Pennsylvania

  • September 22, 2020

    House Dems Slam Pentagon's Pursuit Of Spectrum Sharing

    A pair of House Democrats on Monday criticized the U.S. Department of Defense for floating a trial balloon to push the creation of a government-run next-generation wireless network, saying it would hobble U.S. competitiveness in the global race to deploy 5G.

  • September 22, 2020

    Disney Sued For Barring Maskless Autistic Boy From Store

    The Walt Disney Co. violated the Americans with Disabilities Act when it barred a 7-year-old autistic boy from one of its stores amid the COVID-19 pandemic because he wasn't wearing a mask, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • September 22, 2020

    Feds Take Bid To Cut Immigrants From Census To High Court

    The Trump administration pushed the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday for permission to exclude unauthorized immigrants from the census count for political redistricting, after a three-judge panel blocked the effort and found that the case was "not particularly close."

  • September 22, 2020

    3rd Circ. Tosses Suit Brought Over Philly Family Killed In Fire

    The Third Circuit on Tuesday affirmed the dismissal of claims brought by the estate of a family that died in an apartment fire in Philadelphia after a "cascade of errors" in the emergency response, in a precedential opinion that maintained that courts can only provide relief in limited circumstances.

  • September 22, 2020

    Judge Won't Reinstate Pa. Virus Restrictions During Appeal

    A Pennsylvania federal court on Tuesday denied Gov. Tom Wolf's request that it stay its ruling lifting the state's limits on gatherings during the COVID-19 pandemic, finding that the state did not show it would suffer "irreparable harm" if the limits were struck down pending an appeal.

  • September 22, 2020

    Tenured Teacher Furloughs Were Reasonable, 3rd Circ. Says

    A Pennsylvania school district took reasonable measures when it furloughed three tenured teachers to combat a budget shortfall, a panel of Third Circuit judges has ruled unanimously.

  • September 22, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    As the stalemate over a new COVID-19 pandemic relief bill continues in the federal government, state lawmakers and leaders made progress over the past week with new measures to battle the health and financial fallout of the coronavirus.

  • September 22, 2020

    Pa. GOP To Ask Supreme Court To Block Late Voting Deadline

    Pennsylvania Republicans will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review a state high court decision to extend the mail-in ballot deadline up to three days after Election Day, in what could be one of the first cases before the high court since the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

  • September 22, 2020

    AGs In A Pandemic: Nessel Talks Michigan Drop Shippers

    Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel discusses her office's efforts to curb deceptive business practices by drop shippers — middlemen who entice purchasers using false or misleading information — and to educate consumers about the pitfalls of online shopping during the pandemic.

  • September 22, 2020

    Bridgestone Fudged Timesheets To Dodge OT, Workers Say

    Bridgestone Americas denied its tire store workers proper wages and overtime by not factoring bonuses into overtime rates and altering timesheets to replace hours they spent on the job with lunch breaks they never took, a proposed class action filed in Pennsylvania federal court claims.

  • September 21, 2020

    Justice Ginsburg: Who She Was, How She Shaped The Law

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday at age 87. Here, Law360 looks at the feminist icon's legacy and the battle brewing over her seat.

  • September 21, 2020

    Law360's The Term: The Life And Legacy Of Justice Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is among the few on the U.S. Supreme Court to have etched her name into legal history long before donning a robe. In a special episode this week, Law360's The Term dives into her legacy as a pioneering women's rights advocate with two guests who worked by her side. 

  • September 21, 2020

    Budding Textualist Star Barbara Lagoa Eyed For High Court

    Known as a budding superstar in Florida conservative legal circles, committed textualist Judge Barbara Lagoa could continue her lightning-quick ascent through the appellate ranks if President Donald Trump taps her for the now-vacant U.S. Supreme Court seat, where she would become the first Cuban-American, and first Floridian, to sit on the high court.

  • September 21, 2020

    Greenblatt Pierce Denied Piece Of DuPont's $5M FLSA Deal

    Greenblatt Pierce Funt & Flores cannot intervene in the approval of a $5 million settlement between a class of workers it once represented and DuPont Co. to seek a cut of the award because its claims are just a fight with another firm, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Monday.

