Hospitality

  • January 17, 2020

    Caesars Fights Unions' Bid To Undo NLRB Email Use Ruling

    Caesars Entertainment urged the National Labor Relations Board on Thursday not to reconsider its recent order limiting when workers can use company email systems to organize, saying the opposed unions are rehashing old arguments.

  • January 17, 2020

    Taxation With Representation: Skadden, Simpson, White

    In this week’s Taxation with Representation, Visa acquires fintech company Plaid for $5.3 billion, a Blackstone real estate trust makes a $4.6 billion play for two Vegas hotels, and Saudi Aramco’s IPO raises another $3.8 billion.

  • January 17, 2020

    Tribes Can't Fight $3M Ruling In Tribal Court, Builder Says

    The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes are wrongly trying to keep a construction contract dispute in tribal court after an arbitration panel awarded the construction company close to $3 million, the builder told an Idaho federal court.

  • January 17, 2020

    Workers Group Fights To Keep McDonald's NLRB Case Alive

    The Fight for $15 has asked a National Labor Relations Board judge not to end its push to hold McDonald's jointly responsible for franchisees' labor violations, saying new evidence suggests one of the labor board members who approved a settlement in the case should have recused himself.

  • January 17, 2020

    Law360's Tort Report: Meat Loaf’s Suit Out Of Hell

    A $24 million jury verdict in a suit over a newborn’s brain injury and singer Meat Loaf’s suit against Hyatt over a horror convention injury lead Law360’s Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • January 17, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen a tech company sue an online football stock exchange, a number of seafood distributors and their insurers sue cargo company Maersk, and several hotels add to Visa and MasterCard's swipe-fee class action woes. Here, Law360 looks at these claims and more. 

  • January 16, 2020

    Miss. Casinos Sue Churchill Downs Over Seat License Change

    A partnership of Mississippi casinos hit Churchill Downs, the home of the Kentucky Derby horse race, with a lawsuit in Kentucky federal court Wednesday alleging the track jacked up the price of its seats in the "Millionaires Row" section by 500% and demanded it pay or face the termination of 30-year personal seat licenses the partnership had purchased.

  • January 16, 2020

    Del. Hotel's Burst Pipe Coverage Battle Headed To Trial

    A Delaware judge has found that a jury must weigh a beachside hotel's suit alleging United National Insurance Co. wrongfully denied its claim for water damage stemming from a ruptured pipe, but threw out the hotel's bad faith claim against the insurer.

  • January 16, 2020

    Aramark Strikes $21M Deal To End Managers' Bonus Suit

    Aramark Corp. and a group of several thousand workers have asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to sign off on a $21 million settlement that would resolve a suit claiming the company reneged on its promise to pay bonuses to managers in 2018.

  • January 16, 2020

    Aurelius Unveils €63M Hotel Sale To Germany Real Estate Co.

    Private equity firm Aurelius Equity Opportunities said Thursday it has agreed to sell a hotel subsidiary to German company Art-Invest Real Estate Group for an enterprise value of €63 million ($70 million).

  • January 16, 2020

    Investors Say PNC Was 'Intimately Involved' In EB-5 Fraud

    A group of Chinese investors asked a Florida federal judge on Wednesday not to let PNC Bank walk away from a lawsuit accusing it of being "intimately involved" in a fraud scheme that misappropriated the investors' funds by hijacking the EB-5 visa program.

  • January 15, 2020

    9th Circ. Told It Can Wade Into Big Fish App Pop-Up Fight

    Mobile gaming consumers in a pair of proposed class actions alleging the Big Fish Casino app is illegal gambling told the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday that the appellate court does have basis to review a lower court's refusal to stop the operators of the app from using pop-ups that may block potential class members from joining the cases.

  • January 15, 2020

    Fla. Judge Hands Win To Hotel Owner In Feud With Ex-Partner

    A Florida judge handed a win to the current owner of Miami Beach's Z Ocean Hotel in a long-running dispute with the original developer of the project when he found that the developer lied about his assets to induce investment in the project.

  • January 15, 2020

    Restaurants Unlimited's Ch. 11 Plan Disclosure Gets Approval

    Casual eatery operator Restaurants Unlimited Inc.'s Chapter 11 plan disclosure statement received court approval Wednesday in Delaware without objection, with an attorney for the debtor saying it provides enough information for affected creditors to vote on the plan.

  • January 15, 2020

    Nev. Ballot Initiative By Vegas Teachers Seeks Casino Tax Hike

    Nevada could ask voters in 2022 to approve a new top rate for the state’s gaming tax applicable to larger casinos under an initiative petition recently filed by a teachers’ union, which said the proposal would raise $340 million annually.

  • January 15, 2020

    Investor Can Pursue Coverage Of Hotel Development Fight

    A California state judge has ruled that real estate investment firm Somera Capital Management LLC can proceed with its claim that a unit of The Hartford must fund its defense of a lawsuit alleging it failed to pay fees owed to the developer of two hotels, finding that an exclusion for breach-of-contract claims in Somera’s policy doesn’t bar coverage.

  • January 15, 2020

    FTC Settles With Sales Worker In Belize Scam For $86M

    A Maryland federal judge has approved an $86 million judgment against a sales and marketing employee in a Federal Trade Commission case alleging a massive real estate investment scam in a Manhattan-sized development in the country of Belize.

  • January 15, 2020

    Hispanic Chipotle Workers Can't Get Cert. In Bias Suit

    A California federal judge on Wednesday declined to certify a statewide class action alleging Chipotle holds back Hispanic and Mexican workers by only promoting workers who speak fluent English and banning Spanish in its restaurants, saying the workers didn't show the restaurant has those policies.

