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California

  • January 15, 2019

    Prof Calls Qualcomm Royalties 'Naked Tax,' Invokes Microsoft

    A University of California, Berkeley economics professor testified for the Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday that Qualcomm's standard-essential patent royalties serve as a competition-killing "naked tax" on its modem chips, comparing the practice to software bundling that got Microsoft in trouble with the feds 20 years ago.

  • January 15, 2019

    Aly Raisman's Nassar Suit Paused Pending USAG Ch. 11

    Olympic gold medal-winning gymnast Aly Raisman’s request to pause her suit over disgraced sports medicine doctor Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse was granted on Monday, after a California federal court agreed that a stay would help the parties assess the impact of the recent bankruptcy filing by USA Gymnastics, the sport's governing body.

  • January 15, 2019

    Drivers At Fault For Their Own Stalled Arbitrations, Uber Says

    Uber told a California federal judge on Monday that drivers requesting an order to force the ride-hailing company to cover the costs of their individual arbitrations over a classification dispute are impeding their own progress by seeking the order in federal court and refusing to pay their filing fees.

  • January 15, 2019

    DLA Piper Scores Tech IP Buff From Boies Schiller Flexner

    DLA Piper added a partner with patent litigation experience from Boies Schiller Flexner LLP to its intellectual property and technology practice in Los Angeles, the firm announced.

  • January 15, 2019

    Quinn Emanuel Partner Dies After Lung Cancer Battle

    Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP partner Steve Anderson, a founding member of the firm’s patent practice, has died after a 15-year battle with lung cancer, the firm has announced.

  • January 15, 2019

    Gov't Hits Tetra Tech With FCA Suit Over Navy Cleanup Work

    The federal government has accused a Tetra Tech unit of billing the U.S. Navy for radiation remediation services at a former Navy shipyard in San Francisco that it did not actually perform, in violation of the False Claims Act.

  • January 15, 2019

    Rihanna Says Father Can't Stand Under Her Name's Umbrella

    Music icon Rihanna demanded on Tuesday that her father stop exploiting her name and brand to fraudulently make "millions of dollars" through his company Fenty Entertainment LLC, according to a lawsuit filed in California federal court.

  • January 15, 2019

    CWA Shift Pushes Calif., States Toward Stricter Water Regs

    California is close to finalizing new protections for its wetlands in response to the Trump administration's proposal to redefine which waters are subject to federal Clean Water Act jurisdiction, leading the way for like-minded states that could use their considerable authority to counteract a new definition they see as inadequate.

  • January 15, 2019

    Attys Say Wartime Law Can't Save One 'Fat Leonard' Case

    A defense lawyers' group has urged a San Diego judge to toss charges against a retired U.S. Navy captain caught up in the “Fat Leonard” bribery scandal, saying a law meant for wartime fraud shouldn't be used to preserve a case brought years too late.

  • January 15, 2019

    States, Tribes Back Swinomish In BNSF Appeal At 9th Circ.

    Three states and three tribes have urged the Ninth Circuit to uphold a lower court decision favoring the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community in its suit against BNSF Railway Co. over shipping crude oil across reservation land, saying federal law doesn’t pre-empt an easement pact and treaty rights are at stake.

  • January 15, 2019

    Insurer Wants Out Of Covering Depomed In Opioid Litigation

    Navigators Specialty Insurance Co. has asked a California federal court to affirm that it doesn't have to defend or indemnify Depomed Inc.'s successor in more than three dozen suits over the drugmaker's role in the opioid crisis, saying the policies don't cover opioid-related injuries and "allegedly intentional wrongdoing."

  • January 15, 2019

    States Urge 5th Circ. To Reverse ICWA Invalidation Order

    California, Massachusetts, Illinois and New Jersey have joined over a dozen states that are throwing support behind four tribes and the federal government as they seek to overturn a decision deeming the Indian Child Welfare Act unconstitutional, arguing that the statute provides critical protections for Native American children and their families.

  • January 15, 2019

    4th Circ. Hands Saveri Firm Win In $1.2M Legal Fees Battle

    Former Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein LLP attorney Joseph Saveri's firm doesn't have to pay another plaintiffs firm a $1.2 million referral fee out of his score from settlements in titanium dioxide price-fixing litigation, the Fourth Circuit ruled Monday, finding he'd never agreed to shell out the sum.

  • January 15, 2019

    2 Companies Join IPO Pipeline With Filings Totaling $47M

    An Israeli medical device company and a California-based maker of animated television commercials joined the pipeline for initial public offerings Monday with filings totaling $47 million, despite a lengthening government shutdown that makes it uncertain when the deals will price.

