Hospitality

  • May 13, 2021

    San Juan Pilots Group Wants Out Of $9M Port Crash Suit

    A Puerto Rico pilots group is asking to be set free from a suit in the island's federal court stemming from the February 2019 crash of a Norwegian Cruise Line ship that caused $9 million in damage to a port in San Juan, saying it cannot be held liable for the actions of one of its members.

  • May 13, 2021

    Injured Couple Says They Had Right To Intervene In AIG Fight

    A couple injured in a zip line accident during a Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. shore excursion told the Eleventh Circuit Thursday that they should have been allowed to intervene in a suit between the zip line company and its insurer AIG over whether the dispute should have been arbitrated.

  • May 12, 2021

    Don't Let Insurer Expand Ruling's Reach In MDL, Court Told

    A group of Society Insurance Co. policyholders urged an Illinois federal judge Wednesday not to let their insurer cite a limited bellwether ruling to pursue dismissal of all civil authority and contamination claims in multidistrict litigation over its COVID-19 coverage refusals.

  • May 12, 2021

    Investors Seek $6M Win In Suit Over Failed Hotel Project

    A group of investors has asked a New York federal court for a judgment of more than $6 million in its suit accusing hotel developers of stealing funds for a project in Colombia that never happened, saying the developers breached their obligation to repay the money that was loaned.

  • May 12, 2021

    Mo. Judge Tosses Taco Restaurant's COVID-19 Coverage Suit

    A Missouri federal judge tossed a taco restaurant chain's COVID-19 business interruption suit on Tuesday, saying government shutdown orders to curb the pandemic didn't cause a physical loss or damage triggering coverage with the Cincinnati Insurance Co.

  • May 12, 2021

    Green Groups OK'd To Join Biden's Wyo. Oil Lease Fight

    Conservation groups were given the go-ahead on Wednesday to defend the Biden administration's decision to halt new oil and gas leasing on federal lands, which the state of Wyoming and industry groups have called an overreach and harmful to the economy.

  • May 12, 2021

    Tenn. Titans Accused Of Sacking Worker On COVID Leave

    The Tennessee Titans were hit with a lawsuit on Wednesday alleging that the NFL team ran afoul of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act and other federal labor laws by firing a field maintenance employee who took time off after contracting COVID-19.

  • May 12, 2021

    Buyback Padded Founders' Pockets, Travel Co. Workers Say

    A proposed class of World Travel Inc. employees has accused Prudent Fiduciary Services and its owner of overpaying for a $200 million stock buyback from the company's founders by saddling the employee ownership plan with "tens of millions" of dollars in debt.

  • May 12, 2021

    Calif. Judge Won't Hear LA Fitness COVID-19 Coverage Row

    A California federal judge has granted LA Fitness' bid to stay a U.K. insurer's suit seeking to avoid covering its pandemic losses, saying further proceedings are unnecessary when a Washington state court is looking at the same issue in the gym chain's consolidated $950 million coverage action.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ex-Electric Co. Controller Charged By Feds With $17M Fraud

    The former controller of a New York City electric contractor siphoned $17 million from the company so that she and her Florida family could live a "life of luxury," the Manhattan U.S. Attorney's office said Wednesday, unveiling charges against her, her husband and two children.

  • May 12, 2021

    Sky Zone Arbitration Bid Collapses Over Mom's Authority

    A New Jersey state appeals court on Wednesday said a Sky Zone trampoline park cannot use an arbitration agreement signed by the mother of a boy's friend to keep his own mother from pursuing a lawsuit in court alleging the facility's negligence caused the child to fracture his leg.

  • May 12, 2021

    Hotel Owner Asks 8th Circ. To Revive Virus Coverage Bid

    An owner of Best Western, Hilton, Holiday Inn and Marriott franchises urged the Eighth Circuit to revive its coronavirus business interruption suit, arguing the government closure orders caused physical loss and damage covered by Continental Casualty Co.

  • May 11, 2021

    6th Circ. Affirms Toss Of Burger King Credit Card Receipt Suit

    While a Burger King operator did technically violate the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act by including 10 credit card digits on a customer's receipt, the customer did not properly allege that she was harmed, the Sixth Circuit ruled Tuesday, upholding a lower court's dismissal of her putative class action.

  • May 11, 2021

    Realty Group Wants Redo Of Decision Over ICE Lease

    A Rhode Island realty group has asked the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to reconsider its decision declaring it ineligible for a contract to provide office space for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, saying that the ruling insulates a flawed contracting process from judicial review.

  • May 11, 2021

    Businesses Take COVID-19 Coverage Fights To 9th Circ.

    A Las Vegas casino and two California restaurants have urged the Ninth Circuit to revive their COVID-19 business interruption lawsuits against AIG and Travelers, arguing that government shutdown orders in response to the pandemic caused property damage covered by their policies.

  • May 11, 2021

    La. Restaurants Win Bid To Send Virus Suit To State Court

    A Louisiana restaurant and catering group can send its COVID-19 business interruption suit against its insurer back to state court, a federal judge has ruled, saying the group has sufficiently shown it may recover damages against the local agency for wrongful conduct.

