Pennsylvania

  • July 19, 2019

    Ailing NFL Players And The Lawyer They Say Swindled Them

    The inside story of how an avaricious lawyer, an ex-con and an unlicensed doctor preyed on NFL players in hopes of getting rich off the league's landmark concussion settlement.

  • July 19, 2019

    Pa. Man's $3.5M Award Over Missed Heart Disease Upheld

    A Pennsylvania appellate panel on Friday affirmed a jury’s decision to award $3.5 million in a suit accusing a hospital of failing to timely diagnose a man’s heart disease, saying certain medical expert testimony was not required.

  • July 19, 2019

    Ex-CSX Worker's Injury Suit Derailed By Case's Location

    The Pennsylvania Superior Court issued a published decision Friday finding that the state was not the proper forum for a lawsuit brought by a former Consolidated Rail Corp. and CSX Transportation Inc. worker over injuries he suffered during the course of his four-decade career at a rail yard in New York.

  • July 19, 2019

    After Delay, Pa. Programmer Pleads To Siemens Sabotage

    A Pittsburgh-area computer programmer pled guilty in federal court Friday to planting code that would deliberately break programs he’d written under contract with Siemens Corp., after his previous plea hearing was halted in June amid disagreements over whether his motivation should have been considered.

  • July 19, 2019

    Philly Hospital's Ch.11 Plan To Sell Residency Program OK'd

    A plan to sell doctor training programs proposed by Philadelphia hospital operator Center City Healthcare received approval Friday when a Delaware bankruptcy judge said the plan would protect the interests of affected resident doctors as best it could.

  • July 19, 2019

    Excela Surgical Center Doesn't Get Hospital's Tax Exemption

    A Pennsylvania appeals court ruled Friday that an ambulatory surgical center owned by an Excela Health hospital in Westmoreland County did not qualify for an exemption from property taxes because it could not be considered a "hospital" in and of itself.

  • July 19, 2019

    SC Utility Customers Tell 2nd Circ. To Revive Nuke Plant Suit

    Two South Carolina utility customers on Friday asked the Second Circuit to revive a suit against Westinghouse Electric Co. to recover payments made for an abandoned nuclear project, saying their claims arise from Westinghouse’s post-Chapter 11 acts.

  • July 19, 2019

    FDCPA Time Limit Is Year From Incident, Feds Tell Justices

    The federal government has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to affirm the Third Circuit’s determination that the one-year time limit for launching Fair Debt Collection Practices Act lawsuits starts when the alleged wrongdoing occurs, not when it is discovered.

  • July 19, 2019

    Pa. TV Reporter Sues Red Bull Over Flugtag Stunt Injuries

    Energy drink maker Red Bull hid the danger and injuries inherent in its extreme-sports stunts when it got a TV reporter to crash off a ramp into the Ohio River as part of its Flugtag event at Pittsburgh's 2017 Three Rivers Regatta, the journalist has alleged in a lawsuit.

  • July 18, 2019

    State AGs Urge FDA To Keep Exploring Cannabis Regulation

    Dozens of state attorneys general have told the U.S. Food and Drug Administration they support the agency’s recent push to regulate cannabis-derived products like cannabidiol, while asking it to ensure that the states maintain their roles as regulators as the market emerges.

  • July 18, 2019

    Pa. Atty Faces Federal Charges Over Client Diversion Scheme

    Federal prosecutors have charged a Philadelphia-area personal injury attorney with mail fraud, claiming he secretly referred clients of his longtime personal injury firm to outside attorneys in exchange for a substantial cut of their fees and defrauded his firm out of $4.2 million, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Clark Hill Client Says Firm Pushed $1M Deal For His $63M Suit

    A Philadelphia-area mergers and acquisitions adviser said Clark Hill PLC attorneys pressured him into accepting a settlement worth less than $1 million for a $63.5 million lawsuit, according to a professional malpractice claim filed Wednesday in a Pennsylvania state court.

  • July 18, 2019

    3rd Circ. Exceeded Authority In Liability Ruling, Amazon Says

    Amazon.com Inc. accused a Third Circuit panel on Wednesday of legislating from the bench when it handed down a precedent-setting decision this month finding that the online retailer could be held liable for defective products manufactured by third parties, asking for the entire court to hear the case.

  • July 18, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: AB InBev, AT&T, Axalta

    AB InBev is reportedly mulling selling off assets after the company scrapped a planned Hong Kong offering of its Asia Pacific unit, AT&T is looking at options for its Puerto Rican business, and Axalta Coating Systems is exploring a sale.

  • July 18, 2019

    EQT Trade Secrets Suit Paused Amid CEO, Board Change

    A Pennsylvania federal lawsuit accusing an ex-EQT Corp. employee of stealing company data the night before his firing was put on hold Thursday after a secondary target in the case took over the company in a proxy battle.