  • September 21, 2020

    McConnell Defends Election-Year Plan To Replace Ginsburg

    The Senate majority leader on Monday defended his plan to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg this year, while the House speaker said the late jurist will become the first woman to lie in state at the Capitol.

  • September 21, 2020

    Philly Bolsters Paid Sick Leave Requirements Amid Pandemic

    Thousands of Philadelphia workers are now eligible for two weeks of paid sick leave under the Public Health Emergency Leave bill adopted last week, a measure city council members said was necessary to fill gaps left by federal leave laws in the midst of COVID-19.

  • September 21, 2020

    Power Plant Designer Can't Slip Suits Over Fatal Pa. Gas Leak

    The companies that designed and built part of a Pittsburgh-area power plant can't escape a trio of lawsuits brought after a 2017 gas leak killed and injured workers, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Monday.

  • September 21, 2020

    Navient Takes New Tack To Shave Pa. AG's Student Loan Suit

    Student loan servicer Navient Corp. challenged the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's delegation of enforcement power to Pennsylvania's attorney general late Friday, taking a new tack in its district court battle with the commonwealth after losing a related Third Circuit appeal.

  • September 21, 2020

    Postal Service Must Prioritize Ballot Delivery, Halt Changes

    A New York federal judge agreed Monday to halt U.S. Postal Service changes that allegedly threaten to delay mail-in ballot delivery to voters during a contentious election year complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic, ordering the agency to prioritize election mail delivery and greenlight extra hours for postal workers.

  • September 21, 2020

    Trump Revives Drop-Box Challenge After Pa. Justices' Ruling

    President Donald Trump's reelection campaign said the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania's ruling allowing counties to collect mail-in ballots with drop boxes didn't address the campaign's claims that such boxes are vulnerable to fraud, and sought Monday to revive its federal lawsuit to stop their use in the upcoming election.

  • September 20, 2020

    Birthdays, Weddings And In Between: RBG And Her Clerks

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s law clerks say that she brought the same level of care and dedication to her relationships with them as she did to the rest of her life. Here are some stories they shared, demonstrating how those qualities seeped into her relationships and interactions.

  • September 20, 2020

    Our 'North Star': What RBG Means To Women In Law

    Female attorneys around the country say they're devastated by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a woman they looked to as a role model for candidly speaking out about the struggles she faced as a female lawyer integrating her work and family life, which made her a relatable icon.

  • September 20, 2020

    Will The Senate Replace Ginsburg Before Election Day?

    Senators return Monday to a chamber consumed with President Donald Trump's vow to quickly select a replacement for the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and cement a conservative majority for years to come.

  • September 20, 2020

    Why The Risks Of 'YouTube Trials' May Outweigh The Benefits

    COVID-19 has forced courts to find creative ways to keep operating, but a Philadelphia policy to put criminal trials and other proceedings "live" on YouTube isn't worth the privacy risks, according to victims' advocates and other critics. That policy is in limbo for now, but the controversy may serve as a warning to other jurisdictions considering similar steps.

  • September 20, 2020

    5 To Watch As GOP Races To Fill Ginsburg's Seat

    President Donald Trump has said he will name a woman to succeed the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U.S. Supreme Court. Here's a look at five candidates he could pick in the coming days.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    The Case For A Nonpolitical Federal Judiciary

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    For the last 20 years, at the insistence of both parties, U.S. Supreme Court nominations have been fierce ideological battles — which is bad for the country and bad for the public's perception of the legitimacy of the court, say Judge Eric Moyé, Judge Craig Smith and Winston & Strawn partner Tom Melsheimer.

