White Collar

  • May 13, 2021

    2 More Boston Cops To Plead Guilty In No-Work OT Case

    Two more Boston police officers accused of embezzling city funds through no-work overtime shifts at the department's evidence warehouse agreed to plead guilty in the federal case, according to Thursday court filings.

  • May 13, 2021

    Ex-CEO Must Face Charges In NJ Bank Fraud Scheme

    A New Jersey federal judge has refused to toss criminal charges that the onetime head of the now-defunct First State Bank took part in creating sham documents as part of an alleged scheme to deceive regulators and the bank about its financial health, finding that the records fell under a federal fraud statute.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ericsson To Pay Nokia €80M To Nix FCPA Probe-Related Claim

    Ericsson has agreed to pay Nokia €80 million ($97 million) to end a damages claim related to the 2019 resolution of allegations by U.S. agencies that the Stockholm-based telecom giant violated the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, it was announced Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Gibson Dunn Partner Questioned On 7-Figure Donziger Bills

    A Gibson Dunn partner with a lead role in pursuing financial information from Chevron foe Steven Donziger acknowledged during cross-examination Wednesday that the oil giant was willing to spend millions to pursue an $800,000 judgment and other relief against him.

  • May 12, 2021

    Jenner & Block Partner Appointed To Monitor UAW Deal

    A Michigan federal judge on Wednesday granted the government's unopposed motion to appoint Jenner & Block LLP partner Neil Barofsky as an independent monitor to help carry out a consent decree that ended a sprawling probe into the United Auto Workers union.

  • May 12, 2021

    9th Circ. Revives Charges Over DOD Contract Fraud Scheme

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday revived charges against a former military contracting officer over his alleged role in a bribery scheme, saying a law pausing the expiration of certain claims during wartime did not require fraud claims to be connected to a specific war.

  • May 12, 2021

    SEC Fines Broker $1.5M For Failure To Report Cybercrimes

    A broker-dealer of Empower Retirement must pay $1.5 million to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for failing to file hundreds of suspicious-activity reports despite knowing that bad actors were hacking, or attempting to hack, customer accounts, the agency announced Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Feds Say Private Equity CEO Forged Docs To Get $95M Loan

    The CEO of a private equity fund lied about his investors and used bogus financial documents to obtain a $95 million loan from a California bank, according to an indictment handed up in Manhattan federal court Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Investors Seek $6M Win In Suit Over Failed Hotel Project

    A group of investors has asked a New York federal court for a judgment of more than $6 million in its suit accusing hotel developers of stealing funds for a project in Colombia that never happened, saying the developers breached their obligation to repay the money that was loaned.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ghislaine Maxwell Sex Trafficking Trial Set For November

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday set a November trial date for Ghislaine Maxwell, the former associate of deceased financier Jeffrey Epstein, on sex trafficking charges.

  • May 12, 2021

    Antitrust Violation Not Enough To Revoke Realtor's License

    A Florida appeals court on Wednesday reversed the revocation of a realtor's real estate license, finding that the Department of Business and Professional Regulation did not have the authority to discipline him based solely on his conviction for antitrust violations.

  • May 12, 2021

    2 Charged For Roles In $650M Weed, Cattle Ponzi Scheme

    An indictment unsealed Tuesday in Colorado federal court charged an Illinois woman and a Georgia man over their roles in a Ponzi scheme involving cannabis and cattle that raised around $650 million from investors nationwide, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    NJ Judge Shoots Down FCA Suit Over Lobbyist Payments

    A New Jersey federal judge dismissed a False Claims Act lawsuit against Bayada Home Health Care Inc. on Wednesday, saying it failed to make the case that the company's decision not to disclose how it paid a lobbyist when buying an Ocean City home health care agency impacted the federal government through its Medicaid and Medicare programs.

  • May 12, 2021

    Biden Orders IT Gov't Contractors To Report Data Breaches

    President Joe Biden created a new national review board for major cyberattacks and ordered IT sector government contractors to report data breaches as part of an executive order issued Wednesday after hacks on a major U.S. pipeline company and federal agencies.

  • May 12, 2021

    Father-Son Investment Duo Can't Duck SEC's Fraud Claims

    A California federal judge on Tuesday refused to dismiss U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claims that a dad impersonated his son in order to give professional financial advice to clients when he was unable to access brokerage platforms himself.

  • May 12, 2021

    Firms Can't Shake RICO Suit Over Loan Scheme, Court Told

    A now-defunct investment partnership urged an Illinois federal judge not to let two law firms escape civil racketeering claims it launched over their alleged roles in a fraudulent loan scheme, arguing the attorneys should be forced to answer for their conduct.

  • May 12, 2021

    DC Judge Sanctions Paul Weiss, Alex Oh In Exxon Case

    A D.C. federal judge opted Wednesday to admonish Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP and former firm partner Alex Oh in connection with the Exxon human rights case that appears to have led Oh to resign prematurely from her new post as enforcement head of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ex-Electric Co. Controller Charged By Feds With $17M Fraud

    The former controller of a New York City electric contractor siphoned $17 million from the company so that she and her Florida family could live a "life of luxury," the Manhattan U.S. Attorney's office said Wednesday, unveiling charges against her, her husband and two children.

