California

  • January 27, 2022

    Netflix Can't Checkmate 'Queen's Gambit' Defamation Suit

    A California federal judge denied Netflix's attempt to dismiss a defamation suit from Georgian chess champion Nona Gaprindashvili over her portrayal in the hit show "The Queen's Gambit," ruling Thursday that while the show is fictional, the reference to Gaprindashvili could be interpreted as a true historical detail.

  • January 27, 2022

    IP Forecast: S&P To Fight Claims Its TM Suit Came Too Late

    S&P Global will ask a Delaware federal judge next week to keep alive parts of its trademark suit against a call service center named S&P Data, in the face of claims that lawyers for the market ratings giant knew about the name of the smaller business for years before suing. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • January 27, 2022

    ICE Agrees To Detainee Virus Safety Rules In Class Settlement

    The federal government has agreed to a slew of COVID-19 safety measures at two U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facilities in California, according to a bid Thursday for preliminary approval of a class settlement with current and former detainees alleging they were not protected from the virus.

  • January 27, 2022

    Walmart Seeks Toss Of Suit Over Crash That Killed Girl Scouts

    Walmart Inc. urged a California federal court to dismiss a lawsuit over the deaths of two Wisconsin Girl Scouts and one of their mothers who were run over by a pickup-truck driver high on Ultra Duster, accusing the victims' families of a "blatant act of forum shopping."

  • January 27, 2022

    Northrop's Pension Denials 'Appropriate,' Judge Told

    A Northrop Grumman executive testified at a California federal bench trial Thursday over Employee Retirement Income Security Act class claims and said an "appropriate" interpretation of a retirement plan it oversees can leave some workers with no pension benefits despite years of service.

  • January 27, 2022

    Lil Yachty Says NFT Biz Used His TMs To Boost Cash Flow

    Rapper Lil Yachty filed a trademark infringement suit in California federal court against two music companies he claims used his likeness and name without his permission to raise over $6.5 million in venture capital funds for a line of nonfungible tokens.

  • January 27, 2022

    The Term: Breyer's Legacy And The Nomination To Come

    Justice Stephen Breyer on Thursday formally announced he would be retiring at the end of the Supreme Court term. Here, The Term breaks down the legacy he will leave behind and takes a look at what lies ahead for his potential successor with two special guests.

  • January 27, 2022

    Edelson, Ex-Girardi Attys Can Post Separate Financial Charts

    An Illinois federal judge probing contempt liability over Thomas V. Girardi's misappropriation of $2 million said Thursday that he'll accept separate charts reflecting certain Girardi & Keese accounts' cash flow, after learning a dispute arose over how to present the information to the court.

  • January 27, 2022

    Breyer Retiring As Supreme Court Lurches Right

    Justice Stephen Breyer is retiring from the U.S. Supreme Court at a time when his conservative colleagues on the bench seem intent on dismantling landmark precedents on abortion, affirmative action and the administrative state, to name a few. Can his successor preserve his liberal legacy?

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Says Bid To Nix EEOC Suit 'Wasted Everyone's Time'

    A California federal judge forcefully rejected a now-defunct cellphone company's push Thursday to get a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sexual harassment lawsuit thrown out, labeling the motion a "baseless" waste of time.

  • January 27, 2022

    Chicken Of The Sea Buyers Win OK Of $40M Price-Fix Deals

    A California federal judge has signed off on three deals totaling $39.5 million resolving buyers' claims that Chicken of the Sea International schemed with other seafood producers to jack up the price of canned tuna, bringing an end to years of antitrust litigation against the tuna giant.

  • January 27, 2022

    Split Fed. Circ. Reverses Data IP Indefiniteness Ruling

    A split Federal Circuit panel has undone a California federal court's decision that invalidated claims in Nature Simulation Systems' computer-aided design patents as indefinite, finding the lower court didn't do a proper analysis of whether the claims were actually valid or not.

  • January 27, 2022

    Apple, Gibson Dunn Beat COVID App Maker's Sanction Bid

    An app developer waited too long to request sanctions against Apple Inc. and its counsel Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP for their alleged conduct in a now-dismissed lawsuit accusing Apple of blocking competing coronavirus-tracking apps from its App Store, a California federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • January 27, 2022

    Apple Can't Hide Behind Privacy In Epic Fight, 9th Circ. Told

    Nearly 40 law, business and economics academics urged the Ninth Circuit on Thursday to upend Apple's win over Epic Games' allegations that the technology giant's App Store policies are anti-competitive, arguing the judge wrongly accepted Apple's justifications that restrictions on third-party app distribution are necessary to protect users.

