Technology

  • April 12, 2021

    ITC Clears Garmin and Fitbit in Philips Patent Case

    The U.S. International Trade Commission on Monday terminated an investigation into Garmin and Fitbit Inc. that looked into whether the companies infringed two patents from Philips, according to a notice from the agency.

  • April 12, 2021

    Biden Nominates Senior National Security Officials

    President Joe Biden on Monday nominated several people to senior defense and national security positions, including an inaugural national cyber director, a new federal counterterrorism chief, and potentially the first-ever woman to serve as Army secretary.

  • April 12, 2021

    Regulators Warn That SPAC Accounting Errors Require Fixes

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday cautioned that special purpose acquisition companies may need to refile regulatory documents to correct accounting errors involving the classification of warrants, potentially generating uncertainty for the red-hot SPAC market.

  • April 12, 2021

    Intel's Chip Advances Were Borrowed Tech, VLSI Tells Jury

    After a punishing $2 billion loss, Intel went to trial again Monday against patent claims by hedge-fund-backed VLSI, which told jurors in Texas the chip powerhouse helped itself to efficiency advances created two decades ago by innovative engineers "looking over the horizon."

  • April 12, 2021

    Three Firms Tapped To Lead Robinhood Order Flow Suits

    A California federal judge Monday consolidated five putative class actions from Robinhood users over the alleged failure to disclose the processes of payment for order flow, appointing Ahdoot & Wolfson PC, Bursor & Fisher PA and Liddle & Dubin PC as lead counsel.

  • April 12, 2021

    9th Circ. Doubts NSO's Immunity Defense In WhatsApp Suit

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared skeptical Monday of Israeli spyware company NSO Group's argument that sovereign immunity protects it from Facebook's lawsuit over hacks to subsidiary WhatsApp, with two judges pointing out the lack of case law to support NSO's position and a third judge saying the case should go to discovery.

  • April 12, 2021

    Delivery Co. Asks High Court For Atty Fees In IP Dispute

    Roadie Inc. asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Federal Circuit decision that it's not entitled to attorney fees under the Patent Act, despite beating its rival Baggage Airline Guest Services Inc.'s infringement suit for lost luggage technology, saying judicial discretion over fees in exceptional cases is "inconsistent and contradictory."

  • April 12, 2021

    Facebook Tells 1st Circ. To Reverse FTC Doc Release Order

    Facebook has urged the First Circuit to reverse an order requiring the Federal Trade Commission to respond to a Freedom of Information Act request for documents related to a $5 billion settlement with Facebook, saying dissenting comments from two FTC commissioners are not "official" disclosures triggering the official-acknowledgment doctrine.

  • April 12, 2021

    Tech Attys Tell USPTO To Rethink PTAB Review Denials

    Top attorneys from Cisco and Microsoft called Monday for the next U.S. Patent and Trademark Office director to consider the "practical" realities of the agency's practice of refusing to review patent challenges in light of parallel district court litigation.

  • April 12, 2021

    FCC Wants Your Internet Speed Data For Broadband Maps

    The Federal Communications Commission wants everyone to download the agency's speed test smartphone application to help it quickly gather data about network performance across the country.

  • April 12, 2021

    Ky. Latest State To Enact COVID-19 Liability Shield Law

    Kentucky has enacted a law that shields businesses and health care providers from COVID-19 injury and death lawsuits, following Florida as the latest state to provide a legal safe haven for businesses amid the pandemic.

  • April 12, 2021

    T-Mobile Says Dish To Blame For 3G Shutdown Threat

    T-Mobile is combating assertions that it's trying to "prematurely" kick Boost Mobile subscribers off its 3G network, telling the Federal Communications Commission that its network transition plan is firmly in line with prior merger commitments.

  • April 12, 2021

    Ex-Netflix Biz Partner Acknowledged 'Pay-To-Play,' Jury Told

    During the second day of a former Netflix executive's criminal bribery trial, a California federal jury viewed internal email exchanges in which a startup CEO acknowledged that "there's clearly some pay-to-play" occurring between his company and the streaming giant.

