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White Collar

  • May 17, 2019

    Helping Manafort's Kid Get Skadden Gig No Crime, Craig Says

    Former Skadden partner Gregory Craig urged a D.C. federal court Friday to bar the government from introducing evidence that he helped line up a job at Skadden for the daughter of the now-jailed former chairman of the Trump campaign, Paul Manafort.

  • May 17, 2019

    Calif. Man Who Threatened FCC Chair's Kids Gets 1.5 Years

    A California man who threatened to kill the children of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai was sentenced Friday morning to 20 months in prison, the U.S. Department of Justice has announced.

  • May 17, 2019

    Airplane Broker Can't Slip 7-Year Sentence For Skimming

    The Eleventh Circuit said Friday that the lower court did not err in ordering a 90-month prison sentence, and more than $600,000 in restitution, for a former airplane salesman convicted of skimming from his employer.

  • May 17, 2019

    Esformes Seeks New Trial, Says Feds Violated His Rights

    Nursing home mogul and convicted fraudster Philip Esformes has urged a Florida federal judge to grant him a new trial, arguing that the prosecution infringed his due process rights by using hollow charges of Medicare violations to influence the jury with weeks of evidence about unhappy patients at his facilities.

  • May 17, 2019

    Platinum Exec Says Co-Founder Misled Investors

    A former Platinum Partners executive on Friday told a New York federal jury that the firm’s co-founder and others misled potential investors about the financial health of Platinum’s main fund while the hedge fund manager was struggling to pay back tens of millions of dollars to its limited partners.

  • May 17, 2019

    Why Law Firms Must Have A Compliance Plan For PE Clients

    As the SEC focuses on compliance in private equity investments, legal advisers must be ready to help clients assess risk, look for red flags at target companies and implement formal compliance systems, because the simple act of having a plan in place can win favor with regulators.

  • May 17, 2019

    Constitutional Crisis? Not Quite, But Courts Could Be Tested

    Legal and political scholars agree we are not in a constitutional crisis … yet. But as tensions mount between the president and Congress, the role of the third branch of government could be both crucial and perilous.

  • May 17, 2019

    Conrad Black Prosecutors Irked By Bypass Of Pardon Process

    Three of the former prosecutors who tried former media mogul Lord Conrad Black are upset about his pardon — not because it happened, but because President Donald Trump appears to have bypassed the U.S. Department of Justice's traditional role in the process.

  • May 17, 2019

    Ex-Skyworks Engineer Arrested On Insider Trading Charges

    An engineer who formerly worked at semiconductor maker Skyworks Solutions Inc. turned himself in on Friday to face charges in California federal court that he stole private financial information from his ex-employer, cashed in on illegal trades, and then fled to Taiwan when he was caught.

  • May 17, 2019

    Prosecutors Evade Cop's Released Expunged Records Suit

    An internal affairs police officer at a New Jersey military base cannot sue a county prosecutor's office for releasing his expunged criminal records to a patrolman he had investigated because he did not file a tort claim notice within the requisite time frame, a state appeals court said Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Ohio State Doctor's Abuse Was 'Open Secret,' Report Says

    A report by Perkins Coie LLP on allegations that a now-deceased Ohio State University sports doctor sexually abused and harassed student-athletes for decades concluded that the abuse was an “open secret” that involved at least 177 men but failed to spur action by the school.

  • May 17, 2019

    Platinum Reinsurer Strikes Back At Insurer 'Smear Campaign'

    A set of reinsurance and asset management companies that has been accused of operating as an alter ego of now-defunct Platinum Partners is fighting to escape racketeering claims from the hedge fund's insurers.

  • May 17, 2019

    The Law Firms Making Millions Off The PG&E Cases

    The nation's largest utility company, Pacific Gas and Electric, has paid at least $89 million in the past year in legal fees to firms directly involved with its bankruptcy, civil, criminal and regulatory cases stemming from California wildfires — and the vast majority of that sum has gone to Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP.

