White Collar

  • July 19, 2019

    Ex-Credit Suisse Director Cops To Role In $2B Loan Fraud

    A former Credit Suisse managing director on Friday admitted to his role in a bribery and investor fraud scheme involving $2 billion in loans to state-backed companies in Mozambique, telling a New York federal judge he conspired to defraud those who invested in the debt.

  • July 19, 2019

    Judge Chides Carnival Execs To Take Lead On Pollution Fixes

    A frustrated Florida federal judge pressed Carnival Corp. leaders Friday to demonstrate their commitment to changing the company's approach after agreeing last month to pay $20 million for violating a previous settlement for illegal dumping.

  • July 19, 2019

    Judge Won't Let HSBC Hong Kong Kill Discovery In Ponzi Suit

    A New York federal judge on Friday said he would not reconsider his decision to order jurisdictional discovery for claims that HSBC's Hong Kong affiliate aided a Ponzi scheme that pulled $37 million from investors' pockets.

  • July 19, 2019

    'Everybody In The Crosshairs' As DOJ Opioid Blitz Gets Real

    The U.S. Department of Justice's newest indictment of a painkiller distributor and its executives strongly suggests that the agency has embarked on a calculated criminal crackdown after years of civil enforcement failed to ease the opioid epidemic.

  • July 19, 2019

    Ex-NSA Contractor Gets 9 Years For Classified Doc Theft

    A former National Security Agency contractor was sentenced to nine years in prison on Friday after amassing a hoard of top-secret and other classified documents over the course of roughly two decades, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • July 19, 2019

    Targeted Ransomware Attacks Soar, Symantec Reports

    The number of targeted ransomware attacks has skyrocketed in the past year as new attackers have increasingly emerged, cybersecurity giant Symantec Corp. said in a recent report.

  • July 19, 2019

    CFTC Gets $2.9M Win Against No-Show Alleged Fraudster

    A Texas federal judge granted the Commodity Futures Trading Commission a $2.9 million final judgment on Friday against an alleged fraudster who never appeared in the case or responded to the agency’s complaint.

  • July 19, 2019

    Banque Bonhôte Pays DOJ $1.2M More Over US Accounts

    Switzerland-based Banque Bonhôte & Cie SA agreed Friday to pay $1.2 million extra to the U.S. for failing to disclose eight U.S.-related bank accounts with approximately $33 million in assets when it first struck a nonprosecution agreement in 2015.

  • July 19, 2019

    Craig Won't Use Ukraine Report From Judge's Firm At Trial

    Ex-Skadden partner Gregory Craig indicated Friday he didn’t want to introduce at his upcoming trial a Ukraine-focused report authored by lawyers at the former firm of the D.C. federal judge overseeing his criminal case.

  • July 19, 2019

    Palm Beach Sheriff To Probe Epstein Work Release

    The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office announced on Friday an internal investigation into the Florida department’s supervision of financier Jeffrey Epstein when he was jailed there a decade ago on sex crime charges, after a lawyer for some of Epstein's alleged victims implied the accused child rapist had abused the privileges of his work release.

  • July 19, 2019

    Rep. Asks Feds If DOJ Policy Shielded Trump From Indictment

    The head of the House Oversight Committee wants federal prosecutors to explain whether a U.S. Department of Justice policy that bars indicting a sitting president impacted the decision not to indict President Donald Trump following allegations that he violated campaign finance laws by paying off women he had affairs with.

  • July 19, 2019

    Money Moves: Covington, Weil, Eversheds Sutherland

    Covington & Burling LLP snagged a lobbying firm's formal general counsel, Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP added to its London office and Eversheds Sutherland is building out its banking team after a record year — this is Law360's latest roundup of personnel moves in the banking arena.

  • July 19, 2019

    Massachusetts Cases To Watch: Midyear Report

    Boston courthouses have been hopping as spring has turned to summer and high-profile white collar cases, the anticipated verdict in a landmark education and employment case, and a pair of cases dealing with courthouse immigration arrests have been filling up the Bay State's dockets. Here, Law360 highlights some of the most important cases to watch in the second half of 2019.

