California

  • July 19, 2019

    Katy Perry's 'Dark Horse' 'Borrows' Rapper's Beat, Jury Told

    Katy Perry's single "Dark Horse" uses a musical phrase that's substantially similar to that of a Christian rap song the pop singer is accused of ripping off, a California federal jury heard Friday in an intellectual property trial over whether Perry's songwriters listened to the rap before writing her hit.

  • July 19, 2019

    Equinox Insurer Denied Win In Sex Assault Suit Fees Row

    An insurer for Equinox Fitness beat a claim from another insurer of the luxury gym that it wasn’t paying its fair share of legal fees in an ongoing sexual assault lawsuit a Pilates instructor brought against another employee, according to a California federal court ruling Friday.

  • July 19, 2019

    Attys Seek $6M Award For El Pollo Loco Stock-Drop Deal

    Lawyers have asked a California federal court to award them $6 million in attorneys’ fees after settling a suit for an investor class that claimed El Pollo Loco’s top executives concealed the source of the chicken chain's decreasing sales then sold their own shares ahead of a stock plunge.

  • July 19, 2019

    Cannabis Candy Maker Sued Over 'Stoney Patch' Gummies

    The maker of Sour Patch candies, Mondelez Canada Inc., lodged a lawsuit on Friday in California federal court alleging a company that sells cannabis-infused gummies under the name “Stoney Patch” is infringing its intellectual property.

  • July 19, 2019

    Endo Pharma To Pay $2.3M To 18 States In Lidoderm Deal

    Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc. has agreed to pay $2.3 million to 18 states in a deal reached Friday, the same day the states hit the pharmaceutical company with a suit alleging it entered into a reverse-payment agreement to obstruct generic competition to Lidoderm, a pain relief patch.

  • July 19, 2019

    Couple Tries To Save $2B Roundup Win After Judge Slashes It

    A couple urged a California judge Friday to keep intact a $2.055 billion jury verdict against Monsanto in a trial over claims its Roundup contributed to their cancer, after the judge tentatively ruled that the award should be cut significantly.

  • July 19, 2019

    States Urge Justices To Reject Trump's Border Wall Funding

    California and New Mexico urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday not to stay a federal court ruling that keeps President Donald Trump from pulling $2.5 billion to pay for the construction of a southern border wall, arguing that it would interfere with state laws.

  • July 19, 2019

    Oakland Faces Skeptical Judge In NFL Suit Over Raiders Move

    A California federal judge struggled to see how an antitrust injury resulted from the National Football League allowing the Raiders team to move from Oakland to Las Vegas, but nonetheless granted on Friday the City of Oakland an opportunity to amend its complaint.

  • July 19, 2019

    11 Firms To Guide 7 IPOs Exceeding $1.4B As July Stays Hot

    Eleven firms are set to guide eight initial public offerings estimated to raise more than $1.4 billion during the week of July 22, continuing a sizzling stretch on the IPO schedule highlighted by a Chinese sports marketing giant and a wide gamut of issuers.

  • July 19, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Revives Suit Alleging Air Force Contaminated Water

    The Federal Circuit on Friday revived two California water districts' case over hexavalent chromium contamination allegedly stemming from a local U.S. Air Force base, saying a lower court had misclassified their claims as a regulatory taking dispute instead of a physical taking case.

  • July 19, 2019

    Wells Fargo Says Tribe Must Pay In $250M Loan Dispute

    Wells Fargo has sued the Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians of California in New York state court, accusing the tribe and its economic development authority of participating in a scheme to avoid making payments owed as part of a $250 million loan agreement.

  • July 19, 2019

    Anti-Tax Group Defends Challenge To Calif. Auto-IRA Program

    An anti-tax group urged a California federal judge not to toss its challenge to a state program that automatically funnels a portion of private sector workers' earnings into individual retirement accounts unless they opt out, arguing the program is preempted by federal benefits law.

  • July 19, 2019

    Pa. TV Reporter Sues Red Bull Over Flugtag Stunt Injuries

    Energy drink maker Red Bull hid the danger and injuries inherent in its extreme-sports stunts when it got a TV reporter to crash off a ramp into the Ohio River as part of its Flugtag event at Pittsburgh's 2017 Three Rivers Regatta, the journalist has alleged in a lawsuit.

  • July 19, 2019

    3 Cos. Raise $1B In IPOs Led By Peruvian Asset Manager

    A trio of companies, including a Latin American asset manager, made their public debuts Friday, hitting the market a day after pricing shares in initial public offerings that brought in a total of $1 billion.

  • July 19, 2019

    Ogletree Adds Hinshaw ERISA Litigator In Orange Co.

    Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC has expanded its ranks in Orange County, California, by bringing on a veteran Employee Retirement Income Security Act litigator from Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP. 

  • July 18, 2019

    Katy Perry Takes The Stand To Defend 'Dark Horse' Beat

    Katy Perry told a California federal jury Thursday that she's never heard the Christian rap song she's accused of ripping off to make her single "Dark Horse," kicking off an intellectual property trial over whether her songwriters listened to the rap before writing her hit.

  • July 18, 2019

    State AGs Urge FDA To Keep Exploring Cannabis Regulation

    Dozens of state attorneys general have told the U.S. Food and Drug Administration they support the agency’s recent push to regulate cannabis-derived products like cannabidiol, while asking it to ensure that the states maintain their roles as regulators as the market emerges.

