Hospitality

  • July 19, 2019

    Equinox Insurer Denied Win In Sex Assault Suit Fees Row

    An insurer for Equinox Fitness beat a claim from another insurer of the luxury gym that it wasn’t paying its fair share of legal fees in an ongoing sexual assault lawsuit a Pilates instructor brought against another employee, according to a California federal court ruling Friday.

  • July 19, 2019

    Attys Seek $6M Award For El Pollo Loco Stock-Drop Deal

    Lawyers have asked a California federal court to award them $6 million in attorneys’ fees after settling a suit for an investor class that claimed El Pollo Loco’s top executives concealed the source of the chicken chain's decreasing sales then sold their own shares ahead of a stock plunge.

  • July 19, 2019

    Judge Chides Carnival Execs To Take Lead On Pollution Fixes

    A frustrated Florida federal judge pressed Carnival Corp. leaders Friday to demonstrate their commitment to changing the company's approach after agreeing last month to pay $20 million for violating a previous settlement for illegal dumping.

  • July 19, 2019

    Salesforce Can't Move Sex Trafficking Suit To Federal Court

    Tech giant Salesforce.com couldn't convince a federal judge in Texas that a lawsuit alleging it helped Backpage.com profit from sex trafficking should stay in federal court, despite its argument the plaintiff included hotels as defendants in the case specifically to keep the case in state court.

  • July 19, 2019

    Wells Fargo Says Tribe Must Pay In $250M Loan Dispute

    Wells Fargo has sued the Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians of California in New York state court, accusing the tribe and its economic development authority of participating in a scheme to avoid making payments owed as part of a $250 million loan agreement.

  • July 19, 2019

    Whataburger Urges Fla. Court To Drop EEOC Bias Suit

    Whataburger has asked a Florida federal district court to toss a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit accusing the fast food chain of forcing an employee to quit after she refused to comply with a racially discriminatory directive to hire white job applicants.

  • July 19, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Cummins, Coface, Atlantis

    Cummins has made an offer for MAN Energy Solutions, Apollo Global Management has offered to buy French credit insurer Coface, and Brookfield Asset Management is considering selling luxury Bahamian resort Atlantis Paradise Island Resort.

  • July 18, 2019

    Google, Lendlease Team Up On $15B Bay Area Project

    Google and Australia-based construction company Lendlease Group have reached a roughly $15 billion agreement to redevelop Google's properties in three Silicon Valley markets into mixed-use communities with plans to build 15,000 or more homes, according to a Thursday announcement from the companies.

  • July 18, 2019

    NY Strip Clubs Mostly Escape Models' TM Claims

    Two New York City strip clubs are largely off the hook in a lawsuit over their use of images of models on social media, after a federal judge ruled most of the women who brought the case weren't famous enough to have trademark rights over their pictures.

  • July 18, 2019

    Sports Betting Case Tests Theory Of Retroactive Damages

    A New Jersey horse racetrack operator is trying to recoup from professional sports leagues some $150 million in revenue it claims to have lost while leading the successful fight to overturn the federal ban on sports betting, a case that experts say could become a model for applying damages on the basis of a change in the law.

  • July 18, 2019

    Tribe Opposes Mass. Bid To Change Casino Suit Judgment

    The Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head has asked a federal court to deny Massachusetts' "backhanded" attempt to amend an order over tribal plans to build a casino, arguing that state officials can't dodge the decision that says they may not interfere with the tribe's right to operate a gambling facility.

  • July 18, 2019

    House OKs $15 Minimum Wage Hike, Teeing Up Senate Battle

    The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday passed a hotly debated proposal to raise the minimum wage for the first time in a decade, approving a Democratic plan to gradually raise the wage to $15 over six years.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    Block & Leviton Snag Lead Counsel In Care.com Investor Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Wednesday appointed Block & Leviton LLP as lead counsel for a proposed class of Care.com investors alleging the website and its top executives violated securities laws by failing to disclose they didn't vet the caregivers and day care providers who advertise on the site.

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hear Justice Stevens In 5 Memorable Moments On The Bench

    Justice John Paul Stevens was known for being collegial and kind, but he also wasn’t one to mince words. Listen to a few of the justice’s most memorable words from the bench, in majority opinions, sharply worded dissents and at oral argument.

  • July 17, 2019

    Calif. Court Backs Six Flags' Trial Win In Worker Injury Suit

    A California appeals court has affirmed a jury's decision to clear Six Flags of liability in a suit accusing the amusement park operator of causing two employees' severe injuries following a 2010 explosion, saying certain evidence was properly excluded by the trial judge.

