International Trade

  • May 13, 2021

    LG Exploding Battery Suits Find Likely Path Forward In Ga.

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent rejection of strict limits on where Ford can be sued in product defect cases and rulings from Georgia state and federal judges appear to be channeling litigation over an LG unit's allegedly exploding lithium-ion batteries into Georgia state courts.

  • May 13, 2021

    Insurers Fight $10M Suit Over Ship Stuck In Venezuela

    Lloyd's of London underwriters have argued that a subsidiary of Crédit Agricole SA cannot claim $10.4 million for a tanker requisitioned by Venezuela because the U.S. has signaled that it could relax sanctions against the nation, which make its return more likely.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ericsson To Pay Nokia €80M To Nix FCPA Probe-Related Claim

    Ericsson has agreed to pay Nokia €80 million ($97 million) to end a damages claim related to the 2019 resolution of allegations by U.S. agencies that the Stockholm-based telecom giant violated the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, it was announced Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Senate Panel Greenlights TikTok Ban For Federal Devices

    The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee unanimously passed a bill that aims to prevent federal employees from downloading the controversial app TikTok onto government devices, according to a Wednesday statement from Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., a sponsor of the bill.

  • May 12, 2021

    Pentagon Removing Chinese Co. Xiaomi From Trump Blacklist

    The U.S. Department of Defense told a D.C. federal judge Tuesday it will soon reverse a Trump administration order placing Chinese electronics company Xiaomi Corp. on a blacklist over alleged military ties, a move that would allow U.S. investment in the firm to resume.

  • May 12, 2021

    Chinese Tire Cos. Ask Fed. Circ. To Peel Back Steep Duties

    Chinese companies urged the Federal Circuit to pull back steep anti-dumping duties on certain tires, saying the rates, which the U.S. Department of Commerce issued against dozens of companies' imports, were based on one business's "aberrational" importing activity.

  • May 12, 2021

    Tai Clashes With Senators Over COVID-19 Vaccine IP Waiver

    U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai defended her office's endorsement of a temporary waiver of intellectual property protections for COVID-19 vaccines Wednesday as skeptical senators expressed their discontent with the decision.

  • May 12, 2021

    EU Courts Told To Let Iranian Cos. Use Sanction Blocking Law

    Iranian banks and businesses should be allowed to ask European Union courts to invoke a blocking law if they think a company has cut ties over fears of violating U.S. sanctions, a legal adviser told the bloc's top court on Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Biden Launches Labor Trade Case Against Mexican GM Plant

    The Biden administration brought a new labor case under the U.S. trade deal with Mexico on Wednesday, calling on the Mexican government to investigate "irregularities" in a recent union vote at a General Motors Co. facility in the northern city of Silao.

  • May 11, 2021

    Judge Weighs Effect Of Sanctions In Del. Venezuela Cases

    A Delaware federal judge weighing whether to grant seizure orders for Citgo's parent company to creditors owed hundreds of millions of dollars by Venezuela indicated Tuesday that he is considering whether U.S. sanctions on Caracas preclude him from issuing such an order.

  • May 11, 2021

    Atty Says Girardi Was Part Of Chiquita Terror-Funding MDL

    An attorney representing families of banana farmers accusing Chiquita Brands International Inc. of funding terrorist groups in South America said Tuesday that lawyers for other plaintiffs have failed to disclose that embattled lawyer Thomas Girardi has been part of the case.

  • May 11, 2021

    Taxpayers Hold $2T Abroad In Tax Havens, IRS Official Says

    U.S. taxpayers could hold as much as $2 trillion in assets in low-tax haven jurisdictions, a top research and analytics officer at the Internal Revenue Service said Tuesday during a Senate hearing.

  • May 11, 2021

    Cayman Islands Court OKs Disclosure In $1.5B Award Fight

    A Cayman Islands appeals court has affirmed an order directing the principal holding company for Indian conglomerate Essar Group to disclose information and documents relating to the assets of an Essar unit that owes U.S. steel company ArcelorMittal more than $1.5 billion under a 2017 arbitral award.

  • May 11, 2021

    WTO Members Inch Closer To Fisheries Subsidies Deal

    The World Trade Organization is weighing a mechanism to provide flexibility for developing countries under a long-awaited agreement curbing illegal fisheries subsidies, according to draft text released Monday.

  • May 11, 2021

    COVID IP Waiver Still Has Doubters In Europe, Industry

    U.S. President Joe Biden's backing last week of a temporary waiver of intellectual property protections on COVID-19 vaccines reinforces the support the World Trade Organization proposal has received from more than 100 countries, but European leaders, some U.S. lawmakers and pharmaceutical companies remain wary.

  • May 11, 2021

    ITC Says Steel Strand Harms US Biz, Paving Way To Tariffs

    The U.S. International Trade Commission unanimously found that inexpensive concrete steel strand imported from seven countries was undermining U.S. producers, clearing the way Tuesday for anti-dumping duties of up to 155%.

  • May 10, 2021

    ITC To Probe TVs, Remotes By LG, Spectrum, Samsung

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has launched an investigation into the importation of certain televisions and remote controls on behalf of Roku Inc., the commission announced Monday, adding that the probe involves a long list of companies including LG Electronics, Spectrum and Samsung.

  • May 10, 2021

    Norwegian Must Fork Over Lobbying Docs In Cuban Dock Row

    A Florida federal magistrate judge on Monday ordered Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. to produce its correspondences with the Cuban government and documents pertaining to its lobbying and political strategy, largely siding with a Cuban dock company in a stolen property trafficking suit.

