Construction

  • July 19, 2019

    NH Justices Back Block Of Eversource Hydropower Project

    New Hampshire state regulators were within their authority to reject Eversource Energy's proposal for the primary portion of a $1.6 billion power line project intended to ship Canadian hydroelectricity to Massachusetts, the state's Supreme Court held Friday.

  • July 19, 2019

    Mexican Cos. Tell 10th Circ. $36M Award Wrongly Confirmed

    A Mexican cement company has urged the Tenth Circuit to reverse the confirmation of a $36.1 million arbitral award in favor of a Bolivian investment firm, saying the Colorado federal court lacked jurisdiction over the Mexican parties and should never have enforced the award.

  • July 19, 2019

    Biggest Enviro Law Cases To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2019

    Here, Law360 takes a look at some of the biggest environmental cases to watch in the second half of 2019, including U.S. Supreme Court appeals based on Superfund and Clean Water Act issues and a challenge to President Donald Trump's authority to shrink national monuments designed by his predecessor.

  • July 19, 2019

    Army Corps Owes ND $38M For Pipeline Protests, Suit Says

    North Dakota hit the U.S. government with a suit in federal court, claiming the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owes the state $38 million for failing to contain protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

  • July 19, 2019

    SC Utility Customers Tell 2nd Circ. To Revive Nuke Plant Suit

    Two South Carolina utility customers on Friday asked the Second Circuit to revive a suit against Westinghouse Electric Co. to recover payments made for an abandoned nuclear project, saying their claims arise from Westinghouse’s post-Chapter 11 acts.

  • July 19, 2019

    NBA's Cavs Roll Out Plans For Esports Facility In Cleveland

    Cavs Legion, an esports team affiliated with the NBA’s Cleveland Cavaliers, said Friday it will open a new facility in Cleveland that will cater to players and fans of the fast-growing esports industry.

  • July 19, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen the owner of a Manchester skyscraper that needed repair sue several underwriters at Lloyd's, a prominent cryptocurrency trader drag a U.K. digital currency exchange into court and an executive for Honeywell sue HSBC Bank PLC. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 18, 2019

    BofA Can't Ditch Housing Advocates' Discrimination Suit

    A Maryland federal judge on Thursday rejected Bank of America NA's bid to toss a discrimination lawsuit filed by housing advocacy groups accusing the bank and its maintenance contractor of unfairly neglecting foreclosed bank-owned properties in African American and Latino neighborhoods, finding that the allegations are sufficiently pled.

  • July 18, 2019

    Simpson Thacher Guides $14B Blackstone Infrastructure Fund

    Blackstone's infrastructure fund raised $14 billion in the final close of its inaugural fundraising round, putting the Simpson Thacher-guided vehicle among the world's three largest infrastructure funds, Blackstone said Thursday.

  • July 18, 2019

    Climate Change Divides FERC As LaFleur Says Goodbye

    Members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission relitigated how the agency should consider the climate change impacts of projects Thursday in Commissioner Cheryl LaFleur's final meeting, underlining a continued disagreement between its members.

  • July 18, 2019

    Google, Lendlease Team Up On $15B Bay Area Project

    Google and Australia-based construction company Lendlease Group have reached a roughly $15 billion agreement to redevelop Google's properties in three Silicon Valley markets into mixed-use communities with plans to build 15,000 or more homes, according to a Thursday announcement from the companies.

  • July 18, 2019

    Real Estate Lawyers On The Move

    Cozen O'Connor, Stoel Rives, Shipman & Goodwin, Eversheds Sutherland, Baker Donelson, DLA Piper, King & Spalding, King & Wood Mallesons, Holland & Knight, Seyfarth Shaw, Clifford Chance and Hinckley Allen were among various firms that made real estate hires in the last month.

  • July 18, 2019

    DOJ's New Enviro Cases Down Nearly A Third, Report Says

    The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a steadily decreasing number of environmental lawsuits in federal district court since 2010, while green groups have picked up some of the slack and law firms are busier than ever, according to a new litigation report.

  • July 18, 2019

    NJ AG Wins Bid To Pursue Superstorm Sandy Fraud Suit

    The New Jersey Attorney General's Office can pursue a consumer fraud action against a contractor over Superstorm Sandy repairs, a state appellate panel said Thursday, upending a trial court ruling that paused the suit pending the resolution of potential criminal charges against the man.

  • July 18, 2019

    Acacia Units Will Pause Mining Arbitration Against Tanzania

    Gold miner Acacia Mining PLC said that two of its subsidiaries are asking to pause their international arbitration proceedings against the Tanzanian government over mineral development agreements to allow its majority shareholder to finish negotiating a settlement.

  • July 18, 2019

    Tribe Opposes Mass. Bid To Change Casino Suit Judgment

    The Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head has asked a federal court to deny Massachusetts' "backhanded" attempt to amend an order over tribal plans to build a casino, arguing that state officials can't dodge the decision that says they may not interfere with the tribe's right to operate a gambling facility.

  • July 18, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Magnum, Oscar Health, Trez Forman

    A Magnum Management venture has reportedly sold a New York retail condo for $88.75 million, Oscar Health is said to be taking another 80,000 square feet in New York, and Trez Forman Capital has reportedly loaned $13.2 million for a Florida luxury condo project.