  • April 12, 2021

    Sen. Wants To Ban 'Dominant' Tech, $100B Cos. From All M&A

    Online platforms designated as "dominant digital firms" and any company with a market capitalization of more than $100 billion would be all but banned from any mergers and acquisitions activity under a new bill Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., unveiled Monday in a sweeping antitrust broadside against "woke mega-corporations."

  • April 12, 2021

    Latham-Led Cybersecurity Biz Darktrace Floats London IPO

    Cybersecurity giant Darktrace, working with Latham & Watkins LLP, unveiled plans Monday to launch a public offering and list on the London Stock Exchange.

  • April 12, 2021

    7 Cos. Restock Pipeline With IPOs That Could Exceed $2.1B

    Automation software company UiPath on Monday launched plans for an initial public offering estimated to raise nearly $1 billion, joined by six more companies that set price ranges on offerings that could net another $1.1 billion combined, replenishing the IPO pipeline through late April.

  • April 12, 2021

    Nat'l Security Team Clears Polhem's $1B Telia Carrier Buy

    A key U.S. national security panel said Monday it won't object to Telia Co. selling its international carrier business to Polhem Infra for 9,450 million Swedish krona ($1.1 billion) if certain conditions are met.

  • April 12, 2021

    Walmart Owes $115M For Stealing Startup's Food Tech

    A jury in Walmart's home state of Arkansas said the world's largest retailer owes a Texas food technology startup $115 million after it developed shelf-freshness technology by shoplifting the startup's trade secrets.

  • April 12, 2021

    SEC Loses Bid For Ripple Labs Execs' Personal Financial Info

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission will not be able to access eight years of personal financial information for the two top executives of Ripple Labs, marking the regulator's second major discovery defeat in the closely watched cryptocurrency fight.

  • April 12, 2021

    Apple Says Not Naming Third-Party Witnesses Was Epic Fail

    Apple has urged a California federal judge to block Epic Games from calling three witnesses in an upcoming antitrust trial unless they hand over troves of documents, saying Epic caused a "procedural Catch-22" by not disclosing their names in earlier discovery.

  • April 12, 2021

    Ardian Raises €7.5B Via Latest Buyout Fund, Co-Investments

    Private investment firm Ardian said Monday that it landed a combined €7.5 billion (over $8.9 billion) through its latest buyout fundraise and co-investments to continue injecting capital into health care, food chain, and technology and services companies.

  • April 12, 2021

    9th Circ. Says Tech Co. Not Covered For $4.8M Email Scam

    The Ninth Circuit upheld a lower court ruling that Star Surplus Lines Insurance Co. needn't cover an information technology company's $4.8 million loss from a 2018 phishing attack, holding that the incident did not constitute an insurance claim under the policy.

  • April 12, 2021

    Release Too Broad For Honda 'Infotainment' Settlement

    A California federal judge has denied preliminary approval to a settlement aimed at resolving claims that the touch screen systems in American Honda Motor Co. Inc. vehicles are defective, saying the deal's release clause would block claims not related to the complaint.

  • April 12, 2021

    Fox News Taps Ex-Google Atty For General Counsel Spot

    Fox News Media has recruited an in-house lawyer who has worked at Google and Oprah Winfrey's global media company as its next general counsel and executive vice president of corporate development, the New York City-based network said Monday.

  • April 12, 2021

    Breaking IP Barriers: Q&A With Dechert's Nisha Patel

    When Dechert LLP partner Nisha Patel was in college, she was at times the only woman in a class with dozens of men. Though less extreme, that disparity continued as she became an intellectual property litigator working in high tech.

Expert Analysis

  • Where Health Care Enforcement Is Headed Under Biden

    Author Photo

    Early actions by President Joe Biden's administration signal a robust health care enforcement environment in which federal agencies will aggressively scrutinize pandemic-related and Medicare Advantage fraud, nursing homes, and medical technology, and False Claims Act activity will likely increase, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Consumer Protection Takeaways From ABA Antitrust Meeting

    Author Photo

    During the recent Antitrust Law Spring Meeting, the American Bar Association's panels evaluated how antitrust and consumer protection fit into broader social and political issues, and revealed how that perspective might inform enforcement, litigation and consumer education in the future, say Patrick Thompson and Kevin Schock at Perkins Coie.

