Technology

  • July 19, 2019

    Salesforce Can't Move Sex Trafficking Suit To Federal Court

    Tech giant Salesforce.com couldn't convince a federal judge in Texas that a lawsuit alleging it helped Backpage.com profit from sex trafficking should stay in federal court, despite its argument the plaintiff included hotels as defendants in the case specifically to keep the case in state court.

  • July 19, 2019

    Kids' Data Again In Spotlight As FTC Revisits Privacy Rule

    The Federal Trade Commission has called for what could be a multiyear review of its child privacy rules, a process that could upend compliance plans for website operators and app developers and bring a wider range of service providers and personal information under the law, attorneys say. 

  • July 19, 2019

    Failed Tech Co. Execs Get Claims Trimmed In Investor's Suit

    The Delaware Chancery Court has partly dismissed a suit brought against former executives at now-defunct Basho Technologies Inc. by an investor, who accused them of violating their fiduciary duties by inducing him to invest millions in what they knew was a failing enterprise.

  • July 19, 2019

    DNC Wants Mueller Report Kept Out Of Election Hack Suit

    The Democratic National Committee told a Manhattan federal judge Friday there is no need to take judicial notice of the Mueller report in considering the plausibility of its complaint claiming the party was harmed by email hacking in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

  • July 19, 2019

    PTAB Backs Comcast, Axes By-Voice Video-Ordering Patent

    Comcast Cable Communications LLC demonstrated that many claims of a Silicon Valley-based company’s patent covering a system that lets TV viewers order videos online using voice commands are invalid, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board has found.

  • July 19, 2019

    Targeted Ransomware Attacks Soar, Symantec Reports

    The number of targeted ransomware attacks has skyrocketed in the past year as new attackers have increasingly emerged, cybersecurity giant Symantec Corp. said in a recent report.

  • July 19, 2019

    11th Circ. Won't Force City To Trash Red Light Cameras

    The Eleventh Circuit has said it will not stop an Alabama city from using traffic cameras to penalize drivers who run red lights, dismissing a lawsuit challenging the policy for reasons that differ from an Alabama district court's.

  • July 19, 2019

    Brand Battles: Tinder Tightens Grip On 'Swipe' Trademark

    In Law360's latest roundup of new actions at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, Tinder takes a swipe at a smaller company's “Swiped-Out” trademark, golf legend Jack Nicklaus defends his "Golden Bear" logo, and BMW finds itself in a "Mini" dispute with Macy's.

  • July 19, 2019

    Goodwin Guides Radiology Biz To $4B Valuation

    Venture capital-backed Radiology Partners, guided by Goodwin, said Friday it reached a $4 billion valuation following an investment from Starr Investment Holdings.

  • July 19, 2019

    After Delay, Pa. Programmer Pleads To Siemens Sabotage

    A Pittsburgh-area computer programmer pled guilty in federal court Friday to planting code that would deliberately break programs he’d written under contract with Siemens Corp., after his previous plea hearing was halted in June amid disagreements over whether his motivation should have been considered.

  • July 19, 2019

    O'Rielly To Broadcasters: Don't 'Screw Up' New Kid Vid Rules

    FCC Commissioner Michael O'Rielly warned broadcasters to not "screw this up" as they take advantage of newfound flexibility in airing mandated children's TV programming, saying that shirking those responsibilities could result in heavier regulations later.

  • July 19, 2019

    11 Firms To Guide 7 IPOs Exceeding $1.4B As July Stays Hot

    Eleven firms are set to guide eight initial public offerings estimated to raise more than $1.4 billion during the week of July 22, continuing a sizzling stretch on the IPO schedule highlighted by a Chinese sports marketing giant and a wide gamut of issuers.

  • July 19, 2019

    Audit Identifies Basic Cybersecurity Flaws At The IRS

    The Internal Revenue Service has put millions of taxpayer records at risk by failing to address dozens of cybersecurity flaws, including its failure to take basic steps to authenticate users, according to a congressional watchdog.

  • July 19, 2019

    SC Utility Customers Tell 2nd Circ. To Revive Nuke Plant Suit

    Two South Carolina utility customers on Friday asked the Second Circuit to revive a suit against Westinghouse Electric Co. to recover payments made for an abandoned nuclear project, saying their claims arise from Westinghouse’s post-Chapter 11 acts.

  • July 19, 2019

    Bosch Urges FCC To Give High-Frequency Use Another Look

    German conglomerate Bosch has called on the Federal Communications Commission to reconsider how it approaches experimental use of ultra-high frequency bands, saying the agency missed an opportunity to boost high-tech sector growth by opening up more unlicensed spectrum.

  • July 19, 2019

    Qualcomm's Profitability No National Security Issue, FTC Says

    The Federal Trade Commission has fired back against efforts by Qualcomm and the U.S. Department of Justice to pause a blockbuster antitrust ruling forcing the chipmaker to retool its business model, arguing that reining in Qualcomm’s anti-competitive conduct outweighs any vague national security concerns the pair alluded to.

  • July 19, 2019

    Gamers Say Nintendo Joystick Defect Ruins Controllers

    A proposed class of video game players sued Nintendo of America Inc. in Washington federal court on Friday, saying the acclaimed developer has known about a defect in controllers for its latest system but refuses to fix it.

  • July 19, 2019

    FCC Mulling Customer Opt-Outs For Wireless Carriers' Texts

    The Federal Communications Commission is considering whether to allow cell service customers to opt out of all texts from their providers after an AT&T customer complained the carrier wouldn’t stop sending frequent, unwanted messages about his data usage and bills.

