Technology

  • November 21, 2019

    Take-Two Wants WWE Game Tattoo IP Suit Paused

    Take-Two Interactive Software Inc. has asked an Illinois federal court to pause a tattoo artist's lawsuit alleging it infringed her copyright by depicting a wrestler she inked in a video game, arguing that a pending motion could decide the matter once and for all.

  • November 21, 2019

    Bitcoin ‘Inventor’ Faces $658K Atty Fee Bid Over Sanctions

    The estate accusing self-proclaimed Bitcoin inventor Craig Wright of stealing $10 billion worth of the cryptocurrency from his late partner is seeking $658,581 in attorney fees and expenses incurred while trying to get Wright to comply with court orders.

  • November 21, 2019

    House Dems Tell Airbnb To Explain How It IDs Illegal Listings

    Six Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday demanded that Airbnb explain how it plans to deal with "deceptive" limited liability corporations that disguise themselves as hosts on the home-sharing platform so they can market short-term rentals.

  • November 21, 2019

    Wells Fargo Borrowers Renew Class Bid In Foreclosure Suit

    Current and former Wells Fargo mortgage borrowers with loans provided or serviced by the bank renewed a class certification bid Thursday alleging the bank denied mortgage aid to more than 850 eligible struggling homeowners, causing nearly 550 of them to lose their homes.

  • November 21, 2019

    9th Circ. Won't Revive DVD Drive Price-Fixing Suit

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday refused to revive claims from consumers accusing two DVD drive makers of participating in a conspiracy to fix prices, affirming a lower court’s ruling that testimony of the buyers’ expert was too hypothetical.

  • November 21, 2019

    Hagens Berman, Cohen Milstein Get $10M Fees On 2nd Try

    A California federal judge on Thursday approved $10 million in attorney fees sought by Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP and Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll PLLC for securing a $50 million settlement over electronics industry price-fixing, saying they'd resolved concerns about "insufficient" billing explanations he'd raised earlier.

  • November 21, 2019

    Apple, Intel Fight Alleged Backer Of 'Meritless Patent' Scheme

    Intel has rejiggered its lawsuit against investment management firm Fortress Investment Group LLC in California federal court, dropping its initial complaint in order to file a new one backed by Apple against the firm’s alleged funding of an anti-competitive patent aggregation scheme.

  • November 21, 2019

    FCC’s Starks Says Carriers Need Cash For Huawei, ZTE Purge

    On the eve of the Federal Communications Commission’s planned vote on a national security proposal to remove Huawei and ZTE equipment from U.S. networks, Commissioner Geoffrey Starks argued that rural carriers will be hit the hardest and deserve help covering the cost, which could climb upward of $1 billion.

  • November 21, 2019

    Snap Investors Win Cert. In IPO Class Action

    Shareholders in Snapchat parent Snap Inc. won certification in California federal court Wednesday in their class action over the company's alleged cover-up of problematic growth metrics ahead of its initial public offering.

  • November 21, 2019

    Gov't Expands Counterfeit Reporting Rule To All Contractors

    A requirement for defense contractors to report counterfeit electronic parts in their supply chain was expanded to include all U.S. federal contractors and more parts, under a final regulation that the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council issued Thursday.

  • November 21, 2019

    DOJ Can't DQ Munger Tolles In Sprint, T-Mobile Merger Fight

    A New York federal judge on Thursday shot down a bid by the U.S. Department of Justice to intervene in several states' effort to block Sprint and T-Mobile's planned merger, saying that it was "inexcusable" that the attempt to disqualify the states' lead counsel at Munger Tolles & Olson was filed so late.

  • November 21, 2019

    Senate Bill Would Require That C-Band Proceeds Go To US

    Louisiana Sen. John Kennedy has filed legislation to ensure that only the Federal Communications Commission, not private satellite operators, auctions off parts of the C-band for next-generation wireless deployment and that the proceeds go to U.S. taxpayers and boost rural broadband.

  • November 21, 2019

    Facebook Asks Texas Justices To Pause Sex Trafficking Suit

    Facebook Inc. has asked the Texas Supreme Court to pause proceedings in a lawsuit against it by a sex trafficking survivor to prevent the company from answering “burdensome discovery” before an appellate court can decide whether it’s immune from the claims.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-Twitter Worker Wins Release Pending Trial On Spy Charges

    A California federal judge will allow the pretrial release of a former Twitter employee accused of helping Saudi Arabia spy on users deemed critics of the regime, saying prosecutors did not sufficiently demonstrate that the Seattle resident is a flight risk.

