International Trade

  • June 29, 2022

    Feds Scrap Trade Secrets Case Against Ex-ADI Worker's Wife

    Federal prosecutors in Boston dismissed charges against the wife of a former Analog Devices Inc. engineer after the husband largely beat a case alleging he stole company trade secrets to jump-start his own computer chip business.

  • June 28, 2022

    Shipping Giant Says $2.7M Banana Fight Belongs In SDNY

    Shipping and logistics behemoth MSC Mediterranean Shipping Co. SA has asked the Southern District of New York to step in and block a prominent banana grower from arbitrating its $2.7 million cargo claims, arguing that the claims are "manifestly not subject to any agreement to arbitrate."

  • June 28, 2022

    China Accused Of Influence Campaign Targeting Mining Cos.

    Chinese state actors posed as local residents in Texas and Oklahoma as part of an unsuccessful influence campaign targeting rare-earths mining giants that compete with Chinese companies, the cybersecurity firm Mandiant said Tuesday.

  • June 28, 2022

    ITC Judge Says Apple Infringed Rival's ECG Wristband

    A U.S. International Trade Commission judge has determined that Apple has infringed two patents covering medical device maker AliveCor's wristband device for measuring irregular heartbeats.

  • June 28, 2022

    SEC Wins Default Judgment In Ex-Herbalife Exec's Absence

    A New York district court judge ordered a former executive at the Chinese subsidiary of California-based health supplement company Herbalife Ltd. to pay $550,092 in civil penalties after he was charged with plotting to bribe Chinese officials.

  • June 28, 2022

    Calif. Court Tosses LG Exploding Battery Suit

    A San Diego man who suffered burns after a battery he used for vaping exploded in his pocket can't sue the manufacturer, a subsidiary of LG Corp., a California state appeals court ruled, saying the maker tried to prevent him from buying it.

  • June 28, 2022

    Feds Ask For Vigilance On Russian Export Sanctions

    Bureaus of the U.S. Treasury Department and U.S. Commerce Department urged financial institutions Tuesday to monitor for efforts of Russia and Belarus to evade export sanctions related to the invasion of Ukraine, providing some pointers that could help keep certain equipment out of the hands of Russia's military. 

  • June 28, 2022

    3rd Circ. Casts Doubtful Eye On Auto Glass Co. In PPG IP Row

    A Chinese automobile glass company that allegedly ripped off PPG Industries' aircraft windshield trade secrets appeared to have a difficult time convincing the Third Circuit on Tuesday that, despite its decision to participate in the lawsuit only after being slapped with a default judgment, PPG isn't entitled to $26 million in damages.

  • June 28, 2022

    Bryan Cave DC Leader Jumps To Akin Gump

    The partner in charge of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP's Washington, D.C., office has left her former firm to join Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP's location in the nation's capital.

  • June 28, 2022

    Feds Drop Haitian Bribe Case After Discovering New Evidence

    Federal prosecutors in Boston dropped a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case against a former U.S. Army colonel and a lawyer just days before they were set to be tried for a second time, after the FBI unearthed text messages suggesting the two were innocent.

  • June 27, 2022

    Biden Issues Tariff Hike On Certain Russian Goods

    The White House announced on Monday that it would raise levies to 35% on certain Russian imports not already prohibited in the U.S., in accordance with its suspension of trade relations with Russia amid the country's war on Ukraine.

  • June 27, 2022

    3rd Circ. Urged To Allow Ammo Maker's Tort Claims

    Ammunitions broker Battle Born Munitions Inc. asked the Third Circuit to overturn a lower court's finding that it can't bring tort claims against its vendor Dick's Sporting Goods Inc., saying that Dick's knew it would not accept delivery of store-branded bullets when it said it would.

  • June 27, 2022

    Biden Orders Agencies To Rein In Illegal Fishing Practices

    President Joe Biden moved to crack down on fishing practices that threaten ocean health, directing federal agencies Monday to fully leverage their regulatory and diplomatic powers to curb illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

  • June 27, 2022

    Ditching Live Testimony For Declarations Is Risky, Attys Say

    U.S. courts should move cautiously before embracing written statements at bench trials in lieu of live direct examination testimony, lawyers tell Law360, cautioning that their recent use in a high-stakes opioid trial doesn't mean the practice — which is standard in the U.K. — should be widely adopted at home.

