Transportation

  • November 30, 2020

    TSA Worker Says Security Screeners Owed Virus Hazard Pay

    A Transportation Security Administration employee filed a putative class action Monday against the federal government alleging that TSA workers are being deprived of required hazard and environmental discharge pay for work conducted at airports during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • November 30, 2020

    DOT Unfair Biz Practices Final Rule Gives Airlines More Say

    The U.S. Department of Transportation has finalized a rule narrowing the agency's authority to penalize airlines and ticket agents accused of engaging in unfair and deceptive practices, a move that gives airlines more say in federal oversight of its practices, which consumer advocates have slammed as corporate protectionism that opens the door to further slippery practices.

  • November 30, 2020

    2nd Circ. Says Clerk's Green Light Suit Lacks Standing

    A Second Circuit panel ruled Monday that a county clerk lacks grounds to sue New York over a law that allows undocumented immigrants to apply for driver's licenses and shields their records from federal immigration authorities.

  • November 30, 2020

    3 Firms Steer CDK Global's $1.45B Sale Of International Unit

    Automotive retail technology company CDK Global will sell its international business unit to private equity firm Francisco Partners in a $1.45 billion deal guided by Paul Hastings, Kirkland and Mayer Brown, the companies said Monday.

  • November 25, 2020

    Law360 Names Practice Groups Of The Year

    Law360 congratulates the winners of its 2020 Practice Groups of the Year awards, which honor the law firms behind the litigation wins and major deals that resonated throughout the legal industry in the past year.

  • November 25, 2020

    The Firms That Dominated In 2020

    The eight law firms topping Law360's Firms of the Year managed to win 54 Practice Group of the Year awards among them, for guiding landmark deals, scoring victories in high-profile disputes and helping companies navigate uncharted legal seas made rough by the coronavirus pandemic.

  • November 27, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a state-owned energy company in Norway being sued, major telecom providers targeted by academic publishers and Italian cable manufacturer Prysmian instigate an intellectual property dispute. 

  • November 25, 2020

    EU Floats IP Plan, Eyes Standard-Essential Patents

    The European Union is going to take new steps to overhaul intellectual property law in an effort to "reduce frictions" and litigation over standard-essential patents in the tech sector, the bloc's top antitrust and digital technology official announced.

  • November 25, 2020

    Norwegian Cruise Rips Investors' Virus Sales Fraud Claims

    Norwegian Cruise Line slammed investors' claims that it ran a "top-down" deceptive sales campaign downplaying the COVID-19 pandemic to prospective customers in order to stave off revenue losses, maintaining that it doesn't have to disclose allegedly aggressive sales practices.

  • November 25, 2020

    Toyota Gets Faulty Highlander Drive Shaft Suit Axed For Now

    A California federal judge has dismissed a proposed nationwide consumer class action accusing Toyota Motor Corp. of creating Highlander model SUVs with defective drive shafts and knowingly concealing the issue, but gave the proposed class a chance to amend its complaint.

  • November 25, 2020

    Trump Says DOJ Can Stop Enviro Project Settlements

    The Trump administration told a Massachusetts federal court that it had the discretion to reach settlements as it saw fit, pushing to end a suit by environmental advocates that said the U.S. Department of Justice's policy banning environmental improvement projects in enforcement settlements is unlawful.

  • November 25, 2020

    Texas Tries Again To Undo $29M Verdict Over Highway Project

    Texas' government asked the state Supreme Court on Tuesday to review an appeals court's approval of a $29 million verdict for a developer who claimed that a highway project and related land condemnation tanked the value of the developer's residential project site, saying the ruling was incorrect.

  • November 25, 2020

    Ill. Cab Biz Isn't Covered In Fatal Carjacking Suit, Insurer Says 

    A Pennsylvania insurer told an Illinois federal court Wednesday that it has no duty to defend a cab company in a suit by victims of a fatal crash involving a stolen taxi, saying its policy doesn't cover anything stemming from the violent carjacking that led to the accident.

  • November 25, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Ahead of the long weekend, when Americans are most known for gathering and traveling, Thanksgiving-minded governors laid down more restrictions as COVID-19 cases continued surging over the past week.

  • November 25, 2020

    UK Antitrust Dept. Claims Authority To Ban $360M Sabre Deal

    The U.K.'s competition watchdog told an appeal tribunal Wednesday that it had lawful discretion to determine the relevant travel services at issue when it blocked travel tech giant Sabre Corp.'s proposed $360 million takeover of rival Farelogix.

  • November 25, 2020

    Drivers Say GM Engines Were 'Engineered To Fail'

    A group of drivers led by a siding business is hitting General Motors LLC with a proposed class action alleging that it knowingly sold vehicles with engines "engineered to fail" through a defective oil system.

  • November 25, 2020

    Calif. Airport, City Tangled In Service Monopoly Lawsuit

    A Los Angeles man and a partnership created to purchase property at a Southern California airport filed a lawsuit Tuesday against two companies that act as fixed-base operators, claiming they have monopoly control over services and operations rendered at the airport.

  • November 25, 2020

    BigLaw's Sustainability Pro Bono Drive Blew Past $15M Goal

    When a group of BigLaw firms committed two years ago to devote $15 million worth of time to climate change and sustainability issues, they got overwhelming interest from junior associates and senior partners alike, and as the program has grown, firms have contributed at least $24 million in pro bono work.

  • November 25, 2020

    Linklaters Steers £219M PE Bid For UK Motor Insurer

    Motor insurer AA PLC said on Wednesday that it has accepted a £219 million ($290 million) takeover bid by two private equity companies in a deal that will result in more money being invested in the struggling company.

