam NC Strip Clubs Over Image Use

    Two groups of professional models, including "Baywatch" actress Carmen Electra, have slapped two North Carolina strip clubs with publicity rights suits in federal court for illegally using their images, while the U.S. Supreme Court reviews a similar case.

  • October 15, 2021

    Hotel Union Wants NJ Sheraton To Pay For Pandemic Layoffs

    A New York hospitality union has urged a New Jersey federal court to confirm three arbitration awards directing a Sheraton hotel to pay for severance and health fund contributions due to employees who were laid off as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • October 15, 2021

    11th Circ. Denies Strip Club's Bid For Extended Alcohol Sales

    The Eleventh Circuit denied a former Atlanta-area strip club's efforts to extend the hours when it can sell alcohol, saying the club doesn't have a vested right to serve drinks into the wee hours despite a city ordinance barring late-night sales.

  • October 15, 2021

    Eagle Hospitality To Float $380M Cash Payout In Ch. 11 Plan

    Eagle Hospitality Group has rolled out a plan and disclosure statement for its Delaware Chapter 11 liquidation, aiming to complete voting by Dec. 9 and secure a confirmation on Dec. 16 or 20 for a liquidation that will pay about $379.5 million to top creditors in the 15-hotel bankruptcy.

  • October 15, 2021

    3 Firms Construct SPAC Deal For $2.6B Philippines Casino

    The parent of Philippines-based casino and luxury resort Okada Manila will merge with a special-purpose acquisition vehicle in a transaction that features an enterprise value of $2.6 billion and was built by Baker McKenzie, Milbank and Schulte Roth, the companies said Friday.

  • October 15, 2021

    49ers Stadium Contractor To Pay Team $6M For ADA Liability

    The general contractor for Levi's Stadium has agreed to pay $6 million to the San Francisco 49ers for its alleged role in building a purported "disability access nightmare," two years after the NFL team inked a $24 million Americans with Disabilities Act class settlement over the venue.

  • October 14, 2021

    Former Vegas Riviera Hotel Land Parcel Sold For $120M

    The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority's board of directors said it has unanimously approved the $120 million sale of a prime 10-acre land parcel on the Strip to a Chilean casino resort operator, who has agreed to develop the property as a hotel or resort.

  • October 14, 2021

    1st Circ. Tosses Dispute Over Nonprofit's Housing Credit Deal

    A suit from an investment group contesting an affordable housing not-for-profit's efforts to purchase a housing tax credit project was properly dismissed by a Massachusetts federal court, the First Circuit said, ruling the lower court lacked jurisdiction.

  • October 14, 2021

    Texas Bars Say Fight Over Pandemic Closures Far From Moot

    A group of Texas bars told a Texas appellate court Thursday that the state can't claim mootness as a reason to end their challenge to restrictions that shut their doors during the height of the pandemic because they still face potential consequences.

  • October 14, 2021

    Ga. Hotel Seeks Jury In Sex-Trafficking Coverage Row

    A Red Roof Inn franchisee is urging a Georgia federal judge to allow a jury to weigh in on its dispute with Mesa Underwriters over insurance coverage for a sex-trafficking suit, arguing that policy language in its assault and battery exclusion is "broad, vague and ambiguous."

  • October 14, 2021

    Chiropractor Sues State Farm Seeking Virus Coverage

    A Pennsylvania chiropractic clinic brought a proposed class action against State Farm Fire and Casualty Co. for coverage of pandemic-related losses, saying government restrictions caused the type of physical loss required for coverage under its "all-risk" policy.

  • October 14, 2021

    Steak Chain Plans Revised Virus Suit After Judge's Dismissal

    An Arizona federal judge dismissed a COVID-19 coverage lawsuit from the owner of steakhouses and restaurants in Arizona, Illinois and Texas, finding that the loss of use of its buildings did not amount to a "direct physical loss or damage" that would qualify it for coverage from Allianz and Axa units.

  • October 14, 2021

    Ex-Olympic Skater May Get Bail In Virus Loan Fraud Case

    A New York federal judge said Thursday he'd grant bail for a Slovenian former Olympic figure skater charged with defrauding the federal COVID-19 economic relief program if the former coach guaranteeing the release package acknowledges the risks of backing someone from a country with no extradition.

