International Trade

  • November 21, 2019

    FERC's Glick Says Pipeline OK Has Whiff Of A 'Rubber Stamp'

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday refused to reconsider its approval for a gas pipeline in Illinois and Missouri, a decision that Commissioner Richard Glick said justifies criticism that the agency acts as a “rubber stamp” for gas projects.

  • November 21, 2019

    Pelosi Casts Doubt On Holding NAFTA 2.0 Vote This Year

    Congress may be out of time to hold a vote on the Trump administration's renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement before the end of the year, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Thursday, adding more uncertainty to the future of the accord.

  • November 21, 2019

    CIT Backs Steep Duty For Noncooperative Chinese Co.

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has approved a three-digit anti-dumping duty on a Chinese steel rod producer, even though one of the company's customers said it should have been given a lower rate.

  • November 21, 2019

    Drone Maker Strikes $1M Deal To End Trade Violation Claims

    A California-based manufacturer of unmanned aircraft systems will pay the U.S. Department of State $1 million to end allegations that it illegally exported military equipment in violation of international trade law and regulations, the company announced Thursday.

  • November 21, 2019

    Russian Billionaire Loses Doc Fight After London Raid

    A London court on Thursday blocked a Russian billionaire featured in the Mueller report from learning why U.S. prosecutors had records seized from a company he controlled, saying disclosure could harm relations with U.S. authorities. 

  • November 21, 2019

    Defense Co. Was Upfront In Saudi Bomb Deal, 1st Circ. Finds

    A defense contractor did not lure a Saudi consultancy into a low-fee contract with the promise of an offset payment after inking an arms deal with the Saudi government, the First Circuit held in an opinion Wednesday that affirmed a lower court ruling.

  • November 20, 2019

    House Sends Hong Kong Bill To Trump Amid Chinese Protests

    Congress on Wednesday passed legislation supporting pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong, sending the bill to the desk of President Donald Trump the same day China's foreign ministry slammed the measure as "a serious violation of international law."

  • November 20, 2019

    DOJ Tweaks FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy For Clarity

    The U.S. Department of Justice has tweaked its policy offering companies leniency under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, clarifying what companies need to disclose and when.

  • November 20, 2019

    Amazon Seeks To Snuff Out Cuban Charcoal 'Trafficking' Suit

    Amazon Inc. didn't know the origins of imported Cuban charcoal sold on its website by a third party, and therefore couldn't be liable in a Miami man's lawsuit claiming the retailer and an importer violated a ban on knowingly trafficking in property the Cuban government had seized from Americans, according to briefs the companies filed Tuesday in a Florida federal court.

  • November 20, 2019

    Brazilian Oil Exec Charged With Corruption Pleads Not Guilty

    A former CEO of Brazilian oil company Braskem pled not guilty to corruption charges stemming from alleged violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in Brooklyn federal court late Wednesday afternoon.

  • November 20, 2019

    Singapore Court Denies Slot Club Investor's $200M Award

    A Singapore appellate court has reversed a lower court's decision that favored a $200 million arbitral award to an investment firm following a dispute over a slot gambling club, saying the award can’t be enforced because the parties did not choose the seat of arbitration.

  • November 20, 2019

    Trade Panel Clears Path For Chinese Wire, Cable Duties

    Aluminum wire and cable imported from China will face new duties ranging up to 165% after the U.S. International Trade Commission found Wednesday that the imports have injured U.S. companies that make the same products.

  • November 20, 2019

    Trump Begins Approving US Sales To Blacklisted Huawei

    The Trump administration has begun allowing certain U.S. companies to sell to Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. even as the Chinese telecom giant remains on the national security blacklist, the U.S. Department of Commerce confirmed Wednesday.

  • November 20, 2019

    State Dept. Approves $5.27B In Sales To Morocco, India

    The U.S. Department of State has approved a $4.25 billion sale of 36 AH-64E Apache attack helicopters to Morocco and a $1.02 billion sale of up to 13 MK-45 naval guns to India, the Defense Security Cooperation Agency announced Wednesday.

