Pennsylvania

  • January 17, 2020

    Tanenbaum Keale Snags Marshall Dennehey Partner In Pa.

    In a move that has helped push the firm into a more spacious set of Philadelphia-area offices, litigation boutique Tanenbaum Keale LLP has announced the hiring of a former Marshall Dennehey Warner Coleman & Goggin PC product liability partner.

  • January 17, 2020

    Chancery Energizes Investor Bids To Probe Corporations

    A ruling by Delaware Vice Chancellor J. Travis Laster has recharged stockholder rights of access to company books and records, beating down AmerisourceBergen Corp.'s efforts to stop an investor probe of opioid-control oversight failures and potentially shoring up cases the plaintiffs bar considered to be at risk.

  • January 17, 2020

    Pa. Law Excuses 3rd-Party Driller From Worker’s Death Suit

    A Pennsylvania drilling company can't be pulled into the wrongful-death lawsuit over a worker killed by a falling piece of equipment because the law of the state where he died gave immunity to employers and trumped the Texas law chosen in a contract between the driller and its equipment provider, a Pittsburgh federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • January 17, 2020

    US Steel Hit With More Fines Over Pa. Facility Emissions

    A Pennsylvania county announced nearly $745,000 in fines against U.S. Steel Inc. on Friday for alleged pollution control violations at the company’s Clairton Coke Works facility, adding to millions in penalties previously levied against the steelmaker by the county.

  • January 17, 2020

    Justices Will Hear ACA Contraception Clash

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to examine the lawfulness of religious and moral exemptions from the Affordable Care Act’s requirement for employer health plans to cover birth control.

  • January 17, 2020

    Law360's Tort Report: Meat Loaf’s Suit Out Of Hell

    A $24 million jury verdict in a suit over a newborn’s brain injury and singer Meat Loaf’s suit against Hyatt over a horror convention injury lead Law360’s Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • January 17, 2020

    $8B Risperdal Verdict Slashed To $6.8M

    A Philadelphia County judge agreed Friday to cut an $8 billion punitive damages verdict against a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary to $6.8 million in a landmark case over side effects associated with the antipsychotic drug Risperdal.

  • January 16, 2020

    Cluttered TJ Maxx, Marshalls Stores Violate ADA, Suit Says

    The owner of TJ Maxx and Marshalls was slapped with a disability discrimination suit in Pennsylvania federal court by a proposed class of consumers who claim the cluttered stores and narrow aisles present a significant barrier to the disabled.

  • January 16, 2020

    Duane Morris, Satterlee Stephens Set To Combine

    Duane Morris LLP and Satterlee Stephens LLP are on course to combine into an 850-attorney law firm after partners at both firms backed the merger, firm leaders confirmed Thursday.

  • January 16, 2020

    CBD Retailer Latest To Be Hit With ADA Suit Over Website

    CBD seller Green Growth Brands LLC was the latest cannabis company to be hit with a proposed class action under the Americans with Disabilities Act alleging its website is not accessible to blind customers.

  • January 16, 2020

    3rd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-Plant Worker's FLSA Suit

    The Third Circuit on Thursday refused to revive a former Pennsylvania industrial plant employee's suit claiming he was wrongly fired for complaining about not getting overtime pay, backing a district court finding that the suit was a bid to end-run around an unfavorable decision in another case.

  • January 16, 2020

    States Sue Trump Administration Over Food Stamp Rollbacks

    More than a dozen states filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration Thursday alleging the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food stamp rollbacks violate federal law.

  • January 16, 2020

    Judge Ignored District's Rationale In Uniform Tax Challenge

    A Pennsylvania appeals court ruled in a published decision on Thursday that a trial judge ignored evidence that tax assessment appeals a Lehigh Valley school district brought against commercial property owners were based on earnest efforts to identify undervalued properties and not an unconstitutional targeting of a single class of property.

  • January 16, 2020

    TSA Hit With Class Action For Seizing Man's Life Savings

    A Pittsburgh retiree and his daughter filed a proposed nationwide class action lawsuit against the Transportation Security Administration and the Drug Enforcement Administration Wednesday, arguing that the federal agencies violated their civil rights by seizing the family’s life savings as the daughter tried to take it through security at Pittsburgh International Airport.

  • January 16, 2020

    Warranty Claims Cut In Suit Over Hot Microwave Handles

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday dismissed warranty and other claims in a proposed class action alleging the handles on Electrolux microwaves burn people, finding some claims were filed too late.

  • January 16, 2020

    Dems Warn That Iran Could Target Telecom Networks

    Two House Democrats have warned U.S. telecom and defense agencies that the nation's communications networks may become a target for Iranian cyberattacks following the Trump administration's assassination of Iranian general Qasem Soleimani.

  • January 16, 2020

    Sunoco Slapped With $2M Fine In Latest Pa. Pipeline Sanction

    Sunoco LP was slapped with the latest in a string of penalties over the troubled Mariner East natural gas pipelines on Thursday as Pennsylvania environmental regulators fined the company nearly $2 million for leaking drilling fluid into a Harrisburg-area lake.

  • January 16, 2020

    Dick's Customer Says Faulty Crossbow Sliced His Fingers

    An Illinois man is suing Dick's Sporting Goods Inc. after a crossbow he purchased from the retailer unexpectedly discharged and ripped through his fingers despite the safety being engaged, according to a lawsuit removed to federal court Thursday.

