Pennsylvania

  • January 21, 2022

    Customer Says Dollar Bank Policy Should've Halted $4M Scam

    A woman who was tricked into converting $4.3 million into cryptocurrency and wiring it to scammers has told a Pennsylvania state court that Dollar Bank had a policy that should have flagged and stopped the wire transfers, saying that makes the bank liable for negligence.

  • January 21, 2022

    'Data-Rich' Sources Can ID Niaspan Class, 3rd Circ. Told

    Antitrust advocacy groups want the Third Circuit to reverse a Pennsylvania federal judge's decision refusing to certify a class of end-payors alleging improper pay-for-delay settlements between AbbVie and Teva Pharmaceuticals delaying generic forms of cholesterol drug Niaspan, arguing there's ample data to identify class members.

  • January 21, 2022

    J2 Class Attys Get $2M For Saving $25M On Insider Deal

    Two firms representing digital media business J2 Global Inc. investors have nabbed $1.95 million in connection with a settlement ending a Delaware Chancery Court suit that challenged an investment contract worth millions made to a fund chaired by J2's chairman.

  • January 21, 2022

    Pa. Atty Disbarred In NJ Over $300K Fraud Convictions

    A former Pennsylvania attorney was disbarred in New Jersey after he was sentenced to three years in prison for stealing nearly $400,000 from a client's estate.

  • January 21, 2022

    Atty In Mask Suit To Seek Ethics Opinion Over Fronting Fees

    The attorney for dozens of shoppers challenging a Pennsylvania grocery chain's mask mandate can seek ethics experts' opinions on whether his firm can front two plaintiffs' sanctions over discovery delays, a federal judge has ruled.

  • January 20, 2022

    Fed Hints At Digital Dollar Approach As Debate Stage Set

    The Federal Reserve hinted Thursday at the direction it might take in designing a U.S. central bank digital currency, pinpointing features like privacy protection and private-sector intermediation as desirable while stressing that no decisions have yet been made about whether to even pursue such a project.

  • January 20, 2022

    3rd Circ. Revives Magic Johnson Food Co.'s Drexel Fraud Suit

    The Third Circuit revived claims that Drexel University deceived a food service company during contract negotiations by representing that the university would be increasing enrollment, finding on Thursday that a district court improperly tossed most of the case between Drexel and the company, partly owned by Earvin "Magic" Johnson.

  • January 20, 2022

    Suit Says Pa. Councillors Cast Predetermined Amazon Vote

    Residents of a Pittsburgh suburb have appealed the local council's approval of a proposed Amazon sorting facility, claiming several council members should have recused themselves for having allegedly made up their minds in favor of the project before their vote.

  • January 20, 2022

    3rd Circ. Won't Touch Convictions In NJ Water Agency Fraud

    The Third Circuit on Thursday refused to set aside the convictions and nine-year prison sentence of an ex-Newark, New Jersey, police officer over a kickback scheme at a defunct water agency, rejecting her stance that it and its former executive director did not act in a public capacity.

  • January 20, 2022

    Pair Of Docs Must Pay $1M Over Misdiagnosed Ankle Break

    A Pennsylvania federal jury has awarded more than $1 million to a woman who says two doctors misdiagnosed her broken ankle as a sprain, leading to her worsening the injury when they advised her she could put weight on it shortly after the initial injury.

  • January 20, 2022

    3rd Circ. Wary Of ERISA Suit Over Asbestos In J&J Powder

    The Third Circuit appeared skeptical Thursday about reviving a proposed class action filed by former Johnson & Johnson employees who claim the company hurt their retirement savings by concealing the presence of asbestos in its baby powder, pointing to the high bar for pursuing a federal benefits law case.

  • January 19, 2022

    Sanofi Tells 10th Circ. It Paid $36M To Access EpiPen Market

    Sanofi-Aventis US LLC told the Tenth Circuit during oral argument Wednesday that it should not have had to offer a pharmacy benefits manager $36 million in rebates for an unrelated product to be able to compete with Mylan in the market for its emergency allergy treatment EpiPen.

