Construction

  • February 02, 2024

    Green Group Blasts Berkshire Unit's Bid To Flush Water Suit

    An environmentalist group urged a North Carolina federal court to keep alive its Clean Water Act complaint against a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. unit, arguing that it's packed with specifics about how pollution from a development has sullied nearby waterways.

  • February 02, 2024

    Clyde & Co. Hires Ex-Lewis Brisbois Team In Chicago

    Law firm Clyde & Co. LLP announced Thursday that it had hired nine Chicago-based insurance law and general liability attorneys from Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP, including that firm's former managing partner in the city.

  • February 02, 2024

    Mich. Electric Co. Can't Put Upgrade Delay Cost On Customers

    An electric company cannot pass the extra costs of construction delays during a power plant upgrade onto customers, an appellate panel said Thursday, affirming a Michigan regulator's decision that the utility must eat the loss.

  • February 02, 2024

    US Steel Owes Wages For Off-Clock Duties, Worker Says

    U.S. Steel has not been paying its workers at a Pittsburgh-area plant for the time they spend preparing for and wrapping up their shifts, shorting them on wages, a mechanic has alleged in a complaint filed in Pennsylvania state court.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ohio Demolition Co. Hit With Post-Default Discovery Fines

    An Ohio building demolition and sewer services contractor has to pay daily fines for failing to respond to information requests from multiple union benefit funds' trustees in a case the company and its owner have already lost by default after they were found in contempt of federal court.

  • February 02, 2024

    Md. Bill Seeks Property Tax Credits For Residential Projects

    Maryland would allow local governments to grant property tax credits for certain hotel and residential developments with the requirement that larger developments include affordable housing under legislation introduced in the state House of Delegates.

  • February 02, 2024

    Calif. Drywall Co. Again Short On Wages And OT, Court Told

    A California drywall company continues to underpay its workers and to prevent them from recording their overtime despite having faced several U.S. Department of Labor investigations on those issues, the state's attorney general has said in state court.

  • February 01, 2024

    EPA Floats New PFAS Rules For Hazardous Waste

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday proposed two rules that would clear the way for extensive new regulation of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances.

  • February 01, 2024

    Ariz. Tribes Push To Halt Work On SunZia Line

    Two tribes and conservation groups are urging an Arizona federal judge to pause construction on a 550-mile power transmission line approved by the U.S. Department of the Interior before the work damages historic and cultural resources they claim the government failed to properly assess and safeguard.

  • February 01, 2024

    Alaska Tribes Seek Canada Recognition To Consult On Mines

    A group of tribal governments in southeast Alaska is asking Canadian regulators to acknowledge its historic presence along the boundary-crossing Unuk River, in order to protect the watershed from open-pit gold and silver mining Skeena Resources Ltd. is proposing in British Columbia.

  • February 01, 2024

    NC Woman Wants Town Forced Off Land After 10 Years

    A North Carolina homeowner has said the North Carolina Supreme Court needs to stop the town of Apex from violating her constitutional rights by taking over her property because it was ordered to do so.

  • February 01, 2024

    Enbridge Unit Denied Land Transfer For Texas Pipeline

    A Texas federal judge on Thursday rejected as premature an Enbridge Inc. unit's immediate land transfer request to conduct environmental surveys for a federally approved 137-mile-long natural gas pipeline project, following the company's unsuccessful attempts to contact the landowners.

  • February 01, 2024

    Mexico Can't Confirm US Labor Claims At Fujikura Auto Plant

    Investigators from Mexico's Ministry of Labor and Ministry of Economy said Wednesday they can't verify U.S.-backed claims of labor rights violations and discrimination against former union organizers at an automotive plant in Piedras Negras, Coahuila.

  • February 01, 2024

    $50M Tire Supply Demand Could Fall Flat, Conn. Judge Says

    A Hartford federal judge on Thursday said he was unconvinced that he could interpret an Iowa company's preferred supplier agreement in a way that would generate a nearly $50 million judgment against a longtime buyer, and asked for further briefing to justify the company's position.

  • February 01, 2024

    Ex-Trump Org. CFO Faces Possible Perjury Charge, Mulls Plea

    Donald Trump's longtime top financial officer Allen Weisselberg is in plea negotiations related to potential perjury charges stemming from his testimony in the New York attorney general's civil fraud trial, according to a source familiar with the matter.

  • February 01, 2024

    Real Estate Rumors: Fortinet, Kayne Anderson, Northwind

    Fortinet has reportedly bought a Santa Clara campus for $192 million, Kayne Anderson is believed to be associated with the buyer of a $55.8 million apartment complex near Ohio State University and Northwind Group is said to be the lender behind a $70 million mortgage for a property in Jersey City.

  • February 01, 2024

    9th Circ. Told RICO Claim Can't Stick To Enviro Complaint

    Developer Relevant Group has shot back at eight interest groups who told the Ninth Circuit in a combined brief that it should allow a property owner to challenge projects using California environmental law, in a case from the developer arguing the complaints over its work amount to extortion.

  • January 31, 2024

    Security Co. Prez Downplays AG Probes In Toll Bros. Lawsuit

    The president of a Connecticut-based home security company quibbled Wednesday with a Toll Brothers Inc. subsidiary's attempt to use government enforcement actions to bolster a $2.7 million prejudgment remedy bid in a contract feud, at one point correcting his opponent on the fine one state collected by some $4 million.

