California

  • January 17, 2020

    DoorDash Says $39M Deal Should Halt Courier Cases

    DoorDash has asked a California federal judge to hit pause on a consolidated suit accusing the app-based food delivery company of misclassifying thousands of couriers while a state court decides whether to approve a $39 million settlement in a similar case that would purportedly cover nearly all the federal claimants.

  • January 17, 2020

    Radio Group Pushes Split Market View In Music Rights Row

    A U.S. magistrate judge was wrong to dismiss discovery claims from a radio station buyers coalition that sought a performance rights group's sales information because she based her ruling on an improper definition of the market, the buyers group told a California federal judge.

  • January 17, 2020

    $4.75M Deal Ends Calif. Lumber Liquidators Overtime Battle

    A California state judge on Friday gave the final go-ahead to a $4.75 million deal ending a suit alleging flooring retailer Lumber Liquidators underpaid more than 100 store managers and trainees by misclassifying them as exempt from overtime.

  • January 17, 2020

    Chevron Owes $18B Arbitration Payout, Saudis Tell 9th Circ.

    Saudi families claiming to be the titleholders of oil lands leased to a Chevron Corp. predecessor have urged the Ninth Circuit to enforce a $17.9 billion arbitration award against the oil giant, saying the lower court wrongly concluded it lacked jurisdiction and relied on "incompetent and not credible evidence."

  • January 17, 2020

    Pulling Up Stakes: Sidley, Baker Botts, Hogan Lovells

    In our latest roundup of deal-makers on the move, Sidley Austin snagged a private equity pro from Linklaters for its Singapore office, Baker Botts bolstered its media and telecommunications practice and Hogan Lovells added a veteran capital markets practitioner in London.

  • January 17, 2020

    Calif. Sub Teachers May Get Summer Unemployment Pay

    The California Supreme Court has opened the door for substitute teachers to possibly get unemployment benefits during the summer if they aren't called in, finding they would be eligible for such benefits if a summer school session mirrors the normal school year in certain aspects.

  • January 17, 2020

    Bat Buyers Swing For Cert. In Rawlings False Ad Suit

    A group of baseball bat buyers on Friday asked a California federal judge to grant class certification in a suit alleging that Rawlings Sporting Goods Co. Inc. mislabeled the weight of its non-wood baseball bats, selling them at a heavier weight than advertised.

  • January 17, 2020

    4 Companies Kick Off 2020 IPO Season After Raising $373M

    Four companies went public Friday after raising $373 million combined in initial public offerings, marking the first four IPOs of 2020 and providing fresh capital for three Chinese issuers plus a U.S. mortgage lender.  

  • January 17, 2020

    Travelers Needn't Defend KLA-Tencor In Patent Antitrust Row

    A California appeals court has ruled that Travelers doesn’t have to cover KLA-Tencor Corp.’s costs to successfully defend against a lawsuit alleging it sought to damage a rival’s business by fraudulently obtaining a patent for advanced semiconductor measurement systems.

  • January 17, 2020

    NCAA May OK More Training Expenses For Olympic Athletes

    Elite Olympic and Paralympic athletes will be able to have “additional training expenses” paid without jeopardizing their NCAA eligibility under a rule change to be voted on next week as the NCAA takes the first steps toward reforming its rules to let athletes benefit from their names, images, and likenesses.

  • January 17, 2020

    Tech Giants Join Fight Against Trump 'Public Charge' Policy

    More than 100 businesses and trade associations, including tech giants LinkedIn, Twitter and Microsoft, have thrown their support behind a lawsuit challenging a policy that would penalize low-income green card applicants, arguing that the new restrictions will hurt U.S. employers.

  • January 17, 2020

    Chuck Norris, Wife Drop Claims MRI Drug Threatened Her Life

    Actor Chuck Norris and his wife abandoned their lawsuit in San Francisco County Court alleging that drugs injected into her system during an MRI left her with a lingering painful condition, according to a press release from Bracco Diagnostics Inc., one of the several drugmakers named in the suit.

  • January 17, 2020

    Consumers Say XL Entities Liable For $267M TCPA Judgment

    A class of consumers urged a California federal judge to deny XL American Inc. and XL Group Ltd.’s bid to remove themselves from a suit over a $267 million Telephone Consumer Protection Act award, saying the insurers were heavily involved.

  • January 17, 2020

    9th Circ. Says News Orgs Have Right To 'Timely' Court Docs

    The Ninth Circuit ruled Friday that news organizations have a First Amendment right to timely access to court documents, but courts still can impose "reasonable restrictions" and need not grant "immediate access."

  • January 17, 2020

    Taxation With Representation: Skadden, Simpson, White

    In this week’s Taxation with Representation, Visa acquires fintech company Plaid for $5.3 billion, a Blackstone real estate trust makes a $4.6 billion play for two Vegas hotels, and Saudi Aramco’s IPO raises another $3.8 billion.

  • January 17, 2020

    Calif. Jumps Into Fight With Feds Over Fracking Impact

    California on Friday joined environmental groups in accusing the federal government of failing to properly assess the environmental and health impacts of hydraulic fracturing on more than 1 million acres of land in the Golden State now open for oil and gas development.

  • January 17, 2020

    Paving Co. Will Upgrade Facilities To End Water Pollution Suit

    A transportation construction company agreed to pay $60,000 for a project to improve the Los Angeles River and make upgrades to its facilities to settle an environmental group's claims that it violated the Clean Water Act by letting zinc, lead and other substances flow from the property.