  • November 21, 2019

    Pai Drawing Up New Robocall Regs If Carriers Don't Hustle

    Unhappy with the progress carriers have made toward implementing robocall-screening caller ID measures, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said Thursday that his staff is preparing new rules in case carriers don’t move fast enough by the end of the year.

  • November 21, 2019

    Chinese Crypto Miner Raises $90M In Low-Pricing IPO

    Chinese bitcoin mining company Canaan Inc. raised $90 million in an initial public offering that priced at the bottom of its range on Thursday, represented by Simpson Thacher and underwriters counsel Freshfields.

  • November 21, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Hudson's Bay, Charles Schwab, DoorDash

    A private equity firm is hoping to usurp the previously announced deal for Hudson’s Bay worth about $1.4 billion, Charles Schwab could pay $25 billion to buy smaller rival TD Ameritrade, and DoorDash is considering a direct listing instead of an IPO. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • November 21, 2019

    Timing Device Co. Debuts With $56M Pillsbury-Led IPO

    SiTime, a timing device company that counts Apple as a major customer, started trading Thursday after raising $55.9 million in an initial public offering steered by Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.

  • November 21, 2019

    AI Startup’s Value Doubles To $2.5B After Series C Round

    Data mining startup Celonis announced Thursday it completed a $290 million Series C funding round led by Arena Holdings, lifting the company’s valuation to $2.5 billion.

  • November 21, 2019

    Apple, Cisco Must Redo Fee Requests In 'Reckless' IP Fight

    U.S. District Judge William Alsup is ordering Apple and Cisco to resubmit their bids for attorney fees from a tech company they say dragged them into “recklessly litigated” patent disputes, warning that he may deny relief entirely if the new calculations are unreasonable.

  • November 21, 2019

    Xerox Prepared To Go Hostile With $33B HP Takeover Bid

    Xerox said Thursday that it will bring its $33 billion takeover offer for HP directly to shareholders next week if HP doesn’t agree to terms that will allow both companies to complete thorough due diligence.

  • November 20, 2019

    Amazon Home Security Raises Privacy Concerns, Dems Say

    A group of Senate Democrats raised privacy concerns Wednesday about Amazon's home security system, Ring, and want to know how users' personal information will be protected from hackers and foreign agents once it's on Amazon's servers.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-Twitter Worker Accused Of Spying Is Flight Risk, Feds Say

    Prosecutors asked a California federal judge Wednesday not to release a former Twitter employee accused of helping Saudi Arabia spy on users deemed critics of the regime, arguing that the Seattle resident is a flight risk.

  • November 20, 2019

    Prosus Urges Just Eat Investors To Back Competing £5B Bid

    Prosus on Wednesday urged shareholders of fellow food delivery service Just Eat to support its £4.85 billion ($6.2 billion) offer and reject a planned all-stock sale to Takeaway.com, contending its interloping bid is less risky and that it will be more invested in Just Eat's future.

  • November 20, 2019

    PTAB Wrestles With How To Construe Anti-Spoofing Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board asked tough questions Wednesday about whether it should adopt a district court’s definition of a key term in a TrustID Inc. patent covering anti-spoofing technology challenged by Next Caller.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Ways US Cos. Can Take Advantage Of Tariff Exclusions

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    As the U.S. and China continue their protracted negotiations over trade agreements, there are actions U.S. businesses can take today in an effort to mitigate damages arising out of the latest round of tariffs on Chinese imports, says Katie Roskam at Varnum Riddering.

  • FAA Efforts Aim To Reduce Drone Jurisdictional Disputes

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    Local and state laws concerning drones are widespread, but so, too, are confusion and disagreement over the extent of federal jurisdiction in this area. The Federal Aviation Administration's forthcoming remote identification rules may help resolve some of these conflicts, says Mark Dombroff of Fox Rothschild.

  • How To Hire Lateral Partners More Effectively

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    Although lateral partner hiring is the preferred method of inorganic growth among law firms, the traditional approach to vetting does not employ sufficient due diligence by the hiring firm, says Michael Ellenhorn at executive search firm Decipher Competitive Intelligence.

