Business of Law

  • February 21, 2020

    Fish & Richardson Names Biosimilars Litigator As New CEO

    Fish & Richardson PC principals have voted for John C. Adkisson to take over as the president and CEO of the nation's largest intellectual property firm, but that doesn’t mean he’s about to give up his biosimilar-focused patent litigation practice.

  • February 21, 2020

    In Case You Missed It: Hottest Firms And Stories On Law360

    For those who missed out, here's a look back at the law firms, stories and expert analyses that generated the most buzz on Law360 last week.

  • February 21, 2020

    Trump's Judicial Noms Part Of Bump In Judiciary Budget

    With the Trump administration confirming judges faster than anticipated and increases in caseload and workload stemming from its prosecutorial decisions, the judiciary asked Congress for a 4.4% increase in its discretionary budget for fiscal year 2021.

  • February 21, 2020

    Prosecutor Took Jabs At Roger Stone's Reduced Sentence

    When John Crabb Jr. appeared before the federal judge set to sentence Roger Stone on Thursday, the case's top prosecutor made a string of striking arguments that flew in the face of the U.S. Department of Justice's official line.

  • February 21, 2020

    Law360's Pro Say: When Law Students Unite, BigLaw Listens

    A groundswell of activism at the country’s elite law schools has already forced a number of BigLaw shops to abandon controversial employment agreements, as students have seized upon their unique leverage within the industry. On this week's episode of Pro Say, we’re joined by Law360’s Massachusetts court reporter Chris Villani to discuss the student-led movement that has put BigLaw on notice. 

  • February 21, 2020

    Up Next At High Court: Pipeline Problems, Terror Victims

    The Supreme Court will reconvene after three weeks off Monday for a busy February session that begins with oral arguments in two multibillion-dollar terrorism and pipeline cases, and an obscure immigration law that has raised free speech concerns. Here's what to expect.

  • February 21, 2020

    Clark Hill Can't Duck $50M Malpractice Suit Over Hacked Docs

    A Chinese entrepreneur and prominent dissident may proceed with most of his $50 million malpractice suit against Clark Hill PLC because he has submitted sufficient evidence to suggest the firm mishandled his personal information in an asylum bid and failed to protect the data from hackers, a D.C. federal judge has ruled.

  • February 21, 2020

    House Impeachment Lawyer Returns To Private Practice

    A key lawyer on the House Judiciary Committee's impeachment team has returned to private practice at Kaplan Hecker & Fink LLP after what he described to Law360 as an "extraordinary five-month crash course in high-stakes, complex legal and political decision-making."

  • February 21, 2020

    DOL Judge Kills Ex-Morgan Stanley Atty Whistleblower Case

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge has thrown out a former Morgan Stanley attorney’s claims that he was pushed out of his job after he brought up ethical concerns, finding he isn’t protected by the retaliation provision of a U.S. anti-fraud law because he worked in Hong Kong.

  • February 21, 2020

    DLA Piper Embraces Cannabis In Rare Move For BigLaw

    DLA Piper announced the formation of a global practice group focused on cannabis Friday, following many law firms' public embrace of the federally illegal industry. But the move stands out among the country's biggest law firms, which have been slower to go green than their smaller rivals.

  • February 21, 2020

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    An ex-AIG legal department worker and his father have settled insider trading claims, and a New Jersey federal judge rejected bids to dismiss Foreign Corrupt Practices Act charges against two former Cognizant executives accused of bribing Indian officials. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

  • February 21, 2020

    Greenberg Traurig's $65M Deal In Stanford Ponzi Suit OK'd

    A Texas federal judge on Friday gave his blessing to Greenberg Traurig's $65 million settlement of claims related to its alleged involvement in a $7 billion scheme run by convicted Ponzi scammer R. Allen Stanford.

  • February 20, 2020

    Delaware Bench Balance Rule Is 'Offensive,' High Court Told

    An attorney challenging Delaware's judicial political parity rule told the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday that a provision of the state constitution requiring equal representation of parties on the bench is "offensive to the First Amendment."

  • February 20, 2020

    Roger Stone Judge Strikes Blow For Judicial Independence

    The judge who sentenced Roger Stone for obstruction called President Donald Trump's remarks on the case inappropriate, a rebuke that former judges said served to underscore the importance of an independent judiciary in a distrustful era.

