Technology

  • June 11, 2021

    EDTX Jury Clears LED Maker And Axes Patents

    An Eastern District of Texas jury on Friday found that LED maker Absen Inc. did not infringe a Texas lighting manufacturer's patents for modular light-emitting diode technology, while striking down parts of the patents as well.

  • June 11, 2021

    Alice Ax Of TV Patent Defied Precedent, Full Fed. Circ. Told

    By reversing a lower court and declaring that a Samba TV content recommendation patent covers an abstract idea, the Federal Circuit flouted its own precedent limiting when patents can be invalidated under the U.S. Supreme Court's Alice decision, Samba TV has told the full court.

  • June 11, 2021

    AT&T Pushes Back Against Parts Of Biden Broadband Plan

    Communications giant AT&T is pushing back on elements of the Biden administration's infrastructure proposals, particularly a plan to partner with local governments, asserting support for municipalities could become politicized and broadband affordability hasn't reached a crisis level.

  • June 11, 2021

    Biden DOT Eyes Stiff Car Safety Rules And Worker Protections

    The U.S. Department of Transportation rolled out a regulatory agenda Friday focused on improving vehicle and road safety standards, protecting flight crews and tackling climate change as President Joe Biden also seeks to build momentum for his ambitious infrastructure investment plan.

  • June 11, 2021

    WTO Ends Trump's Case Over China's Patent Rules

    The World Trade Organization quietly ended its investigation into China over its patent licensing rules on Friday, two years after the Trump administration put the case on ice in lieu of intellectual property negotiations with Beijing.

  • June 11, 2021

    House Lawmakers Float Bipartisan Big Tech Bills

    A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced a package of legislation in the U.S. House on Friday aimed at reining in large technology companies and restoring competition in digital markets, including a measure barring the tech giants from competing on their own platforms.

  • June 11, 2021

    Robbins Geller To Rep Investors In Nutanix Sales Slump Suit

    Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP will take the reins representing investors in a proposed class action accusing computing company Nutanix Inc. of letting its sales prospects dry up and concealing it from investors.

  • June 11, 2021

    Justices Urged To Nix 'Devastating' IPR Rulings In $44M Case

    Ultratec has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a series of 2019 Federal Circuit orders summarily affirming Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions that invalidated eight of its closed-caption patents, saying the decisions imperil a $44 million jury verdict it won against rival CaptionCall.

  • June 11, 2021

    Ackman's SPAC Strategy Pushes Deal Structure's Boundaries

    Hedge fund titan Bill Ackman's multilayered proposal to acquire a minority stake in music giant UMG through his special purpose acquisition company, while also enabling future acquisitions, seeks to rewrite the SPAC playbook through several complicated steps that could spur imitators.

  • June 11, 2021

    Would Google Work As A Common Carrier? Experts Doubtful

    Conservative officials are trying a new way to rein in Big Tech, but experts from across the political spectrum wonder if the Ohio attorney general's lawsuit seeking to declare Google a common carrier can succeed legally or practically.

  • June 11, 2021

    NY's $15 Low-Income Internet Law Is Put On Hold

    A New York federal judge on Friday blocked the Empire State at least temporarily from enforcing a requirement for internet plans capped at $15 for qualifying low-income households, a plan that had triggered a legal challenge from across the telecom industry.

  • June 11, 2021

    Google Offers UK Fixes For Third-Party Cookie Concerns

    Google has offered the U.K.'s competition enforcer a series of fixes to address concerns raised by the tech giant's plan to phase out use of third-party cookies in its Chrome browser, including limits on data use and an oversight role for regulators.

  • June 11, 2021

    SEC Bulletin Warns Bitcoin Futures Are 'Highly Speculative'

    Investors exposed to Bitcoin and Bitcoin futures are making a "highly speculative investment" and are taking on considerable risk, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission said in an investor bulletin.

  • June 11, 2021

    Huawei Gets PTAB To Eye 2 Patents Involved In WDTX Suits

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has agreed to review whether two Brazos Licensing and Development communications patents are invalid, giving a boost to Huawei in its effort to fend off a dozen infringement suits from Brazos in the Western District of Texas.