  • October 13, 2021

    Chinese Tourism Biz Can Glimpse Hot Air Balloon Co.'s Taxes

    A Massachusetts magistrate judge has allowed a Chinese tourism company to take a partial look at a now-dissolved hot air balloon manufacturer's tax returns in its suit to confirm a $1.4 million foreign arbitration award, saying it can see filings from 2018 and 2019 only.

  • October 13, 2021

    Watchdogs Want Trump Org Blocked From Federal Contracts

    A pair of watchdog groups and a law professor have urged federal agencies to suspend the Trump Organization from contracting, saying recent indictments, settlements and a critical congressional report show the company is not fit to work with the government.

  • October 13, 2021

    Uber Has Itself To Blame For $91M Arbitration Bill, Judge Says

    A New York state judge ruled Wednesday that a deluge of arbitration claims against Uber — and the $91 million in "outrageous" fees the ride-sharing giant says it now faces — is a nightmare of the company's own making and that he would not grant an injunction to halt a multimillion-dollar payment.

  • October 13, 2021

    Liberty Tells 11th Circ. To Keep Hotelier's Virus Coverage Loss

    Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. urged the Eleventh Circuit to uphold a decision finding that a Georgia-based hotel operator isn't entitled to coverage for its pandemic losses because it failed to allege the virus caused any physical damage required for coverage.

  • October 13, 2021

    Billionaire's Doc Bid Again Rejected In $297M Award Suit

    Two companies owned by Spanish-Filipino billionaire Enrique K. Razon Jr. lost a second attempt to compel discovery in a $297 million award enforcement and with it their defense that casino operator Global Gaming Asset Management secured the award by withholding evidence of bribery from the tribunal.  

  • October 13, 2021

    Calif. Tribe Sues State Over Delayed Gaming Compact Talks

    The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians has accused California and its governor in federal court of failing to negotiate a new gaming compact in good faith, saying the state wants to hamper its casino operations by repeatedly asking for unacceptable labor relations and other changes.

  • October 13, 2021

    US Hits H-2B Visa Limit For First Half Of FY 2022

    Employers can no longer recruit foreign workers under the H-2B visa program for the first half of fiscal year 2022 after the federal government announced that it reached its statutory visa cap on Sept. 30.

  • October 13, 2021

    InterContinental Wants Out Of NM Franchisee's Antitrust Suit

    InterContinental Hotels Group wants a New Mexico federal judge to drop a proposed class action accusing the hotel giant of forcing franchisees to buy overpriced and low-quality goods from its mandated vendors, so it could receive kickbacks, calling it an attempt to "repudiate and rewrite" their contract.

  • October 13, 2021

    Insurer Owes No Duty To Bar Over Shooting Of Patron

    An insurance company has no obligation to pay out an arbitration award on behalf of a St. Louis bar in an underlying lawsuit filed by a woman who was seriously injured in a shooting on the premises, a Missouri federal judge held.

  • October 12, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Verdict Takes Pressure Off Feds — For Now

    Prosecutors' clean sweep in the first trial over the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scheme gives them a road map for victory in future cases without needing to call a central witness who has been accused of stretching the truth, but it leaves the convicted parents with meaty appellate issues, experts say.

  • October 12, 2021

    Bidder For Miami Marina Project Sues Over Stalled Award

    A marina operator that twice won a bidding process for a contract to run a Miami marina is suing the city for allegedly delaying awarding the contract and now trying to subvert the competitive bidding process with a ballot initiative that would allow voters to award the contract to a competitor.

  • October 12, 2021

    SEC Official Warns Vast Swaths Of Economy Are 'Going Dark'

    U.S. Securities and Exchange Commissioner Allison Herren Lee said Tuesday that regulators should revise how "shareholders of record" — a key metric that determines when companies must file regular SEC disclosures — are defined to prevent the public from being left in the dark.

