Product Liability

  • October 19, 2020

    Ga. Justices Affirm $6M Award In Suzuki Brake Defect Case

    A trial court properly halved a $12.5 million verdict against Suzuki Motor Corp. for what jurors found was a defectively designed brake, the Georgia Supreme Court held Monday, affirming a $6 million judgment for a motorcyclist injured in a crash.

  • October 19, 2020

    Preparing The Next Generation Of Female Trial Lawyers

    To build the ranks of female trial attorneys, law firms must integrate them into every aspect of a case — from witness preparation to courtroom arguments — instead of relegating them to small roles, says Kalpana Srinivasan, co-managing partner at Susman Godfrey.

  • October 19, 2020

    Mentorship Is Key To Fixing Drop-Off Of Women In Law

    It falls to senior male attorneys to recognize the crisis female attorneys face as the pandemic amplifies an already unequal system and to offer their knowledge, experience and counsel to build a better future for women in law, says James Meadows at Culhane Meadows.

  • October 19, 2020

    What BigLaw Can Do To Actually Retain Female Attorneys

    Even as BigLaw firms are recruiting women into their ranks in larger numbers, their presence in leadership and equity partnerships remains stubbornly low. Here’s a look at why this is happening — and what firms can do.

  • October 19, 2020

    Female Attorneys Gain Ground In Battle For Clerkships​

    More female attorneys are landing highly sought-after U.S. Supreme Court clerkships, and the experience can turbocharge their careers.

  • October 19, 2020

    These Firms Have The Most Women In Equity Partnerships

    At most U.S. law firms, equity partnerships are still overwhelmingly male, but women at some firms are starting to shake up that reality and smash the glass ceiling that has prevented them from advancing to the uppermost ranks. Here are this year’s Ceiling Smashers — the firms that are outpacing their peers as the legal industry works toward closing the gender gap in its top ranks.

  • October 19, 2020

    Wearing Natural Hair In BigLaw

    In this video, four Black women share their thoughts about wearing natural hair as BigLaw attorneys. In order of appearance, the attorneys are: Rukayatu Tijani, founder of Firm for the Culture and a former BigLaw associate; Delilah Clay, legislative & regulatory advisor at Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP; Rachel Boyce, associate at Cooley LLP; and Crystal Nwaneri, associate at Fenwick & West LLP.

  • October 19, 2020

    Biden-Trump Contest Has Fate Of Green Regs At Stake

    The 2020 presidential election will determine whether the country gets four more years of environmental deregulation or a concerted effort to tighten existing pollution controls and be part of global efforts to curb climate change.

  • October 19, 2020

    OneBeacon Must Pay Reinsurance In $35M Asbestos Deal

    A New York federal judge held Monday that OneBeacon Insurance Co. must reimburse a portion of Fireman's Fund Insurance Co.'s $35 million settlement payment resolving asbestos injury claims against a mining company.

  • October 19, 2020

    Drivers Seek Final OK In $890M Hyundai, Kia Engine Fire Deal

    Drivers asked a California federal judge to sign off on an estimated $890 million deal that includes full reimbursements for repairs and extended warranties to settle consolidated class claims that Hyundai and Kia sold vehicles with failure-prone engines that could sometimes catch fire.

  • October 19, 2020

    Hyundai Inks Deal To Fix Cars In Engine Defect Suit

    A proposed class of Elantra drivers is asking a New Jersey federal court to give the go-ahead to a deal that would have Hyundai Motor America pay to fix cars with an alleged engine defect and bring the claims against the automaker to a close.

  • October 19, 2020

    High Court Won't Hear FDA Stimulant Seizure Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal of a suit brought by Hi-Tech Pharmaceuticals Inc. challenging the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's seizure of dietary supplements containing an illegal stimulant.

  • October 19, 2020

    High Court Won't Review Dog Food FDA Approval Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a jurisdictional dispute in a case alleging prescription dog foods made by Nestle Purina Petcare Co. and Royal Canin USA Inc. were not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, leaving the case in federal court.