  • July 18, 2019

    Nike Says Kawhi Leonard's Logo Suit Flouts Copyright Office

    Nike Inc. shot back Wednesday at NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard's federal lawsuit seeking to deny the shoe company the copyright to a "Claw" logo that Leonard says he designed based on his notably large hands, alleging the star player is trying to "re-write history" and "defraud" the U.S. Copyright Office.

  • July 18, 2019

    Judge Alsup's Settlement Rules Face Fire At 9th Circ.

    Logitech Inc. urged the Ninth Circuit Thursday to scrap U.S. District Judge William Alsup’s standing order to prohibit parties from entering settlement negotiations until after class certification is decided, arguing that the order violates the parties’ First Amendment rights and federal civil procedure rules that promote settlements.

  • July 18, 2019

    'Repealer' Cathode Ray Tube Buyers Oppose Separate Trials

    Indirect purchasers of television and computer component cathode ray tubes from nine states, who were excluded from a $576.8 million price-fixing settlement with Toshiba, Panasonic and LG, have urged a California federal court to throw out a bid from other buyers seeking two separate trials next year.

  • July 18, 2019

    Suit Against Downey Brand Over $150M REIT Sale Dismissed

    A New York federal judge has dismissed a suit against California firm Downey Brand LLP over the $150 million sale of a real estate investment trust that the firm handled, with the judge saying that the suit was too similar to another suit that was dismissed in 2018.

  • July 18, 2019

    9th Circ. Asked To Revive Tesla Model 3 Disclosures Suit

    Investors told the Ninth Circuit that Tesla Inc. knowingly misled the public about the pace of production of its Model 3 sedan and shouldn't be allowed to dodge proposed class claims that its investors bore the brunt of the damage when Tesla's stock declined.

  • July 18, 2019

    Google, Lendlease Team Up On $15B Bay Area Project

    Google and Australia-based construction company Lendlease Group have reached a roughly $15 billion agreement to redevelop Google's properties in three Silicon Valley markets into mixed-use communities with plans to build 15,000 or more homes, according to a Thursday announcement from the companies.

  • July 18, 2019

    SEC Slaps Former OSI Systems Exec With Insider Trading Suit

    A former executive of X-ray technology developer OSI Systems Inc. fraudulently used insider information to make more than $400,000, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said in a suit filed in California federal court Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Calif. Staffing Co. Must Pay 2 H-1B Workers $58K, DOL Says

    A California staffing agency on Wednesday paid two foreign employees more than $58,000 after the U.S. Department of Labor found that the company illegally charged one employee for visa application fees and underpaid another employee in violation of the H-1B program.

Expert Analysis

  • Corporate Compliance Through The Lens Of Calif. Privacy Law

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    While businesses are preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act they can pull from the U.S. Department of Justice's recent guidance on compliance programs to establish controls that not only protect consumer information, but also enhance overarching corporate compliance, say Robb Adkins and Shawn Obi at Winston & Strawn and Stephanie Douglas at Guidepost Solutions.

  • State Net

    A Look At How States Are Experimenting With Health Care

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    The fate of the Affordable Care Act is currently pending in federal court, but states are proceeding on the premise that the law will survive its latest legal challenge as they consider competing Democratic and Republican visions of health care, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • 2 High Court Admiralty Cases Diverge On Common Law's Role

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    Although the U.S. Supreme Court's recent admiralty ruling in Air & Liquid Systems v. DeVries indicates success in expanding the availability of common law protections to mariners, its decision in Dutra Group v. Batterton — decided just months later — counsels that new classes of remedies will now be harder to obtain under the common law, says Brian Maloney of Seward & Kissel.

  • Opinion

    Time To Heed Justice Stevens' Criticism Of Gun Decision

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    Justice John Paul Stevens was right that the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 gun rights decision in Heller desperately needs to be overruled, but while he viewed revision or repeal of the Second Amendment as the easier course for correction, only the court can clean up the mess it made, says Robert Ludwig​ of the American Enlightenment Project.

  • The Potential Effects Of Calif. Contractor Reclassification Bill

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    If enacted, California’s Assembly Bill 5 would codify the so-called ABC test for independent contractors established in the California Supreme Court's Dynamex decision. Notably, the bill goes beyond the scope of Dynamex and could have an extraordinary impact on the state's economy, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • Keeping Conventional Power Going Until Renewables Mature

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    The U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and state regulators have a handful of tools to compel generators to delay the retirement of nuclear, coal and gas plants until greener options are more reliable, but their scope has not yet been tested in court, says Gordon Coffee at Winston & Strawn.

  • Calif. Privacy Law's 3 Limited Exemptions For Health Cos.

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    So that health and life sciences companies can better determine whether the information they collect is subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act, Jason Linder and Libby Jelinek of Irell & Manella address the scope of certain CCPA exemptions and identify the main areas of ambiguity.

  • Community Solar Needs Clear, Flexible State Regulations

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    As states adopt and expand third-party solar development programs, regulators should streamline rules and avoid prescriptive requirements for developers, say Elliot Hinds and Diana Jeschke at Crowell & Moring.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • California Tax Takes: San Francisco Tax Litigation Heats Up

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    On July 5, the San Francisco Superior Court held that two local taxes passed by voter initiative are valid because they are not subject to the two-thirds voting requirement for special taxes codified in the California Constitution. Attorneys at Reed Smith discuss the implications for San Francisco taxpayers who must now pay the taxes despite continuing litigation in the case.

  • State Net

    Local Governments Push To Regulate Public Surveillance

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    San Francisco's Board of Supervisors recently approved an ordinance banning the use of facial recognition technology by all city departments. The law is part of a growing movement among localities and states to increase oversight of the use of surveillance technologies by government entities, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.