  • June 27, 2022

    Russia's War Is Complicating US M&A In The UK And Europe 

    Since Russia invaded Ukraine, U.S. appetite for acquisitions in the U.K. and Europe has dampened, as experts say the headwinds of war, combined with inflation and rising interest rates, have combined to create an overall challenging global environment.

  • June 24, 2022

    Vidal Sees More Fintiv Changes After Formal Rulemaking

    Guidance issued earlier this week clarifying how the Patent Trial and Appeal Board should apply the controversial Fintiv precedent was intended to memorialize the PTAB's current practice around the policy while the agency prepares for formal rulemaking, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal told Law360 in an exclusive interview Friday.

  • June 24, 2022

    WTO Official Stresses Close Trade Ties Amid Global Crises

    World Trade Organization Deputy Director-General Angela Ellard said Friday that close trade ties and a strengthened WTO are key to helping solve a recent surge of global calamities.

  • June 24, 2022

    Modernized Energy Charter Treaty Would Nix Intra-EU Claims

    A final agreement has been reached on the modernization of the Energy Charter Treaty that would immediately bar European investors from filing investor-state claims against EU member states, according to a Friday announcement.

  • June 24, 2022

    Commerce Sets Early Duties On Russian Sodium Compound

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has set preliminary anti-dumping duties and final countervailing duties on imports of a Russian sodium compound used in military weapons that were found to be subsidized and sold in the U.S. at unfairly low prices.

  • June 24, 2022

    Gov't Gets 30 More Days To Review China Tariff Comments

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has given the federal government an extra 30 days to review scores of public comments regarding tariffs on billions of dollars worth of Chinese goods in the wake of a ruling that officials failed to assess that feedback before imposing the levies.

  • June 24, 2022

    CIT Deals Blow To Soap Maker's Duty Evasion Challenge

    The U.S. Court of International Trade took a broad swipe at a California soap company's case looking to undo a ruling that it dodged duties on crucial imports from China Friday, ruling that the company has not moved quickly enough to correct the deficiencies in its court filings.

  • June 24, 2022

    Supreme Court Overturns Roe v. Wade

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday upheld a Mississippi abortion ban and overturned the constitutional abortion right established nearly 50 years ago in Roe v. Wade, setting the stage for a widespread rollback of abortion rights in many statehouses around the country.

  • June 23, 2022

    Crypto Platform Exits Venezuela Over US Sanctions Risks

    Cryptocurrency trading platform Uphold said Thursday it's pulling out of Venezuela over concerns about complying with U.S. sanctions.

  • June 23, 2022

    $1.7M Air Cargo Dispute Must Be Arbitrated, Court Rules

    A New York federal judge ruled Thursday that a $1.7 million air cargo transport dispute between logistics company Kuehne + Nagel Inc. and Baker Hughes Co. must be arbitrated, saying the matter fell within the scope of the companies' arbitration agreement.

  • June 23, 2022

    Bipartisan Bill Looks To Stop Data Sale To 'High-Risk' Nations

    A bipartisan group of U.S. senators introduced legislation Thursday aimed at giving the federal government the authority to prevent the sale of Americans' personal data to "high-risk" foreign countries such as China.

Expert Analysis

  • Texas Infrastructure Act And Renewables Projects: 1 Year In

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    A year into implementation of Texas' Lone Star Infrastructure Protection Act, Jennifer Pier at Husch Blackwell discusses how renewable energy project developers, owners and investors planning projects in Texas can incorporate LIPA-related provisions into transaction and financing documents.

  • Opinion

    Now's The Time To Address Archaic Law School Curricula

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    With law school enrollments jumping significantly ahead of a potential recession and more students graduating than the market can absorb, law schools should turn to creative solutions to teach students how to negotiate, work with clients, specialize and use technology to practice their craft more efficiently, says University of Colorado adjunct professor Jason Mendelson.

