Immigration

  • September 23, 2019

    Seattle Tech Co. Chef To Stop Working With ICE, CBP

    Software company Chef announced Monday it will not renew its contracts with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, citing opposition to the Trump administration's hard-line immigration policies and employee backlash over the deals.

  • September 23, 2019

    Feds Too Slow On Visas For Those Who Aided Troops: Judge

    The Trump administration failed to meet congressionally mandated deadlines for processing visa applications for a class of Afghan and Iraqi citizens who helped U.S. troops, a D.C. federal court has ruled.

  • September 23, 2019

    Twitter, Airbnb, Other Tech Cos. Back Bill To End Travel Ban

    Thirteen tech companies told Congress they support an immigration bill that would repeal President Donald Trump's travel ban targeting immigrants from several Muslim-majority countries, saying the order is harming the U.S. economy.

  • September 23, 2019

    Mass. Nonprofits Fight Rule Expanding Faster Deportations

    Two Massachusetts nonprofits and a group of asylum seekers have urged a D.C. federal court to block the Trump administration from carrying out a new policy that would sweep more immigrants into fast-tracked deportation proceedings.

  • September 23, 2019

    IT Co. Boss Gets 7 Years For H-1B Visa Fraud Scheme

    The former CEO of two Seattle-area information technology companies was sentenced to over seven years in prison for fraud and tax charges, brought over what prosecutors claim was a yearslong visa fraud scheme involving hundreds of workers.

  • September 20, 2019

    Family Separation At Border Is 'Child Abuse,' ACLU Tells Court

    The American Civil Liberties Union on Friday urged a California federal judge to rule that U.S. immigration officials are illegally separating parents from their children based on criminal histories instead of separating families only when a parent is deemed unfit or a danger to their child, saying its present policy is tantamount to "child abuse."

  • September 20, 2019

    Migrant Families Sue US For Damages Over Emotional Trauma

    Five asylum-seeking families have sued the federal government for money damages, saying they suffered emotional trauma after immigration authorities separated them from their young children at the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • September 20, 2019

    US Strikes Asylum Deal With El Salvador, But Details Unclear

    The Trump administration and the government of El Salvador have struck an agreement to boost the Central American country’s asylum capacity, according to a Friday announcement that offered scant details on how the agreement would be carried out.

  • September 20, 2019

    Gov't Fights To End Suit Over DHS Detention Policy

    The government urged a D.C. federal judge Friday to grant it a win in a certified class action alleging the U.S. Department of Homeland Security implemented a de facto policy to deny asylum-seekers parole at five ICE field offices, admitting that the offices have made mistakes, but arguing they've never engaged in blanket parole denials.

  • September 20, 2019

    Constangy Adds Ex-Foley Hoag Immigration Atty In Boston

    Constangy Brooks Smith & Prophete LLP has recruited a former Foley Hoag attorney who has 20 years of experience helping companies of all sizes across various industries secure visas for international workers.

  • September 20, 2019

    DOL Says Texas Construction Co. Can't Hire H-2B Workers

    The U.S. Department of Labor won't allow a Texas construction company to hire H-2B workers, finding it hadn't shown it needed the extra help to supplement, rather than replace, its permanent workforce.

  • September 19, 2019

    Marijuana Shouldn't Trigger Deportation, Dems' Bill Proposes

    More than 20 Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives introduced a bill on Wednesday to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to remove minor marijuana use, possession and distribution charges from the list of deportable offenses.

  • September 19, 2019

    Asylee With Ties To Ex-Liberian Dictator Sues ICE For Arrest

    An African asylee with family ties to former Liberian dictator Charles Taylor has sued U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in a New York federal court seeking $10 million, alleging that the agency arrested and imprisoned him for more than a year on an erroneous removal order.

  • September 19, 2019

    Chicago Wins Block On Anti-Sanctuary Rules For DOJ Grants

    A Chicago federal judge on Thursday blocked the U.S. Department of Justice from putting certain conditions on public safety funds in an attempt to force so-called sanctuary cities to comply with federal immigration policies, though the judge limited the effect of his order to the Windy City.

  • September 19, 2019

    USCIS Will Process Deferred Action Bids Again After Backlash

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said Thursday it will resume processing requests for deportation relief from immigrants without legal status, including those with serious medical conditions, after the agency's decision to stop considering them sparked strong backlash on Capitol Hill.

  • September 19, 2019

    NY Cleaning Co. Fined $1.1M For I-9 Paperwork Violations

    The Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer has ordered a now-defunct New York cleaning company to pay $1.16 million in penalties after finding that the company failed to complete I-9 forms and had unauthorized workers on staff.

  • September 19, 2019

    Wash. State Slams Transfer Of Military Funds For Border Wall

    Washington state joined an onslaught of litigation against President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration with a lawsuit filed in federal court Thursday challenging the administration’s authority to dip into funds earmarked for military construction projects to pay for a border wall.

  • September 19, 2019

    Labor Dept. Moves Recruitment Online For H-2A Employers

    The U.S. Department of Labor will no longer require employers to run print ads in newspapers to recruit for open positions before they can hire migrant farmworkers under the H-2A visa program, with the agency announcing it will instead move the process online.

  • September 18, 2019

    Senate Dems Block Gov't Funding Bill Amid Border Wall Fight

    Senate Democrats on Wednesday derailed a Republican attempt to take up a government spending package as the fight over funding for President Donald Trump’s long-promised border wall continues on Capitol Hill.

  • September 18, 2019

    Immigration Court Backlog Tops 1M As Cases Keep Piling Up

    The immigration court backlog surpassed 1 million cases in August, according to a report released Wednesday by Syracuse University's Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, a nonpartisan data research organization.

