Business of Law

  • July 30, 2021

    In Case You Missed It: Hottest Firms And Stories On Law360

    For those who missed out, here's a look back at the law firms, stories and expert analyses that generated the most buzz on Law360 last week.

  • July 30, 2021

    House Dems Want More District Judges, Too — 203 Of Them

    A group of House Democrats on Friday unveiled a proposal to create 203 new federal judgeships, introducing legislation a day after a bipartisan pair of senators proposed adding 77 federal district court seats in the coming years.

  • July 30, 2021

    High Court Expansion Push Slowly Gains Steam In House

    The progressive effort to expand the U.S. Supreme Court has gradually gained more Democratic support in the U.S. House of Representatives, most recently on Thursday, as backers argue a recent voting rights ruling and an upcoming abortion case will push their long-shot effort into the mainstream.

  • July 30, 2021

    DC Circ. Upholds Judicial Watch's $2.8M Win Over Klayman

    Conservative attorney Larry Klayman is still on the hook for $2.8 million after the D.C. Circuit rejected his attempt to undo his defeat in a jury trial that capped off more than a decade of bitter litigation between Klayman and Judicial Watch, the right-wing legal activist organization he founded.

  • July 30, 2021

    Fed. Circuit Courts Masking Up Again As Delta Variant Surges

    New COVID-19 guidance from the federal government triggered by the surge in delta variant cases has prompted at least three federal circuit courts as of Friday to reinstate mask mandates for everyone regardless of their vaccination status to help contain the virus.

  • July 30, 2021

    Hub Hires: McDermott, ACLU, Austria

    A rainy July did nothing to dampen the hiring mood for Boston law firms. Two firms added to their tax teams, the ACLU tapped several BigLaw attorneys for its new slate of directors, and a lawyer with Bay State ties may be heading to Vienna.

  • July 30, 2021

    5th Circ. Judge Assails Disparate Impact In Race Bias Case

    A Trump-appointed Fifth Circuit judge took aim at the idea that "neutral policies" with a disproportionate negative impact on minorities violate federal discrimination law, likening the notion to critical race theory and arguing both can engender racial bias.

  • July 30, 2021

    Public Defender Up For 10th Circ. Seat Is Worth $3.3M

    One of President Joe Biden's six pending nominees to the appellate courts, a federal public defender chosen for a vacancy on the Tenth Circuit, has reported net worth of more than $3.34 million to the U.S. Senate.

  • July 30, 2021

    More Law Firms Require COVID-19 Vax To Return To Office

    Hogan Lovells, Dickinson Wright PLLC and Lowenstein Sandler LLP will require workers to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to enter their offices, Law360 learned Friday, with the trio becoming the latest law firms to implement vaccine mandates as the U.S. sees a resurgence in coronavirus cases.

  • July 30, 2021

    The Top In-House Hires Of July

    Legal department hires during July included high-profile appointments at Coca-Cola Co., Ford Motor Co. and Univision Holdings Inc. Here, Law360 looks at some of the top in-house announcements from the past few weeks.

  • July 30, 2021

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    Experts speaking on an American Bar Association panel said remote work isn't going anywhere, and an ABA annual report published Thursday gives a data snapshot on multiple areas of the industry including law school enrollment and attorney mental health. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.

  • July 30, 2021

    Ex-SFO Official Says ENRC Was On Course For Charges

    A former Serious Fraud Office investigator testified Friday that Eurasian Natural Resources Corp. was heading toward criminal charges after a Dechert attorney revealed suspicions that the mining company had breached sanctions and bribed African officials.

  • July 29, 2021

    Lawmakers Unveil Overhaul Of Judiciary Workplace Rights

    A bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers on Thursday introduced a new comprehensive proposal to provide the 30,000 federal judiciary workers with the same rights and protections against discrimination, sexual harassment and other misconduct afforded to other government workers and those in the private sector.

  • July 29, 2021

    Judge Says Zoom Formal Attire Optional, But Clothing A Must

    A Texas federal magistrate judge on Wednesday told attorneys representing parties in litigation over the Keystone XL Pipeline that they're not required to wear formal attire when they appear before him in an upcoming virtual hearing on Zoom, but offered a friendly reminder that some form of clothing is required.