  • February 20, 2020

    10 Ex-Holland & Knight Attys Form Ill. Gov't Practice Boutique

    Holland & Knight LLP's former executive partner for Chicago, Steven Elrod, has left his firm with nine other lawyers to start a municipal government-focused boutique that will sell itself to clients as more flexible on rates.

  • February 20, 2020

    How Trump's 10 Picks Have Already Shifted The 9th Circuit

    Although Democratic appointees still hold a majority on the influential Ninth Circuit, experts say President Donald Trump has already succeeded in shifting the historically liberal court, a longtime goal of conservatives that could reduce legal obstacles for hotly contested administration policies.

  • February 20, 2020

    The Term: Billions At Stake In Pipeline, Terrorism Cases

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be back in session next week, so the team is previewing key arguments scheduled for the returning justices, including a dispute over a national trail that is threatening to obstruct a $7 billion gas pipeline project and whether a $4.2 billion judgment in a terrorism case can stand.

  • February 20, 2020

    Atty Accused Of Shaking Butt At Adversary Replaced

    Chevron Phillips Chemical Co. asked a Texas federal court on Thursday to put allegations of inappropriate butt-shaking by a BakerHostetler partner during a mediation in the "rearview mirror," saying it replaced its legal team to avoid bogging down the employment discrimination case.

  • February 20, 2020

    70 Ex-Reinhardt Clerks Urge Courts To Confront Harassment

    More than 70 former clerks for the late Ninth Circuit Judge Stephen Reinhardt on Thursday commended a fellow clerk for telling members of Congress about sexual harassment by the judge, urging changes to workplace training and reporting in the federal judiciary.

  • February 20, 2020

    Mass. Justices Call ICE Deportation 'An Affront To Justice'

    Top Massachusetts state court justices criticized U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in a letter made public Thursday, calling the recent deportation of a defendant facing drug charges before he could stand trial "an affront to justice."

  • February 20, 2020

    Whiteout: 23 Top State Courts Have All-White Benches

    The racial and gender makeup of state supreme court benches continues to fall short at reflecting the diverse U.S. population, as 23 states have zero justices of color on their high court benches, according to a report out Thursday.

  • February 20, 2020

    Dentons Hit With $32.3M Verdict Over Conflict Of Interest

    Dentons has been ordered by an Ohio jury to pay nearly $32.3 million to a technology company that sued the firm after its attorneys were disqualified in a patent enforcement case because of a conflict of interest involving The Gap Inc.

  • February 20, 2020

    Law360's Weekly Verdict: Legal Lions & Lambs

    Kirkland & Ellis snagged this week's top legal lions spot with a $764 million win for Motorola Solutions in a copyright infringement suit, while Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner ended up among the legal lambs after client Monsanto was hit with $250 million in punitive damages alongside another company that makes the weedkiller dicamba.

  • February 20, 2020

    Trump Ally Roger Stone Sentenced To Over 3 Years

    President Donald Trump’s longtime adviser Roger Stone was sentenced to three years and four months in prison Thursday on seven felony charges of lying to Congress about his connections with WikiLeaks, witness tampering and obstructing a congressional panel's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

  • February 19, 2020

    5th Circ. Nixes Opinion Citing Anti-Gay Bias After Apology

    The Fifth Circuit withdrew a previously published opinion, citing an apology by a mother whose attorney had been taken to task for filing an appeal allegedly laced with anti-gay prejudice in a case accusing a Mississippi school district of violating a student's rights with a purportedly improper search.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    AI Can't Accurately Predict Case Length And Cost — Yet

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 guest article argued that artificial intelligence can precisely estimate the length and cost of a new case, but several limitations will likely delay truly accurate predictions for years to come, says Andrew Russell at Shaw Keller.

  • Lawyers Can Build Trust Through The Spoken Word

    Author Photo

    As attorneys, we may prefer the precision of written communication, but a phone call or an in-person conversation builds trust by letting others see and hear our authentic selves, rather than something constructed or scripted, says mediator Sidney Kanazawa of ARC.