  • May 11, 2021

    Liebowitz Escapes 'Overly Punitive' Atty Fee Bid In Pa. Case

    Alleged "copyright troll" Richard Liebowitz doesn't need to pay attorney fees for bringing an unsuccessful copyright lawsuit over stock images of spare ribs after a Pennsylvania federal judge on Monday found the request for fees to be "overly punitive."

  • May 11, 2021

    DC Circ. Wary Of Calif. Tribe's Bid To Join DOI Casino Fight

    A D.C. Circuit judge on Tuesday leveled skepticism toward the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation's request to allow it to intervene in the Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians' suit over the federal government's rejection of a casino plan, questioning the Northern California tribe's "legally protected interest" in the matter.

  • May 11, 2021

    Aramark Stiffed Workers Of Pay, School Cook Says

    Food services giant Aramark was hit with proposed collective and class actions in New York federal court from a school cook who claims the company forced her to work off the clock and discriminated against her for having autoimmune issues.

  • May 11, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: Morgan, Chetrit, Wells Fargo

    Morgan Group Development is reportedly hoping to buy a Miami site and build 236 apartments there, Chetrit Group is said to have scored $62.5 million in financing for a New York hotel project and Wells Fargo has reportedly loaned $32.8 million for a project to build two warehouses in South Florida.

  • May 11, 2021

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    COVID-19 relief efforts took the form of cash influxes announced over the past week in several states, including a $100 billion "comeback plan" for California's economy and $235 million in relief funding for small businesses in New Jersey.

  • May 11, 2021

    'By Chloe' Chef Says PE Firms Tried To 'Milk' Her IP For Profit

    Celebrity chef Chloe Coscarelli is suing private equity giants including Bain Capital in New York federal court for allegedly infringing and profiting off her trademarks, the latest in a long-running fight over control of her now-bankrupt "By Chloe" vegan restaurant chain.

  • May 11, 2021

    Trade Group Backs Legal Sea Foods In Virus Insurance Appeal

    Legal Sea Foods' quest to cover losses from the COVID-19 pandemic earned the backing of nonprofit insurance trade group United Policyholders, which told the First Circuit on Monday that a lower court was wrong to dismiss the restaurant chain's suit.

  • May 11, 2021

    NY Probes Can't Get Tour Bus Co. Out Of Drivers' FLSA Suit

    A New York City tour bus company can't dodge a class and conditional collective action by drivers claiming overtime and minimum wage violations because the case does not clearly overlap enough with state Department of Labor investigations into the company, a federal judge ruled.

  • May 10, 2021

    Factory Mutual Cries Foul On Sacramento Kings Virus Suit

    Factory Mutual Insurance Co. is seeking to net a dismissal in California federal court in a suit against the owners of the Sacramento Kings, saying they failed to show that COVID-19 and government shutdowns caused $850 million in insurable damage.

Expert Analysis

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

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    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • How Justices' AMG Ruling Affects Privacy And Cybersecurity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in AMG Capital Management v. Federal Trade Commission removes the regulator's ability to seek monetary damages that discouraged privacy and cybersecurity breaches, and as a result, companies should reassess their exposure in these areas, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • New Markets Credit Will Aid Recovery In Low-Income Areas

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    The recently extended New Markets Tax Credit is a critical tool for economic development in low-income communities, which have been hit especially hard by the pandemic, so public finance attorneys should consider its benefits when advising clients on projects, says Julia Fendler at Butler Snow.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • Mich. Pandemic Rent Ruling Is A Critical Win For Tenants

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    A Michigan federal court's well-reasoned decision in Bay City Realty v. Mattress Firm, upholding temporary frustration as a valid defense for failure to pay rent during the pandemic, rejects common commercial landlord arguments and is likely to contribute toward a growing trend of decisions favoring tenants, says Aaron Goodman at Baker McKenzie.

  • Bankruptcy Litigation Could See More Third-Party Funding

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    The next few years could be an opportune time for bankruptcy litigants to capitalize on the advantages of third-party financing as the obstacles to its use — including attorney ethics issues and prohibitions against champerty — seem to be clearing at a slow but steady pace, say Daniel Simon and Natalie Rowles at McDermott.

  • ADA Ruling Highlights Circuit Conflict Over Web Accessibility

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Gil v. Winn-Dixie, that a grocery chain need not make its website accessible to the blind because the retailer could be accessed in person, serves as a reminder of the irreconcilable differences among the circuit courts as to how websites figure, if at all, under Title III of the Americans With Disabilities Act, says Donald Brown at Manatt.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

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    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

  • Outliers Offer False Hope For Virus Biz Interruption Claims

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    A few recent policyholder wins have caused some to overstate the potential for recovery in commercial property claims over COVID-19 prevention efforts, but in reality business interruption decisions are consistently and overwhelmingly favoring insurers, say Erin Bradham and Keith Moskowitz at Dentons.

  • Thought Leadership's Critical Role In Law Firm Diversity

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    Minority attorneys are often underrepresented in conferences, media interviews and other law firm thought leadership campaigns, which affects their visibility with potential clients and their ability to advance at their firms, says John Hellerman at Hellerman Communications.

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