Construction

  • August 07, 2020

    Nationwide Beats Construction Defect Suit At 11th Circ.

    The Eleventh Circuit held that an Alabama district court wrongly applied federal rather than Alabama state laws when determining privity in a suit between a homeowner and contractor, freeing Nationwide Mutual Fire Insurance Co. from defending the contractor's allegedly botched work.

  • August 07, 2020

    Lumber Exec Wants Rival Firm In IP Suit DQ'd For Estate Work

    The founder of a lumber equipment company has said he's "shocked" that the law firm where his family's personal attorney is a partner is representing his former employer in a trade secrets theft suit against him, arguing the firm's apparent conflict of interest calls for disqualification.

  • August 07, 2020

    1st Circ. Says Citizens Can't Intervene In T-Mobile Fight

    The First Circuit upheld a lower court decision Friday that blocked two local residents of a coastal Massachusetts town from intervening in a case over a T-Mobile antenna installation in a church steeple, ruling that their local government represented the views of the concerned citizens adequately.

  • August 07, 2020

    Foley Hoag Steers Bid Valuing Building Products Co. At $72M

    Investment firm Mill Road Capital, represented by Foley Hoag LLP, on Friday announced its offer to buy out Huttig Building Products in a deal valuing the company at about $71.5 million, saying it understands the difficulties faced by microcap companies in creating value for shareholders.

  • August 07, 2020

    Full DC Circ. Leaves Border Wall Funding Dispute Unresolved

    In light of a full D.C. Circuit finding that the House can sue to enforce subpoenas, a majority of the court on Friday bounced the House's suit over whether the Trump administration can reallocate border wall funding to a three-judge panel to decide.

  • August 07, 2020

    Dems Seek Info On Trump's Fast-Tracked Projects

    Nearly 60 Democratic members of Congress have demanded that the Trump administration come clean about which major infrastructure projects have benefited from an executive order to fast-track environmental reviews amid the economic downturn sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • August 07, 2020

    Canada Unveils $2.7B Plan To Retaliate Against New US Tariffs

    Canada on Friday laid out its plan to retaliate against the Trump administration's newly revived tariff on Canadian aluminum, proposing new duties of its own on $2.7 billion worth of U.S. goods, including bicycles, household appliances and sports equipment.

  • August 07, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Hales Franciscan, Omninet, Estate

    Hales Franciscan is now reportedly hoping to sell all of its Chicago campus, Omninet Capital has reportedly leased out 28,800 square feet east of Los Angeles to Carmichael International Service, and Estate Investments Group is said to be hoping to build a 23-story mixed-use tower in North Miami Beach.

  • August 07, 2020

    Sierra Club Says Feds' Objection To Deal With DTE Unfounded

    The Sierra Club says the federal government's opposition to a deal the group struck with DTE Energy Co. to resolve long-standing allegations that DTE illegally modified power plants is over the top, unfounded and should be rejected.

  • August 07, 2020

    Coronavirus Q&A: Cassin Real Estate Leader

    In this edition of Coronavirus Q&A, one of Cassin's real estate leaders discusses the challenges of building affordable housing amid the pandemic, but also the continued lending activity for those projects from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

  • August 07, 2020

    Rising Star: Bracewell's Tom Swarbrick

    Tom Swarbrick of Bracewell LLP has trotted the globe in his youthful career to iron out the intricate legal aspects of some of the world's key up-and-coming energy projects, in sectors ranging from oil and natural gas to solar, earning him a spot among the construction practitioners under age 40 honored as Law360 Rising Stars.

  • August 07, 2020

    Cattle Group's Challenge To Trump Water Rule Falls Short

    An Oregon federal judge on Thursday refused to block the Trump administration rule narrowing the scope of the Clean Water Act, tossing a challenge to the rule lodged by a ranching industry group.

  • August 07, 2020

    4 Texas Supreme Court Cases To Watch This Term

    In the Texas Supreme Court's upcoming term, the court has the chance to clarify what evidence is required for injured employees or relatives of dead employees to hold their employers liable in intentional tort suits and establish how trade secrets are treated during court proceedings. Here, Law360 takes a look at four cases attorneys are watching.