  • Opinion

    Legal Prediction Is Demanding But Not Impossible

    Author Photo

    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent decision in Balducci v. Cige incorrectly concluded that predicting the length and cost of a case is nearly impossible, and overlooked artificial intelligence's ability to do so, says Joseph Avery with Claudius Legal Intelligence.

  • Malpractice Landscape Is Becoming Riskier For BigLaw

    Author Photo

    A recent survey of lawyers’ professional liability insurers revealed an increase in malpractice claims against law firms, suggesting clients will demand more accountability in the coming decade, say Gerald Klein and Amy Nguyen at Klein & Wilson.

  • Perspectives

    Book Review: A Lawyer Reflects On Defending Guilty People

    Author Photo

    In her new book, "Guilty People," Abbe Smith successfully conveys that seeing ourselves in people who commit crime may be the first step to exacting change in our justice system, says U.S. District Judge Diane Humetewa of the District of Arizona.

  • Alphabet's Missteps Offer Crisis Management Case Study

    Author Photo

    Corporate strategy and communications surrounding the recent resignation of Alphabet's chief legal officer provide a remarkable example of what companies should not do in a crisis, says Jolie Balido at NewStar Media.

  • How Emotional Intelligence Can Benefit Transactional Attys

    Author Photo

    By investing in self- and social-awareness skills, transactional lawyers can make the negotiation process more productive and pleasant while also increasing post-deal stability, say Frank Williamson at Oaklyn Consulting and Mike Harrell at Latitude Advisors.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Following A Serendipitous Path

    Author Photo

    I went to law school intending to pursue a career in politics, inspired by Ted Sorensen and Gary Hart — but learning to solve problems in a new and exciting way drew me to litigation, says David Goodman of Goodman Law Group Chicago.

  • Book Excerpt

    Music Copyright License Lessons From The Jazz Age

    Author Photo

    National Music Publishers' Association President David Israelite recently predicted that the 2020s would be a decade of accountability for businesses built on uncompensated use of copyrighted music. A closer look at the first decade of accountability — the 1920s — could prove instructive, says attorney Gary Rosen, author of the new book "Adventures of a Jazz Age Lawyer."

  • 7 Ethics Questions To Ask Before Marketing Your Law Firm

    Author Photo

    While ethics rules for attorney advertising vary by state and are frequently updated, there are several basic principles that all firms should understand, says Michelle King at Reputation Ink.

  • Opinion

    Most Lawyers Do Not Understand How AI Works

    Author Photo

    Clearview AI's problematic attempt to defend its facial recognition and artificial intelligence technology provides a potent case study in potential pitfalls for lawyers working on AI issues, say Albert Fox Cahn and John Veiszlemlein at the Urban Justice Center's Surveillance Technology Oversight Project.

  • 4 Considerations When Moving To A New Law Firm

    Author Photo

    When contemplating a lateral move to a new law firm, lawyers should carefully review questions concerning firm structure, benefits, compensation and binding documents in order to identify obligations and potential red flags, say Amy Richardson and Lauren Snyder at Harris Wiltshire.

  • A Modest Plan To Streamline Civil Cases In LA Superior Court

    Author Photo

    The California Legislature's recent effort to simplify civil litigation is laudable, but working with the Los Angeles Superior Court to make efficient litigation stipulations mandatory, rather than voluntary, would improve the process further, say professor Gary Craig and students Jasmine Gomez and Kennedy Myers at Loyola Law School.

  • What Courts Are Saying About Litigation Finance Disclosure

    Author Photo

    Four recent federal court decisions concerning commercial litigation finance disclosure are largely consistent with a broader trend of rejecting or limiting discovery based on relevance and the attorney work product doctrine, say Stephanie Spangler at Norris McLaughlin and Dai Wai Chin Feman at Parabellum Capital.

  • Opinion

    NY Commercial Division Hyperlinking Rule Should Be Adopted

    Author Photo

    New York state's proposed amendment to Commercial Division Rule 6, requiring e-filed documents to hyperlink to certain other documents, represents a sensible step to increase the use of a widely available tool that is very convenient for the judiciary and practitioners, say Elizabeth Sacksteder and Tony Joe at Paul Weiss.

Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!