Construction

  • September 24, 2021

    Trade Court Again Knocks Down Duties On Chinese Plywood

    The U.S. Court of International Trade remanded for a fourth time duties on Chinese hardwood plywood, again faulting the U.S. Department of Commerce on Friday for how it calculated tariffs for Chinese importers that weren't separately investigated.

  • September 24, 2021

    11th Circ. Won't Revive Suit Over Worker's Head Injury

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday sided with SEW-Eurodrive Inc. in a suit alleging that its negligence led to a tool falling onto a contracted worker's head and injuring her, saying the company did not have a duty to her.

  • September 24, 2021

    Dubai Developer Revealed As Bidder On Surfside Condo Site

    The opening $120 million offer for the site of fallen Champlain Towers South condominium in Surfside, Florida, came from Dubai, United Arab Emirates-based Damac Properties PJSC, one of the Middle East's largest real estate developers, a court filing revealed Friday.

  • September 24, 2021

    Otis Dodges Insurer's Suit Over Elevator Fall In Skyscraper

    Otis Elevator has avoided an insurer's suit in Illinois federal court seeking reimbursement after an elevator in Chicago's formerly named John Hancock Center skyscraper fell 84 floors and was shut down by the city, stopping customers from visiting a 95th-floor restaurant insured by the company.

  • September 24, 2021

    Feds, Pa. Pulled Road Project 'Bait and Switch,' NAACP Says

    The NAACP and an environmental group on Friday asked a federal judge to force federal and Pennsylvania transportation regulators to do a more thorough environmental analysis of a road project they allege was only approved after the agencies perpetrated a "bait-and-switch scheme" on nearby residents.

  • September 24, 2021

    Subcontractor Seeks $3M From Arlington Road Job

    A subcontractor for a road renovation job at Arlington National Cemetery has sued the contractor in Virginia federal court for more than $3 million, saying it was wrongly terminated from the government contract and was blocked from fixing problems.

  • September 24, 2021

    MVP: Troutman Pepper's Aaron Abraham

    Aaron Abraham of Troutman Pepper has helped represent JP Morgan Chase in the ongoing construction of its new skyscraper in Manhattan and SL Green Realty's One Vanderbilt tower next to Grand Central Terminal, earning him a spot among Law360's 2021 Construction MVPs.

  • September 24, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: Kolter Homes, Savanna, DR Horton

    Kolter Homes is reportedly hoping to rezone 466 acres in Florida, Savanna is said to have leased out 20,175 square feet in New York, and D.R. Horton has reportedly paid $7.31 million for a Florida development site.

  • September 24, 2021

    Biden Launches Security Probe Of Crucial Magnet Imports

    The Biden administration on Friday announced an investigation into whether imported rare earth magnets pose a threat to U.S. national security, teeing up potential tariffs on the imports with a Cold War-era trade law revived during the Trump administration.

  • September 24, 2021

    Tahoe Regional Agency Appointee Sees More Wildfire Hurdles

    The current Caldor fire has not caused the level of devastation in South Lake Tahoe as the Angora fire did 14 years ago thanks to new rules and regulations, but hurdles remain as agencies balance clearing underbrush with protecting property rights, the presidential appointee to the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency recently told Law360.

  • September 24, 2021

    Trump Org Ordered To Comply With NY AG's Subpoenas

    A New York state court ordered the Trump Organization to comply with state attorney general subpoenas for information related to former President Donald Trump as part of a civil probe over whether he inflated the value of his assets.

  • September 23, 2021

    Calif. Tells 9th Circ. Federal Dam Not Allowed To Hurt Trout

    California has asked the Ninth Circuit to revive a suit aimed at securing more water releases from a dam near Santa Maria for a protected trout's benefit, telling the court in an amicus brief that the dam's authorization doesn't just allow for species conservation, it requires it.

  • September 23, 2021

    Judge Cautions About Harming Surfside Site's Value

    A day after a conditional "stalking horse" contract was signed for the site of fallen condominiums in Surfside, Florida, the state court judge overseeing related litigation cautioned Thursday against public statements questioning the property's fate, which he said would only hurt its eventual sale price and victims' recovery.