  • January 31, 2024

    GM Execs Hid Driverless Tech And Airbag Concerns, Suit Says

    GM executives and directors have been hit with a shareholder derivative suit alleging they placed the company in legal jeopardy and harmed its share price by downplaying safety concerns about its Cruise autonomous vehicle technology and making misrepresentations about airbag safety.

  • January 31, 2024

    Final Immigration Fee Hikes Seen As 'Tax' On Employers

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' final fee schedule imposing fee hikes for employment-based visas and a $600 fee to fund the asylum system is drawing ire from attorneys who say it amounts to a tax on talent-strapped employers.

  • January 31, 2024

    Solar CEO Says Feds Skimped On Offshore Wind Farm Review

    A solar developer fighting federal approvals for an offshore wind project taking shape off Massachusetts told the First Circuit the government took an improper "slice and dice" approach to conclude that construction would not significantly harm endangered North Atlantic right whales.

  • January 31, 2024

    Biden Climate Team Gains New Int'l Aide, EPA Air Leader

    In significant moves for the Biden administration's climate agenda, the White House on Wednesday said John Podesta will replace John Kerry as President Joe Biden's top international climate change policy adviser and the U.S. Senate confirmed Biden's pick to lead the Environmental Protection Agency's air office.

  • January 31, 2024

    Drowned Dredging Worker's Widow Hits Feds With $4M Suit

    The Army Corps of Engineers' failure to properly ensure safe working conditions for workers contracted to dredge the Delaware River led to the death of a man who fell from an elevated work platform and drowned, according to a $4 million suit by the man's widow.

  • January 31, 2024

    NYC Developer Gets OK To Seek Votes For Ch. 11 Plan

    The developer of a stalled construction project in New York City's West Chelsea can solicit votes on its most recent Chapter 11 plan, which includes an $87.4 million sale of the property, a Delaware bankruptcy judge said at a hearing Wednesday.

  • January 31, 2024

    Insurer Says Dispute Over Developer's HVAC Claim Settled

    A Tokio Marine unit notified a Minnesota federal court Wednesday that it has reached an agreement with a construction company and subcontractor in a coverage dispute over a property developer's claim that the companies must pay to replace part of a residential HVAC system.

Expert Analysis

  • Navigating USCIS' New Minimum EB-5 Investment Period

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    Recent significant modifications to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ EB-5 at-risk requirement are causing uncertainty for several reasons, but investors who consider certain key aspects of prospective projects can mitigate the immigration and investment risks, say Samuel Silverman at EB5AN, Ronald Klasko at Klasko Immigration, and Kate Kalmykov at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Mexico

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    ESG has yet to become part of the DNA of the Mexican business model, but huge strides are being made in that direction, as more stakeholders demand that companies adopt, at the least, a modicum of sustainability commitments and demonstrate how they will meet them, says Carlos Escoto at Galicia Abogados.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • DC Ruling Provides Support For Builders Risk Claim Recovery

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    To deny coverage for builders risk claims, insurers have been increasingly relying on two arguments, both of which have been invalidated in the recent U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia decision, South Capitol Bridgebuilders v. Lexington, say Greg Podolak and Cheryl Kozdrey at Saxe Doernberger.

  • What NJ's Green Remediation Guidance Means For Cleanups

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    Recent guidance from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection promoting greener approaches to restoring contaminated sites demonstrates the state's commitment to sustainability and environmental justice — but could also entail more complexity, higher costs and longer remediation timelines, say J. Michael Showalter and Bradley Rochlen at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Mo. Solar Projects Need Clarity On Enterprise Zone Tax Relief

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    In Missouri, enhanced enterprise zones offer tax abatements that could offset the cost of solar project infrastructure, but developers must be willing to navigate uncertainty about whether the project is classified as real property, say Lizzy McEntire and Anna Kimbrell at Husch Blackwell.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Looking For Defense Contract Appeal Trends In Annual Report

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    A deep dive into the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals annual report for the 2023 fiscal year reveals increases in the number of cases filed, pending motions and expedited or accelerated cases, while the board disposed of fewer cases than in prior fiscal years, say Scott Flesch and Alexandra Prime at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 2nd Circ. Holding Could Disrupt SEC Disgorgement Methods

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    A recent Second Circuit decision in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Govil that held disgorgement to be an equitable remedy has the potential to substantially disrupt the SEC's long-standing approach to monetary remedies in many of the cases the agency brings, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: South Korea

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    Numerous ESG trends have materialized in South Korea in the past three years, with impacts ranging from greenwashing prevention and carbon neutrality measures to workplace harassment and board diversity initiatives, say Chang Wook Min and Hyun Chan Jung at Jipyong.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • A Look At Successful Bid Protests In FY 2023

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    Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin look beyond the statistics in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s recent annual report on bid protests, sharing their insights about nine categories of sustained protests, gained from reading every fiscal year 2023 decision in which the protester had a positive result.

  • A Bird's Eye View Of NYC's New Parapet Inspection Law

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    Building owners in New York City should be ready for the city's new parapet inspection requirements going into effect in January, which will likely necessitate additional construction work for countless buildings not previously subject to formal inspections, says Benjamin Fox Tracy at Braverman Greenspun.

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