International Trade

  • February 28, 2020

    Oil Trading Co. Gets Tax-Free Zone Break, Texas Justices Rule

    An importer storing products in a local tax-free “subzone” can claim the subzone's tax exemptions, the Texas Supreme Court said Friday, reversing a lower court holding that a corporate structure change caused the importer to lose access to the exemptions.

  • February 28, 2020

    Cardinal Health Pays Nearly $9M To Resolve FCPA Claims

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Friday that pharmaceutical company Cardinal Health Inc. has agreed to pay almost $9 million to resolve allegations that its Chinese subsidiary violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

  • February 28, 2020

    Trump Won't Impose National Security Tariffs On Titanium

    President Donald Trump has decided not to issue tariffs on titanium products, despite national security concerns, saying that working with Japan, the U.S.'s largest source of titanium imports, would more effectively address those concerns.

  • February 28, 2020

    Chilean Copper Producer Approved For Major Mine Expansion

    Chile’s state-owned copper company Codelco has received environmental approval for a major $1 billion expansion of one of its mines, a move that will allow it to increase its fine copper production to more than 90,000 tons a year, the company said Friday.

  • February 28, 2020

    Illumina Sues Chinese Rival, Again, For 'Brazen Infringement'

    Illumina has asked a California federal court to stop Complete Genomics’ “latest attempt at brazen infringement” of its DNA sequencing patents as part of a decadelong patent war.

  • February 28, 2020

    Fla. Judge Urges Permanent Toss Of $4.4B Superyacht Suit

    A Florida federal magistrate judge recommended a permanent end to a $4.4 billion racketeering suit over an illegal bidding scheme for a luxury superyacht, finding that after several chances, the builder of the yacht has yet to make its case against the buyer.

  • February 28, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Keeps Trump's Nat'l Security Steel Tariffs Intact

    The Federal Circuit denied a steel importer group’s bid to undo the Trump administration’s national security tariffs Friday, finding that the Cold War-era law used to impose the levies did not violate the U.S. Constitution.

  • February 27, 2020

    Chinese Co. Accused Of Espionage Tells 9th Circ. It's Immune

    A state-owned Chinese steel company told the Ninth Circuit it can't face criminal charges alleging the business stole manufacturing trade secrets from DuPont Co., arguing it's immune from the charges under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act.

  • February 27, 2020

    Ex-Alstom Exec's Acquittal May Escalate Future FCPA Battles

    A Connecticut federal judge's decision clearing former Alstom SA executive Lawrence Hoskins of bribery may spur prosecutors to shift tactics in Foreign Corrupt Practices Act cases and increase defendants' resolve to challenge the government’s theories, attorneys say.

  • February 27, 2020

    Justices Urged To Ax Fed. Circ. Doctrine Of Equivalents Rule

    Three companies have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a Federal Circuit rule on when patent infringement can be found under the doctrine of equivalents, saying it creates “significant uncertainty” about what patents cover and poses a “grave threat to innovation.”

  • February 27, 2020

    Senators Release Bipartisan Energy Innovation Bill

    A bipartisan pair of senators released an energy bill Thursday aimed at advancing innovation and research in energy efficiency, renewable sources and electric grid technology.  

  • February 27, 2020

    $1B Huawei 'Rip And Replace' Bill Headed To Oval Office

    The Senate is preparing to send a bill to President Donald Trump's desk that would allocate up to $1 billion to replace telecom equipment manufactured by Huawei, ZTE and other firms deemed a national security risk.

  • February 27, 2020

    FTC Warns Coal Venture Would Spike Consumers' Utility Bills

    Arch Coal Inc.'s planned joint venture with Peabody Energy Corp. to mine coal in northeastern Wyoming would trigger spikes in consumer energy bills, the Federal Trade Commission said Thursday in a complaint asking a Missouri federal court to temporarily halt the deal.

  • February 27, 2020

    Nonprofit Can't Exit DOJ's Cap-And-Trade Suit Against Calif.