  • October 16, 2020

    In Their Own Words: Being A Woman In BigLaw

    Firms are recruiting more women than previously to their ranks, but still have trouble retaining them at the same rate as men. Law360 asked three female attorneys who left BigLaw about how firms could better serve the women who work there. Here's what they have to say.

  • October 16, 2020

    Law360's Glass Ceiling Report: What You Need To Know

    While law firms continue to tout efforts to close the gender gap in their ranks, parity is still a distant goal, our annual survey shows.

  • October 16, 2020

    Glass Ceiling Report: How Does Your Firm Measure Up?

    Law firms have long struggled to clear the barriers women face in the legal industry, particularly when it comes to accessing the top ranks. Law360's 2020 Glass Ceiling Report looks to shed light on the progress firms have made and where they aim to be.

  • October 16, 2020

    Energy Drink Rivals' Design Trial Closes On Colorful Note

    Counsel for the maker of Bang energy drink sang and strummed his guitar for a Florida federal judge Friday, putting a final note on a trial over alleged trade dress infringement by rival Monster Energy Co. almost as colorful as the vibrant can designs at issue.

  • October 16, 2020

    Patients Say Ill. Allergan Ruling Is Irrelevant To Implant MDL

    Patients accusing Allergan Inc. of making an unsafe breast implant argued Thursday that Allergan's recent defeat of an Illinois suit over the implant won't help a New Jersey federal judge decide whether to dismiss their suits from multidistrict litigation over the product.

  • October 16, 2020

    Peloton Recalls 54K Pedals After Reported Breakage, Injuries

    Peloton Interactive Inc. is recalling pedals from 27,000 of its first-generation exercise bikes, or more than 54,000 pedals, over a risk that their axles could break during use and cut riders' legs, after receiving 120 reports of broken pedals.

  • October 16, 2020

    Green Groups Hammer EPA Over Coal Ash Pit Rule

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday said electric utilities may keep coal ash in unlined pits as long as they prove there's no "reasonable probability" of groundwater contamination, drawing swift condemnation from green groups.

  • October 16, 2020

    Reinsurer Wants 2nd Circ. To Stop Asbestos Billing Appeal

    Munich Reinsurance America Inc. is urging the Second Circuit to uphold a ruling finding that it does not owe Utica Mutual Insurance Co. $2.7 million in expenses stemming from asbestos verdicts, saying the lower court was correct in finding its reinsurance agreement didn't include those costs.

  • October 16, 2020

    Exxon Bashes DC Bid To Make Climate Suit A Local Matter

    ExxonMobil Corp. and other oil giants urged a D.C. federal court to maintain jurisdiction over the U.S. capital city's suit accusing them of deceiving consumers about climate-change-related risks, saying the suit minces words to obscure its true goal of curtailing fossil fuel use.

  • October 16, 2020

    4th Circ. Won't Delay $30M Asbestos Verdict For Co.'s Appeal

    Covil Corp. must pony up more than $30 million to a widow who claimed her husband died as a result of asbestos the company failed to warn him about, after the Fourth Circuit decided it will not delay the enforcement of the verdict while Covil prepares a petition to appeal the verdict to the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • October 15, 2020

    Electrolux Reaches $6.9M Settlement Over FIFRA Allegations

    Electrolux Home Products Inc. agreed Thursday to pay a nearly $7 million civil penalty to settle allegations that it imported unregistered pesticide in "antibacterial" filters for Frigidaire brand dehumidifiers and air conditioners in violation of federal insecticide laws.

  • October 15, 2020

    Enviros, W.Va. Gov.'s Coal Co. Say Deal Could Scuttle Trial

    A West Virginia coal company and several environmental groups have reached a tentative deal resolving their dispute over environmental law violations, they told a West Virginia federal judge Wednesday, just five days before their damages trial was set to kick off.

Expert Analysis

  • Guest Feature

    5 Ways Firms Can Avoid Female Atty Exodus During Pandemic

    Author Photo

    The pandemic's disproportionate impact on women presents law firms with a unique opportunity to devise innovative policies that will address the increasing home life demands female lawyers face and help retain them long after COVID-19 is over, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • Ill. Ruling Bolsters Trend Against No-Injury Monitoring Claims

    Author Photo

    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling in Berry v. City of Chicago, rejecting claims for medical monitoring by plaintiffs not suffering present physical injuries, reflects a growing trend and could influence other state courts to rule similarly, say John Ewald and Matthew Bush at King & Spalding.