  • January 27, 2022

    Judge Tosses LA Landlord's Virus Loss Suit Against Travelers

    A California federal judge tossed a commercial landlord's suit against Travelers Indemnity Co. on Thursday, saying its insurance policy did not provide coverage for more than $1.8 million in pandemic-related losses.

  • January 27, 2022

    Lyft Judge Rips 'Ridiculous' AGIS Bid To Kick IP Suit To Texas

    A California federal judge said Thursday she'll toss Lyft's suit seeking a declaration that its app doesn't infringe AGIS Software's five patents, but she said Lyft could conduct discovery and amend the suit, and slammed as "ridiculous" AGIS' bid to move the fight to Texas.

  • January 27, 2022

    Oakland A's Want Metal Scrapper Sanctioned In Pollution Row

    The Oakland Athletics say the owner of California's largest metal shredding facility should be sanctioned for refusing to turn over documents related to hazardous waste it allegedly spewed into the air, soil and water around West Oakland, in an ongoing battle over a future ballpark's dangerous atmosphere.

  • January 27, 2022

    Irrigators Say FERC, Calif. Wrongly Denied CWA Certificates

    Two California irrigation districts told the D.C. Circuit Court that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission was wrong to have affirmed the Golden State's rejection of its Clean Water Act Section 401 certification for two hydropower projects just before a one-year statutory deadline expired.

  • January 27, 2022

    Alsup Fears $50M Pinterest Workplace Deal May Be 'Cosmetic'

    U.S. District Judge William H. Alsup said Thursday he's inclined to greenlight Pinterest's $50 million deal resolving derivative shareholder litigation alleging discriminatory workplace conditions, but expressed several concerns, saying he's seen "cosmetic settlement after cosmetic settlement" and "this kind of looks like that scenario."

  • January 27, 2022

    Calif. High Court Takes Up Fight Over County's Drilling Bans

    The California Supreme Court has agreed to review a lower court's holding that an approved ballot initiative that would have banned new oil and gas wells, and phased out waste fluid disposal in a county south of San Francisco is preempted by state oil and gas laws.

  • January 27, 2022

    Labaton Nabs Lead In Honest Co. Investor's Diaper IPO Suit

    Labaton Sucharow LLP will represent a proposed class of investors in the Honest Co. baby and beauty concern in a suit accusing the company of failing to properly explain that it might see a post-lockdown slump in diaper sales ahead of its May 2021 initial public offering.

  • January 27, 2022

    Ex-Commander Cops To 'Fat Leonard' Scandal As Trial Nears

    A former Navy officer admitted to accepting thousands of dollars' worth of meals, hotel stays and sex worker services from a contractor, marking the latest officer embroiled in the "Fat Leonard" scandal to plead guilty weeks ahead of trial.

  • January 27, 2022

    All Pa. Counties Join $26B Opioid Deal Over DAs' Objections

    All 67 Pennsylvania counties have signed on to a $26 billion, multistate settlement with three distributors and one manufacturer of opioid drugs, the state's attorney general's office announced Thursday, despite the district attorneys of its two largest counties opposing the deal.

  • January 27, 2022

    Facebook Data Antitrust Suits Get New Judge

    A string of cases in California federal court accusing Facebook of monopolizing social media markets through its use of consumer data have been reassigned to a new judge thanks to the recent elevation of Judge Lucy H. Koh to the Ninth Circuit.

  • January 27, 2022

    Rimon Adds Ex-Greenberg Traurig Securities Pro In SF

    Rimon PC has added a corporate and securities expert from Greenberg Traurig LLP as a partner in its San Francisco office, the firm has announced.