  • June 11, 2021

    Fed. Circ. Judge Rebukes Panel For Alice Ax Of Camera Patent

    A split Federal Circuit panel on Friday upheld the invalidation of a digital camera patent asserted against Apple and Samsung as abstract, leading Judge Pauline Newman to accuse her colleagues of conflating patent eligibility and novelty.

  • June 11, 2021

    Skadden-Led Chinese Recruiting Co. Tops Trio Raising $1.4B

    Chinese job recruitment platform creator Kanzhun Ltd., advised by Skadden, led a trio of operating companies that debuted on the stock exchanges Friday, raising a combined $1.41 billion through their initial public offerings.

  • June 11, 2021

    Interloper Lobs $1.66B Bid At South Korean Chipmaker

    Magnachip said Friday it's mulling a competing takeover offer from Cornucopia Investment Partners worth roughly $1.66 billion, an interloping bid aimed at topping a previously announced $1.4 billion private equity buyout of the South Korean semiconductor company.

  • June 11, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Ukraine's bank deposit protection scheme sue a bank in Liechtenstein, streaming platform Twitch take aim at a viewing bot, and law firm Kennedys files for an injunction against Hiscox.

  • June 10, 2021

    Bank Shakes TCPA Row After Facebook Autodialer Ruling

    A South Carolina federal judge has tossed a lawsuit accusing USAA Federal Savings Bank of violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by placing unwanted debt collection calls, finding that the dialing equipment the bank used didn't fit within the narrow autodialer definition recently laid out by the U.S. Supreme Court in a dispute involving Facebook. 

  • June 10, 2021

    Albright Urged To Triple $13M Verdict In Payment IP Fight

    U.S. District Judge Alan D. Albright has been asked to triple a $13.2 million jury award against cash register manufacturer NCR Corp. and to tack on attorney fees based on the company's conduct during a case that "earned rebukes from both the clerk and the court."

  • June 10, 2021

    Uber Unlikely To Exit Racial Bias Suit Over Driver Ratings

    A California federal judge appeared unlikely Thursday to grant Uber's bid to toss a former driver's lawsuit against the ride-hailing giant, saying it seems the driver has plausibly alleged that his firing stemmed from a rating system that disparately impacts minorities.

  • June 10, 2021

    IP Forecast: Amazon To Face A Texas Jury Over Voice IP

    Amazon is set to be the next tech titan to appear in front of the busiest patent judge in the country as U.S. District Judge Alan Albright is scheduled to kick off a jury trial over claims Alexa infringes voice technology patents owned by an Israeli kitchen technology startup. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • June 10, 2021

    Bid Protester Can't Get Costs After GSA Redoes $15B IT Deal

    The Court of Federal Claims has refused to grant costs to a previously successful protester after the U.S. General Services Administration canceled and re-procured the disputed $15 billion information technology deal, saying the protester wasn't harmed by the change. 

  • June 10, 2021

    Ill. City Goes After Netflix, Hulu Over Franchise Fees

    East St. Louis, Illinois, became the latest city to accuse Hulu and Netflix of illegally providing video service in its city limits by failing to comply with a state law and register as a franchise and pay fees for use of public rights-of-way.

  • June 10, 2021

    Google Poised To Escape Kids' Data Collection Suit

    A California federal judge indicated during a hearing Thursday that parents accusing Google and other companies of illegally collecting children's personal information through YouTube for targeted advertisements have so far failed to show that the plaintiffs' state law privacy claims aren't preempted by the federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.

Expert Analysis

  • A Gov't Contractor's Road Map To Biden Cybersecurity Order

    Author Photo

    Following President Joe Biden's recent executive order to improve U.S. cybersecurity, Justin Chiarodo and Sharon Klein at Blank Rome highlight how four key elements will particularly affect government contractors and their suppliers, and what contractors should expect as they prepare to operate in a new compliance environment.

  • A Biz Strategy Model To Improve Lateral Atty Hiring Diversity

    Author Photo

    Quantitative comparison tools commonly used by companies in evaluating merger targets will allow law firms to assess lateral hire candidates in a demographically neutral manner, help remove bias from the hiring process and bring real diversity to the legal profession, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University.

  • How Trade Dress Law Has Evolved During COVID

    Author Photo

    As consumers return to in-store shopping and retailers shift strategies to boost products' shelf appeal, it's important to note that trade dress case law developments during the pandemic have emphasized a fine line between identity of brand and that of function, say Howard Hogan and Laura Mumm at Gibson Dunn.