  • January 19, 2022

    Philly Printing Co. Wants Trucker's Insurance To Cover Injury

    A Philadelphia printing company wants Zurich American Insurance to cover its defense in a truck driver's work injury case, arguing that the driver's employer had a Zurich policy that covered injuries from loading or unloading its trucks, according to a lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania state court.

  • January 19, 2022

    Philly-Based Weir & Partners, Greenblatt Pierce Merge

    Philadelphia-based firms Weir & Partners LLP and Greenblatt Pierce Funt & Flores LLC recently combined offices, making official a long-running professional relationship between the firms.

  • January 19, 2022

    Frontier Airlines Illegally Kept $2M In Wage Tax, Philly Claims

    Frontier Airlines failed to remit nearly $2 million in Philadelphia wage tax that it had already withheld from its employees for two tax years, the city Department of Revenue said in a complaint filed in a Pennsylvania court.

  • January 19, 2022

    Sharia Divorce Meets US Citizenship Test, 3rd Circ. Says

    The Third Circuit said a Jordanian native deserved U.S. citizenship through his naturalized father, ruling Wednesday in a precedential opinion that a district court was wrong to not recognize his parents' divorce under Sharia law as proof they were legally separated at the time of the naturalization.

  • January 19, 2022

    Marketer Says Racial Bias Drove Pa. Lab's Contract Breach

    A Pennsylvania medical laboratory failed to pay a St. Louis marketing firm bonuses it was owed for drumming up business and terminated their contract early, allegedly because the marketing firm's owner was Black, according to a lawsuit the firm has filed in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • January 19, 2022

    3rd Circ. Doubts NJ's Expired Virus Order Hurts Landlords

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday suggested that the expiration of New Jersey's COVID-19 pandemic renter relief measure moots a constitutional challenge brought by residential landlords, as the court had ruled in a similar lawsuit over Pennsylvania virus mandates.

  • January 19, 2022

    3rd Circ., Trial Court Picks Include BigLaw, Civil Rights Vets

    President Joe Biden announced his first judicial nominees of 2022 on Wednesday, tapping a veteran public defender for the Third Circuit and naming trial court picks in four states, including several veteran civil rights attorneys and attorneys at Jones Day and Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • January 18, 2022

    Purdue Urges 2nd Circ. To Quickly Undo Ch. 11 Plan Rejection

    Purdue Pharma on Tuesday asked the Second Circuit to overturn a New York federal judge's decision rejecting the embattled drugmaker's Chapter 11 bankruptcy plan, arguing that other courts have long permitted the nonconsensual releases of third-party claims of nondebtors that the judge had flagged.

  • January 18, 2022

    Contractors Say PECO Falsely Accused Them Of Trespassing

    A group of telecommunications contractors from the Washington, D.C., area said they were wrongfully charged with trespassing on PECO Energy Co. property after security personnel didn't believe they were scouting rooftops for potential antenna locations, according to a lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania state court.

  • January 18, 2022

    Feds, Calif. Sheriff Illegally Seizing Cannabis Cash, Co. Says

    Armored transportation company Empyreal Logistics has filed a civil rights suit against the federal government and a California sheriff, claiming officers are unlawfully searching the vehicles and seizing money from cannabis clients so law enforcement can reap gains through civil forfeiture.

  • January 18, 2022

    USW Workers Want Class Cert. In Benefits Termination Suit

    A group of retired United Steelworkers members asked an Indiana federal judge to certify a class in their lawsuit claiming their former employer, a Pittsburgh aluminum manufacturer, illegally terminated their life insurance.

  • January 18, 2022

    Stroock Finance Partner Rejoins Dechert In Philly

    Dechert LLP has expanded its transaction team with the recent addition of a global finance attorney who returned to the firm after more than five years with Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP.

