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Immigration

  • November 13, 2018

    Sessions' Immigration Actions Set Durable Precedent

    Though Jeff Sessions stepped down from his post as U.S. attorney general last week, the effects of his decisions upending Board of Immigration Appeals precedents and placing direct pressure on immigration judges to process cases more quickly will long outlast his tenure, attorneys said.

  • November 13, 2018

    Immigration Firms Grossman Law, Hammond Young Merge

    Maryland immigration boutiques Hammond Young Immigration Law LLC and Grossman Law LLC said Tuesday that they had joined forces to create Grossman Young & Hammond, bringing together their respective expertise in business immigration and humanitarian immigration matters.

  • November 13, 2018

    Tata Encouraged 'Expats Versus Locals' Culture, Jury Hears

    A California federal jury considering class claims that Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. discriminates against non-South Asians heard taped deposition testimony Tuesday from a former Tata senior human resources manager, who said that the company prioritizes visa holders and the culture was “expats versus locals.”

  • November 13, 2018

    9th Circ. Denies Right-To-Counsel Bid By Immigrant Minors

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday declined to reconsider a case brought by a class of thousands of unaccompanied immigrant children seeking lawyers and due process rights in deportation cases, leaving in place its earlier decision that the children can’t bypass immigration court and head straight to district court.

  • November 13, 2018

    No Quick Win For Feds In Haitian Refugee Status Suit

    A Brooklyn federal judge declined to toss a suit Tuesday claiming racism motivated the Trump administration to revoke the temporary protected status of 50,000 Haitians in the wake of an earthquake, giving parties only two months to prepare for trial.

  • November 13, 2018

    ICE Officer Cut From Citizen's Detention Row

    A Florida federal judge has dismissed several claims brought by a U.S. citizen of Honduran ancestry who has been detained twice on suspicion of being in the country illegally, tossing all claims filed against an ICE officer while allowing several against a Florida county and the federal government to proceed.

  • November 9, 2018

    Who Has Standing To Challenge Whitaker DOJ Appointment?

    Democratic senators have questioned the legality of President Donald Trump's appointment of a Mueller critic to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions, but it may take someone directly affected by what new acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker does on immigration or other policy issues to challenge his appointment.

  • November 9, 2018

    Fla. Developer With Kushner Ties Slams EB-5 Fraud Suit

    A real estate developer connected to White House adviser Jared Kushner has urged a Florida state court to scrap claims from a group of Chinese investors seeking EB-5 visas that he defrauded them of $99.5 million, arguing that the lawsuit is based on false allegations and is time-barred.

  • November 9, 2018

    Okla. Pork Co. Pays $1M To End ICE Employment Probe

    An Oklahoma agribusiness agreed on Thursday to fork over more than $1 million to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the Oklahoma Attorney General's Office to resolve claims that the company's pork production plant hired unauthorized immigrant workers, according to ICE.

  • November 9, 2018

    Trump’s Proclamation Skirts US Asylum Law, Attys Say

    President Donald Trump’s proclamation imposing new restrictions on asylum seekers presenting themselves outside ports of entry contradicts the plain text and congressional intent behind the Immigration and Nationality Act’s definition of who can petition for asylum, immigration attorneys and policy analysts said Friday.

  • November 9, 2018

    Humanitarian Visas Targeted In USCIS Deportation Policy

    Victims of domestic abuse, human trafficking and other crimes could soon be thrown into deportation proceedings immediately upon the denial of their visa petitions, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said on Thursday.

  • November 9, 2018

    Dozens Of NJ Cos. Accused Of Unlawful Immigration Services

    More than two dozen tax preparers, travel agencies and other businesses in New Jersey have been slammed with notices of violation seeking more than $300,000 in civil penalties over claims they defrauded consumers by offering immigration assistance services they were not authorized to provide, authorities said Friday.

  • November 9, 2018

    Trump Restricts Asylum Outside Ports Of Entry

    President Donald Trump issued a proclamation Friday morning that would bar asylum seekers crossing the U.S.-Mexico border from bringing their claims if they do not present themselves at a designated port of entry.

  • November 8, 2018

    Judge Takes Loeb & Loeb Atty To Task Over Evidence At Trial

    A California federal judge on Thursday questioned whether a Loeb & Loeb LLP attorney defending Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. in a class discrimination trial had misrepresented evidence to jurors, saying "it looked to me that there [were] some misrepresentations happening" and allowing opposing counsel to clarify the evidence with the jury.