  • September 18, 2019

    Contractor Revenue Growing Under Immigration Crackdown

    Revenue for contractors who run immigration detention centers and correctional facilities has surged with increased immigration enforcement under the Trump and Obama administrations, a Wednesday report by consumer advocacy group Public Citizen found.

  • September 18, 2019

    DC Judge Tells Gov't To Toe Line On Asylum Parole Order

    A D.C. federal judge said Wednesday that he's going to be much "less indulgent" with the government after having to order immigration officials in New Orleans for the second time to stop ignoring a government policy that allows detained asylum-seekers to be paroled.

  • September 18, 2019

    NJ County Says AG Has No Right To Bar Sharing Info With ICE

    A New Jersey county slammed the state attorney general in federal court Wednesday, challenging his directive last year that barred law enforcement agencies from sharing certain information with federal immigration authorities and saying the move violated federal and state law.

  • September 18, 2019

    Dems Roll Out Bill Blocking Trump's 'Public Charge' Rule

    More than 20 Senate Democrats have rolled out legislation that would block the Trump administration's recent policy penalizing immigrants for using public benefits.

  • September 17, 2019

    DOJ Turns To 5th Circ. Ruling In Abuse Victims' Asylum Suit

    The U.S. Department of Justice has told the D.C. Circuit that a recent Fifth Circuit decision warrants rolling back an injunction on a Trump administration rule restricting certain groups, including domestic violence victims, from receiving asylum.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Steps Toward A Supportive Firm Culture

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    As an early advocate of the American Bar Association's year-old well-being pledge, we launched an integrated program to create and sustain a supportive workplace culture with initiatives focused on raising mental health awareness, embracing creativity and giving back to the community, says Casey Ryan at Reed Smith.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Mental Health Education As A Firm Priority

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    Our firm drives a holistic concept of well-being through educational opportunities, such as a series of expert-led workshops intended to address mental health and substance abuse issues that we vowed to fight when we signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge one year ago, says Krista Logelin at Morgan Lewis.

  • New Visa Means 1 Less Problem For Offshore Wind Projects

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    The U.S. State Department has updated the Foreign Affairs Manual to include a visa category for offshore wind projects, removing a regulatory hurdle that was causing significant logistical problems for the industry, say Jonathan Waldron and Stefanos Roulakis at Blank Rome.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: A Firm's Work With Mental Health Experts

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    Signing the American Bar Association's well-being pledge last year was a natural progression of our firm's commitment to employee wellness, which has included developing partnerships with professionals in the mental health space to provide customized programming to firm attorneys and staff, say Annette Sciallo and Mark Goldberg at Latham.

  • Steps Toward Ensuring B-1 Visa Compliance

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    B-1 visas are perhaps the most widely used visa for foreign professionals entering the U.S. to participate in short-term business activities, but misuse of business visa rules is a common area of noncompliance and there are signs that this visa category is facing greater scrutiny, say Elena Nesch and Xavier Francis at Berry Appleman.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: When A Firm Brings Counseling On Site

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    One year ago, our firm signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge and embraced a commitment to providing on-site behavioral health resources, which has since become a key aspect of our well-being program, say Meg Meserole and Kimberly Merkel at Akin Gump.

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    Pursuing Wellness: Inside A Firm Meditation Program

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    After our firm signed the American Bar Association’s well-being pledge one year ago, we launched two key programs that included weekly meditation sessions and monthly on-site chair massages to help people address both the mental and physical aspects of working at a law firm, says Marci Eisenstein at Schiff Hardin.

  • Early Sampling Of Electronic Info Is Underutilized In Discovery

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    The early and prompt provision of samples from all electronically stored information sources as a part of ESI protocol search methodology is consistent with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and may allow for significant cost savings during discovery, says Zachary Caplan at Berger Montague.

  • The Factors Courts Consider In Deposition Location Disputes

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    In the absence of a federal rule governing deposition location, federal courts are frequently called on to resolve objections to out-of-state deposition notices. Recent decisions reveal what information is crucial to courts in making the determination, says Kevin O’Brien at Porter Wright.

  • What To Consider Before Filing For A Rule 57 Speedy Hearing

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    Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 57 and its state counterparts provide a method for expediting claims for declaratory judgment that warrants closer attention than it has historically received from litigants and courts, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Expanding The Meaning Of Diversity

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    My conservative, Catholic parents never skipped a beat when accepting that I was gay, and encouraged me to follow my dreams wherever they might lead. But I did not expect they would lead to the law, until I met an inspiring college professor, says James Holmes of Clyde & Co.

  • How The Wayback Machine Can Strengthen Your Case

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    The Wayback Machine, which archives screenshots of websites at particular points in time, can be an invaluable tool in litigation, but attorneys need to follow a few simple steps early in the discovery process to increase the odds of being able to use materials obtained from the archive, says Timothy Freeman of Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Takeaways From New H-1B Visa Registration Proposal

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    On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security released its proposed H-1B visa filing fee rule and registration procedures, which give sponsoring employers some new options but also leave open questions, says John Quill at Mintz.

  • Opinion

    Draft Civil Procedure Jurisdictional Rule Needs A Tweak

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    The Judicial Conference Advisory Committee’s proposed addition to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 7.1 needs to be amended slightly to prevent late-stage jurisdictional confusion in cases where the parties do not have attributed citizenship, says GianCarlo Canaparo at The Heritage Foundation.

  • How DHS' Public Charge Rule Will Affect Immigrant Benefits

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    Though the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's new public charge rule has limited direct impact related to benefits, it may deter immigrant families from enrolling in Medicaid and other public programs due to fear or confusion, say attorneys at Manatt Phelps.