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Immigration

  • May 17, 2019

    Don't Write Off Trump's Green Card Proposal, Attys Say

    Attorneys have expressed cautious optimism about President Donald Trump’s proposal to create a points-based green card system that would prioritize highly skilled workers, but they also said it should not come at the expense of family-based immigration.

  • May 17, 2019

    Trump’s Border Wall Faces Skeptical Calif. Judge

    A California federal judge appeared open Friday to blocking the Trump administration from repurposing defense funds to build a wall along the southern border, saying he doesn't know if it is right to let the government build the wall before legal challenges to it are resolved.

  • May 17, 2019

    CBP Outlines Futile Hunt For Wall Contract From Trump Tweet

    The American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts has received a declaration under oath from U.S. Customs and Border Protection outlining the agency's fruitless search for evidence of a supposed "115-mile long" border wall contract that President Donald Trump referenced in a tweet on Christmas Eve.

  • May 17, 2019

    4th Circ. Says Planned Termination Of DACA Is Illegal

    A split Fourth Circuit panel on Friday threw out the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's planned rescission of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, finding that the Trump administration had not adequately explained its decision to roll back the Obama-era policy.

  • May 17, 2019

    Constitutional Group Backs Trump In Wall Funding Fight

    The American Center for Law and Justice has told a D.C. federal court that the Democrat-led House of Representatives has failed to plead its case for an injunction that would block funding for President Donald Trump’s long-promised border wall.

  • May 17, 2019

    Army Can't Toss Noncitizen Troops' Improper Discharge Suit

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge has refused to end a proposed class action accusing the U.S. Army of wrongfully discharging noncitizen soldiers without prior notice, ruling the dispute was not a "broad programmatic attack" on Army recruitment barred by sovereign immunity.

  • May 17, 2019

    New England Couples Win Cert. To Fight Spouse Deportations

    A Massachusetts federal judge certified a class of U.S. citizens and their undocumented spouses in a ruling from the bench Thursday in Boston, opening the door for potentially thousands of New England couples to sue the federal government for deporting an undocumented spouse. 

  • May 16, 2019

    4th Circ. Urged To Speed Up Review Of 2020 Census Dispute

    The Fourth Circuit was urged on Wednesday to quickly hear an appeal of a lower court decision that the Trump administration did not intend to discriminate against noncitizens by including a question about citizenship status on the 2020 census, as the government’s deadline to finalize the census looms.

  • May 16, 2019

    Law Profs, States Urge 9th Circ. To Block Trump Asylum Rule

    The Ninth Circuit was urged by immigration law professors and several states and localities Wednesday to uphold a preliminary injunction against the Trump administration's so-called asylum ban on migrants who cross the U.S.-Mexico border outside of a designated port of entry.

  • May 16, 2019

    Trump Unveils Sweeping 'Merit-Based' Immigration Proposal

    President Donald Trump unveiled a sweeping immigration reform proposal Thursday that would represent a shift toward what he has repeatedly referred to as a "merit-based" immigration system, prioritizing high-skilled workers and creating a points-based means of evaluating green card holders.

  • May 16, 2019

    Sen. Graham Calls For Asylum System Overhaul In New Bill

    Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has proposed new legislation that would overhaul the U.S. asylum system, seeking to strip away Central Americans' right to apply for asylum at the U.S. border and to increase the amount of time that migrant children can be detained with their families.

  • May 16, 2019

    Lawmakers Urge DOJ To Undo Barr's Migrant Bond Decision

    Dozens of lawmakers urged the U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday to overturn U.S. Attorney General William Barr’s decision to restrict certain asylum-seekers from being released on bond, arguing that the administration should not use indefinite detention as a deterrent for migration.

  • May 16, 2019

    Same-Sex Couple's Citizenship Policy Suit Moves Ahead

    A D.C. federal judge paved the way Wednesday for a same-sex couple's lawsuit challenging a U.S. Department of State policy requiring a biological relationship between foreign-born children and their American parent to see the inside of a courtroom.

  • May 15, 2019

    High Court Case Could Expand State Immigration Enforcement

    The U.S. Supreme Court is reviewing a case over the use of I-9 employment authorization forms in state identity theft prosecutions that could expand states' role in enforcing federal immigration laws, attorneys said.

  • May 15, 2019

    New Bill Aims To Add 4,000 Visas For Afghan Interpreters

    A bill unveiled by a bipartisan group of senators Tuesday seeks to add 4,000 new visas for Afghan interpreters and translators who have helped American troops during the Afghanistan war, amid reports that the Trump administration plans to make it harder to obtain those visas.

  • May 15, 2019

    Kentucky Rep. Slams House Bid To Block Border Wall Funds

    A Republican congressman from Kentucky urged a D.C. federal court on Tuesday not to block funding for President Donald Trump’s long-promised border wall, siding with the Trump administration as it battles back a legal challenge from the Democrat-led House of Representatives.

  • May 15, 2019

    DHS Waives More Enviro Laws For Calif., Ariz. Wall Sections

    The Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday said it issued a trio of waivers to speed up border wall construction along 93 miles of land in Arizona and California, areas the agency claims suffer from high rates of illegal entry, human trafficking and drug smuggling.

  • May 15, 2019

    5th Circ. Revives Twice-Deported Texas Man's Citizenship Bid

    A Fifth Circuit panel revived a Texas man’s bid to be declared an American citizen, finding on Tuesday that his latest suit had remedied one of the key problems raised during his previous attempt for a citizenship declaration.

  • May 14, 2019

    Nonprofit Sues For Docs In Census Citizenship Question Case

    A progressive nonprofit filed suit against the Department of Commerce on Monday, seeking the release of records related to the Trump administration’s decision to include a question about citizenship status on the 2020 census.

  • May 14, 2019

    9th Circ. Urged To Backtrack On ‘Remain In Mexico’ Policy

    The American Civil Liberties Union and other immigrant advocates urged the Ninth Circuit on Monday to reconsider its decision to temporarily revive President Donald Trump’s “Remain in Mexico” policy so as not to create binding precedent for future decisions in the case.

Expert Analysis

  • The Drawbacks Of White House's Visa Overstay Memo

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    Methods proposed in President Donald Trump's recent memo on so-called visa overstays seem suboptimal in achieving the stated policy objectives when considered with data from a U.S. Department of Homeland Security report on foreign visitors to the U.S., says Andrew Greenfield of Fragomen.

  • State Net

    Why States And Cities Are Concerned About Census Accuracy

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    The 2020 census will impact every state, city and county in the United States, because population is a major factor in how the federal government distributes funds. Despite apprehensions about an undercount, there are reasons for optimism about the accuracy of the census, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • Perspectives

    Immigration Enforcement Under Trump Neglects Rule Of Law

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    What President Donald Trump and his administration have described as a “humanitarian crisis” at the U.S. southern border is, in reality, a Trump-exacerbated crisis — which demands real solutions, not incendiary rhetoric, cruelty and lawlessness, says David Leopold of Ulmer & Berne.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

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    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • No-Match Letters Raise 4 Areas Of Concern For Employers

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    Recently, the Social Security Administration has resumed mailing "no-match" letters informing employers of mismatches between their employees' names and Social Security numbers. When responding to such letters, employers must walk the fine line between good faith compliance and discrimination, says Becki Young of Grossman Young.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

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    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.