Transportation

  • July 19, 2019

    Geico Liable For Totaled Car Fees In Fla. Class Action

    Florida drivers who totaled their cars are entitled to title and license plate fees from Geico, a federal judge ruled Friday, saying the payments are part of the vehicles’ replacement costs under the insurer’s policy.

  • July 19, 2019

    Biggest Enviro Law Cases To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2019

    Here, Law360 takes a look at some of the biggest environmental cases to watch in the second half of 2019, including U.S. Supreme Court appeals based on Superfund and Clean Water Act issues and a challenge to President Donald Trump's authority to shrink national monuments designed by his predecessor.

  • July 19, 2019

    $5.5M Mahle Behr AC Price-Fixing Deal Scores Tentative OK

    A Michigan federal judge on Friday tentatively approved Mahle Behr's $5.5 million deal to end proposed class claims it conspired to rig the prices of vehicle air conditioning systems in sprawling antitrust multidistrict litigation involving global auto parts manufacturers.

  • July 19, 2019

    Ex-CSX Worker's Injury Suit Derailed By Case's Location

    The Pennsylvania Superior Court issued a published decision Friday finding that the state was not the proper forum for a lawsuit brought by a former Consolidated Rail Corp. and CSX Transportation Inc. worker over injuries he suffered during the course of his four-decade career at a rail yard in New York.

  • July 19, 2019

    11th Circ. Won't Force City To Trash Red Light Cameras

    The Eleventh Circuit has said it will not stop an Alabama city from using traffic cameras to penalize drivers who run red lights, dismissing a lawsuit challenging the policy for reasons that differ from an Alabama district court's.

  • July 19, 2019

    Scientists Ask 1st Circ. To Revive Expert 'Purge' Lawsuit

    A group of scientists told the First Circuit a lower court wrongly signed off on a Trump administration directive that bars scientists from its advisory committees who receive U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grants, saying it violates the Administrative Procedure Act.

  • July 19, 2019

    Army Corps Owes ND $38M For Pipeline Protests, Suit Says

    North Dakota hit the U.S. government with a suit in federal court, claiming the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owes the state $38 million for failing to contain protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

  • July 19, 2019

    Fraud Ring Posing As Gov't Officials, DHS Watchdog Warns

    The Department of Homeland Security’s watchdog has issued an alert about a scheme by an Atlanta-based transnational fraud ring that poses as government procurement officials to steal electronics from unsuspecting contractors.

  • July 19, 2019

    UK Antitrust Court Rules Against Rail Infrastructure Giant

    The U.K.'s Competition Appeal Tribunal handed a win to auditor Achilles Information Ltd. on Friday after the company accused Network Rail of changing its audit rules in a way that essentially excluded Achilles from providing auditing services.

  • July 19, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Most Important Personal Injury Opinions

    The more than 1,000 opinions the late Justice John Paul Stevens authored during his three-plus decades on the U.S. Supreme Court included seminal rulings on punitive damages awards and maritime wrongful death cases. Here, Law360 looks back at a handful of opinions he wrote that have affected the personal injury bar and changed the way trial attorneys practice law.

  • July 19, 2019

    2nd Circ. Revives NYC Taxi Drivers' Unfair Suspension Suits

    The Second Circuit ruled Friday that New York City's practice of summarily suspending licenses for taxi drivers who've been arrested but not yet convicted deprives them of due process by denying them meaningful opportunities to challenge their suspensions.

  • July 19, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Cummins, Coface, Atlantis

    Cummins has made an offer for MAN Energy Solutions, Apollo Global Management has offered to buy French credit insurer Coface, and Brookfield Asset Management is considering selling luxury Bahamian resort Atlantis Paradise Island Resort.

  • July 19, 2019

    Engine Maker Execs Inflated Revenues By $25M, Feds Say

    An Illinois-based alternative-energy engine maker’s former executives got hit with criminal and civil securities fraud charges Friday over claims they engaged in an accounting fraud scheme that inflated company revenues by $25 million.

  • July 19, 2019

    Top Aston Martin Shareholder Lobs £68M Bid For More Shares

    An indirect subsidiary of Aston Martin’s largest shareholder on Friday said it has offered to snap up an additional 3% stake in the luxury car maker for roughly £68.4 million ($85.5 million).

  • July 19, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen the owner of a Manchester skyscraper that needed repair sue several underwriters at Lloyd's, a prominent cryptocurrency trader drag a U.K. digital currency exchange into court and an executive for Honeywell sue HSBC Bank PLC. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 18, 2019

    Mitsubishi, Corning Get Judge's Nod In Auto Parts Cartel Deal

    A Michigan federal judge on Thursday granted preliminary approval to two agreements totaling roughly $10.5 million to resolve claims in proposed class actions by auto dealers against Mitsubishi, Corning Inc., and a Japanese subsidiary that they colluded with other manufacturers to fix prices on car parts sold to U.S. automakers.

  • July 18, 2019

    Justice Stevens Ruling Set Groundwork For US Climate Policy

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Massachusetts v. EPA forced the federal government to address the problem of climate change and unleashed a flood of decarbonization policies, a deluge that the Trump administration is trying to reverse.