  • July 18, 2019

    Fried Frank, Wick Phillips Guide Data Center Co.’s $3B Growth

    Data center company Compass said Thursday it secured additional funding for a planned $3 billion expansion, with guidance from Fried Frank and Wick Phillips.

  • July 17, 2019

    'May I Just Ask': Era Of Civility Passes With Justice Stevens

    Former clerks and attorneys remember Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday night at the age of 99, for his trenchant mind and his unending civility. Does his passing mark an end to an era of collegiality on the bench?

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' Chevron Legacy Under Attack

    Justice John Paul Stevens' landmark decision in Chevron USA Inc. v. NRDC shaped the course of administrative law, and his legacy, for decades. But a recent wave of criticism shared by members of the current court threatens to erase a doctrine that has long bolstered federal regulators' sway over corporate America.

  • July 17, 2019

    'Kindness, Humility, Wisdom': Justices Remember Stevens

    A day after retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died at the age of 99, his colleagues paid tribute to the third-longest-serving member of the high court, cherishing his devotion to public service, his kindness and his unwavering commitment to justice.

  • July 17, 2019

    The Stories They Tell About Justice Stevens

    Justice John Paul Stevens had a legendary reputation as one of the most humble and caring members of the court. His clerks related some tales that show why.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hear Justice Stevens In 5 Memorable Moments On The Bench

    Justice John Paul Stevens was known for being collegial and kind, but he also wasn’t one to mince words. Listen to a few of the justice’s most memorable words from the bench, in majority opinions, sharply worded dissents and at oral argument.

  • July 17, 2019

    Justice Stevens' High Court Legacy In 4 Charts

    In this data deep-dive, Law360 examines retired Justice John Paul Stevens’ long tenure, his relatively breezy confirmation, his transformation from a run-of-the-mill Republican appointee to runaway liberal, and the legacy that lives on in his clerks.

  • July 17, 2019

    NY Climate Legislation Would Stress Building, Power Sectors

    New York's ambitious climate change bill puts the state on a path toward net-zero emissions, placing immense pressure on building owners and the power sector to take action soon to comply with the state's aggressive goals.

Expert Analysis

  • Fed. Circ. Limits Gov't Contractors' Litigation Cost Claims

    Author Photo

    The Federal Circuit's July 16 decision in Bechtel National v. United States upholds the precedent set in Geren v. Tecom, making it harder for contractors to argue government agencies indicated their willingness to reimburse them for third-party litigation expenses through contract terms, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • The Potential Effects Of Calif. Contractor Reclassification Bill

    Author Photo

    If enacted, California’s Assembly Bill 5 would codify the so-called ABC test for independent contractors established in the California Supreme Court's Dynamex decision. Notably, the bill goes beyond the scope of Dynamex and could have an extraordinary impact on the state's economy, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

    Author Photo

    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • The Latest Executive Order On Buying American Has Teeth

    Author Photo

    Earlier executive orders aimed at strengthening compliance with the Buy American Act were essentially position statements. Monday’s executive order differs, however, because it proposes a textual change to the Federal Acquisition Regulation, one that would have wide-ranging, potentially disruptive effects on government contractors, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

    Author Photo

    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

    Author Photo

    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

    Author Photo

    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

    Author Photo

    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • How High Court FOIA Ruling Will Help Gov't Contractors

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent Food Marketing Institute v. Argus decision will make it easier for government contractors to protect financial information from Freedom of Information Act requests even though the new standard for obtaining a FOIA exemption is somewhat unclear, say James Boland and Christopher Griesedieck of Venable.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

    Author Photo

    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • Rethinking The Tech-First Approach To Law Firm Solutions

    Author Photo

    When a lawyer complains about some workflow inefficiency they are having, the knee-jerk reaction of many firms is to look for a technology-based workaround. This overlooks the importance of human psychology and behavior, which may be the root of the problem, says Ryan Steadman of Zero.

  • Top 10 Techniques For Crafting A Dazzling Brief

    Author Photo

    Legal writing often falls flat not because it’s unorganized, but because it’s technically unsound and riddled with gaffes that cheapen and degrade it. Avoiding the most common mistakes will keep judges interested and, most importantly, make them trust you, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • High Court's Knick Ruling Is A Big Win For Property Rights

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Knick v. Township of Scott puts an end to a Catch-22 that left property owners with no way to challenge violations of the Fifth Amendment's takings clause, and will likely trigger an increase in federal takings claims across the country, says Paul Beard of Alston & Bird.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Ballard Spahr Diversity Chief Virginia Essandoh

    Author Photo

    In the final installment of this monthly series, legal recruiting expert Carlos Pauling from Major Lindsey & Africa talks with Virginia Essandoh about the trends and challenges she sees as chief diversity officer at Ballard Spahr.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McMahon On 'Roosevelt For The Defense'

    Author Photo

    In "Theodore Roosevelt for the Defense," authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher meticulously chronicle the forgotten high-profile 1915 libel trial of Teddy Roosevelt, capturing the interesting legal customs of an era before things like notice pleading and pretrial discovery, says Chief U.S. District Judge Colleen McMahon of the Southern District of New York.