  • How Legal Profession Can Help LGBTQ Patent Attys Thrive

    Author Photo

    Given the underrepresentation of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans community in the patent bar, and recognizing that inclusivity benefits not only employees but also firms and clients, Jeremy Saks at Fish & Richardson discusses measures the legal profession can take to support LGBTQ patent attorneys.

  • How Curbs On Russia And Belarus Trade Will Affect Tech Cos.

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Kirkland examine how the Biden administration's newly authorized Russian sanctions, restrictions on dealings with companies in Belarus and other likely measures will affect the technology sector and how companies should respond to the changes.

  • Opinion

    FTC's Drop Of Illumina-Grail Federal Court Case Raises Uncertainty

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's move to drop its lawsuit challenging the proposed merger of Illumina and its cancer-screening spinoff Grail is procedural posturing that undermines the agency's goals and has created maximum uncertainty for companies focused on creating life-saving technologies, say Zarema Jarimillo and Leiv Blad at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • What Tax Court's Mylan Legal Fee Ruling Means For IP Suits

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Tax Court's recent ruling that Mylan Inc. could deduct as regular business expenses the legal fees it incurred defending itself against patent infringement suits from brand-name drug manufacturers has the potential to increase patent litigation and may make settlement less appealing, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Obstacles To Defining Injury, Class In Cyberattack Suits

    Author Photo

    As cyberattacks and data privacy litigation evolve, quantifying and identifying uninjured class members becomes increasingly complex and further complicates economic models of injury, as shown by the lawsuit filed last month in a Georgia federal court after the Colonial Pipeline hack, says Michael Kheyfets at Edgeworth Economics.

  • Smaller Firms Need Employee Wellness Programs, Too

    Author Photo

    As we emerge from the pandemic, small and midsize firms — which offer an ideal setting for companywide connection — should follow in the footsteps of larger organizations and heed the American Bar Association’s recommendations by adopting well-being initiatives and appointing a chief wellness officer, says Janine Pollack at Calcaterra Pollack.

  • Why AI Can't Replace Humans In Environmental Compliance

    Author Photo

    As organizations increasingly integrate artificial intelligence into their operations, it is clear that, while AI may play a valuable role in environmental compliance programs, it cannot replace the judgment, perspective, experience and ethical values of human beings, says Gerry Caron, chief counsel for safety, health and environment at Cabot.

  • Opinion

    Antitrust Reform Should Focus On Targeted Solutions

    Author Photo

    Antitrust law can and should be updated to reflect the needs of our modern economic landscape by addressing specific areas where meaningful problems exist, but some proposals, like the call to overturn the consumer welfare standard, go too far, says Trace Mitchell at NetChoice.

  • Ill. BIPA Ruling Marks Critical Win For Silent Cyber Coverage

    Author Photo

    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent decision in West Bend Mutual v. Krishna Schaumburg Tan, confirming that commercial general liability policies do not have to include specific language to cover claims under the Biometric Information Privacy Act, represents a critical victory for policyholders, but leaves unresolved issues in the battle over BIPA coverage, says Tae Andrews at Miller Friel.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Clarity, Timeliness, Agency Deference

    Author Photo

    In this month's bid protest roundup, Caitlin Crujido at MoFo looks at decisions from the U.S. Government Accountability Office and U.S. Court of Federal Claims highlighting the importance of clear proposals and timeliness in solicitation ambiguity protests, and showing that the GAO and Claims Court will generally defer to an agency's judgment about an organizational conflict.

  • China Trade Secret Developments Bring Certainty For US Cos.

    Author Photo

    U.S. companies should welcome recent reforms to Chinese trade secret legislation and case law that make the litigation landscape more plaintiff-friendly and provide clarity on what business information is protectable and what confidentiality measures the law requires, say attorneys at Jones Day.

  • What Semiconductor Shortage Means For Patent Drafting

    Author Photo

    Since a critical shortage in the global supply of semiconductors could lead to an increase in U.S. capacity, semiconductor-related patent owners should consider directing more patent claims to manufacturing processes, manufacturing tools and intermediate structures, say Darren Smith and David Ben-Meir at Norton Rose.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!