  • September 23, 2021

    High Court Asked To Revisit Landmark Water Permit Ruling

    Idaho landowners who say they should not be forced to apply for a Clean Water Act permit for a home construction project on Wednesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit a landmark ruling that set guidelines for when the statute applies in permitting decisions.

  • September 23, 2021

    Ballard Spahr Guiding $1B New Orleans Mixed-Use Project

    Ballard Spahr is representing River District Neighborhood Investors, which is acting as the master developer of a $1 billion New Orleans mixed-use project, the firm said Thursday.

  • September 23, 2021

    Trade Court Orders Redo On Korean Steel Tariffs

    The U.S. Court of International Trade ordered the U.S. Department of Commerce to recalculate anti-dumping tariffs on Korean steel pipes and tubes, saying Thursday the department bungled the calculations by finding that a "particular market situation" called for higher tariffs.

  • September 22, 2021

    NY Utilities Defend Avoiding $1.6B Grid Project Future Costs

    New York utilities urged the D.C. Circuit not to disturb Federal Energy Regulatory Commission orders allowing them to limit future costs associated with a $1.2 billion transmission project that the Empire State utilities say primarily benefits New Jerseyans.

  • September 22, 2021

    NY Gov. Taps Final Members For State's Pot Regulatory Board

    New York Gov. Kathy Hochul on Wednesday tapped a union leader and the head of the state's dormitory authority as the two final picks for New York's board of Office of Cannabis Management, moving swiftly to get the Empire State's cannabis industry on its feet.

  • September 22, 2021

    Pa. Suppliers Can't Deduct Local Costs From Foreign Steel

    A Pennsylvania contractor can't deduct domestic importing, shipping and storage expenses from the cost of foreign-made steel for the purposes of a state law requiring that public projects use no more than 25% of the foreign material, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.

  • September 22, 2021

    Canadian Lender Wins $47M In Mortgage Fight With Mexico

    Mexico has been ordered by an international tribunal to pay a Canadian lender $47 million after Mexican courts failed to halt a fraudulent scheme that resulted in the unlawful cancellation of a series of loans for three real estate development projects.

  • September 22, 2021

    Court Says Travelers Can't Trim Tool Co.'s Coverage Suit

    A Texas federal judge declined Wednesday to strike a toolmaker's accusations that Travelers wrongly refused to pay coverage benefits for a suit accusing the toolmaker and one of its directors of transferring more than $40 million to dodge a court judgment.

  • September 22, 2021

    Solar Industry Group Blasts Bid For New China-Based Tariffs

    A leading U.S. solar industry group Wednesday urged the U.S. Department of Commerce to reject a request by domestic manufacturers to extend China-based tariffs on solar cells and panels to three nearby countries, arguing that it would "devastate" U.S. solar development.

  • September 22, 2021

    Tribes Ask Army Corps To Ax DAPL Environment Consultant

    Leaders of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and Oglala Sioux Tribe wrote the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Wednesday, asking the agency to fix the Dakota Access oil pipeline's "fatally flawed" environmental review.

  • September 22, 2021

    North Carolina Developer Buys $63M Long Island City Site

    Grubb Properties has purchased a site in Long Island City, Queens, for $63 million and plans to build a 17-story residential project there, according to a Wednesday announcement by sell-side broker CBRE Group.

  • September 22, 2021

    Adams And Reese Snags Partners In NOLA, Mississippi

    Southeast firm Adams and Reese LLP announced major additions to a pair of its offices, adding a trio of financial service partners to its New Orleans office and a construction litigation partner in Jackson, Mississippi.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Attorney Ethics Considerations For Litigation Funding

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    The growth of the litigation finance industry has generated questions on the obligations of counsel when their clients are seeking outside capital to fund litigation, which litigators must understand when providing information to a third-party funder and discussing legal strategy with a client, says Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

  • How OSHA's 5 Cooperative Programs Can Benefit Employers

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    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s recent renewal of a 20-year regional partnership with the Builders’ Association highlights how OSHA's cooperative programs can help employers educate and protect their workers — and bolster their defense against workplace safety citations, says Patrick Bickford at Ausley McMullen. 