  • Opinion

    Growth Cos. Should Disclose Projections In IPO Prospectuses

    Author Photo

    It's time for the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to encourage smaller and emerging companies to demonstrate their prospective growth to investors by providing reasonable financial projections in their initial public offering prospectuses for a greater chance of success, says Spencer Feldman at Olshan Frome.

  • What Associates Should Consider Before Switching Practices

    Author Photo

    The current high demand for midlevel associates provides them a rare opportunity to potentially explore new practice areas, but associates should first ask themselves six questions to begin figuring out why a change sounds appealing, says Stephanie Biderman at Major Lindsey.

  • Mitigating Anti-Kickback Risks Of Health Tech Stock Warrants

    Author Photo

    While stock warrants are a practical way for the health technology industry to finance growth, companies should utilize statutory safe harbors to mitigate federal Anti-Kickback Statute compliance risks, which could arise from an improperly structured arrangement that encourages referral of business to a vendor, say Meenakshi Datta and Jon Zucker at Sidley.

  • High Court Oracle Copyright Ruling Is A Boon For Innovation

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on Monday that Google made fair use of the declaring code of Oracle's Java application programming interface should encourage development of new code based on existing APIs and spur technological growth, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • 4 Effective Ways To Prioritize Client Advocacy

    Author Photo

    To truly support a client going through a complicated lawsuit or a painful experience, lawyers must think beyond interpreting legal guidelines and navigating court proceedings, says attorney Scott Corwin.

  • Remote Law Firm Culture Should Prioritize Associate Training

    Author Photo

    Due to the pandemic, the gap between law school and the first day on the job has never been wider, but law firms can leverage training to bridge that intimidating gap and convey the unique value of their culture in a virtual environment, say Melissa Schwind at Ward and Smith, and William Kenney and Jaron Luttich at Element Standard.

  • Virtual Litigation May Unravel The Narcissistic Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The virtual courtroom limits a narcissistic lawyer's ability to intimidate witnesses and opposing counsel, boast to clients or engage in grandstanding — an unexpected benefit of the global pandemic as some aspects of remote litigation are likely here to stay, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • Defense Options After Calif. High Court Call-Recording Ruling

    Author Photo

    Despite the California Supreme Court's recent ruling in Smith v. LoanMe that both parties and nonparties must get consent from everyone in cellular or cordless phone conversations before making recordings, defendants still have multiple means of successfully defeating suits for recording without consent, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • Understanding SPACs' Hidden Capital Costs

    Author Photo

    Business is brisk in special purpose acquisition company initial public offerings, but the many costs and complexities of the SPAC process must also be taken into consideration before choosing this financing method, as signs of a crash become increasingly evident, say Nicole Hatcher and Natasha Allen at Foley & Lardner.

  • ABA Remote Work Guide Raises Bar For Atty Tech Know-How

    Author Photo

    A recent American Bar Association opinion on lawyers' ethical duties of competence and confidentiality when working remotely should be viewed as part of a larger movement by which attorneys are being exhorted to develop competence in 21st century technology, say Jennifer Goldsmith at Ironshore and Barry Temkin at Mound Cotton.

  • Antitrust Risk Considerations In Light Of FTC Merger Focus

    Author Photo

    Recent Federal Trade Commission distribution merger challenges are consistent with its focus on nascent competition, highlighting essential antitrust issues merger parties should assess to avoid a costly investigation, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Lateral Hire Conflict Screening Lessons From DLA Piper Case

    Author Photo

    While a Texas federal court recently denied a motion to disqualify DLA Piper from representing Apple in a patent dispute after the law firm hired an attorney who formerly represented opponent Maxwell, the case is a reminder that robust conflict checks during lateral hiring can save firms the time and expense of defending disqualification motions, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • High Court's Autodialer Ruling Raises Bar For TCPA Plaintiffs

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Facebook v. Duguid, adopting a narrow definition of "automatic telephone dialing system," will create hurdles for Telephone Consumer Protection Act plaintiffs, though the effects of the court's guidance may be short-lived if Congress revisits the statute, say attorneys at Dechert.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!