  • November 20, 2019

    Dems On NAFTA 2.0 'Wild Goose Chase,' GOP Says

    President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans on Wednesday stepped up their criticism of the sluggish pace of the revised North American Free Trade Agreement ratification process after House Democrats continued to push for improvements to the deal’s labor rules.

  • November 20, 2019

    Swedbank Denies US Sanctions Violations As Probes Mount

    Sweden’s oldest bank was forced Wednesday to deny claims by a Swedish national broadcaster that it had allowed bank transfers through its Estonian branch that could have violated U.S. sanctions against Russia.

  • November 19, 2019

    Biz Groups Want Tariff Reform Bill To Erase Metal Duties

    As Congress works on a bill to curb the White House's authority to impose national security tariffs, a collection of business groups on Tuesday pressed for the legislation to remove the tariffs on steel and aluminium the Trump administration has already put in place.

  • November 19, 2019

    Boustani Denies Bribes, Says He 'Tangoed' With Mozambicans

    Privinvest Group executive Jean Boustani readily acknowledged at his fraud and money laundering trial Tuesday in Brooklyn federal court that he arranged to pay a Mozambican agent and a Credit Suisse banker millions, but declined to call them bribes or kickbacks.

  • November 19, 2019

    PDVSA Contractor Gets 18 Months In Prison For Bribery

    A Venezuelan native who paid bribes to secure lucrative energy contracts with Petroleos de Venezuela SA was sentenced Tuesday to 18 months in prison by a federal judge in Houston and ordered to continue making payments on a $9 million judgment against him.

  • November 19, 2019

    Citing Oath, Judge Sends Former Och-Ziff Exec To Prison

    A Brooklyn federal judge sentenced a former executive at Och-Ziff Capital Management Group to three months in prison on Tuesday for lying to investigators, saying he felt compelled to do so by the oath he took to "do equal right to the poor and to the rich."

  • November 19, 2019

    Trump's Tariff Powers Take A Glancing Blow From Trade Court

    With a short procedural decision last week, the U.S. Court of International Trade delivered the firmest rebuke yet of President Donald Trump's use of national security tariffs and potentially offered a roadmap for other companies that may look to fight future White House duties.

  • November 19, 2019

    UK Set To OK Advent-Cobham Deal With Company Promises

    The British government said Tuesday it is likely to approve private equity firm Advent International Corp.'s £4 billion ($5.17 billion) takeover of U.K. defense company Cobham PLC after the companies offered concessions to allay regulators' national security concerns about the deal.

  • November 19, 2019

    Survivors, Families Sue Japanese Co. Over Navy Collision

    The survivors and families of seven sailors killed in a collision between a U.S. Navy destroyer and a container ship have sued the ship’s charterer for more than $287 million in damages, saying the company is responsible for reckless and negligent conduct by the ship’s crew.

  • November 18, 2019

    Boustani Testifies Of African 'Gold Rush,' Denies $2B Fraud

    Privinvest Group executive Jean Boustani took the stand in Brooklyn federal court Monday to deny that he defrauded investors in $2 billion worth of loans used to finance state-backed maritime projects in Mozambique, recounting how he and his friends joined Africa’s “gold rush.”

  • November 18, 2019

    Cruise Line Seeks Nix Of Suit Over Using Cuban Dock

    MSC Cruises has urged a Florida federal court to toss a suit from a Havana port’s ex-owner accusing the cruise line of trafficking in stolen property by using the terminal, saying that the former owner had failed to specify which acts constitute such trafficking.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Ways US Cos. Can Take Advantage Of Tariff Exclusions

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    As the U.S. and China continue their protracted negotiations over trade agreements, there are actions U.S. businesses can take today in an effort to mitigate damages arising out of the latest round of tariffs on Chinese imports, says Katie Roskam at Varnum Riddering.