  • July 18, 2019

    Comcast Must Face Whistleblower Suit Over Balloon Fight

    A whistleblower suit that a former Comcast employee filed after a workplace fight over a popped balloon may proceed, a New Jersey appellate panel said Thursday, finding the lower court shouldn't have struck down the case based on credibility determinations without first finding facts and reaching required legal conclusions.

  • July 18, 2019

    Ill. Latest Battleground For Bayer In Essure Safety Suits

    Bayer Corp. has been hit with a lawsuit in Illinois state court claiming the company misrepresented the safety of its Essure permanent birth control device and hid its serious and potentially life-threatening risks in women.

  • July 18, 2019

    Philly Commercial Property Tax Hike Ruled Unconstitutional

    The city of Philadelphia is facing the prospect of refunding tens of millions of dollars' worth of taxes following a state judge's decision Thursday that commercial property had been selectively reassessed in violation of uniform taxation rules in the Pennsylvania Constitution.

  • July 17, 2019

    Pa. Med Mal Insurer Law Won't Get Blocked, For Now

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday declined to issue a preliminary injunction blocking a law calling for more state control over a publicly created medical malpractice insurer, finding the state's joint underwriting association hasn't shown an imminent likelihood of irreparable harm as its case proceeds.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Pitt Sues Former Sports Marketing Co. For Withholding $3.6M

    The University of Pittsburgh is taking its former sports marketing company to federal court, alleging that IMG College LLC has withheld more than $3.6 million in payments since the school decided earlier this year not to renew its licensing agreement with the company.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hear Justice Stevens In 5 Memorable Moments On The Bench

    Justice John Paul Stevens was known for being collegial and kind, but he also wasn’t one to mince words. Listen to a few of the justice’s most memorable words from the bench, in majority opinions, sharply worded dissents and at oral argument.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    A Look At How States Are Experimenting With Health Care

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    The fate of the Affordable Care Act is currently pending in federal court, but states are proceeding on the premise that the law will survive its latest legal challenge as they consider competing Democratic and Republican visions of health care, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • 2 High Court Admiralty Cases Diverge On Common Law's Role

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    Although the U.S. Supreme Court's recent admiralty ruling in Air & Liquid Systems v. DeVries indicates success in expanding the availability of common law protections to mariners, its decision in Dutra Group v. Batterton — decided just months later — counsels that new classes of remedies will now be harder to obtain under the common law, says Brian Maloney of Seward & Kissel.

  • Opinion

    Time To Heed Justice Stevens' Criticism Of Gun Decision

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    Justice John Paul Stevens was right that the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 gun rights decision in Heller desperately needs to be overruled, but while he viewed revision or repeal of the Second Amendment as the easier course for correction, only the court can clean up the mess it made, says Robert Ludwig​ of the American Enlightenment Project.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • Community Solar Needs Clear, Flexible State Regulations

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    As states adopt and expand third-party solar development programs, regulators should streamline rules and avoid prescriptive requirements for developers, say Elliot Hinds and Diana Jeschke at Crowell & Moring.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • State Net

    Local Governments Push To Regulate Public Surveillance

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    San Francisco's Board of Supervisors recently approved an ordinance banning the use of facial recognition technology by all city departments. The law is part of a growing movement among localities and states to increase oversight of the use of surveillance technologies by government entities, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Revenge Porn Can Be Outlawed Under The First Amendment

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    To date, 46 states and the District of Columbia have passed needed legislation penalizing nonconsensual distribution of pornographic images of another person, but constitutionally outlawing this phenomenon is tricky and some statutes will likely be struck down, says Nicole Ligon, supervising attorney of the First Amendment Clinic at Duke Law.

  • Opinion

    Pa. Court Muddies Privilege And Work-Product Waters

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    With respect to attorney-client privilege and the work-product doctrine in Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania Superior Court's recent decision in Newsuan v. Republic Services is significantly flawed and will contribute to confusion, uncertainty and risks, says Kevin Allen of Eckert Seamans.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • State Net

    Why States, Cities Are Requiring Merchants To Accept Cash

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    New technology is broadening the ways people can pay without having to carry paper money and coins, possibly hastening the decline of cash. But some state and local lawmakers are pushing back, and retail businesses are taking note, says Dave Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Art Of The 'Science And Expert Team' In Mass Torts

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    Science is at the foundation of mass tort lawsuits involving drugs or medical devices. Critical to a virtual law team in these cases, the "science and expert team" does more than get into the weeds of scientific issues and retain experts, say attorneys at FaegreBD, Peabody & Arnold and Shook Hardy.