  • January 15, 2020

    Checkers Drive-In Settles Nationwide TCPA Suit Over Texts

    Checkers Drive-In Restaurants Inc. agreed to provide two $5 vouchers to all members of a proposed class of customers who say they received promotional text messages from the fast food chain in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

  • January 15, 2020

    Maine's Tribes Push To Restore Authority Over Lands

    A task force of Native American and state leaders has handed recommendations to the Maine Legislature’s Judiciary Committee in a bid to give tribes greater decision-making powers over key issues such as gambling and fishing rights on Indian lands, according to local news reports.

  • January 14, 2020

    Perkins & Marie Callender's Liquidation Plan Approved

    The Chapter 11 plan of liquidation of former restaurant chain franchisor Perkins & Marie Callender's received court approval Tuesday in Delaware, with a bankruptcy judge lauding the success of the case that resulted in asset sales garnering more than $70 million for the estate.

  • January 14, 2020

    Va. Tribe Inks Land Deal With Norfolk For Commercial Casino

    A federally recognized Native American tribe in Virginia said Monday it has signed a $10 million deal with the city of Norfolk allowing it to develop 13.4 acres of land as a commercial resort and casino.

  • January 14, 2020

    Alaska Allowed In On Tribe's Suit Over Gaming Lease

    A D.C. federal court on Tuesday granted Alaska's bid to step into the Native Village of Eklutna’s suit claiming congressional representatives illegally influenced the U.S. government when it refused to approve a tribal lease for gambling.

  • January 14, 2020

    Houston Deli Tries To Sink $400K Kolache Poisoning Verdict

    A deli in Houston is fighting a $400,000 verdict in which a jury found it gave a customer food poisoning via a bad kolache, telling a Texas appellate court the only medical expert testimony in the case pointed to a different cause for the illness.

  • January 14, 2020

    Borgata Casino Must Face Negligence Claims Over Assault

    The Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City must face claims that it failed to prevent an assault after a New Jersey appellate panel on Tuesday said a trial court improperly tossed the victim's suit over a lack of expert testimony on the casino’s purported negligence.

Expert Analysis

  • Tightening Up Contracts In A Hardening Insurance Market

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    Commercial property insurance terms and conditions have softened in the last decade, but underwriters may consider adding important clauses into their contracts as the market shows signs of hardening, say Jason Reeves of Zelle and Helen Campbell of Argo Insurance Bermuda.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • The New Class Action Frontier Under Illinois Privacy Law

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    One year after a pivotal Illinois Supreme Court ruling broadened liability under the Biometric Information Privacy Act, companies in a wide variety of industries need to be vigilant of a rise in potentially financially ruinous class action filings, and there are several steps they can take to protect themselves from BIPA liability, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • A Wide Range Of Legal Priorities For Tribes In 2020

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    This year, Indian Country faces a number of critical policy and legal issues that must be addressed to protect tribal sovereignty, with key developments to watch for in all three branches of government, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • Rodeo Ruling Clarifies Atty Conflict Rules In Derivative Suits

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    While the Texas Supreme Court's recent decision not to disqualify Kelly Hart & Hallman's representation of owners of the Billy Bob's Texas rodeo in a dispute over control of the business is noteworthy, its clarification on firms' conflicts of interest in derivative cases is the more important point, says former Texas Court of Appeals Justice Douglas Lang, of Dorsey & Whitney.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

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    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • The Top FMLA And ADA Decisions Of 2019: Part 1

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    In the first of two articles discussing last year’s most significant Family and Medical Leave Act and Americans with Disabilities Act decisions, Linda Dwoskin and Melissa Squire at Dechert review coverage for potential future disabilities, what constitutes sufficient notice of the need for leave, and working from home as a reasonable accommodation.

  • Opinion

    States Should Not Follow ABA On Attorney Conduct Rules

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    Because the American Bar Association's new rule on diversity continues to use the Model Rules of Professional Conduct as a cultural bludgeon, states should create independent codes limited to constitutionally valid purposes of attorney regulation, says Bradley Abramson of Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • How Courts And Litigants Can Benefit From Special Masters

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    As we approach the first anniversary of the American Bar Association's adoption of guidelines for the appointment and use of special masters in civil litigation, retired U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin, now at Stroock, explains how special masters can help parties and courts with faster decision-making and subject matter expertise.

  • Uber Policy Calls For Refresher On ABA Confidentiality Rules

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    Uber's recent policy update allowing drivers to audio-record passenger rides is a reminder for lawyers to observe the highest standard of care in protecting client information under the American Bar Association's confidentiality model rule, says Paul Boehm at Williams & Connolly.

  • NY Saw Big Changes To Its Liquor License Laws Last Year

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    Legislators and regulators introduced several important changes to New York’s liquor license laws in 2019, all of which may have significant economic impacts on businesses that manufacture, distribute, sell or serve alcohol, says Jennifer Tsyn at Bond Schoeneck.

  • Fed. Circ. Provides Clues On Competition In Contracting Issue

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    Although the Federal Circuit declined to provide precedential guidance in last month's Safeguard Base Operations v. United States decision, the case offers several important insights into the fate of Competition in Contracting Act override challenges, says Nathaniel Castellano at Arnold & Porter.

  • Rethinking Corporate Crisis And Litigation Communications

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    While conventional wisdom among attorneys may be that no response is the safest response during a corporate crisis, recent examples demonstrate the consequences of failing to share timely and relevant information with key audiences, says Aidan Ryan of Goldberg Segalla.