  • July 29, 2021

    Bipartisan Sens. Propose 77 New Fed. Judgeships Nationwide

    A bipartisan pair of senators on Thursday proposed adding 77 federal district court seats across the country, matching the judiciary's recommendations — except for omitted appellate seats — and splitting the new judgeships between 2025 and 2029 to sidestep partisan concerns.

  • July 29, 2021

    Davis Wright Bumps Associate Pay, Billable Hour Targets

    Davis Wright Tremaine LLP is the latest BigLaw firm to raise associate and counsel pay — and it's also hiking billable hour requirements, Law360 Pulse has learned.

  • July 29, 2021

    CFO Of John Pierce's Legal Org Facing Criminal Charges

    The chief financial officer of controversial attorney John Pierce's new civil rights organization, the National Constitutional Law Union, or NCLU, was indicted last year for allegedly falsifying court documents in what prosecutors say was a scheme to defraud an elderly woman.

  • July 29, 2021

    EX-SFO Official Denies Dishonest Plot To Delete ENRC Emails

    A former SFO investigator testified Thursday that he had to "double delete" his emails because the agency lacked storage capacity, denying accusations that he tried to conceal communications with a Dechert attorney running an internal corruption probe into mining giant ENRC.

  • July 28, 2021

    Endo, Arnold & Porter Accused Of Cover-Up In Opioid MDL

    Endo Pharmaceuticals and its Arnold & Porter lawyers are making "incredibly belated" discovery disclosures in multidistrict opioid litigation after a severe punishment for discovery violations in a separate opioid case, and an explanation under oath is needed, an Illinois federal judge heard Wednesday.

  • July 28, 2021

    DOJ Barred From Interviewing Glenmark Execs Without Attys

    A Pennsylvania federal judge instructed the U.S. Department of Justice Wednesday to stop demanding interviews with senior Glenmark executives in India without any notice to counsel, hours after attorneys for the drugmaker in the DOJ's price-fixing case against it accused the agency of prosecutorial misconduct.

  • July 28, 2021

    Biden Judicial Noms Draw Rare GOP Praise, Unlike DOJ Pick

    President Joe Biden's selections for the Fourth Circuit and district courts in Connecticut and Virginia drew unusual bipartisan accolades at a Senate confirmation hearing Wednesday, although some Republicans did lambaste a former Boies Schiller partner tapped for a top post at the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • July 28, 2021

    Colo. Bar Clarifies When Attys Must Ask About Illegal Conduct

    The Colorado Bar has determined that attorneys don't have a duty to inquire about a client's request if they have no actual knowledge or are not willfully blind to a client's criminal or fraudulent activity, differing from standards set by the American Bar Association last year.

  • July 28, 2021

    SDNY Takes Over 'Lottery Lawyer' Case Due To EDNY Conflict

    Federal prosecutors from the Southern District of New York are taking over the case accusing the "Lottery Lawyer" of defrauding clients out of millions of dollars from the Eastern District of New York in light of a conflict due to the marriage of the acting EDNY U.S. attorney and a lawyer for the former Rivkin Radler partner.

  • July 28, 2021

    Longtime Sidley Leader Howard Trienens Dies At 97

    During his eight decades with Sidley Austin LLP, Howard J. Trienens helped guide the firm through massive growth and change, including the launch of its New York and Los Angeles offices. Trienens died this week of natural causes at age 97.

  • July 28, 2021

    3rd Circ. Clears Unnamed Appellate Judges Of Race Bias

    The Third Circuit's Judicial Council on Tuesday rejected a Black former court executive's allegations that two unnamed appellate judges from another circuit abused their authority to force him into retirement based on his race.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    DC Court Is Wrong On Jan. 6 Grand Jury Evidence Sharing

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    The D.C. federal court erred recently when it denied the government's request to share grand jury materials from U.S. Capitol riot cases with a private contractor hired to organize the voluminous evidence, turning the practical grand jury secrecy doctrine into a straitjacket, says Steven Gordon at Holland & Knight.