  • January 15, 2019

    Blank Rome Can Arbitrate Ex-Dickstein Partners' $4M Suit

    A Los Angeles judge told a group of former Dickstein Shapiro LLP partners Tuesday they must arbitrate claims that Blank Rome LLP mischaracterized its hire of more than 100 lawyers from the now-defunct Dickstein as an asset sale, rather than a merger, to avoid paying the former partners $4 million.

  • January 15, 2019

    Cloud Data Co. Rubrik Nabs $261M In Series E Funding Round

    Cloud data management company Rubrik on Tuesday said it pocketed $261 million in a Series E funding round that boosted the Palo Alto, California-based company’s value to $3.3 billion.

  • January 15, 2019

    Truck Body Maker Tries To Nix Workers' Rest Break Suit

    A truck body manufacturer accused in a proposed class action of failing to provide employees with required work breaks contended in California federal court Monday the suit should be tossed, saying just because employees must stay on-premises, it does not mean that their 10-minute rest periods under state labor laws are being violated.

  • January 15, 2019

    USCIS Breached Asylum Seeker's Confidentiality: 9th Circ.

    The Ninth Circuit has revived asylum claims made by a Kenyan citizen who claimed she escaped genital mutilation, holding that by uncovering through a third-party source that a piece of her evidence was forged, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services violated her confidentiality and may have put her at further risk.

  • January 14, 2019

    Nissan, Driver Agree To Mediate Defective Sunroof Suit

    Nissan North America Inc. and a consumer in a potential class action accusing the carmaker of selling vehicles with defective sunroofs agreed Monday to mediate the case, just months after a California federal judge denied Nissan's attempt to compel arbitration.

  • January 14, 2019

    Comcast Sued Again Over DVR Tech In TiVo IP Battle

    A TiVo Corp. unit filed new patent infringement allegations Monday in California federal court over the digital video recording technology in Comcast Corp.'s set-top boxes, despite the Patent Trial and Appeal Board finding related patents to be invalid.

Expert Analysis

  • Why AFAs Are Key To The Future Of Legal Practice

    Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul

    Alternative fee agreements can help align law firm and client interests, increase efficiency and eliminate corporate extortion, among other benefits. They are the best thing to happen to the practice of law in decades, says Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP.

  • What To Expect In Environmental Law In 2019

    Forrest Smith

    From a business perspective, the environmental law developments that are likely to have the most immediate domestic consequences in the coming year are air- and water-related litigation and regulations, say attorneys with Reed Smith LLP.

  • Transparency Versus Confidentiality In 2019 Tax Disputes

    Tim Gustafson

    The growing tension between government promises of transparency and taxpayers’ right to confidentiality is likely to continue this year, as highlighted by two recent developments in Pennsylvania and California, say Tim Gustafson and Mike Le of Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.

  • 21st Amendment Vs. Commerce Clause At The High Court

    Alva Mather

    On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court hears argument in Byrd v. Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Association, highlighting the conflict between states’ rights to regulate alcohol under the 21st Amendment and the restrictions in the U.S. Constitution's commerce clause on states’ power to regulate interstate commerce, says Alva Mather of DLA Piper LLP.

  • 'Hyatt 3' Oral Argument And Potential State Tax Implications

    Jeffrey Reed

    However the U.S. Supreme Court decides the third iteration of Franchise Tax Board v. Hyatt, argued on Jan. 9, it is much more likely that the opinion will be featured in federal courts casebooks than taxation casebooks. Nevertheless, the matter surely has some state tax relevance, says Jeffrey Reed of Kilpatrick Townsend LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Barron Reviews 'The Clamor Of Lawyers'

    Judge David Barron

    Can lawyers lead a revolution? According to "The Clamor of Lawyers: The American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession" — a slim but elegant volume by Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer — they can and they did, says First Circuit Judge David Barron.

  • Why Apple Customers Lost A Suit Over Storage Capacity

    Jeffrey Edelstein

    A California federal court recently dismissed a lawsuit filed by Apple customers over the advertised storage capacity of iPhones and iPads. The case illustrates the importance of accurate advertising about the technical specifications of products, but also the need for plaintiffs to draft their complaints with care, says Jeffrey Edelstein of Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP.

  • State Net

    State Lawmakers Grapple With Proliferation Of E-Scooters

    David Royse

    As state legislators return to session this year, many face a new issue: the explosion of e-scooters on city streets. Municipal officials scrambling to evaluate the legality of the rental scooters are seeking policy guidance at the state level, says David Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • How Calif. Privacy Act Could Prompt Private Plaintiff Suits

    Joshua Jessen

    Even absent a private right of action, businesses subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act should still be concerned about the possibility of private lawsuits — including class actions — arising from the law, says Joshua Jessen of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 2

    Peter Jarvis

    Lawyer-directed nonrecourse litigation funding is more likely to protect a lawyer's exercise of independent professional judgment than traditional means of litigation finance, and furthermore enables worthwhile cases that otherwise could not be funded, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.