  • Lessons From Lawyer Fee-Sharing Agreements Gone Wrong

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    The recent fee-sharing dispute between Edelson and Girardi Keese is a reminder that lawyers who do not strictly follow the applicable rules may risk a disciplinary complaint, lose their share of the fee, or wind up in costly litigation with co-counsel, says David Grossbaum at Hinshaw.

  • LeClairRyan Bankruptcy Highlights Pass-Through Tax Issue

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    A Virginia bankruptcy court's recent ruling in the case of defunct law firm LeClairRyan shows there may be serious tax consequences for pass-through entity partners who give up their ownership interest without following operating agreement exit provisions and updating bankruptcy court filings, say Edward Schnitzer and Hannah Travaglini at Montgomery McCracken.

  • Enforcement Trends To Watch After SEP Remedies Withdrawal

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    Patent holders and implementers will need to consider several key issues in light of the new case-by-case federal enforcement stance following the withdrawal of the 2019 policy statement on standard-essential patents and the recent decision not to implement a new policy statement, say Alexander Okuliar and John Lanham at MoFo.

  • 8 Steps To Creating A Legal Ops Technology Road Map

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    Legal departments struggling to find and implement the right technologies for their operations should consider creating a road map that summarizes their approach to technology changes, provides clearly defined metrics for success, and serves as the single source of truth for stakeholders, says Melanie Shafer at SimpleLegal.

  • What Outbound Investment Reviews Would Mean For US Cos.

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    A recent legislative proposal to establish outbound investment controls appears more sweeping than its predecessors and, if enacted, may significantly affect deal timing, feasibility and certainty for U.S. investors and companies engaging in ex-U.S. transactions, particularly those involving China, say Mario Mancuso and Luci Hague at Kirkland.

  • The Importance Of Data And Data Analysis In Litigation

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    Understanding, analyzing and effectively presenting large data sets is an increasingly important skill in litigation as it allows plaintiffs to dramatically scale up the scope of cases and is often critical to defeating motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment, says David Burnett at Motley Rice.

  • How ITC Is Addressing Its Importation Requirement

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    The U.S. International Trade Commission's importation requirement is frequently one of the less contentious issues in a Section 337 investigation, but four recent decisions suggest opportunities for ongoing developments in this area — or at least creative thinking, says Elizabeth Niemeyer at Finnegan.

  • EU Hydrogen Plans: Infrastructure And Regulatory Challenges

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    As interest grows in hydrogen import and distribution infrastructure in the European Union, project developers and potential end users need to evaluate possible midstream bottlenecks, and track the EU's evolving hydrogen regulatory framework, say Dan Feldman and Natalya Pilbeam at Shearman.

  • Navigating The Void Left By Withdrawn SEP Policy Statement

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    While the withdrawal of the 2019 policy statement on standard-essential patents and the decision not to implement a new policy statement leave both SEP holders and implementers without guidance as to how the agencies will view these disputes, we can gain some insights by examining how we got here, says Ryan Richardson at Sterne Kessler.

  • Steps Companies Can Take To Mitigate Privilege Labeling Risk

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    Although Google prevailed on a recent privilege labeling sanctions motion, an important takeaway from the decision is that companies should assess their in-house procedures and employee training programs regarding privileged communications to mitigate risks of the potential appearance of bad faith privilege claims, say Gareth Evans at Redgrave and e-discovery attorney James Hertsch.

  • Steps Toward Eliminating Slavery In Apparel Supply Chains

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    To minimize regulatory, operational and reputational risks associated with human trafficking activity, apparel companies should assess whether they have sufficiently robust and accurate reporting on their end-to-end supply chains, and ensure they can meet U.S. Customs and Border Protection evidentiary requirements, say consultants at FTI Consulting.

  • What Litigation Funding Disclosure In Delaware May Look Like

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    A standing order issued by Delaware's chief federal judge requiring litigants to disclose whether their cases or defenses are being financed by third parties is unlikely to have onerous effects but may raise questions regarding potential conflicts of interest and access to justice, say Cayse Llorens and Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

  • Scope Of Russia's New Blocking Sanctions Is Unclear

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    Russia's recently introduced measures to block transactions with 31 energy companies may substantially extend the purview of its existing economic sanctions, but until the federation issues official guidance about how the measures apply to existing contracts, the practical consequences must be determined on a case-by-case basis, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

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