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Business of Law

  • May 17, 2019

    In Case You Missed It: Hottest Firms And Stories On Law360

    For those who missed out, here's a look back at the law firms, stories and expert analyses that generated the most buzz on Law360 last week.

  • May 17, 2019

    Helping Manafort's Kid Get Skadden Gig No Crime, Craig Says

    Former Skadden partner Gregory Craig urged a D.C. federal court Friday to bar the government from introducing evidence that he helped line up a job at Skadden for the daughter of the now-jailed former chairman of the Trump campaign, Paul Manafort.

  • May 17, 2019

    ABA Raises Bar For Law School Accreditation On Third Vote

    The American Bar Association on Friday adopted a new standard requiring ABA-accredited law schools to show that at least 75% of graduates pass the bar exam within two years of getting their diplomas, a tightened standard that the organization had rejected twice before.

  • May 17, 2019

    Law360's Pro Say: Kavanaugh V. Gorsuch

    President Donald Trump’s two U.S. Supreme Court appointees have found themselves at odds in a surprising number of cases, most recently in a big ruling this week backing iPhone owners who want to sue Apple. Reporter Jimmy Hoover joins us on the Pro Say podcast to discuss the Apple case and the rift between the court’s newest justices.

  • May 17, 2019

    Group Got $17M Secret Donation Ahead Of Kavanaugh Fight

    The Judicial Crisis Network received $17 million from an anonymous donor shortly before the fight to confirm Justice Brett Kavanaugh, according to two government watchdog groups that obtained the conservative judicial group's latest tax returns.

  • May 17, 2019

    Pierce Bainbridge Ends Partnership With Funder Pravati

    Litigation boutique Pierce Bainbridge has concluded its partnership with litigation funder Pravati Capital, whose investment helped fuel the young firm's rapid national expansion over the past two years, the parties confirmed Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Top NJ Federal Judge Bemoans Court's Workload Upon Exit

    New Jersey's federal court system outpaced all other district courts in civil case filings over the past year, further burdening a short-staffed bench that’s riddled with six vacancies, U.S. District Judge Jose L. Linares said Friday in announcing his departure for private practice.

  • May 17, 2019

    Constitutional Crisis? Not Quite, But Courts Could Be Tested

    Legal and political scholars agree we are not in a constitutional crisis … yet. But as tensions mount between the president and Congress, the role of the third branch of government could be both crucial and perilous.

  • May 17, 2019

    30K Attys In Calif. In Trouble Over Their Fingerprints

    Nearly 30,000 attorneys in California face escalating penalties this month for missing a deadline to submit new fingerprints to the State Bar in an unpopular push to discover attorneys convicted of crimes.

  • May 17, 2019

    NJ District Chief Judge Joins McCarter & English

    McCarter & English LLP on Friday welcomed retired U.S. District Judge Jose L. Linares, the former chief of New Jersey’s federal court, as a partner who will lead the firm’s alternative dispute resolution practice in its Newark, New Jersey, headquarters.

  • May 17, 2019

    Robinson Bradshaw Liable For Diversity Promises, Atty Says

    Law firms should be held liable for deceptive advertising when they lure minority and female attorneys by talking up their diversity and inclusion efforts and then fail to live up to their promises, according to a Thursday filing in a race bias suit against Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson PA.

  • May 17, 2019

    The Law Firms Making Millions Off The PG&E Cases

    The nation's largest utility company, Pacific Gas and Electric, has paid at least $89 million in the past year in legal fees to firms directly involved with its bankruptcy, civil, criminal and regulatory cases stemming from California wildfires — and the vast majority of that sum has gone to Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP.

  • May 17, 2019

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    General counsel said they think legal operations departments might make lasting progress on diversity and inclusion where others so far haven't succeeded, and the Federal Trade Commission said it's cracking down on companies that buy consumer data gathered through scammers. These are some of the stories in legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

  • May 17, 2019

    FEC Chair Rips Peers For Nixing Thornton Donation Inquiry

    The Federal Election Commission came up two votes shy of moving forward with an investigation into whether Boston-based Thornton Law illegally reimbursed partners for campaign donations, frustrating the commission's chair who worried that FEC inaction could spawn more unlawful activity.

  • May 17, 2019

    4 Blunders Law Firms Make On Social Media

    Social media presents law firms with ample opportunity to build their reputation and attract the attention of new clients, but all too often firms end up stumbling in their online marketing strategies, falling face first into social media mediocrity.

  • May 17, 2019

    Titan Of The Plaintiffs Bar: Caldwell Cassady's Brad Caldwell

    If Apple could send people back in time, it would likely make them steer Brad Caldwell away from law school. It probably wouldn’t have even been that hard: He’d studied to be an engineer, even worked as one for the CIA, before applying for law school on a whim. There was a very real future in which he didn’t become a lawyer, and in that future, Apple might have kept the $1 billion Caldwell bled from it in court.

  • May 16, 2019

    Greenberg Traurig To Open Milan Office, Its 40th Worldwide

    Greenberg Traurig LLP said Thursday it will acquire a boutique law firm in Milan and open an office in the northern Italian city, marking its fifth location in Europe and its 40th in the world.

  • May 16, 2019

    Which States Are Best And Worst At Atty Discipline?

    Hawaii, Delaware and New Hampshire are the best states in the country when it comes to handling attorney discipline cases, according to a new paper from two researchers at Florida Atlantic University.

  • May 16, 2019

    Benefits Of Arbitration Pacts Hotly Debated At House Hearing

    A fault line emerged at a House Judiciary subcommittee hearing Thursday over whether arbitration agreements that limit class actions are beneficial for workers and consumers, with proponents of such pacts saying they give people a chance to pursue small-dollar claims and opponents arguing instead that they make potential claims vanish.

  • May 16, 2019

    3rd-Party Funding Now A Top Alternative Choice For Lawyers

    Third-party litigation and arbitration funding has increasingly become an attractive destination for lawyers who’ve grown weary of the billable hour because it allows them to draw on their experience while challenging them to ensure a funded claim will be a good investment, said several people who have made the move.

Expert Analysis

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

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    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

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    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.

  • An Overview Of The Debate Over Litigation Finance Disclosure

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    In light of a New York federal court's recent decision in Benitez v. Lopez, which joins a growing body of case law denying forced disclosure of commercial litigation finance, Stephanie Spangler of Norris McLaughlin and Dai Wai Chin Feman of Parabellum Capital break down the arguments commonly raised for and against disclosure.

  • How To Identify And Deal With Narcissists In Law

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    Given that a large swath of the legal profession may display some narcissistic tendencies, it is important for lawyers to know how to address the narcissist in the room — and it may be you, says Jennifer Gibbs of Zelle.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Cleary Chief Talent Officer Hy Pomerance

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Amanda Brady and Dustin Laws talk with Hy Pomerance, chief talent officer of Cleary.

  • Rebuttal

    Forced Arbitration Is A Far Worse 'Product' Than Jury Trials

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    Jury trials are not dying because arbitration is a “better product,” as alleged in a recent Law360 guest article, but because corporations have rigged the system through forced arbitration to ensure they cannot be held accountable before a judge or jury, say attorneys at Hagens Berman.