    State officials and an international nonprofit can’t escape the Trump administration's lawsuit seeking to dismantle a cap-and-trade deal between the Golden State and the Canadian province of Quebec, a California federal court has ruled.

  • February 27, 2020

    ITC To Review Decision Clearing Toyota In Broadcom IP Probe

    The full U.S. International Trade Commission will review part of a decision clearing Toyota, Panasonic and other Japanese companies of allegations that they are importing and selling car infotainment systems that infringe Broadcom's patented technology, according to a Wednesday notice.

  • February 27, 2020

    Appeals Court Halts Heathrow Expansion Over Climate Risk

    An English appeals court blocked plans to build a third runway at London's Heathrow Airport on Thursday, ruling that the government's policy hadn't explained how it factored in the country's global climate change commitments.

  • February 27, 2020

    UK Sets June Deadline For Canada-Style Trade Deal With EU

    The British government said Thursday it will push for a broad outline of a Canada-style free trade deal with Europe by June or else decide if the U.K.’s “attention should move away from negotiations” and prepare for emerging from the post-Brexit transition period in December without a deal.

  • February 26, 2020

    Tribes, Feds Spar Over Presidential Permit For Keystone XL

    The Rosebud Sioux and Fort Belknap tribes traded blows with the federal government in Montana federal court, battling over the impact of the Keystone XL pipeline on tribal mineral rights and whether President Donald Trump had the authority to issue a permit for the project.

  • February 26, 2020

    Hyundai Wins $5M, Injunction In Counterfeit-Car-Parts Suit

    A North Carolina federal judge has ordered an auto parts company that admitted willfully infringing Hyundai Motor America Inc. trademarks to pay the carmaker $5 million and to stop selling knockoff Hyundai parts, according to an order issued Tuesday.

  • February 26, 2020

    More Businesses Challenge Trump’s Steel, Aluminum Tariffs

    Four more importers and distributors of steel and aluminum products have sued the Trump administration, adding to the slew of businesses challenging as unconstitutional the sudden imposition of recent tariffs on their nails, staples, wires and more.

  • February 26, 2020

    Coronavirus Causing 'Renewed Uncertainty' In HK Markets

    The Hong Kong Stock Exchange’s parent on Wednesday cautioned that the coronavirus outbreak is causing "renewed uncertainty" for its capital markets, tempering an otherwise optimistic outlook after the bourse reported a record annual profit aided by robust initial public offerings activity.

  • February 26, 2020

    Judge Throws Out Ex-Alstom Exec's Bribery Convictions

    A Connecticut federal judge overturned a former Alstom SA executive's foreign bribery convictions Wednesday after finding prosecutors failed to prove the defendant was an agent of the company’s U.S. subsidiary, but the court upheld his money-laundering convictions.

  • February 26, 2020

    Huawei Judge Details Why DOJ Work Led To Sidley Atty's DQ

    A New York federal judge gave a fuller explanation of why she disqualified a Sidley Austin LLP partner from representing Huawei in a criminal bank fraud case, saying an investigation the lawyer had been involved with as a deputy attorney general was too closely related to the case at hand.

  • February 26, 2020

    US Cos. Want Duties On Chinese Plywood Imports Widened

    A group of American producers has asked the U.S. Department of Commerce to expand duties on Chinese hardwood plywood to cover shipments that are sent to Vietnam for assembly before being imported into the U.S.

  • February 25, 2020

    Turkish Bank Agrees To Be Arraigned On Sanctions Charges

    Counsel for Turkey’s state-owned Halkbank said Tuesday that the bank, after months of avoiding a formal appearance, has agreed to be arraigned in a New York federal court on charges that it violated U.S. sanctions against Iran.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    Legal Industry Should Pursue AI Prediction Progress

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    As part of the debate prompted by my recent Law360 guest article on legal prediction using artificial intelligence, I would like to unpack four issues and suggest that attorneys and technologists continue to tackle the problems presently within reach, says Joseph Avery at Claudius Legal Intelligence.