  • January 16, 2020

    Garland, EPA Atty Clash Over Impact Of Past Pollution Ruling

    The D.C. Circuit’s chief judge on Thursday balked at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s justification for denying requests by Delaware and Maryland to reduce air pollution blowing in from other states, contending that the agency relied on a regulation the appeals court contested in a similar dispute last fall.

  • January 16, 2020

    Aramark Strikes $21M Deal To End Managers' Bonus Suit

    Aramark Corp. and a group of several thousand workers have asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to sign off on a $21 million settlement that would resolve a suit claiming the company reneged on its promise to pay bonuses to managers in 2018.

  • January 16, 2020

    Judge Frees Navy From Firefighting Foam Medical Monitoring

    A Pennsylvania federal judge said the U.S. Navy doesn't have to pay for medical monitoring for two families claiming they were exposed to dangerous chemicals in firefighting foam the government used because the chemicals aren't classified as a hazardous substance.

  • January 16, 2020

    Phelan Hallinan Won't Be Sanctioned For 'Stale' Accusations

    A Pittsburgh federal judge denied a motion for sanctions Wednesday against Phelan Hallinan & Schmieg LLP for allegedly making a false claim about its opponent collecting fees, since the claim appeared in a footnote to a sur-reply filed more than two years ago and was now "stale."

  • January 15, 2020

    Liberty Aims To Preserve Win In Pharmacy's Painkiller Suit

    Liberty Mutual on Wednesday urged the Third Circuit to uphold the dismissal of a mail-order pharmacy's putative class action accusing the insurer of refusing to cover topical pain-relief creams as an alternative to more abuse-prone opioid pills.

  • January 15, 2020

    Sprint/T-Mobile Deal Will Lead To High Prices, Court Hears

    An attorney for a coalition of states challenging the merger of T-Mobile and Sprint on Wednesday made a final pitch to the New York federal judge, saying that consumers across the country risk paying billions of dollars more for wireless services if the proposed deal goes through.

  • January 15, 2020

    Tenn. Businessman Exits Pension Theft Suit In Pa.

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday allowed a Tennessee businessman to exit a lawsuit claiming one of his business partners illegally drained millions of dollars from a central Pennsylvania fire brick manufacturer’s pension plan.

Expert Analysis

  • Bias Case Gives Justices Chance To Rethink Title VII

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    If the U.S. Supreme Court decides to hear Peterson v. Linear Controls, its decision could resolve a circuit split and redefine the scope of Title VII's discrimination protections, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • What Pa. Employment Suit Means For Medical Cannabis Users

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    In allowing Palmiter v. Commonwealth Health Systems to proceed, a Pennsylvania state court joins a national trend to allow medical cannabis patients to proceed with unlawful termination claims based on off-site medical cannabis use, say Ruth Rauls and Matthew Smith of Saul Ewing.

  • 3rd Circ. Sheds Light On Ch. 11 Liability Release Approval

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    In Millennium Lab, the Third Circuit recently upheld the Delaware bankruptcy court's authority to approve a Chapter 11 plan containing nonconsensual liability releases, offering guidance on the factors courts may consider in deciding whether to approve them, says Jane VanLare of Cleary.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • State Net

    How States Are Responding To The Insulin Price Crisis

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    Increases in the need for insulin and dramatic surges in its cost have made access to the drug one of the biggest health policy issues at the state and federal level, and now state legislators are taking action to rein in prices, says Dave Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

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    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Opinion

    States Should Not Follow ABA On Attorney Conduct Rules

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    Because the American Bar Association's new rule on diversity continues to use the Model Rules of Professional Conduct as a cultural bludgeon, states should create independent codes limited to constitutionally valid purposes of attorney regulation, says Bradley Abramson of Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • How Courts And Litigants Can Benefit From Special Masters

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    As we approach the first anniversary of the American Bar Association's adoption of guidelines for the appointment and use of special masters in civil litigation, retired U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin, now at Stroock, explains how special masters can help parties and courts with faster decision-making and subject matter expertise.

  • Uber Policy Calls For Refresher On ABA Confidentiality Rules

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    Uber's recent policy update allowing drivers to audio-record passenger rides is a reminder for lawyers to observe the highest standard of care in protecting client information under the American Bar Association's confidentiality model rule, says Paul Boehm at Williams & Connolly.

  • Opinion

    2 Overlooked Advantages Of Hourly Fees

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    Alternative-fee disputes like Bartlit Beck v. Okada in Illinois federal court may tell us something about the reasons for the continued vitality of the hourly fee, especially among clients who have the wherewithal to pay, says attorney J.B. Heaton.

  • A Lower Bar To Prove Market Efficiency In Securities Cases

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    Several federal courts' recent securities fraud decisions have reaffirmed that a 95% confidence level is not necessary in all instances of measuring stock price reactions, and is inconsistent with the preponderance of the evidence standard in civil actions, say John Esmay and Philip Leggio at Labaton Sucharow.

  • 5 Things To Watch In Litigation Finance This Year

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    As 2020 arrives, we may see new products and initiatives in litigation finance that we can’t imagine yet, but one thing is clear — this industry is well past its earliest stage and is entering a very active growth spurt, says Ralph Sutton of Validity Finance.

  • Hottest Legal Industry Guest Topics Of 2019

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    This year guest contributors discussed tips for lawyers combating burnout and dealing with narcissists, how millennials are changing law firm culture, BigLaw’s move toward plaintiff-side litigation and other legal industry trends.