Transportation

  • July 02, 2020

    OECD Offers New Tax Reporting Rules For Gig Economy

    The providers of so-called gig economy platforms such as Uber and Airbnb will be required to report the tax information of sellers on their networks under recommended rules issued Thursday by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

  • July 03, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a competition suit against Royal Mail, a Saint-Gobain unit lodge a patent claim against 3M and a Russian bank file another suit against Mozambique and one of the state-owned entities embroiled in a $2 billion bribery scandal. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 02, 2020

    Calif. Air Medics Get Initial OK For $78M Wage Settlement

    A California state judge has given a preliminary thumbs-up to a $78 million settlement that would resolve outstanding claims by a certified class of about 450 medical flight crew workers accusing helicopter operator Air Methods Corp. of committing various wage violations.

  • July 02, 2020

    United Airlines Seeks To Duck Suit Over $5B Virus Relief Deal

    United Airlines urged an Illinois federal judge on Thursday to dismiss a putative class action accusing it of breaching its agreement with the federal government over $5 billion in payroll support funds amid the coronavirus pandemic, arguing the employee who filed the suit has no statutory rights to enforce the agreement.

  • July 02, 2020

    Calif. Ryder Delivery Drivers Ink $5M Miclassification Deal

    A motor carrier owner working for Ryder System Inc. urged a California federal judge Wednesday to sign off on a proposed $5 million class settlement to resolve claims that Ryder misclassified delivery workers as independent contractors to avoid paying all wages and job-related expenses.

  • July 02, 2020

    Faraday Future Tycoon Exits Ch. 11 After $3.5B Reorg

    A Chinese tycoon and founder of electric car startup Faraday Future reported a successful emergence Thursday from a personal Chapter 11 in California that briefly detoured through Delaware bankruptcy court, following confirmation of a more than $3.5 billion reorganization.

  • July 02, 2020

    FERC Seeks Hill's Help After DC Circ. Dumps Pipeline Policy

    Two Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioners on Thursday urged Congress to extend the agency's administrative appeals process and give landowners more protection, two days after the D.C. Circuit blew a hole in FERC's ability to delay requests to reconsider gas project approvals.

  • July 02, 2020

    Ryanair Testing EU's Discretion In Lufthansa Aid Challenge

    Ryanair's challenge of the German government's €9 billion bailout of Lufthansa may hinge on whether European regulators missed something in their rush to combat COVID-19's economic fallout on the major carrier.

  • July 02, 2020

    The Biggest Energy Rulings Of 2020: Midyear Report

    It's already been a blockbuster year for court decisions affecting the energy sector, with courts ruling on whether climate change-related litigation can proceed as well as weighing in on key permitting and liability issues. Here are some of the most significant energy-related court decisions from the first half of 2020.

  • July 02, 2020

    4th Circ. Grounds Challenge To Baltimore Airport Construction

    A Maryland county missed the deadline to challenge an updated plan for expanding cargo capabilities at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport by seven days and can't pin the delay on anyone other than itself, a Fourth Circuit panel has ruled. 

  • July 02, 2020

    American Airlines Beats Class Bid In 401(k) Management Suit

    Two former American Airlines workers lost their bid to certify a 20,000-member class in their suit alleging their retirement plan was mismanaged, after a Texas federal judge said certification wasn't necessary since they are suing on behalf of the whole plan.

  • July 02, 2020

    Judge Pans NY Defenses In Uber Drivers' Fight For Benefits

    The Brooklyn federal judge handling Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers' legal battle for New York unemployment benefits appeared to take the drivers' side during a case hearing Thursday morning, as she repeatedly laid into the Empire State's arguments against immediate court intervention.

  • July 02, 2020

    Top Florida News 2020: A Midyear Report

    The coronavirus pandemic dominated the first half of the year in Florida as judges and litigators had to adjust to the new normal of justice by computer screen, but the courts continued their work, issuing rulings in battles over felon voting rights and bitcoin holdings, as well as handling pandemic-related litigation over business interruption coverage and cruise ship liability.