  • Coronavirus Prompts 2 Trade Contract Considerations In US

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    U.S. businesses most likely don't need to worry about the coronavirus being transmitted through imported goods, but certain contract considerations are necessary to manage supply chain disruptions, say attorneys at Thompson Hine.

  • Tips To Reduce Added Tariffs On Chinese Merchandise

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    U.S. importers can mitigate additional duties imposed on Chinese goods by the Trump administration with legal workarounds that make supply chains more efficient, says Laura Rabinowitz at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Solutions To 4 Common Law Firm Diversity Challenges

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    A workshop recently held by the California Minority Counsel Program provides steps law firms can take toward solving minority attorneys' limited access to social capital and lack of meaningful investment, as well as other obstacles to diversity and inclusion, says Alexandra DeFelice, director of marketing and business development at Payne & Fears.

  • Rebuttal

    Discrimination Cases Are Too Complex For AI Fee Prediction

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    A recent Law360 guest article criticizing the New Jersey Supreme Court’s ruling in Balducci v. Cige overlooks the intricate nature of discrimination cases, which renders artificial intelligence an insufficient tool for predicting time and cost, says Paul Aloe at Kudman Trachten.

  • Courts May Clash With Litigants Over Document Review Tech

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    As courts increasingly accept technology-assisted document review, some are bordering on forcing parties to employ TAR, in which case attorneys may need to step in if their clients prefer other processes, say Donna Fisher and Matthew Hamilton at Pepper Hamilton.

  • Pharma Ruling Broadens Gov't Drug Procurement Options

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    In Acetris Health v. U.S., the Federal Circuit's decision that a company sourcing active pharmaceutical ingredients from India could sell them to the U.S. government greatly expanded foreign-produced pharmaceutical products available for U.S. procurement, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • What DHS Report Means For Counterfeits In E-Commerce

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    The protectionist policy initiative the U.S. Department of Homeland Security published following the U.S.-China trade deal should be welcomed by brands, because it shifts the responsibility to e-commerce platforms for policing, monitoring and penalizing intellectual property-counterfeiting activities, says Chloe Lee of Incopro.

  • Rebuttal

    AI Can't Accurately Predict Case Length And Cost — Yet

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    A recent Law360 guest article argued that artificial intelligence can precisely estimate the length and cost of a new case, but several limitations will likely delay truly accurate predictions for years to come, says Andrew Russell at Shaw Keller.

  • Opinion

    High Court Should Not Abet Google's Efficient IP Infringement

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    ​​​​​​​A U.S. Supreme Court ruling in favor of Google in its copyright infringement battle with Oracle would vindicate the search engine’s ruthless economic calculus, encourage IP abuse and dissuade future victims from bringing challenges, says James Skyles of Skyles Law Group.

  • Key Trade Secrets Developments Of 2019: Part 2

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    Last year brought significant news in U.S. trade secret law, including the U.S. Department of Justice’s continued enforcement of its China initiative and further development of the inevitable disclosure doctrine under the Defend Trade Secrets Act, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • How Enviros Will Challenge Trump's NEPA Update

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    The Trump administration's recently proposed updates to National Environmental Policy Act regulations — which forgo analysis of climate change impacts — are certain to draw litigation attacking the changes as arbitrary, capricious and an abuse of regulatory discretion, say Marcella Burke and Cason Hewgley of King & Spalding.

  • A Good Year Ahead For Energy Infrastructure M&A

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    Recent policy developments and investment trends in China, Europe and the United States offer a number of compelling reasons to expect that energy infrastructure M&A deals will be strong in 2020, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Lawyers Can Build Trust Through The Spoken Word

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    As attorneys, we may prefer the precision of written communication, but a phone call or an in-person conversation builds trust by letting others see and hear our authentic selves, rather than something constructed or scripted, says mediator Sidney Kanazawa of ARC.

  • Opinion

    Legal Prediction Is Demanding But Not Impossible

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent decision in Balducci v. Cige incorrectly concluded that predicting the length and cost of a case is nearly impossible, and overlooked artificial intelligence's ability to do so, says Joseph Avery with Claudius Legal Intelligence.

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