  • January 18, 2022

    Pa. School District Must Keep Mask Mandate During ADA Suit

    Students in a Pittsburgh-area school district had to keep wearing masks when they returned to class Tuesday, after a federal judge granted a temporary restraining order to a group of parents who claimed lifting the district's mask mandate violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Expert Analysis

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

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    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • What Infrastructure Act Means For Transmission Line Projects

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    The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act gives the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission authority to supersede state siting decisions for electric transmission projects, but environmental review requirements make a sudden acceleration of transmission line construction unlikely, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

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    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • Pa. High Court Tax Refund Ruling Leaves Questions

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    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court's recent General Motors v. Commonwealth tax decision deciding the constitutionality of limitations on net loss deductions and net loss carryovers raises questions about retroactivity, remedies in future cases, and financial statements, says Michael Semes at BakerHostetler.

  • Pa. Jurisdiction Ruling Is Good News For Out-Of-State Cos.

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    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court's recent landmark decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern, ending the practice of subjecting foreign corporations to general personal jurisdiction based on their registration to conduct business in the state, should significantly reduce lawsuits against out-of-state companies in Pennsylvania courts, says Benjamin Hartwell at Ward Greenberg.

  • How State High Courts Are Ruling On Consent To Jurisdiction

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    Recent state supreme court decisions from New York, New Mexico, Pennsylvania and Georgia implicate whether a corporate defendant will be subject to suit for claims unconnected to a state merely for registering to do business there, and the tension between the Georgia Supreme Court's decision and settled precedent means the issue may be before the U.S. Supreme Court soon, say Jayne Risk and Neal Kronley at DLA Piper.

  • 8th Circ. Ruling Sets Road Map For Disability Benefit Reviews

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    A recent ruling from the Eighth Circuit in Roehr v. Sun Life Assurance reinstated the plaintiff's disability benefits, demonstrating that while an initial approval is not a guarantee of ongoing payment, insurers need to tread carefully when they terminate benefits in the absence of new findings, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Sherman.

  • A Tale Of Two Cases: Lessons In No-Poach Litigation

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    Attorneys at Hunton compare two recent no-poach cases, Aya Healthcare v. AMN Healthcare and Pittsburgh Logistics Systems v. Beemac Trucking, which dealt with seemingly similar provisions but reached different results, offering guidance to avoid or combat these crucial antitrust issues.

  • Top 5 Drug And Medical Device Legal Issues Of 2021

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    Two years into the pandemic, COVID-19 continues to drive significant legal developments for drug and device companies, but opioid, personal jurisdiction and litigation funding trends are noteworthy as well, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Recent Bias Suits Against Law Firms And Lessons For 2022

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    2021 employment discrimination case filings and developments show that law firms big and small are not immune from claims, and should serve as a reminder that the start of a new year is a good time to review and update salary, promotion and leave policies to mitigate litigation risks, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • Associate Hiring Outlook At Law Firms Is Bright For 2022

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    After a year of extraordinary signing bonuses, nearly instantaneous offers and flexible work arrangements, strong demand for talented law firm associates will continue into 2022 — with some differences between East and West Coast markets — and junior attorneys should take steps to capitalize on the opportunity, say Ru Bhatt and Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Roundup

    The Most-Read Legal Industry Guest Articles Of 2021

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    Popular legal industry guest articles this year included commentary on the admissibility of video depositions, an unusual U.S. Supreme Court citation, the perils of lawyer perfectionism, and more.

  • Injunctions May Only Pause Gov't Contractor Vaccine Mandate

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    Notwithstanding a string of recent decisions enjoining implementation of President Joe Biden's COVID-19 vaccine mandate for government contractors, it would be prudent for contractors to keep compliance infrastructure in place as litigation continues, says Richard Arnholt at Bass Berry.

  • A Law Firm Leader's Guide To Seeking Effective Feedback

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    Law firm leaders often claim to have their fingers on the pulse of the people in their firms, but perspectives can be heavily weighted toward certain partners, so leaders should take certain steps to ensure they receive well-rounded feedback that helps them make more informed decisions, says Jennifer Johnson at Calibrate Legal.

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