  • January 17, 2020

    Law360's Tort Report: Meat Loaf’s Suit Out Of Hell

    A $24 million jury verdict in a suit over a newborn’s brain injury and singer Meat Loaf’s suit against Hyatt over a horror convention injury lead Law360’s Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • January 17, 2020

    No Standing For Kids In Climate Case, 9th Circ. Says

    The Ninth Circuit said Friday that although a group of children would have a strong enough case to go to trial on claims their future is endangered by the federal government's failure to act to curb climate change, courts simply don’t have the power to fix those policies.

  • January 16, 2020

    Apple Devices Smaller, Better By Infringing Caltech, Jury Told

    A Cornell-educated engineer testified for the California Institute of Technology on Thursday that Apple Inc. and Broadcom Ltd. infringed the university's patents in Wi-Fi chips used in Apple devices, saying the infringing technology allowed the companies to make smaller devices while improving their wireless data capabilities.

  • January 16, 2020

    App Cos. Sue Facebook Over 'Brazen' Anti-Competitive Plot

    A handful of tech companies launched a proposed class action against Facebook on Thursday in California federal court, alleging the social media giant intentionally set out to destroy app developers it deemed as potential rivals in "the most brazen, willful anti-competitive scheme in a generation."

  • January 16, 2020

    Bid To Move Crypto Suit Overseas Called 'Pious' Pretense

    A motion to end a proposed federal cryptocurrency class action stateside — and move the claims to Italy — is a thinly disguised attempt to kill the allegations altogether, according to a California man who claims he lost $260,000 on a defective digital currency exchange.

  • January 16, 2020

    BART Not Liable For Robbery, Says Calif. Appeals Court

    A California state appeals court panel disagreed Wednesday with a woman's contention that Bay Area Rapid Transit had breached its duty to protect her from harm when she was robbed on a train platform in Oakland, California, affirming a trial court’s judgment that BART isn’t liable.

  • January 16, 2020

    Unauthorized Immigrants Can Be Urged To Stay, Justices Told

    The U.S. Supreme Court must strike down a 1986 federal statute making it a felony to encourage unauthorized immigrants to remain in the country because it's too broad and criminalizes a wide range of constitutionally protected speech, an immigration consultant at the center of the dispute has argued.

  • January 16, 2020

    States Sue Trump Administration Over Food Stamp Rollbacks

    More than a dozen states filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration Thursday alleging the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food stamp rollbacks violate federal law.

Expert Analysis

  • Litigating FRAND Rates After Fed. Circ. Ericsson Decision

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    After the Federal Circuit’s recent ruling in TCL v. Ericsson, which puts juries at the helm of calculating FRAND damages for standard-essential patents, litigators should focus on preparing a simplified and emotionally persuasive story and garnering the evidentiary support necessary for a favorable appeal, says Larry Sandell of Mei & Mark.

  • State Net

    Obamacare Clings To Life As States Expand Medicaid

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    While the Affordable Care Act faces new court challenges, the public's growing support for the law and states' increasing interest in its Medicaid expansion option suggest it may have political staying power, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Calif. Ruling Clears Up Pay Stub Rules For Company Names

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    A California appellate court recently ruled in Noori v. Countrywide Payroll that use of an unregistered acronym on wage statements violated the state’s Labor Code, providing guidance on the requirement that pay stubs include an employer’s legal name, says Kirsten Gallacher at Wilson Turner.

  • SG Argument Likely Dooms Ariz. Tax Case At High Court

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    In Arizona's case challenging California's doing business tax, the solicitor general's recently filed amicus brief arguing that Arizona's constitutional challenge does not warrant the U.S. Supreme Court’s exercise of its original jurisdiction may signal the end of Arizona's attempt to bypass state court, say Robert Merten and Mike Le at Pillsbury.

  • Bias Case Gives Justices Chance To Rethink Title VII

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    If the U.S. Supreme Court decides to hear Peterson v. Linear Controls, its decision could resolve a circuit split and redefine the scope of Title VII's discrimination protections, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Top 10 Employment Law Developments Of The Decade: Part 2

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    In the final part of this article, Barbara Roth and Tyler Hendry at Herbert Smith look back on the most significant labor and employment law updates from the second half of the decade, and reveal their choice for the most important change of the 2010s.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • The New Class Action Frontier Under Illinois Privacy Law

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    One year after a pivotal Illinois Supreme Court ruling broadened liability under the Biometric Information Privacy Act, companies in a wide variety of industries need to be vigilant of a rise in potentially financially ruinous class action filings, and there are several steps they can take to protect themselves from BIPA liability, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Where The Fight Over FTC's Enforcement Authority Stands

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    A flurry of year-end activity, including three petitions before the U.S. Supreme Court and a spate of proposed legislation, requires a recap on the current status of the debate over the Federal Trade Commission's Section 13(b) authority to obtain permanent injunctions and restitution, say John Villafranco and Khoury DiPrima of Kelley Drye.

  • Top 10 Employment Law Developments Of The Decade: Part 1

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    In the first of two articles, Barbara Roth and Tyler Hendry at Herbert Smith highlight the decade's most significant labor and employment law changes, including the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2011 decision in Dukes to raise the class certification threshold, and the spread of state and local paid sick leave laws.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • 2019 Trends In DOJ Health Care Enforcement

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    Last year, opioid-related enforcement was the U.S. Department of Justice's top priority, in addition to a sustained focus on the prosecution of private individuals and data-driven identification of health care fraud, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Reviewing 2019's White Collar Cases And Controversies

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    From the “Varsity Blues” investigation to the Mueller report, white collar criminal cases were at the forefront of the national dialogue last year. Attorneys at Keker Van Nest look back at the most significant white collar cases and trends from 2019 and highlight what to watch for in 2020.

  • State Net

    How States Are Responding To The Insulin Price Crisis

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    Increases in the need for insulin and dramatic surges in its cost have made access to the drug one of the biggest health policy issues at the state and federal level, and now state legislators are taking action to rein in prices, says Dave Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.