Expert Analysis

  • Calif. Employers' 2022 Minimum Wage Compliance Checklist

    Author Photo

    California’s minimum wage increased earlier this year, so employers in the state should review areas of potential liability to ensure compliance with the new requirements, from commission exemptions to collective bargaining agreements, says Michael Nader at Ogletree.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: 2021 MDLs In Review

    Author Photo

    The most notable trend in multidistrict litigation in 2021 was a 25% decrease in the number of new petitions for MDL proceedings — but a deeper dive into the numbers suggests that, on the whole, MDLs are thriving, and continuing to have a major impact, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • How AI Can Transform Crisis Management In Litigation

    Author Photo

    Attorneys should understand how to use rapidly advancing artificial intelligence technology to help clients prepare for potential catastrophic events and the inevitable litigation arising from them, from predicting crises before they occur to testing legal theories once they arise, say Stratton Horres at Wilson Elser and David Steiger.

  • What Experts, Attys Must Know About Psychological Injuries

    Author Photo

    As the ongoing litigation between Kobe Bryant's widow and Los Angeles County illustrates, there are many forms of psychological injury that can have serious impacts — so mental health experts and attorneys must be precise when discussing these matters in court, says Prudence Gourguechon, a clinical psychiatrist and professional psychiatric expert witness.

  • Tribal Corp. IP Suit Highlights Sponsored Research Pitfalls

    Author Photo

    In Tulalip Tribal Federal Corp.'s recent Washington federal court action alleging that Stanford University copied a treatment based on research involving the tribes' confidential information, the parties' pleadings shed light on best practices for addressing ownership of sponsored research results in clear and precise terms, says attorney Catlan McCurdy.

  • Supervisor Relationships Are Key To Beating Atty Burnout

    Author Photo

    In order to combat record attorney turnover and high levels of burnout, law firm partners and leaders must build engaging relationships with supervisees, fostering autonomy and control, enabling expression of values, and building a sense of community and belonging, says Anne Brafford at the Institute for Well-Being in Law.

  • How New Laws Could Tighten FDA Regulation Of Cosmetics

    Author Photo

    Federal legislation on the use of perfluoroalkyl or polyfluoroalkyl substances and other ingredients in cosmetics has a good chance of passing this year, so companies should track policy developments, identify any PFAS ingredients in their cosmetic products, and prepare for possible new safety and reporting requirements, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Online Subscriptions Face New Calif. Arbitration Standard

    Author Photo

    After a California state appeals court's recent ruling in Sellers v. JustAnswer against a website's so-called sign-in-wrap agreement that bound consumers to individual arbitration, companies offering recurring subscriptions to California consumers should reevaluate their enrollment processes, says Joseph Addiego at Davis Wright.

  • What To Do As PFAS Food Packaging Phaseouts Approach

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Hogan Lovells offer tips on compliance with the transition timeline for the federal phaseout of the chemicals known as PFAS from food packaging, the coming bans in California, New York, Maine, Vermont, Washington, Connecticut and Minnesota, and the states' differing definitions of packaging terms.

  • Interconnection Process Is Key To Calif.'s Green Power Goals

    Author Photo

    If California is to achieve its greenhouse gas goals and procure its desired mix of power generation resources, the California Independent System Operator will need to get better at keeping pace with surging interconnection requests, says Seth Hilton at Stoel Rives.

  • Libor Isn't Only Benchmark Transition That Requires Attention

    Author Photo

    The final publication of the Eleventh District Cost of Funds Index, used to price adjustable-rate mortgages, is less than two weeks away, and demands the same kind of commitment and process that has gone into replacing Libor to avoid costly delays and litigation, says Jeffrey Armstrong at Berkeley Research Group.

  • Drug Patent Suits' Novel Theory Tests False Claims Act Limits

    Author Photo

    Three recent False Claims Act cases in federal district courts, pursuing the novel theory that pharmaceutical companies defrauded the government by charging inflated drug prices based on invalid patents, could set federal appellate courts on a collision course and create new risks for patent holders, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

    Author Photo

    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • Key Contract Lessons In Del. Justices' Hotel Deal Ruling

    Author Photo

    The Delaware Supreme Court recently ruled in AB Stabile v. MAPS Hotels that a Chinese financial conglomerate breached a hotel sale agreement's standard ordinary course covenant, providing significant insight on the meaning and application of these contracts, and the need for consent on material changes prior to closing, say attorneys at Quinn Emanuel.

  • Opinion

    FTC Should Rethink Market Issues In Facebook Case

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's antitrust prosecution of Meta Platforms, formerly Facebook, may have survived the initial litigation stage this week, but the case still does not embrace the markets it purports to fix, says David Reichenberg at Cozen O'Connor.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!