  • July 19, 2019

    Groups Urge Libra Partners To Stand Up To Facebook

    Four public advocacy groups on Thursday urged the Libra Association's more than two dozen partners to withdraw from the Facebook-led cryptocurrency project, a day after skeptical lawmakers grilled the social media giant.

  • July 19, 2019

    NBA's Cavs Roll Out Plans For Esports Facility In Cleveland

    Cavs Legion, an esports team affiliated with the NBA’s Cleveland Cavaliers, said Friday it will open a new facility in Cleveland that will cater to players and fans of the fast-growing esports industry.

  • July 19, 2019

    3 Cos. Raise $1B In IPOs Led By Peruvian Asset Manager

    A trio of companies, including a Latin American asset manager, made their public debuts Friday, hitting the market a day after pricing shares in initial public offerings that brought in a total of $1 billion.

  • July 19, 2019

    Crypto 'IEOs' Grow Globally Despite US Legal Obstacles

    Initial exchange offerings, a fast-rising global phenomenon where cryptocurrency exchanges administer token sales on behalf of blockchain startups, stand little chance of taking off in the U.S. because of legal risks tied to this novel form of capital raising, lawyers say.

  • July 18, 2019

    BU Loses Bid To Reinstate $14M LED Patent Win

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Thursday shut down Boston University’s bid to reinstate a $14 million patent infringement verdict against three LED manufacturers that was overturned by the Federal Circuit last year.

  • July 18, 2019

    Judge Alsup's Settlement Rules Face Fire At 9th Circ.

    Logitech Inc. urged the Ninth Circuit Thursday to scrap U.S. District Judge William Alsup’s standing order to prohibit parties from entering settlement negotiations until after class certification is decided, arguing that the order violates the parties’ First Amendment rights and federal civil procedure rules that promote settlements.

  • July 18, 2019

    'Repealer' Cathode Ray Tube Buyers Oppose Separate Trials

    Indirect purchasers of television and computer component cathode ray tubes from nine states, who were excluded from a $576.8 million price-fixing settlement with Toshiba, Panasonic and LG, have urged a California federal court to throw out a bid from other buyers seeking two separate trials next year.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Things FTC Competition Bureau Looks For In White Papers

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    Most written advocacy to the Bureau of Competition is of an extremely high quality, but sometimes we notice that there’s some room for improvement, says Daniel Francis, an associate director at the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Competition.

  • Digital Asset Securities Statement May Be Missed Opportunity

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    The long-anticipated joint statement issued earlier this month by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority reminds entities effecting transactions in digital asset securities of broker-dealer compliance requirements with regard to custody, but falls short of providing actionable guidance, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • An Important Step Forward For Driverless Car Tech Standards

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    A white paper recently published by some of the world's largest car manufacturers, tiered suppliers and technology companies starts the conversation about developing technical standards for automated driving systems and will facilitate development of the federal regulatory framework, say Nicole Crowley and Jonathan Fabozzi of Goldberg Segalla.

  • Before The DST Settles: What To Know About UK Digital Tax

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    With the introduction of detailed legislation on July 11 for what the United Kingdom considers to be “a targeted, proportionate and temporary tax,” the U.K. hopes to keep the pressure on the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for a comprehensive consensus-based solution to a digital services tax, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • Preinstitution Submissions May Limit Certain ITC Probes

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    Following recent rule changes, U.S. International Trade Commission determinations and decisions by the Federal Circuit, proposed respondents may be able to prevent or limit the scope of ITC Section 337 investigations if they act quickly using various types of preinstitution submissions, says Michael Doane of Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • 5 Takeaways From DOJ Focus On Chinese Trade Secret Theft

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    Since its official announcement of the China Initiative eight months ago, the U.S. Department of Justice has publicized the initiation of six new cases that include references to both trade secrets and China. These shed some light on DOJ and U.S. business priorities, says Sara O’Connell at Pillsbury.

  • Data Analytics Decision Highlights Product Liability Questions

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    In Rodgers v. Laura & John Arnold Foundation, a New Jersey federal court recently held that a public safety assessment based on data analytics was speech rather than a product. The decision suggests that consumers led astray by analytics may want to consider remedies outside of product liability law, say Davis Walsh and Richard Beaulieu of McGuireWoods.

  • Considerations Before Relying On AIA Prior User Rights

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    While prior user rights under the America Invents Act may lead a company to elect trade secret protection over patent protection for the potential cost savings, there are important caveats, says Karam Saab of Kilpatrick Townsend.

  • IP Protection Still Elusive For Data Compilations In US And EU

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    As businesses continue to increase investment into artificial intelligence systems, questions arise as to whether they can own or legally protect data compiled by those systems. Currently, in the U.S. and EU, obtaining copyright protection for databases is difficult and trade secret protection requires policies and procedures to establish rights, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Tips For Avoiding Multistate HIPAA Data Breach Lawsuits

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    A recent settlement between Medical Informatics Engineering and 16 states appears to be the first state mass action based on purported Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act violations. It signals increased state-level exposure for HIPAA data breaches and offers a useful compliance checklist for HIPAA-covered entities, say Saad Gul and Michael Slipsky of Poyner Spruill.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • State Net

    Local Governments Push To Regulate Public Surveillance

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    San Francisco's Board of Supervisors recently approved an ordinance banning the use of facial recognition technology by all city departments. The law is part of a growing movement among localities and states to increase oversight of the use of surveillance technologies by government entities, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.