  • November 8, 2018

    19 Cities, Counties Say Detained-Minor Rules Flout Flores

    Nineteen cities and counties on Wednesday got behind a class asking a California federal judge to block the government’s proposed rule changes regarding its detention of immigrant minors, saying the changes would “directly undermine” core protections and concerns in their case’s consent decree.

  • November 8, 2018

    White House Moves To Restrict Asylum Eligibility

    The Trump administration has put forth plans to tighten restrictions on asylum eligibility, issuing a rule on Thursday that could bar anyone who crossed the border in between ports of entry from applying for asylum, even if they express a fear of persecution.

  • November 8, 2018

    Married Immigrants Can't Seek Class Status, Gov't Says

    The U.S. government has struck back at the class certification bid by immigrant couples fighting deportation orders for noncitizen spouses, arguing Wednesday that the proposed class includes people who haven’t suffered any injury.

  • November 8, 2018

    DOJ Settles Immigration Bias Claim Against NY Hotel

    The U.S. Department of Justice has settled with a New York operator of a Hyatt hotel near LaGuardia Airport over allegations that the company discriminated against a man who had been granted asylum on the basis of his citizenship status, the department announced Wednesday.

  • November 8, 2018

    DHS, DOL Propose Moving H-2 Visa Recruitment Online

    The Trump administration is considering lifting a rule that requires U.S. employers looking to hire temporary foreign labor to first recruit American workers through print newspaper advertisements, instead allowing employers to satisfy that requirement by posting job openings online.

  • November 8, 2018

    9th Circ. Upholds Continuation Of DACA Nationwide

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday left in place a nationwide injunction keeping the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program alive, finding that former President Barack Obama’s creation of the program was a legitimate exercise of executive discretion.

Expert Analysis

  • It’s Time For Law Firms To Start Talking About Gen Z

    Eliza Stoker

    Since the oldest members of Generation Z aren’t even finished with law school yet, law firm management is in a unique position to prepare for their entrance into the legal workforce, says Eliza Stoker of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • State Net

    How The States Fared In The Midterms

    Lou Cannon

    Lou Cannon, editorial adviser and columnist at LexisNexis State Net Capitol Journal, dissects the results of the governor’s races and state legislative chambers in the 2018 midterm elections.

  • Top 10 Snap Observations From The 2018 Midterm Elections

    Frank Donatelli

    The just-completed midterm elections could be called the “cafeteria midterms,” because there was something for everyone. The results offered both encouragement and warnings for Democrats and Republicans looking to 2020, says Frank Donatelli of McGuireWoods Consulting LLC.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Yale's Linda Greenhouse Talks Journalism

    Linda Greenhouse

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Yale Law School lecturer and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Linda Greenhouse discusses her coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, the conservatives' long game and trends in journalism.

  • Opinion

    Celebrate Veterans By Improving Their Access To Justice

    Linda Klein

    Attorneys should think beyond the Veterans Day parades and use their time and talents to help the many veterans facing urgent legal issues, says Linda Klein of Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC.

  • Top 10 Employer Takeaways From Midterm Election Results

    Richard Meneghello

    In Tuesday's midterm elections, Democrats recaptured the House for the first time in eight years while Republicans retained and strengthened their grip on the Senate. Richard Meneghello and Benjamin Ebbink of Fisher Phillips break down what this means for employers.

  • Opinion

    Time To Reclaim Wellness For All Lawyers

    Leesa Klepper

    The decision last month by Baker McKenzie’s global chairman to step down due to exhaustion indicates that the legal profession needs to mount a broader wellness effort to address long hours, high stress, frequent travel and the daily demands of practice, says Leesa Klepper, director of Thrivewell Coaching.

  • Opinion

    AGs Are Now The 1st Round Draft Picks Of American Politics

    Joshua Spivak

    Given their recent track record and growing policy power, state attorneys general should be the group everyone is watching on Election Day. Chances are the winners of these races will move to higher offices soon enough, says Joshua Spivak, senior fellow at the Hugh L. Carey Institute for Government Reform at Wagner College.

  • Potential Pitfalls Of Hiring Without Degree Requirements

    Xavier Francis

    According to a recent report by Glassdoor.com, some employers no longer require college degrees as a prerequisite for employment. Although forward-thinking, it could present unforeseen challenges to a company’s immigration strategy, say Xavier Francis and Kane Vongsavanh of Erickson Immigration Group.

  • Protecting Law Firm Talent At Both Ends

    Susan Blakely

    By 2030, it is possible that 75 percent of lawyers practicing in the U.S. will be millennials. A broadened focus on retention and advancement of all young lawyers is therefore a logical step forward but it fails to address another major retention issue that law firms should explore, says Susan Smith Blakely of LegalPerspectives LLC.