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' High Court Legacy In 4 Charts

    In this data deep-dive, Law360 examines retired Justice John Paul Stevens’ long tenure, his relatively breezy confirmation, his transformation from a run-of-the-mill Republican appointee to runaway liberal, and the legacy that lives on in his clerks.

  • July 17, 2019

    McDonald's Franchise Draws EEOC Suit Over Beard Policy

    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission hit a Florida McDonald’s franchisee with a lawsuit Tuesday claiming the company discriminated against a Hasidic Jew when it refused to hire him because he would not shave his beard.

  • July 17, 2019

    Trump Org. Can't Protect Records In Panama Hotel Fraud Suit

    A Manhattan federal judge on Wednesday rejected the Trump Organization's plea for a special secrecy deal in a fraud suit brought by owners of luxury hotel units in Panama after the Trump Organization voiced concerns that "highly-proprietary" information could be leaked.

  • July 17, 2019

    NLRB GC Asks Board To Nix Precedent Shielding Union Rat

    The National Labor Relations Board's top attorney has asked the board to reverse an agency judge's ruling that an electrical workers' union didn't violate federal labor law by erecting an inflatable rat outside a Philadelphia hotel, teeing up a possible shift by the board's Republican majority on unions' protest rights.

  • July 17, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Richard Lazzara, Acore, Everest

    Florida dentist Richard Lazzara has reportedly sold a condo development site for $13 million, Acore Capital is said to have loaned $80 million for a New York redevelopment project and Everest Reinsurance is said to be leasing 315,000 square feet in northern New Jersey.

  • July 17, 2019

    Bass Berry, Goodwin Steer Ebix's $337.8M Yatra Online Buy

    Software and e-commerce services firm Ebix has inked a deal to snap up Indian corporate travel exchange Yatra Online in a merger, steered by Bass Berry & Sims PLC and Goodwin Procter LLP, that implies a $337.8 million enterprise value, the companies said Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • NJ Tax Stop: Private, For-Profit Property May Be Tax-Exempt

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    Although an appeal to the New Jersey Supreme Court is pending, if the New Jersey Appellate Division's recent decision in Gourmet Dining v. Union Township stands, it may prove to be a watershed moment for property tax jurisprudence in the state by broadening the definition of "public purpose" to potentially include private, for-profit use of property, says Carl Rizzo of Cole Schotz.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • State Net

    Why States, Cities Are Requiring Merchants To Accept Cash

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    New technology is broadening the ways people can pay without having to carry paper money and coins, possibly hastening the decline of cash. But some state and local lawmakers are pushing back, and retail businesses are taking note, says Dave Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Misconceptions In The Debate About Noncompetes

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    The scope of noncompete abuses needs to be put in context, so policymakers can understand how widespread the problem actually is and how to properly tailor any legislation, says Russell Beck of Beck Reed.

  • Rethinking The Tech-First Approach To Law Firm Solutions

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    When a lawyer complains about some workflow inefficiency they are having, the knee-jerk reaction of many firms is to look for a technology-based workaround. This overlooks the importance of human psychology and behavior, which may be the root of the problem, says Ryan Steadman of Zero.

  • Top 10 Techniques For Crafting A Dazzling Brief

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    Legal writing often falls flat not because it’s unorganized, but because it’s technically unsound and riddled with gaffes that cheapen and degrade it. Avoiding the most common mistakes will keep judges interested and, most importantly, make them trust you, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Courts Are More Rigorously Scrutinizing Class Settlements

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    Although the hurdles to certification of a settlement class are not as high as they were last year, the difficulties of demonstrating that a class action settlement is fair, reasonable and adequate arguably trend higher, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Senate Could Reaffirm Trust Land For Tribes

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Carcieri and Patchak decisions have chilled investment in tribal trust land for nearly a decade, but two recent bills, if approved by the Senate, could restore certainty in tribes' sovereignty over trust land, say Robert Ward and Noah Gillespie of Schulte Roth.

  • 'Fair Workweek' May Be Coming Soon To Chicago

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    Unlike most of the "fair workweek" laws in other cities, Chicago's proposed predictable schedule ordinance is not limited to the retail, hospitality and food and beverage sectors, or to large businesses with a requisite number of locations or employees, says Daniel Pasternak of Squire Patton.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Ballard Spahr Diversity Chief Virginia Essandoh

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    In the final installment of this monthly series, legal recruiting expert Carlos Pauling from Major Lindsey & Africa talks with Virginia Essandoh about the trends and challenges she sees as chief diversity officer at Ballard Spahr.