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Transportation

  • March 21, 2019

    Afghan Man Can’t Duck Counterclaims in Army Contract Suit

    An Afghan national suing an American man for breach of contract over their partnership on a joint venture in Afghanistan can’t escape counterclaims from his former business partner, a Tennessee federal judge has ruled.

  • March 21, 2019

    US Can Sell $82M Yacht Linked To Nigerian Corruption Case

    A federal judge in Texas has approved a request from the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Republic of Nigeria to sell an $82 million mega-yacht linked to an ongoing Nigerian corruption case.

  • March 21, 2019

    FERC Mulls Grid Rate Incentive Policy Changes

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday said it would explore revising its incentive policy for electric transmission projects to ensure it's properly encouraging new development, as well as how it calculates transmission company investor returns.

  • March 21, 2019

    DC Circ. Prods UPS Unit On Grievance Against Union Vote

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Thursday scrutinized a UPS subsidiary's claim that the National Labor Relations Board rushed a unionization vote for a few dozen of the delivery company's Pennsylvania-based truck drivers without giving the company a chance to make its case against the drive.

  • March 21, 2019

    Immigrant Groups Seek Info On Union Pacific Helping ICE

    A coalition of immigrant advocacy groups sued the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in California federal court Wednesday, seeking records regarding Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s alleged cooperation with the Union Pacific Railroad Police on immigration law enforcement.

  • March 21, 2019

    Watchdog Asks DOT To Publicize Info On Airline Immunities

    The U.S. Department of Transportation needs to be more transparent about how it decides whether to hand out antitrust immunity to airlines seeking to make alliances, according to a U.S. Government Accountability Office report released Wednesday.

  • March 21, 2019

    Commerce Hit With FOIA Suit For Auto Tariff Report

    A conservative nonprofit on Wednesday asked a federal court to force the U.S. Department of Commerce to turn over a copy of the agency’s findings from its probe into whether imported cars threaten U.S. national security interests.

  • March 21, 2019

    Chicago O'Hare Injury Suit Not Covered, Insurer Says

    A New Jersey insurance company told an Illinois federal judge Wednesday it is not responsible for providing coverage to the city of Chicago and several construction companies for a personal injury suit stemming from a truck accident at Chicago O'Hare International Airport.

  • March 21, 2019

    Spirit Balks At Flyers' 2nd Circ. Bid To Revive Bag-Fee Suit

    Spirit Airlines told the Second Circuit on Thursday that federal law preempts a proposed class action alleging it defrauded consumers by concealing its carry-on bag fees on tickets sold through other online travel agents, saying passengers cannot invent and force a disclosure obligation.

  • March 21, 2019

    NYC Subway Fall Victim's $3.2M Injury Award Trimmed

    A New York appellate panel on Thursday reduced a $3.2 million jury verdict in a stairway slip-and-fall case against the New York City Transit Authority by $525,000, finding the awards for past and future pain and suffering were unreasonably high.

  • March 21, 2019

    Law360's Tort Report: Personal Injury & Med Mal News In Brief

    A plane crash that killed four partners in the same injury defense firm and proposed tort reform legislation in Kentucky lead Law360’s Tort Report this week, an occasional feature that compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news items that may have been missed.

  • March 21, 2019

    CH Robinson's Arbitration Pacts Stall OT Class Outreach

    An Illinois federal judge has tentatively blocked a C.H. Robinson worker from notifying colleagues who signed arbitration agreements of her proposed overtime misclassification collective action, citing a recent Fifth Circuit ruling that such workers typically can’t join group litigation.

  • March 21, 2019

    JetBlue Made Worker Expose Breasts For Drug Test, Says Suit

    A former JetBlue Airways employee claims she was wrongly detained and forced to expose her breasts while giving a urine sample for a drug test after a work accident in a lawsuit the airline removed Thursday to federal court in Florida.

  • March 21, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Affirms PTAB Ax Of Hybrid Vehicle Patent

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday upheld a Patent Trial and Appeal Board decision invalidating a claim of a hybrid vehicle patent owned by Paice LLC, rejecting the tech company's contention that the board wrongly relied on inconsistent testimony from Ford Motor Co.'s expert.

  • March 21, 2019

    Enviros Sue NHTSA For Docs To Fight Emission Rule Rollback

    An environmental and wildlife conservation group asked a District of Columbia federal court Thursday to order the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to fork over public documents the group requested in its challenge to proposed slackening of greenhouse gas emission standards.

  • March 21, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Lion Air, Ferretti, KKR

    Lion Air is getting ready to go public in its homeland of Indonesia, yacht maker Ferretti is getting ready to go public once again, and KKR is raising its debut real estate fund focused on Asia and is looking to reap $1.5 billion in investments.

  • March 21, 2019

    Tesla, Contractor To Face Trafficking Claim In Visa Fraud Suit

    A California federal judge on Wednesday dumped most of an amended suit alleging Tesla and its contractor committed visa fraud to illegally import low-cost foreign labor, but allowed one of the plaintiffs' human trafficking claims to survive.

  • March 21, 2019

    Equistar Asks Redo To Prove $5M Damages For Faulty Pumps

    Equistar Chemicals LP was wrongly prohibited from presenting evidence to a jury that would have shown its damages stemming from faulty ethane pumps were $5.1 million, as it argued, and not the $37,500 it was awarded, its counsel told a Texas appellate court on Thursday.

  • March 21, 2019

    Union Pension Fund Keeps $3.2M ERISA Award At 6th Circ.

    Bourdow Contracting Inc. is on the hook for a $3.2 million payment to a union pension fund after the Sixth Circuit ruled Thursday that the Michigan business was the alter ego of another company that had pulled out of the fund.

  • March 21, 2019

    Tesla Says Ex-Worker Wrote 'You Sly Dog' As He Stole Info

    Tesla has accused four former employees of stealing company trade secrets and taking them to a competitor, telling a California federal court that one even emailed himself confidential information with the note, "you sly dog you."

Expert Analysis

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • Trial Counsel's Role On A Mass Tort Virtual Law Team

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    Trial counsel’s contribution to the virtual law team throughout the life cycle of a mass tort litigation rests in the key skill of viewing the case through the eyes of the ultimate audience for the defense, the jury, say attorneys at Covington & Burling LLP and Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • How China's Version Of CFIUS Will Expand Security Reviews

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    China's foreign investment security review regime shares many characteristics with the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. And as tensions rise between the two countries, China, like the U.S., is set to scrutinize more deals, says Guogang Li of the Tahota Law Firm.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Aviation Watch: Is The 737 MAX Safe To Fly?

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    The Federal Aviation Administration is often criticized for being a captive of the industries it regulates, but last week's FAA order grounding Boeing's 737 MAX aircraft resulted from presidential pressure. When such considerations override the agency's professional judgments, the traveling public suffers, says Alan Hoffman, a retired product liability attorney and private pilot.

  • The Immodest Textualism Of Justices' Retirement Tax Opinion

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent opinion in BNSF Railway v. Loos, resolving the meaning of “compensation” under the Railroad Retirement Tax Act, is unsatisfying, not because it is bad or wrong so much as it is analytically immodest, say Christopher Collier and Michael Arndt at Hawkins Parnell Thackston & Young LLP.

  • Ethical Social Media Marketing For Lawyers

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    Social media presents rich opportunities to reach prospective clients. Attorneys should not let those opportunities pass them by, but they should keep their ethical obligations in mind as they post, says Cort Sylvester of Nilan Johnson Lewis PA.