  • July 18, 2019

    Judge Lambastes Both Sides In JetBlue Discrimination Case

    A Florida federal judge denied a former JetBlue worker's request to pry additional information from the airline for her discrimination suit Thursday, but had harsh words for both sides, questioning the employee's diligence and the airline's sincerity in its objections.

  • July 18, 2019

    DOL Contract Watchdog Gets $6.6M Bias Win Over Enterprise

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge ordered Enterprise Rent-a-Car's Baltimore unit to pay $6.6 million to a class of black applicants he found were unfairly denied jobs based on their race, and blocked the car rental service from getting government contracts until it cleans up its act.

  • July 18, 2019

    9th Circ. Asked To Revive Tesla Model 3 Disclosures Suit

    Investors told the Ninth Circuit that Tesla Inc. knowingly misled the public about the pace of production of its Model 3 sedan and shouldn't be allowed to dodge proposed class claims that its investors bore the brunt of the damage when Tesla's stock declined.

  • July 18, 2019

    Simpson Thacher Guides $14B Blackstone Infrastructure Fund

    Blackstone's infrastructure fund raised $14 billion in the final close of its inaugural fundraising round, putting the Simpson Thacher-guided vehicle among the world's three largest infrastructure funds, Blackstone said Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Climate Change Divides FERC As LaFleur Says Goodbye

    Members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission relitigated how the agency should consider the climate change impacts of projects Thursday in Commissioner Cheryl LaFleur's final meeting, underlining a continued disagreement between its members.

  • July 18, 2019

    BNSF Not Liable For Worker's Fatal Crash, 7th Circ. Says

    BNSF Railway Co. was right to defeat a lawsuit that claimed it was liable for its employee's fatal snowstorm car crash because there is no way the railroad company could have been found negligent in the case, the Seventh Circuit has ruled.

  • July 18, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: AB InBev, AT&T, Axalta

    AB InBev is reportedly mulling selling off assets after the company scrapped a planned Hong Kong offering of its Asia Pacific unit, AT&T is looking at options for its Puerto Rican business, and Axalta Coating Systems is exploring a sale.

  • July 18, 2019

    DOJ's New Enviro Cases Down Nearly A Third, Report Says

    The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a steadily decreasing number of environmental lawsuits in federal district court since 2010, while green groups have picked up some of the slack and law firms are busier than ever, according to a new litigation report.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Things FTC Competition Bureau Looks For In White Papers

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    Most written advocacy to the Bureau of Competition is of an extremely high quality, but sometimes we notice that there’s some room for improvement, says Daniel Francis, an associate director at the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Competition.

  • 2 High Court Admiralty Cases Diverge On Common Law's Role

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    Although the U.S. Supreme Court's recent admiralty ruling in Air & Liquid Systems v. DeVries indicates success in expanding the availability of common law protections to mariners, its decision in Dutra Group v. Batterton — decided just months later — counsels that new classes of remedies will now be harder to obtain under the common law, says Brian Maloney of Seward & Kissel.

  • An Important Step Forward For Driverless Car Tech Standards

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    A white paper recently published by some of the world's largest car manufacturers, tiered suppliers and technology companies starts the conversation about developing technical standards for automated driving systems and will facilitate development of the federal regulatory framework, say Nicole Crowley and Jonathan Fabozzi of Goldberg Segalla.

  • The Potential Effects Of Calif. Contractor Reclassification Bill

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    If enacted, California’s Assembly Bill 5 would codify the so-called ABC test for independent contractors established in the California Supreme Court's Dynamex decision. Notably, the bill goes beyond the scope of Dynamex and could have an extraordinary impact on the state's economy, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • 5 Takeaways From DOJ Focus On Chinese Trade Secret Theft

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    Since its official announcement of the China Initiative eight months ago, the U.S. Department of Justice has publicized the initiation of six new cases that include references to both trade secrets and China. These shed some light on DOJ and U.S. business priorities, says Sara O’Connell at Pillsbury.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Preemption Vs. Public Nuisance, In Aviation And Opioids

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    A recent Iowa Supreme Court ruling concerning a local airport commission's authority to condemn a structure declared safe by the Federal Aviation Administration presents many of the same preemption questions that will play out in opioid litigation, says Richard Dean of Tucker Ellis.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • A New Regulatory Push For Transportation Cybersecurity

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    Transportation remains one of the few U.S. critical infrastructure sectors that is not covered by federal cybersecurity mandates. But in the last few months, the White House, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Congress have begun raising concerns, and new regulations may be on the way, says Norma Krayem of Holland & Knight.

  • Prosecuting SEPs For Driverless-Car Communications Tech

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    Effective prosecution of standard-essential patents for autonomous vehicle communication requires familiarity with the technical standards for this nascent technology and experience addressing subject matter eligibility and means-plus-function claim limitation issues, says Todd Baker of Oblon McClelland.

  • How High Court FOIA Ruling Will Help Gov't Contractors

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent Food Marketing Institute v. Argus decision will make it easier for government contractors to protect financial information from Freedom of Information Act requests even though the new standard for obtaining a FOIA exemption is somewhat unclear, say James Boland and Christopher Griesedieck of Venable.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.