  • August 06, 2020

    Engineering Co. Says It's Owed $35M For Risberg Pipeline

    An engineering and consulting company accused RH Energytrans, the company behind the 28-mile Risberg natural gas pipeline, of failing to pay $35 million for a construction contract and additional work, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • August 06, 2020

    Corpus Christi Wants Out Of Suit Over $50M Wastewater Plant

    The city of Corpus Christi, Texas, has asked the state's high court to undo a ruling allowing a lawsuit over a soured $50 million contract to build a wastewater treatment plant to proceed, arguing the holding would effectively change the rules about how governmental immunity can be waived.

  • August 06, 2020

    Oakland A's Say Calif. Allows Toxic Releases Near Future Park

    The Oakland Athletics baseball team said Wednesday the California Department of Toxic Substances Control has endangered the community near its planned new stadium by allowing a metal shredder facility to release toxic chemicals into the air and water.

  • August 06, 2020

    NRDC, Others File New Suit Over Project Review Process

    The Natural Resources Defense Council and a coalition of environmental groups on Thursday filed the latest federal court challenge against the Trump administration's proposal to update the National Environmental Policy Act to streamline project reviews, arguing the changes are ill-considered and unlawful.

  • August 06, 2020

    Groups Say New EPA Rule Requires Nix Of Calif. Diesel Regs

    A coalition of industry groups said Wednesday that a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration rule supports their lawsuit challenging California's emissions standards for certain off-road engines.

  • August 06, 2020

    Insurer Sues Elevator Co. Over 84-Story Fall In Ill. Skyscraper

    Admiral Indemnity Co. has sued an elevator company seeking reimbursement after an elevator in Chicago's formerly named John Hancock Center fell 84 floors and was shut down by the city, inhibiting customers from accessing its policyholder, the operator of a 95th-floor restaurant.

  • August 06, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Nuveen, Pascal's Catering, Amazon

    Nuveen Real Estate has reportedly loaned roughly $60 million for two New Jersey industrial parks, an entity tied to Pascal's Catering is said to have bought a mixed-use property, and Amazon has reportedly finalized a lease for 235,240 square feet in Pennsylvania.

  • August 06, 2020

    Telecom Tower Builder Sues Texas City Over Axed Application

    A telecommunications infrastructure company filed a lawsuit against a Texas city Wednesday, claiming the city council's denial of its application to build a T-Mobile cell tower in a residential area was based on reasons that were not supported by substantial evidence.

  • August 06, 2020

    FERC Commissioner To Step Down Next Month

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner Bernard McNamee said he will officially step down Sept. 4, which could leave the agency with the minimum number of commissioners needed for a quorum if President Donald Trump's recent nominations don't get confirmed.

  • August 05, 2020

    Trade Court Questions Commerce's Tariff Exemption Process

    The U.S. Court of International Trade admonished the Trump administration on Wednesday for failing to sufficiently explain its decisions for rejecting a steel importer's requests to be excluded from national security tariffs, sending the requests back for reconsideration.

  • August 05, 2020

    Enviros Say Alaskan Mining Road Was Wrongly Approved

    Environmental organizations asked an Alaska federal court to vacate environmental permits for a mining road in the state's southern Brooks Range and national park areas, saying government agencies wrongly allowed the 211-mile road project to move forward.

  • August 05, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Sterling Bay, DR Horton, JPMorgan

    Sterling Bay has reportedly leased out 20,000 square feet in Chicago, D.R. Horton is said to be under contract to buy 21.1 acres in Florida and JPMorgan has reportedly provided $434 million in CMBS financing for a portfolio of office and industrial properties.

Expert Analysis

  • Analyzing Upward And Downward Trends In Legal Tech

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    Advances in legal technology are often accompanied by bombastic overstatements, but it is important to separate the wheat from the chaff by looking at where various technologies stand on the hype curve, says Lance Eliot at Stanford Law School.