  • May 17, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week has seen a Kazakhstan lender file fraud claims against a dissolved London-based business, a Dubai airport security equipment company sue Barclays, and Yamaha's motorcycle business file claims against a German insurer. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 17, 2019

    Cryptocurrency Thief Gets Six Years For $1.8M Heist

    A New York state judge on Thursday sentenced a man to six years in prison for his admitted role in a kidnapping and robbery that drained $1.8 million worth of Ether cryptocurrency from a victim's digital wallet.

  • May 16, 2019

    Atty-Duping Scammer Cops To Role In $550M Ponzi Scheme

    A Maryland man accused of scamming investors including lawyers, bankers, investment advisers and professional athletes in a $550 million scheme offering high returns on consumer debt pleaded guilty to wire fraud and conspiracy in federal court, prosecutors announced Thursday.

  • May 16, 2019

    DOJ Looking To Avoid 5th Amendment Fracas: Fraud Chief

    The acting chief of the Department of Justice's Fraud Section said on Thursday that prosecutors are trying to avoid a repeat of a recent case in which the government effectively jeopardized the constitutionality of a case against a Deutsche Bank trader by relying too heavily on the bank's lawyers at Paul Weiss.

  • May 16, 2019

    Feds Urge High Court To Pass On 'Bridgegate' Appeal

    Federal prosecutors on Wednesday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a bid from a former appointee of ex-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to review her "Bridgegate" conviction for orchestrating a politically motivated traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge, saying it's backed by sufficient evidence.

  • May 16, 2019

    Prosecutors Prodded To Disclaim Excessive SEC Coordination

    A Manhattan federal judge pushed prosecutors Thursday to disavow any "excessive coordination" with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in the run-up to their decision to criminally charge hedge fund co-founder Jason Rhodes with a $19 million fraud.

  • May 16, 2019

    Ex-GE Worker Cops To Scheme To Nick Trade Secrets

    Federal prosecutors announced Thursday that a former General Electric engineer has copped to charges that he plotted with another former worker to use trade secrets allegedly stolen from the energy giant to benefit a competing business they formed.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    IRS Should Use Tax Law To Combat The Opioid Epidemic

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    The IRS, which enforces anti-trafficking tax laws against state-regulated cannabis businesses, should be fair and apply the same policy against pharmaceutical companies that illegally market their opioids, says Kat Allen at Wykowski Law.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • DC Circ.'s Chance To Clarify 'Should Have Known' Liability

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    With its upcoming decision in Thaddeus North v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the D.C. Circuit should articulate a clear legal standard for when a compliance officer “should have known” about reportable events. Without such guidance, compliance officers cannot do their jobs without fearing unintended consequences, say Brian Rubin and Michelle McIntyre of Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • The Insider Trading 'Mess' Congress Is Trying To Fix

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    The House Committee on Financial Services recently approved the Insider Trading Prohibition Act, which creates a statutory definition of insider trading in response to what one legislator called a “judicial mess.” The history of insider trading prosecutions supports the need for clarification, say attorneys with Paul Hastings.

  • DC Circ. Gives New Meaning To 'Willful' In Securities Statutes

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    The D.C. Circuit’s recent decision in The Robare Group v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission drives home the idea that long-accepted interpretations of federal securities laws may be upended when appellate courts take a fresh look at the statutory language, say attorneys at Debevoise & Plimpton.

  • Practical Safeguards For Employee Use Of Messaging Apps

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    Independent of the U.S. Department of Justice's recent interest in instant and ephemeral messaging apps, companies have plenty of sound reasons to control their use in the office and have an array of tools to do it, say Erin Schrantz and Andrew Philip Walker of Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • What Gov't Outsourcing Ruling Means For Investigations

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    A New York federal court's recent decision in U.S. v. Connolly is a warning to prosecutors against outsourcing their investigations to companies and outside counsel, but it should also be used by companies to determine the framework for internal investigations, says Rachel Maimin of Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Foreign Banks Should Remain Wary Of US Sanctions Laws

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    While major enforcement actions against foreign banks for U.S. sanctions violations have slowed down in the past few years, recent settlements against three foreign banks show that federal and state authorities are still enforcing sanctions laws — and the pace of enforcement will likely increase, say Andrew Zimmitti and Richard Hartunian of Manatt.