  • July 19, 2019

    After Delay, Pa. Programmer Pleads To Siemens Sabotage

    A Pittsburgh-area computer programmer pled guilty in federal court Friday to planting code that would deliberately break programs he’d written under contract with Siemens Corp., after his previous plea hearing was halted in June amid disagreements over whether his motivation should have been considered.

  • July 19, 2019

    Fraud Ring Posing As Gov't Officials, DHS Watchdog Warns

    The Department of Homeland Security’s watchdog has issued an alert about a scheme by an Atlanta-based transnational fraud ring that poses as government procurement officials to steal electronics from unsuspecting contractors.

  • July 19, 2019

    2nd Circ. Revives NYC Taxi Drivers' Unfair Suspension Suits

    The Second Circuit ruled Friday that New York City's practice of summarily suspending licenses for taxi drivers who've been arrested but not yet convicted deprives them of due process by denying them meaningful opportunities to challenge their suspensions.

  • July 19, 2019

    4 Arrested Over $10M Medicaid Fraud Via NYC Pharmacy

    A New York City pharmacy owner and three of her managers were arrested over a multifaceted scheme that included bribing customers to have their HIV drug prescriptions filled there and over $10 million in Medicaid fraud, the New York attorney general announced Friday.

  • July 19, 2019

    Courts Bolster Compassionate Release Under First Step

    Among the thousands of inmates released because of reforms under the First Step Act, a small group of prisoners have been granted compassionate release this year, many of them taking advantage of a new provision letting them make their case for release in court.

  • July 19, 2019

    Sens. Seek Info On Appraiser In Easement Donation Probe

    Senate Finance Committee lawmakers said Friday they requested information from an Alabama real estate licensing board about an appraiser who is alleged to have participated in abusive conservation easement transactions that resulted in $1.8 billion in federal tax deductions.

  • July 19, 2019

    7th Circ. Affirms 5-Year Sentence For Chiropractor's Fraud

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday upheld a five-year sentence for an Illinois chiropractor found guilty of health care fraud, saying he failed to show evidence of an error that could have gotten him a lighter sentencing recommendation.

  • July 19, 2019

    Engine Maker Execs Inflated Revenues By $25M, Feds Say

    An Illinois-based alternative-energy engine maker’s former executives got hit with criminal and civil securities fraud charges Friday over claims they engaged in an accounting fraud scheme that inflated company revenues by $25 million.

  • July 19, 2019

    Hooper Lundy OK To Rep Husband & Wife In 'Varsity Blues'

    A California couple charged in the nationwide college admissions case known as "Varsity Blues" told a Massachusetts federal judge they are comfortable having Hooper Lundy & Bookman PC represent them both, despite several concerns raised by prosecutors during a hearing Friday.

  • July 19, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen the owner of a Manchester skyscraper that needed repair sue several underwriters at Lloyd's, a prominent cryptocurrency trader drag a U.K. digital currency exchange into court and an executive for Honeywell sue HSBC Bank PLC. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 18, 2019

    Honeywell Faces FCPA Probe Related To Petrobras

    Honeywell International Inc. announced Thursday that it is under investigation by U.S. and Brazillian authorities for possible violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in relation to former third party workers from its Brazilian oil business and to Petróleo Brasileiro SA.

  • July 18, 2019

    Pa. Atty Faces Federal Charges Over Client Diversion Scheme

    Federal prosecutors have charged a Philadelphia-area personal injury attorney with mail fraud, claiming he secretly referred clients of his longtime personal injury firm to outside attorneys in exchange for a substantial cut of their fees and defrauded his firm out of $4.2 million, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

  • 8 Key Elements Of An Effective Antitrust Compliance Program

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    Based on our reading of last week’s antitrust compliance guidance from the U.S. Department of Justice, there are several important factors that organizations should consider as they assess whether their current program is up to snuff, say Herbert Allen and Alexa DiCunzolo at Polsinelli.