  • November 24, 2020

    Judge Trims Drivers' Suit Over Cracked Subaru Windshields

    A New Jersey federal judge on Tuesday trimmed several counts from a proposed class action against Subaru over alleged spontaneously cracking windshields but left most counts intact, ruling the consumers can sue over vehicle models they have not owned or leased.

  • November 24, 2020

    Union Pacific Must Face Suit Over Train Crossing Collision

    A Missouri appellate court on Tuesday revived a suit seeking to hold Union Pacific Railroad Co. liable for a train-car collision that caused a woman's permanent injuries, saying a factual dispute exists as to whether the train sounded its horn at a proper decibel level before approaching the crossing.

  • November 24, 2020

    Kuwaiti Auto Dealer's Fight With Ford Will Go To 6th Circ.

    Both sides to a dispute over a terminated deal to distribute Ford vehicles in Kuwait have appealed to the Sixth Circuit a Michigan judge's decision to toss fraud and breach of contract claims asserted by a Kuwaiti auto dealer against the automaker while the claims are sent to arbitration.

  • November 24, 2020

    Railroad Operator's Fees Must Be Covered, Chancery Says

    A Delaware vice chancellor ruled Tuesday that American Rail Partners LLC must cover legal expenses incurred by a railroad ownership company that it sued over unjust enrichment claims, saying an agreement in place "unambiguously" provides that expenses be covered.

  • November 24, 2020

    Feds Say 4th Circ. Skimped On Baltimore Climate Suit Review

    The federal government has told the U.S. Supreme Court that it should be easier for energy giants like Chevron and Exxon Mobil to move state court lawsuits seeking to hold them liable for climate change damages to federal court.

  • November 24, 2020

    NY Appeals Court Skeptical In Lyft Minimum Wage Fight

    Lyft faced tough questioning from a New York state appeals panel on Tuesday in its bid to set aside a New York City regulation that created a minimum wage for app-based drivers, with one justice suggesting the city and Lyft merely had different goals for the regulation.

Expert Analysis

  • Aviation Watch: Why Boeing-Airbus Trade War May End Soon

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    The prolonged trade war between Boeing and Airbus — and between the U.S. and the European Union — has led to economic losses on all sides, but various factors, including a less adversarial attitude from the Biden administration, could lead to a resolution soon, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • 7 Tips For Predeposition Meetings Under New Federal Rule

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    Attorneys can use a new predeposition meet-and-confer obligation for federal litigation — taking effect Tuesday — to better understand and narrow the topics of planned testimony, and more clearly outline the scope of any discovery disputes, says James Wagstaffe at Wagstaffe von Loewenfeldt Busch.

  • What To Expect From Federal Agency Leadership Changes

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    Attorneys at Morgan Lewis discuss how quickly companies may see policy changes from new leadership at the U.S. Department of Treasury, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and National Labor Relations Board after the Biden administration takes office.

  • CFPB Settlement Shows Common FCRA Compliance Flaws

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s recent settlement with debt collector Afni underscores the agency’s ongoing interest in recurring Fair Credit Reporting Act compliance errors related to computer glitches, response deadlines and first delinquency dates, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • NY Contract Litigation Indicates Limits Of COVID-19 Defenses

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    Although there has not yet been a decision on the merits, a wave of COVID-19 litigation concerning force majeure, impossibility and frustration of purpose in New York indicates that using pandemic-related excuses to avoid contractual obligations may be limited, says Seth Kruglak at Norton Rose.

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

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    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

  • 3 Fed. Circ. IP Cases For Gov't Contractors To Watch

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    Nathaniel Castellano at Arnold & Porter discusses recent oral arguments at the Federal Circuit in three cases — Boeing v. Secretary of the Air Force, Bitmanagement Software v. U.S. and Harmonia Holdings v. U.S. — and the broad implications the decisions will have on government contractors and agencies dealing in proprietary data and software.

  • Carbon Capture Policy Should Be Aligned For Global Adoption

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    With support from both Republicans and Democrats, carbon capture, utilization and storage technology as a tool for decarbonization may be poised for domestic growth — but the U.S. and the European Union must coordinate their policies to promote a global approach, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

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    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Expect Major Changes In Aerospace And Defense Under Biden

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    President-elect Joe Biden is expected to significantly shift aerospace and defense industry priorities, revoke certain Trump administration government contractor policies, strengthen "Buy American" requirements, and increase use of defense and NASA budgetary authority to combat climate change, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • How Federal, State Plans Could Bring Carbon Capture To US

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    Proposals from President-elect Joe Biden, a pair of bills currently pending in Congress and a low-carbon fuels program in California provide insights into how carbon capture, utilization and storage technology could be integrated into the fight against climate change in the U.S., say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe.

  • What To Expect From DOJ Enforcement Under Biden

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    Companies shouldn't fear a rapid uptick in overall corporate enforcement actions by the U.S. Department of Justice under a new Democratic administration, but should anticipate a shift in focus away from immigration cases toward COVID-19-related fraud and civil rights reform, say Sandra Moser and Kenneth Polite at Morgan Lewis.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

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    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • EU Climate Goals Are Hard To Reach Without Carbon Capture

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    The European Union's failure to fully embrace blue fuels, produced using carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies, may hinder the region's pursuit of its aggressive decarbonization goals, say Hunter Johnston and Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Picking The Right Location And Tools For Virtual Courtrooms

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    Attorneys should consider the pros and cons of participating in virtual court proceedings from home versus their law firm offices, and whether they have the right audio, video and team communication tools for their particular setup, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

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