Expert Analysis

  • Girardi Scandal Provides Important Ethics Lessons

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    The litigation and media maelstrom following allegations that famed plaintiffs attorney Thomas Girardi and his law firm misappropriated clients' funds provides myriad ethics and professional responsibility lessons for practitioners, especially with regard to misconduct reporting and liability insurance, says Elizabeth Tuttle Newman at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Opinion

    No Signs Of Turning, Tide Of Insurer COVID Wins Persists

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    The trend of COVID-19 business interruption decisions favoring insurers continues to hold strong — any commentary to the contrary is striking a narrative that is not borne out by reality, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Jabil GC Talks Compliance Preparation

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    Tried-and-true compliance lessons from recent decades can be applied to companies’ environmental, social and governance efforts, especially with regard to employee training and consistent application of policies — two factors that can create a foundation for ESG criteria to flourish, says Robert Katz at Jabil.

  • Opinion

    Bankruptcy Venue Reform Bill Needs Amending

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    The Bankruptcy Venue Reform Act, currently pending in Congress, goes too far in limiting Chapter 11 filings to jurisdictions where a debtor's principal assets or headquarters are located; we propose a more targeted solution that considers the current reality of complex corporate structures, say Kenneth Rosen and Philip Gross at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • 3 Ways CLOs Can Drive ESG Efforts

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    Chief legal officers are specially trained to see the legal industry's flaws, and they can leverage that perspective to push their companies toward effective environmental, social and governance engagement, says Mark Chandler at Stanford Law School.

  • How Law Firms Can Rethink Offices In A Post-Pandemic World

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    Based on their own firm's experiences, Kami Quinn and Adam Farra at Gilbert discuss strategies and unique legal industry considerations for law firms planning hybrid models of remote and in-office work in a post-COVID marketplace.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Aids Policyholder Deductible Calculations

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    In its recent McDonnel Group v. Starr Surplus Lines Insurance decision, the Fifth Circuit held that the policy's flood deductible language was ambiguous, providing a win for policyholders and a helpful mathematical interpretation for insureds with similar deductible language in their property insurance policies, says Tae Andrews at Miller Friel.

  • COVID-19 Offers Cautionary Tales On Hospitality Contracts

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    Hotel owners should look closely at the agreements that govern hotel investment and operation to learn lessons from the pandemic and to protect against such vulnerability in the future with force majeure clauses and other provisions, say Anthony Cavanaugh and Jiah Park at Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Baker Hughes CLO Talks Sustainability Team

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    For businesses focused on addressing environmental, social and governance considerations, a legal team that can coordinate sustainability efforts across the company can help to manage risk and compliance issues, anticipate and prepare for change, and identify new opportunities, says Regina Jones at Baker Hughes.

  • What Mainstreaming Of Litigation Finance Means For Industry

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    The rush of new capital and investors into the litigation funding space is expected to bring heightened competition on price and other key deal terms, but litigants will need to be more in tune with individual financiers' proclivities, says William Weisman at Therium Capital Management.

  • Employers: Beware Tip Credit Violations Under New DOL Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Labor’s new regulation, which penalizes employers that improperly take worker tips, even for good faith or first-time offenses, means hospitality employers should reexamine their tip credit policies and prepare for increasingly assertive DOL enforcement, says William Pokorny at Franczek.

  • Opinion

    Federal Courts Make 2 Basic Errors In Virus Coverage Rulings

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    Many federal courts deciding dispositive motions in COVID-19 business interruption coverage cases are neglecting fundamental precepts of civil procedure by acting as fact-finders or failing to defer to forum state decisions, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • What 9th Circ. Privilege Test Means For Dual-Purpose Advice

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    While the Ninth Circuit's recent ruling in In re: Grand Jury confirms that courts should use the primary-purpose test to determine whether communications with both legal and business purposes are shielded by the attorney-client privilege, questions on the application of the test remain, says Scott Tenley at Michelman & Robinson.

  • Opinion

    The DOJ Should Ramp Up FCA Focus In PPP Enforcement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice should utilize qui tam actions more in its Paycheck Projection Program enforcement efforts, both to maintain credibility with whistleblowers and to leverage the False Claims Act's lower burden of proof, which makes settlements easier to reach than criminal convictions, say R. Scott Oswald and Lydia Pappas at the Employment Law Group.

  • Lifting The Veil On The Supreme Court's Shadow Docket

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    Following headline-making U.S. Supreme Court emergency orders on Texas’ new abortion law, COVID-19 restrictions and more, Vetan Kapoor, counsel to Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, examines the court's so-called shadow docket and its decision-making procedures, including questions around transparency, timing and precedential effect.

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