  • How High Court May Resolve Generic '.Com' TM Issue

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    In its upcoming U.S. Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com decision, the U.S. Supreme Court could uphold the Fourth Circuit’s ruling that generic terms can be transformed into protectable marks when combined with a top-level domain in some cases or, instead, adopt the Ninth and Federal Circuits' more stringent view requiring exceptional circumstances, say attorneys at Knobbe Martens.

  • Justices Mull Interplay Of ERISA, Securities Laws In IBM Case

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    At recent U.S. Supreme Court arguments in IBM v. Jander, the justices grappled with the Employee Retirement Income Security Act’s difficult application and its intersection with federal securities laws in considering whether plan fiduciaries must disclose inside information about publicly traded companies, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Using Multiple-Attorney Depositions After Finjan Ruling

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    The recent patent case, Finjan v. Cisco Systems, in which a California federal court prohibited two-attorney questioning in a deposition where the parties failed to agree to it in advance, indicates that it may be better to ask permission than forgiveness when employing this deposition strategy, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • Opinion

    World Athletics Should Allow Nike's Innovative Running Shoes

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    A close examination of Nike's controversial ZoomX Vaporfly Next% running shoes and a review of investigations by other sports’ governing bodies underline the importance of World Athletics' allowing the Vaporfly Next on the course, says Elizabeth McCurrach of BakerHostetler.

  • High Court's Pass On 1 SEC Case Offers Insight Into Another

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    The U.S. Supreme Court effectively recognized the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's extraterritorial reach in denying certiorari in Scoville v. SEC. The move may foreshadow the high court's eventual ruling in Liu v. SEC, which will determine the regulator's authority to seek disgorgement, say Adam Schwartz and Russell Koonin at Homer Bonner.

  • Litigation And Arbitration Are Creating A Public Cyberlaw

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    Although criminal and civil liberties implications are at the forefront of cybercrime and data privacy cases currently before the U.S. Supreme Court, a little-noticed, but potentially important, issue is the development of public cyberlaw at the operational level by commercial lawyers in private business disputes, says Joseph DeMarco of DeVore & DeMarco.

  • What To Know Before Moving Your Supply Chain Out Of China

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    U.S. companies moving their supply chains to avoid Chinese tariffs should be aware of the complexities of U.S. Customs and Border Patrol country-of-origin determinations and the scope of U.S. Department of Commerce authority to impose tariffs on Chinese goods that originate outside of China, say attorneys at Covington.

  • The Coming Storm Of Biometric Privacy Laws: How To Comply

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    To respond to the rapidly evolving legal landscape, companies that incorporate biometric data into their business practices can take several steps to minimize the risk of privacy litigation exposure, say Jeffrey Rosenthal and David Oberly of Blank Rome.

  • How Increased Stays Pending IPR May Affect Venue Choice

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    A little over one year after the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in SAS Institute v. Iancu, data show a 5% increase in district court-granted stays of litigation pending inter partes review, and the grant rate disparities may influence new patent filings toward certain venues and defendants facing patent infringement claims toward others, say attorneys at Armond Wilson.

  • The Coming Storm Of Biometric Privacy Laws: What To Expect

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    While there are only three state biometric privacy laws on the books, there is a growing trend of states' introducing biometric privacy bills, many of which feature far-reaching private right of action provisions that would substantially increase the level of regulatory and litigation risk, say Jeffrey Rosenthal and David Oberly of Blank Rome.

  • Adapting 4th Amendment Standards To Connected Tech

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    An evolving view of the Fourth Amendment acknowledges that the detailed and sensitive nature of internet of things data — which is starting to find its way into courtroom evidence — requires strong privacy protections and a shift away from a blunt, either-or approach to third-party access, say Jennifer Huddleston and Anne Philpot of George Mason University.

  • Fed. Circ.’s Arthrex Ruling: Unforeseen Consequences For IPR

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    The critical and fundamental problem with the Federal Circuit's constitutional remedy for Patent Trial and Appeal Board judicial appointments in Arthrex v. Smith & Nephew is that making administrative patent judges removable at will renders them unable to preside over inter partes review proceedings consistent with the Administrative Procedure Act, say attorneys at Sterne Kessler.