  • 5 Takeaways From DOJ Focus On Chinese Trade Secret Theft

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    Since its official announcement of the China Initiative eight months ago, the U.S. Department of Justice has publicized the initiation of six new cases that include references to both trade secrets and China. These shed some light on DOJ and U.S. business priorities, says Sara O’Connell at Pillsbury.

  • The DOJ's Changing Expectations For Antitrust Compliance

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    Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice reversed its long-standing policy of insisting on guilty pleas for criminal violations of the antitrust laws from companies that do not otherwise qualify for leniency. This shift opens a new path to deferred prosecution agreements for companies with "effective" antitrust compliance programs, say Renata Hesse, Benjamin Walker and Nicholas Menillo at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Answers To Key Legal Finance Ethics Questions

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    While there is discussion in some quarters about new regulations on commercial legal finance, the hands-off approach taken by the majority of courts and legislatures is an implicit recognition that it is already sufficiently regulated, says Danielle Cutrona of Burford Capital.

  • Inside A Closely Watched FCA And FIRREA Decision

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    Last week’s district court decision in Luce v. U.S. interprets a stricter standard of causation for False Claims Act cases and, significantly, makes a helpful contribution to a dearth of case law interpreting the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act’s penalty provisions, says Derek Adams of Feldesman Tucker.

  • Federal Agencies Need A Uniform Record-Keeping Process

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    The administrative record is very important to federal agency litigation — as showcased in last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census — yet there is no set of consistent principles to guide agencies in compiling these official records, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • What To Know About Pending Insider Trading Legislation

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    Recently introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives, the Insider Trading Prohibition Act will represent a potentially significant clarification of U.S. insider trading laws if it proceeds further. And it could be viewed as extending criminal liability to “reckless” conduct, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Opinion

    The Mueller Report Makes A Case For Impeachment

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    In advance of special counsel Robert Mueller's testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees, it is useful to review how specific allegations from his report provide powerful support for articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, says attorney Barbara Radnofsky.

  • The Role Of Dictionaries In Last Term's High Court Decisions

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    Since 32 of the 67 decisions issued by the U.S. Supreme Court during its October term cite dictionaries, it’s worth reviewing the opinions to learn which dictionaries the justices consulted and how they used them, say Bruce Wessel and Brian Weissenberg of Irell & Manella.

  • How To Evaluate The Rise In Legal Employment

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    Although the rate of employment for law school graduates — which had been falling steadily — saw a small increase over the last year, other factors, such as fewer graduates overall and potential future job growth stagnation, temper the good news for those pursuing law degrees, say Tiffane Cochran and Tyler Grimm of AccessLex Institute.

  • Revenge Porn Can Be Outlawed Under The First Amendment

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    To date, 46 states and the District of Columbia have passed needed legislation penalizing nonconsensual distribution of pornographic images of another person, but constitutionally outlawing this phenomenon is tricky and some statutes will likely be struck down, says Nicole Ligon, supervising attorney of the First Amendment Clinic at Duke Law.

  • When FCPA Violations Turn Into Private Securities Cases

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    In recent cases like Doshi v. General Cable Corp., plaintiffs attorneys have tried to use company disclosures of government investigations or settlement agreements with regulators to craft private claims for corporate bribery. There are a few things companies might consider to limit their exposure to such claims, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Opinion

    The Business Case For Championing Diverse Legal Teams

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    Leveraging the collective strengths of a diverse workforce is not only the right thing to do, it’s a strategic imperative for any successful firm or business, says Louise Pentland, executive vice president and chief business affairs and legal officer of PayPal.

  • Sanctions On Iran’s Supreme Leader: A Limited Escalation

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    Last month, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control announced sanctions on Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and on the Supreme Leader's Office. While the effort is notable for targeting prominent Iranian government officials, the practical impacts are fairly limited, say Daniel Waltz and Laura Klick of Squire Patton.