  • July 02, 2020

    Top Delaware Cases Of 2020: A Midyear Report

    Despite the pandemic, the first half of 2020 saw epic judicial gear-shifting but no real slowdown in Delaware's key business courts, with new Chancery Court complaints actually picking up and important corporate and commercial law decisions regularly emerging from remotely conducted proceedings.

  • July 02, 2020

    DOJ Antitrust Chief Denies Staffer Claims Of Political Bias

    The head of the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division has hit back against allegations made by a division staffer that investigations into recent cannabis mergers and a car emissions deal were politically motivated.

  • July 02, 2020

    Transpo Regulation And Legislation To Watch: Midyear Report

    The transportation industry is keeping tabs on infrastructure funding legislation, potential reforms to the Federal Aviation Administration’s aircraft certification process and new consumer protection regulations covering air travel. Here, Law360 highlights legislation and regulation to watch in the latter half of 2020.

  • July 02, 2020

    Deals Rumor Mill: Uber, JBIC, XingSheng

    Uber hopes to pay $2.6 billion for Postmates, a group of Japanese entities is investing $14.4 billion in a gas project in Mozambique, and a new funding round will value Chinese groceries delivery app XingSheng at $3 billion. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • July 02, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Won't Rethink Upholding Bike Chainring Patent

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday denied Fox Factory's request for a rehearing of a panel's decision upholding an Illinois rival's bicycle chainring patent, after the Georgia-based bike parts maker argued that the issues on appeal are the "mirror image" of another appeal that resulted in a related patent's invalidation.

  • July 02, 2020

    Biggest Environmental Law Rulings So Far In 2020

    2020 has already been a huge year for environmental litigation, with the U.S. Supreme Court clearing up important unanswered questions in water and Superfund law, and an ambitious group of youths losing their effort to bring the federal government to trial over climate policy.

  • July 01, 2020

    PTAB Told Broadcom's Bid To Fix Navigation IP Falls Short

    A Patent Trial and Appeal Board panel grappled Wednesday with an argument from Japan Radio that Broadcom Corp.'s revised motion to amend a patent covering global navigation satellite system technology is doomed because Broadcom didn't heed feedback it received from the amendment pilot program.

  • July 01, 2020

    House Passes $1.5T Infrastructure Funding Bill

    The House on Wednesday passed an estimated $1.5 trillion surface transportation and infrastructure investment bill that aggressively tackles climate change and environmental reforms, advancing a measure that the Senate majority leader and the president have already declared dead on arrival. 

  • July 01, 2020

    Bus Shooting Victim Sues Greyhound For Negligence

    Greyhound Lines Inc. allowed a belligerent, armed man to board a bus and failed to protect the 41 other passengers on that bus when the gunman shot five people and killed a sixth, according to a complaint lodged in California state court Tuesday by one of the victims.

  • July 01, 2020

    Top 7 Trademark Rulings Of 2020: A Midyear Report

    From cannabis to video games to three U.S. Supreme Court rulings, the first half of 2020 was a busy time in the world of trademark law. As we head into the back half of the year, here are the seven big trademark decisions you need to know.

  • July 01, 2020

    11th Circ. Says Citigroup Cash-Advance Suit Belongs In US

    The Eleventh Circuit in a published opinion Wednesday reversed a Florida federal judge's decision to dismiss a cash-advance fraud suit against Citigroup based on the finding it belonged in Mexico, remanding the case back to the Sunshine State and saying the wrongdoings involved "reverberated in the United States."

  • July 01, 2020

    Lloyd's Best Buy Death Policy Dispute Sent To Arbitrator

    An Arkansas federal judge on Wednesday sent a dispute between Certain Underwriters at Lloyd's London and a delivery company over coverage of a wrongful death suit to arbitration, saying that Lloyd's status as a foreign company overrules Arkansas law barring arbitration in insurance policies.

Expert Analysis

  • Why Colo. Stay Of Trump's Water Rule Is Noteworthy

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    Following a Colorado federal court's statewide stay of the Trump administration's new Clean Water Act rule, it seems likely the rule will be invalidated in the state — further complicating a national patchwork of definitions of "waters of the U.S." and possibly influencing other courts considering injunction requests, say Christine Jochim and Michael Smith at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • Opinion

    Time To Consider Percentage Rental Agreements For Lawyers

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    It has long been the law that attorneys cannot use percentage rental agreements because doing so would constitute an impermissible sharing of fees with nonlawyers, but such arrangements can help lawyers match expenses with revenues in lean times like now, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson at Holland & Knight.