  • May 10, 2021

    DOJ, SEC Probing Geothermal Co. Bribery Claims

    Federal investigators are investigating a short-seller's claims that geothermal company Ormat Technologies unethically courted power players in key markets around the world to secure favorable treatment and energy contracts.

  • May 10, 2021

    Jury Convicts Parts Buyer Of Violating Iran Trade Embargo

    A Texas federal jury has convicted an Iranian national on a slew of counts, including violating a trade embargo with Iran, for obtaining, or attempting to obtain, $2.6 million worth of parts that federal prosecutors have deemed "military sensitive," the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • May 10, 2021

    Biden Taps AFL-CIO Alum For International Labor Role

    The Biden administration announced Monday that it had tapped an economic policy expert with two decades of experience at the AFL-CIO to lead the U.S. Department of Labor's International Labor Affairs Bureau.

  • May 10, 2021

    Auto Industry Wants Help In Biden's $50B Semiconductor Plan

    Three leading U.S auto industry groups representing the major motor vehicle companies, workers and parts suppliers urged leaders in Congress on Friday to include a priority for the industry in a $50 billion proposal by President Joe Biden to strengthen domestic semiconductor production.

  • May 10, 2021

    Unions Test New Labor Rules In North American Trade Deal

    The AFL-CIO and two other unions alleged a slew of labor violations at Mexican auto-parts factories on Monday, pressing the Biden administration to use brand new enforcement tools in the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement to remedy the situation.

  • May 07, 2021

    With US On Board, COVID IP Waiver Still Faces Long Road

    While the Biden administration has backed a temporary waiver on intellectual property protections for COVID-19 vaccines, experts now foresee heated World Trade Organization negotiations about the scope of any deal, which could keep the proposal in limbo for some time.

  • May 07, 2021

    Energy Trade Group Takes Aim At Mexican Law Amendments

    A trade group representing the U.S. energy industry has sounded the alarm on amendments to Mexico's electrical industry and hydrocarbon laws that allegedly discriminate against foreign investors, urging the Biden administration to ensure that Mexico lives up to its treaty obligations.

Expert Analysis

  • COVID IP Waiver Doesn't Resolve Vaccine Production Barriers

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    Given the lack of know-how and other legal and technical hurdles associated with producing COVID-19 vaccines in developing countries, and the potential harm to U.S. industry, the Biden administration's backing a temporary waiver on intellectual property protections may be merely a gesture of goodwill, says William Bergmann at BakerHostetler.

  • What UK's New Merger Controls Mean For Private Equity

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    Expansive notification and approval requirements under the U.K.’s new merger control regime — the National Security and Investment Act — along with a lack of clarity about when they go into effect, pose unique challenges for private equity sponsors, as well as their investors and portfolio companies, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Keep Forced Labor Out Of Supply Chains As Scrutiny Rises

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    Companies can manage the increasing risk of penalties and reputational harm arising from discovery of forced labor in their supply chains by developing and implementing auditable compliance programs that include measurable milestones and supply chain mapping through data analytics and blockchain automation, say trade and customs advisers at KPMG.

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Evaluating Insurance Options In Light Of Suez Canal Blockage

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    The recent blockage of the Suez Canal by the cargo ship Ever Given illustrates that manufacturers, carriers and recipients of internationally shipped goods should consider all the insurance offerings available to cover losses resulting from shipping delays, say David Klein and Ryan Vanderford at Pillsbury.

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

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    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • Tips For Navigating The Visa Processing Backlog

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    The pandemic has caused U.S. embassies and consulates to fall far behind in visa processing, but new information from the U.S. Department of State can help practitioners determine where a client is in line and whether it's time to use other tools to reduce wait time, says Dominique Pando Bucci at Kurzban Kurzban.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • Time For Auto Suppliers To Review Force Majeure Options

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    With the recent shortage of semiconductor chips leading some auto manufacturers to suspend or reduce production, auto suppliers should review their contracts to determine the scope of their rights to declare force majeure in the event of supply chain disruptions, say attorneys at Varnum.

  • The Biden Administration Is Sharpening The TSCA's Sword

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    The Trump administration implemented the 2016 amendments to the Toxic Substances Control Act in a way that critics felt benefited chemical companies, but the Biden administration can be expected to use the amendments to broaden risk reviews and impose new requirements on the regulated community, say attorneys at Kilpatrick.

  • Rethinking Investment Treaties As Latin America Goes Green

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    As Latin America pivots toward renewable energy, governments should reshape bilateral investment treaties to allow incentives for new technologies and improve dispute settlement mechanisms, while also providing both new and established energy companies with certainty and fair treatment, say attorneys at GST.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • Bio-Rad Ruling Highlights IP Assignment Clause Limits

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    The Federal Circuit's recent holding in Bio-Rad v. International Trade Commission, that an assignment clause wasn’t enough to claim patent ownership where the conception date followed former inventors’ employment, shows companies and workers the importance of specificity in drafting contractual limitations, say Bryan Vogel and Derrick Carman at Robins Kaplan.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    USPTO Refusal To Register Cannabis TMs Hurts Public

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    The recent uncovering of THC-laced, knock-off candies in Florida illustrates why U.S. Patent and Trademark Office registration of cannabis trademarks would protect the public by providing companies with quality and safety incentives and empowering them to pursue counterfeiters, says Frederic Rocafort at Harris Bricken.

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