  • How To Hire Lateral Partners More Effectively

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    Although lateral partner hiring is the preferred method of inorganic growth among law firms, the traditional approach to vetting does not employ sufficient due diligence by the hiring firm, says Michael Ellenhorn at executive search firm Decipher Competitive Intelligence.

  • Aviation Watch: No Winners In Boeing-Airbus Trade Feud

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    Recently announced U.S. tariffs against a range of European products are just the latest negative consequence of a 15-year trade dispute centering on subsidies to Boeing and Airbus — a conflict that has proven disastrous for all involved, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and private pilot.

  • What To Know Before Moving Your Supply Chain Out Of China

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    U.S. companies moving their supply chains to avoid Chinese tariffs should be aware of the complexities of U.S. Customs and Border Patrol country-of-origin determinations and the scope of U.S. Department of Commerce authority to impose tariffs on Chinese goods that originate outside of China, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Key Takeaways From Ex-Alstom Exec's FCPA Conviction

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    In U.S. v. Hoskins, a Connecticut federal court last week convicted a foreigner who did not work for a U.S. company of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations, presenting valuable lessons about the scope of FCPA liability and how to effectively withdraw from a bribery scheme, say Sunil Shenoi and Kim Nemirow at Kirkland.

  • Texas Could Take Page From Mass.'s Judicial Selection Book

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    As Texas and other states review their judicial election processes, they would be well served by taking guidance from Massachusetts' Governor’s Council system, which protects the judiciary from the hazards of campaigning, says Richard Baker of New England Intellectual Property.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McKeown Reviews 'Conversations With RBG'

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    Reading Jeffrey Rosen’s "Conversations With RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law" is like eavesdropping on the author and his subject while they discuss how the restrained judicial minimalist became the fiery leader of the opposition, says Ninth Circuit Judge M. Margaret McKeown.

  • Opinion

    In A Trade War, Everyone Loses

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    While some countries may temporarily benefit from bilateral trade disputes, in the long term, the Trump administration's protectionist strategy puts at risk the enormous achievements of the last decades, both in the U.S. and globally, says Anahita Thoms at Baker McKenzie.

  • Digitalizing The Mining And Metals Global Supply Chain

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    More businesses in the mining and metals sector are considering blockchain to address challenges associated with mineral provenance and supply chain transparency, but it remains to be seen whether the technology can be harnessed to track performance standards related to human rights, labor practices and other factors, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • Opportunities Abound In Patent Litigation Funding At The ITC

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    The recent funding of a patent infringement claim brought by the University of California Santa Barbara demonstrates the advantages of the U.S. International Trade Commission as a venue, where creative intellectual property owners and litigation financers may find lucrative opportunities, despite a few hurdles, say Matt Rizzolo and Hyun-Joong (Daniel) Kim of Ropes & Gray.

  • US Business Strategies To Soften Trade War Impact

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    By monitoring the shifting trade landscape and deploying appropriate tariff strategies to mitigate risk, American businesses can minimize the negative effects that ongoing changes in global tariffs may have on their bottom line, say Michelle Schulz and Luis Arandia of Polsinelli.

  • Opinion

    Flat-Fee Legal Billing Can Liberate Attorneys

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    Replacing hourly billing with flat-fee arrangements, especially for appellate work, will leave attorneys feeling free to spend as much time as necessary to produce their highest quality work, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Spoliation Rule Remains Ambiguous Despite Amendments

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    Although the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended to provide a uniform standard of culpability for spoliation, cases with similar facts are still reaching differing results because the rule does not specify how a court should evaluate a party's intent, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton.

  • 5 Trends Influencing RFPs For Law Firms

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    Requests for proposals, the standard tool of companies evaluating law firms, are becoming better suited to the legal industry, says Matthew Prinn of RFP Advisory Group.

  • What Industry, Investors Think Of The Proposed CFIUS Regs

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    Comments on the U.S. Department of the Treasury's proposed regulations to expand and modernize the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States offer insight into investment community concerns and questions, as well as alternatives that would affect U.S. and foreign entities alike, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.