  • Key Points For Airports Considering Rent Relief For Tenants

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    Airport sponsors are highly motivated to offer rent abatements and other support to hard-hit commercial aeronautical tenants during the COVID-19 downturn — but airports must also keep in mind their obligations to stay economically self-sustaining and to treat similarly situated tenants equally, says Paul Fraidenburgh at Buchalter.

  • Corporate Investigation Lessons From EBay Stalking Scandal

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    The recent eBay criminal cyberstalking scandal reminds companies and law firms that investigative activities, even if undertaken solely using online research tools, could easily risk criminal or civil legal liability and violations of attorney ethics rules, says Joseph DeMarco at DeVore & DeMarco.

  • Auto Cos. Should Ramp Up Their Supply Chain Vetting

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    Automotive companies procuring from new sources because of the pandemic or adapting to new requirements of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement can minimize their compliance risks by implementing full-spectrum, know-your-source due diligence and documenting every aspect of their vetting process, say Gregory Husisian and Jenlain Scott at Foley & Lardner.

  • 'Settle And Sue' Malpractice Cases Have New Clarity In Calif.

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    A California state appellate court's recent decision in Masellis v. Law Office of Leslie F. Jensen provides a road map for proving causation and damages in settle-and-sue legal malpractice cases — an important issue of long-standing confusion, says Steven Berenson at Klinedinst.

  • A Midyear Look At Key US Sanctions Developments

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    During an active first half of 2020, the Office of Foreign Assets Control strengthened its sanctions programs, issued new guidance documents and announced several enforcement actions, underscoring that even during a pandemic, sanctions compliance is indispensable, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • What You Say In Online Mediation May Be Discoverable

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    Mediation conducted online with participants in different states makes it harder to determine where communications were made, increasing the risk that courts will apply laws of a state that does not protect mediation confidentiality, say mediators Jeff Kichaven and Teresa Frisbie and law student Tyler Codina.

  • Key Defense Approaches To 'Other Similar Incident' Evidence

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    A New York state court's recent ruling in Marshall v. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey shows that, while product liability plaintiffs seek to use so-called other similar incident evidence to argue that manufacturers know their products are unsafe, defense counsel can successfully challenge such evidence, says Timothy Freeman at Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Strategic Considerations For The Escalating SEP Battles

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    Recent developments in the standard-essential patent landscape affect licensing negotiations and litigation involving communications and networking technologies, and will lead to increased attention from regulators and potential inconsistencies among different agencies and forums, say Erik Puknys and Michelle Rice at Finnegan.

  • 20 Years Later, E-Sign Act's Transformative Impact Continues

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    The Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act — signed into law on June 30, 2000 — has been the legal foundation for the electronic execution of trusted, enforceable digital contracts, and has enabled the lending economy to thrive despite the COVID-19 pandemic, says Stephen Bisbee at eOriginal.

  • EPA Limits On States' Project Reviews Likely To Face Lawsuits

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recently announced rule limiting the scope of states' reviews of planned energy infrastructure projects will likely mean more litigation between states and the federal government — and more uncertainty for businesses and other stakeholders, says Philip Sholtz at Goldberg Segalla.

  • 10 Tips For A Successful Remote Arbitration Hearing

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    As I learned after completing a recent international arbitration remotely, with advance planning a video hearing can replicate the in-person experience surprisingly well, and may actually be superior in certain respects, says Kate Shih at Quinn Emanuel.

  • 10 Key Changes In EPA Fuel Regulation Overhaul Plan

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recently proposed overhaul of fuel regulations deserves close review, given the breadth of its coverage, the potential implications of revised emissions compliance mechanisms, and new enforcement questions, says Sarah Grey at Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    To Achieve Diversity, Law Firms Must Reinvent Hiring Process

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    If law firms are truly serious about making meaningful change in terms of diversity, they must adopt a demographically neutral, unbiased hiring equation that looks at personality traits with greater import than grades and class rank, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University College of Law.

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