  • Law Firms, Know Who's Responsible For Your Cloud Security

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    Lawyers generally know that files go into the cloud and that the files are then secured and protected, but it's necessary for firms to take a closer look at their cloud supply chain and then come up with a responsibility matrix that helps mitigate any potential risks or weaknesses, says Martin Ward at iManage.

  • Benefits For Law Firms Venturing Into New Services

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    By offering more services, law firms can deepen and strengthen their client relationships and truly become an extension of their clients' teams while generating new revenue streams, and while there are risks associated with expanding into consulting, they may be worth it, says Lou Ramos at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Exelon GC Talks Diversity Initiatives

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    Executing a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion programming, through recruitment, inclusive legal pipelines and community empowerment via pro bono efforts, can ensure a strong environmental, social and governance proposition, says Gayle Littleton at Exelon.

  • Revamping Law Firm Marketing Lists — With Partner Buy-In

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    Jackson Lewis’ Paige Bowser shares lessons from the firm's recent overhaul of an outdated email marketing database, including tips for getting partners on board, ensuring compliance with privacy laws and augmenting outreach strategies.

  • The Murky World Of Legal Rankings Gets Some Clarity In NJ

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    New Jersey's new, stringent approach to legal rankings will make accolade advertising more transparent, benefiting both attorneys and clients and offering legal marketers a new set of best practices amid evolving standards, say Penny Paul at Lowenstein Sandler and Susan Peters at Greybridge.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Cigna Counsel Talks Employee Wellness

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    Building employee well-being into corporate environmental, social and governance priorities required our legal team to focus more closely on cross-functional collaboration within the company and increased communication with our board of directors and shareholders, says Julia Brncic at Cigna.

  • Hybrid Work Models Are Key To Gender Parity In Law Firms

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    To curb the historically high rates of attrition among female lawyers, Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks suggest firms must normalize hybrid work schedules, and they recommend best practices to promote engagement among all attorneys, regardless of where they work.

  • How Law Firms Can Market To Growing Hispanic Community

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    Hispanics constitute one of the fastest growing minority populations in the U.S., and with a young median age and broad technology use, forward-looking firms should consider digital marketing strategies to build a loyal client base, say Natalie Fragkouli and Liel Levy at Nanato Media.

  • 3 Keys To Winning Your Next Oral Argument

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    To leverage the unique opportunity oral arguments provide to talk directly to judges and contribute to their decision making, attorneys must mind the three hallmarks of persuasiveness: projecting credibility, exuding likability and gaining the listener's trust, says Daniel Karon at Karon LLC.

  • Keys To Efficient And Accurate Doc Review For E-Discovery

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    Attorneys involved in e-discovery can review information accurately and cost-effectively by understanding the data in a document collection and identifying its key pitfalls, drafting comprehensive review guidelines, and preparing ahead, says John Wertelet at Eckert Seamans.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Raytheon GC Talks Climate Change

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    Now that the climate crisis is seen as an existential threat, the stakes couldn't be higher — or the challenges more daunting — for the general counsel, who must enlist all parts of the company for support while providing both a legal and ethical road map on how to respond, says Frank Jimenez at Raytheon.

  • Mass. Ruling A Cautionary Tale For Attorneys Changing Firms

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    The Massachusetts high court's recent ruling in Governo v. Bergeron, that lawyers could be held liable for unfair competition with a former firm, highlights important considerations for departing attorneys soliciting clients to come with them, say Mariana Korsunsky and Gary Ronan at Goulston & Storrs.

  • How To Avert Media Narrative And Get A Fair High-Stakes Trial

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    Corporate defendants in bet-the-company litigation may face an uphill battle to a fair trial when the media paints an entire industry, and every entity within it, as a villain — but some strategic tools can help build a more constructive defense and counteract damaging outside spin, says Jessie Zeigler at Bass Berry.

  • Opinion

    State Courts' Stark Lack Of Diversity Demands Action

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    With state judiciaries lagging their federal counterparts in demographic and professional diversity, law firms, state bar associations and other stakeholders should help build a path for more people with diverse backgrounds to become state judges, say Janna Adelstein and Alicia Bannon at the Brennan Center for Justice.

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