  • How Congress May Bail Out FERC On Tolling Orders

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent ruling in Allegheny Defense Project v. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission deals a major blow to FERC's use of tolling orders to forestall judicial rehearings, but Congress may soon come to the agency's aid, say Sandra Rizzo and David Skillman at Arnold & Porter.

  • Climate Change Litigation Looms Over Trump Enviro Overhaul

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    Updated regulations from the White House Council on Environmental Quality likely preclude government agencies from considering climate change in most National Environmental Policy Act analyses, making litigation over the revisions all but certain, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Opinion

    ABA's New Guidance On Litigation Funding Misses The Mark

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    The American Bar Association should revise its recently approved best practices on third-party litigation funding as they do not reflect how legal finance actually works and could create confusion among lawyers, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • What Firms Should Ask Before Hiring Attorneys From Gov't

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    In the final year of any presidential administration, there is an undeniable appetite on the part of large law firms for government-savvy legal talent, but firms need to first consider how they will actually utilize their new star hire, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • The Ethics Of Using Chatbots For Legal Services

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    Delegating legal work to robots involves several risks, including running afoul of statutes dictating unauthorized practice of law, but with the right precautions, law firms can lawfully employ artificially intelligent chatbots that can imitate human conversations, say attorneys at Haynes and Boone.

  • Opinion

    ABA Must Seize Opportunity To Respond To Bar Exam Chaos

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    The challenges of administering bar exams this year have put the future of the profession in jeopardy, but the American Bar Association at its ongoing annual meeting can adopt a resolution that would urge jurisdictions to take emergency actions with respect to licensure of new attorneys, says Nicholas Allard, former president of Brooklyn Law School.

  • How Pandemic Is Affecting The Pace Of Judicial Opinions

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    The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way judges work, but how has it impacted the volume of work product they generate? Ben Strawn and Omeed Azmoudeh at Davis Graham investigate using data from the PACER federal courts registry.

  • 6 Steps For Law Firms Looking To Improve Their Culture

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    The COVID-19 crisis represents an inflection point for law firm culture, and smart firm leaders will take advantage of this moment to build innovation-welcoming environments that support partners, associates, business services teams and clients alike, say Jennifer Johnson at Calibrate Legal and Kathleen Pearson at Pillsbury.

  • Virtual Courts Amplify Lawyers' Corporate Spokesperson Role

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    Greater access to virtual court proceedings during the pandemic means an increased likelihood that legal arguments will jump from the courtroom to the court of public opinion, so counsel must tailor statements with the client's reputation in mind, says Mike Dolan at Finsbury.

  • Law Firms Must Note Pandemic's Outsize Impact On Women

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    In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, gender roles in many families have reverted to scenes from the 1960s, and law firms have a huge opportunity — indeed a business imperative — to avoid the mistakes of the past, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • Opinion

    Calif. Housing Approval Law Is A Strong Tool For Developers

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    Two recent California Superior Court decisions substantially reinforce the strength of a state law requiring swift approval of housing production, allowing the law to work as intended and preclude lengthy litigation challenges, say attorneys at Coblentz Patch.

  • The 'Rocket Docket' Show Goes On Despite Setbacks

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    After 11 years as the fastest civil trial court in the land, the Eastern District of Virginia rocket docket is now tied for second place among the nation's 94 district courts, but the court has moved swiftly to adapt to the COVID-19 crisis and continues to dispense justice safely and efficiently, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Water Reg Suits May Offer Preview Of Likely NEPA Challenges

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    The ongoing litigation over the Trump administration's repeal and replacement of the Obama-era Clean Water Rule provides a road map for what to expect in likely forthcoming lawsuits challenging the White House Council on Environmental Quality's new National Environmental Policy Act regulations, says Christopher Thomas at Perkins Coie.

  • Opinion

    Pandemic Lays Bare The Inequities Inherent In The Bar Exam

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    The outrage over the life-altering consequences of decisions being made around state bar exams during the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the classism built into the exam, and the legal profession should take this moment to reevaluate how new attorneys are licensed, say Naomi Shatz and Katherine Dullea at Zalkind Duncan.

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