  • Anthem-Cigna Merger Ruling Highlights Post-Deal Issues

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    The Delaware Chancery Court's recent decision to halt the Anthem-Cigna merger on antitrust grounds is most notable for not holding Cigna liable for breaching its obligation to support the transaction, and underscores the vulnerability of merger-of-equals transactions to post-signing issues, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • The Keys To A Better Privilege Logging Paradigm

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    Current privilege logging practices to identify what information is being withheld from discovery often lead to costly disputes, so practitioners should adopt a system based on trust and good faith, similar to the presumptions embedded in the business judgment rule for corporate directors and officers, say Kevin Brady at Volkswagen and Charles Ragan and Ted Hiser at Redgrave.

  • Law Firm Hiring Considerations In A COVID-19 Economy

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    Financially robust law firms are entering the recruiting market aggressively knowing that dislocations like the COVID-19 crisis present rare competitive opportunities, and firms that remain on the sidelines when it comes to strategic hiring will be especially vulnerable to having their best talent poached, says Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey.

  • Djokovic's 'Accident' Through The Insurance Case Law Lens

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    The conflict between how tennis pro Novak Djokovic and U.S. Open organizers characterized his striking a line judge with a tennis ball has parallels with one of the most litigated questions in insurance coverage cases — whether an injury was caused by an accident, says Randy Maniloff at White and Williams.

  • Streamlining Power Transmission Siting To Help Renewables

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    It can take years and cost millions of dollars to secure state regulatory approval for electric transmission system upgrades needed to facilitate clean energy development, so it is important for states to create abbreviated siting processes for projects with limited anticipated impacts, says Andy Flavin at Troutman Pepper.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Act To Preserve Democracy This Election

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    COVID-19 concerns and glaring gaps in registration threaten to dampen voter turnout in the 2020 election, so attorneys should take on the problem by leveraging their knowledge and resources in seven ways, says Laura Brill at Kendall Brill.

  • Opinion

    State AG Enforcement Is Important For Workers' Rights

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    A recent increase in state attorney general labor and employment enforcement — including a challenge that prompted a New York federal judge to strike down the U.S. Department of Labor’s joint employer rule last week — sends an important message that worker protections are not easily revoked, says Catherine Ruckelshaus at the National Employment Law Project.

  • How To Effectively Defend Witnesses In Remote Depositions

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    When a witness is isolated from the defending lawyer during a remote deposition, carefully planning the logistics and building witness confidence are critical to avoiding damaging admissions, say Jessica Staiger at Archer Daniels and Alec Solotorovsky at Eimer Stahl.

  • Whether And How To Compel Remote Arbitration

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    As the pandemic delays in-person arbitration hearings, mediator and arbitrator Theodore Cheng provides arbitrators with a checklist to examine the rationale and authority for compelling parties to participate in remote hearings.

  • Series

    AGs In A Pandemic: James Talks NY Response

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    New York Attorney General Letitia James highlights her office's efforts to ease financial burdens for New York residents and businesses struggling during the pandemic by fighting fraud, policing employers, assisting with debt relief and more.

  • The Unique Challenges Of Protecting A Law Firm Brand

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    Recent law firm trademark disputes highlight how the tension between legal ethics rules and trademark law can make it difficult for firms to select brands that are distinctive and entitled to protection, say Kimberly Maynard and Tyler Maulsby at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • The Dollars And Sense Of Antitrust Class Certification: Part 2

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    Detailed analysis of the Third Circuit's Lamictal ruling in the context of other recent pharmaceutical antitrust decisions clarifies when experts can use average prices to demonstrate classwide harm in order to sustain or defeat class certification, say Justin Cohen and Thu Hoang at Wilson Sonsini.

  • 4 Issues To Watch In Philly FTC Hospital Merger Trial

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    On Monday, a Pennsylvania federal court will hear the first-ever hospital merger challenge based on alleged harm to the inpatient rehabilitation services market in Federal Trade Commission v. Thomas Jefferson University, a case that highlights critical market definition, efficiencies and competition issues for parties considering mergers, say Douglas Litvack and David Maas at Davis Wright.

  • What To Know When Making Dispositive Motions In Arbitration

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    As practitioners increasingly turn to dispositive motion practice within arbitration, they should be aware of the underlying authority for these motions and consider practical guidance for their use, says arbitrator and mediator Janice Sperow.

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