  • How ABA Opinion Shifts Alternative Biz Structure Landscape

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    A recent American Bar Association opinion approving lawyers' passive investment in nonlawyer-owned firms eliminates a hurdle for law firms wishing to scale their practice through alternative business structures, but aspiring investors should follow a few best practices, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Deepika Ravi at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: HPE Counsel Talk Effective Board Oversight

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    Governance teams can more effectively shape board oversight of environmental, social and governance issues by ensuring organizationwide agreement on the most relevant issues, building a materiality framework that reflects stakeholder input, and monitoring the integration of ESG into operations, say Rishi Varma and Derek Windham at Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

  • How Calif. High Court Rulings Narrow Prevailing Wage Law

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    Two recent rulings by the California Supreme Court in Mendoza v. Fonseca McElroy Grinding and Busker v. Wabtec should come as good news to public works construction contractors, subcontractors and suppliers, as they clarify and limit the scope of the state’s prevailing wage law in several important ways, say Laurence Phillips and Tyler Paetkau at Procopio Cory.

  • Opinion

    Justice Gap Demands Look At New Legal Service Models

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    Current restrictions on how lawyers structure their businesses stand in the way of meaningful access to justice for many Americans, so states should follow the lead of Utah and Florida and test out innovative law firm business models through regulatory sandboxes, says Zachariah DeMeola at the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System.

  • Bankruptcy Eligibility Is Expanding For Small Biz Debtors

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    A Florida bankruptcy court's recent decision in Vertical Mac Construction expands the scope of "just enough" commercial or business activity for Subchapter V eligibility, and potential debtors should consider this evolving boundary, says Nicholas Koffroth at Fox Rothschild.

  • EPA, Army Corps Guidance Walks Back Regulatory Certainty

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    Recent guidance from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers concerning the 2020 water quality certification rule suggests a return to ill-defined project review timelines that give flexibility to authorities at the expense of transparency and regulatory certainty, say Anna Wildeman and Dave Ross at Troutman Pepper.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Leidos GC Talks Social Responsibility

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    Recent criticisms of corporate commitments to stakeholders such as employees and communities — implicitly opposing environmental, social and governance initiatives — are fundamentally flawed and display a serious misunderstanding of contemporary investor priorities and dynamics, says Jerald Howe at Leidos.

  • Lessons In Crisis Lawyering 20 Years After 9/11

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    Dianne Phillips at Holland & Knight recounts her experiences as in-house counsel at a liquefied natural gas company in the tumultuous aftermath of Sept. 11, 2001, and details the lessons she learned about lawyering in a crisis, including the importance of careful forethought and having trusted advisers on speed dial.

  • Calif.'s Complicated Transition On Solar Panel Disposal

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    California's regulations designating photovoltaic modules — or solar panels — as universal waste will have a widespread effect on the solar industry in California as this framework means new compliance considerations for panel manufacturers, installers, solar developers, service companies and organizations that install panels for their businesses or customers, says Laurie Berger at the Silicon Valley Law Group.

  • Why Structured Data Is Increasingly Important To Your Case

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    During discovery, legal teams often overlook structured data — the rows of information found in financial ledgers and similar corporate systems — and consider it secondary to emails and other anecdotal evidence, but this common mistake could mean litigators are missing key elements of a dispute, say consultants at Alvarez & Marsal.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: AIG Counsel Talks SEC Risk Alert

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    As the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission responds to the changing landscape on environmental, social and corporate governance investing, including with its recent risk alert, it is imperative that the regulator take a measured approach, says Kate Fuentes at AIG.

  • Series

    Insurance Commissioner's Agenda: Wis. Tackles Climate Risk

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    Wisconsin Commissioner of Insurance Mark Afable talks about educating consumers on potential climate-risk coverage gaps and mitigation efforts, and encouraging insurers to recognize the latter in underwriting, in the face of increasingly frequent and severe weather disasters.

  • What The Judiciary's Font Recommendations Can Teach Us

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent soft prohibition on Garamond and the ensuing debates about courts' font preferences should serve as a helpful reminder of a larger point — every departure from convention in legal writing carries some level of risk, says Spencer Short at Stradley Ronon.

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