  • How The State And Local Regulatory Landscape Is Expanding

    Author Photo

    States and localities are employing creative methods to emerge as key players in regulatory enforcement traditionally dominated by the federal government, including False Claims Act investigations, unfair and deceptive acts and practices claims, and pharmaceutical sector regulation, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Beirut Blast Shows Need To Review Ammonium Nitrate Regs

    Author Photo

    The recent ammonium nitrate explosion in Beirut should prompt renewed scrutiny of how the U.S. regulates use and storage of this chemical, and a stronger focus on policies that balance its benefits against its risks to people and the environment, says Karen Cullinane at Goldberg Segalla.

  • How COVID-19 May Rattle Companies' Supply Chains

    Author Photo

    As manufacturers, distributors and retailers begin to resume their activities in the wake of COVID-19 lockdowns, they must be aware of how changes in manufacturing, storage, shipping and staffing practices at different points in the supply chain could compromise product quality and increase legal liability, says Zal Phiroz at Pier Consulting Group.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

    Author Photo

    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

  • Why Online Mediation May Be Here To Stay

    Author Photo

    Videoconferenced mediation offers several advantages and helps cases settle faster and more cordially, making it hard to imagine going back to logistically difficult in-person dispute resolution after COVID-19 restrictions are gone, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC.

  • Clients Have The Power To Promote Wellness At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    Law firm clients can play a role in lowering mental distress in the legal profession by seeking lawyer wellness data from firms and factoring those responses into outside counsel hiring decisions, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Reinforces FTC Disgorgement Authority

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Federal Trade Commission v. OMICS — a case involving deceptive practices allegations against an academic conference and journals company — may further embolden the commission to seek the broadest possible measure of disgorgement, even when not supported by its own evidence, says August Horvath at Foley Hoag.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Courts Should Welcome Well-Crafted Amicus Briefs

    Author Photo

    A Seventh Circuit judge's recent order granting leave for three organizations to file amicus curiae briefs in Prairie Rivers Network v. Dynegy Midwest Generation is a reminder that relevant, nonduplicative amicus briefs can provide courts with helpful perspective, important facts and legal arguments, says Lawrence Ebner at Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • What To Know About FDA's 'Intended Use' Proposed Rule

    Author Photo

    A recently proposed rule from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration provides helpful clarity on what qualifies as evidence of new intended uses for drugs and medical devices, but also raises constitutional and statutory questions, says Coleen Klasmeier at Sidley.

  • Key Takeaways From Groundbreaking Virtual Civil Jury Trial

    Author Photo

    The nation's first online jury trial with a binding verdict — Griffin v. Albanese Enterprise in Florida’s Fourth Judicial Circuit Court — recently provided crucial insights into how to better prepare for virtual voir dire and trial, says Kevin-Khristián Cosgriff Hernández at Delphi Litigation.

  • What Hiring Law Firms Should Consider Instead Of Grades

    Author Photo

    With law schools forgoing traditional grading due to the pandemic, hiring firms that have heavily weighted first-year grades during the on-campus interview process should turn to metrics that allow a more holistic view of a candidate, says Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Pandemic-Era Civil Jury Trials Require Constitutional Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    Courts should carefully consider the constitutional rights of litigants before restarting civil jury trials amid the pandemic, because inadequate remote voir dire procedures and evidentiary handicaps due to health safety measures could amount to the denial of a fair trial by an impartial jury, say attorneys at Rumberger Kirk.

  • FCA Materiality Standard's Odd Application To Payment Terms

    Author Photo

    A recent Pennsylvania federal court's decision in U.S. v. Sanofi highlights a puzzling aspect of False Claims Act materiality, under which failure to satisfy a condition of payment does not necessarily satisfy the materiality requirement to trigger FCA liability, says Geoffrey Kaiser at Kaiser Law.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!