  • May 12, 2021

    Greenberg Traurig Adds Ex-U.S. Atty In Houston

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has added a former federal prosecutor to its white collar defense and investigations practice as a shareholder in Houston, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ex-TGP Exec Gets 3 Months For 'Varsity Blues' Exam Bribe

    A Massachusetts federal judge sentenced a former TGP Capital private equity executive to three months behind bars Wednesday for paying a $50,000 bribe in the "Varsity Blues" scandal to boost his son's standardized test scores.

  • May 12, 2021

    Top EU Court Rules Double Jeopardy Ban Can Halt Arrest

    Individuals prosecuted for crimes in one European Union country should not face arrest in another at the behest of nations outside the bloc — but only if their legal troubles are behind them, Europe's top court ruled Wednesday.

  • May 11, 2021

    Elizabeth Holmes' Mystique Unlikely To Survive Looming Trial

    Before Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes and her ex-boyfriend were charged with deceiving investors and patients about their blood-testing technology's efficacy, the pair exchanged voluminous text messages that now threaten to provide jurors at Holmes' criminal trial this summer a rare window into her psyche.

  • May 11, 2021

    Gibson Dunn Atty Rebuts Donziger Privacy Concerns At Trial

    A Gibson Dunn & Crutcher partner testified Tuesday in Chevron foe Steven Donziger's contempt trial that a court order mandating him to hand over his devices included privacy protections, despite Donziger's fears about delivering the entire body of his communications to the company.

  • May 11, 2021

    Gov't May Lean On Private Sector To Stop Next Critical Hack

    Convincing private businesses to open up to the government about cybercrime could be key in preventing future hacks of U.S. critical infrastructure, a risk underscored by a ransomware attack that has shuttered one of the nation's largest fuel pipelines.

  • May 11, 2021

    NJ To Resume In-Person Jury Trials As Virus Trends Improve

    The New Jersey Supreme Court signed off Tuesday on holding grand jury sessions and certain criminal and civil jury trials in person starting next month amid improving public health conditions throughout the Garden State in the battle against COVID-19.

Expert Analysis

  • Assessing SPAC Risk After SEC Pumps Brakes On Market

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    The current lull in special purpose acquisition company activity following the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent risk advisories offers SPAC parties an opportunity to ramp up due diligence on targets and to evaluate prior accounting of warrants to ensure regulatory compliance, say Julie Copeland and Ellen Graper at StoneTurn.

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

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    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • High Court's AMG Ruling Could Hinder FDA Enforcement

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in AMG Capital v. Federal Trade Commission, limiting the agency's ability to seek equitable monetary relief under the FTC Act, will likely also restrain the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's authority under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, due to similarities between the laws, say Joshua Oyster and Jenna McCarthy at Ropes & Gray.

  • Expect Increasing Scrutiny Of Wage-Fixing, No-Poach Deals

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    Employers can expect more actions against wage-fixing or no-poach agreements as the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division cracks down on labor market collusion, so companies should consider tailoring these agreements on their scope, duration and definition of nonsolicitation, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • How Justices' AMG Ruling Affects Privacy And Cybersecurity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in AMG Capital Management v. Federal Trade Commission removes the regulator's ability to seek monetary damages that discouraged privacy and cybersecurity breaches, and as a result, companies should reassess their exposure in these areas, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • Archegos Fallout Is A Wake-Up Call For Banks

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    Billions in bank losses related to the recent collapse of Archegos Capital Management point to bank risk management and compliance deficiencies, and highlight several steps brokerages should take to avoid exposure next time a family office customer blows up, say consultants at StoneTurn.

  • New Money Laundering Regs Will Aid Art Market Transparency

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    The privacy and anonymity of art and antiquities transactions can enable criminal activity to go undetected — so recent updates to the Anti-Money Laundering Act covering art market participants are an important step forward, says Andrea Perez at Carrington Coleman.

  • High Court Blow To FTC Restitution Could Be Temporary

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to roll back the Federal Trade Commission's power to seek monetary relief in AMG Capital will likely be met with legislative action to restore the agency's authority, or efforts to obtain restitution in other ways, say Bruce Hoffman and Nico Banks at Cleary.

  • How Gov't FCPA Hiring Practices Theory May Pan Out In Court

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    In recent settlements with banks, U.S. authorities have taken the position that providing a job or even an unpaid internship to relatives or friends of foreign officials is a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, but it is worth assessing how this theory would fare in individual prosecutions, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • What OECD Scrutiny Means For Anti-Corruption In Brazil

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    Attorneys at Paul Hastings examine how an unprecedented standing subgroup recently created by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to monitor Brazil's anti-corruption efforts reflects significant uncertainty regarding the country's commitment to enforcement, and what companies can do to address foreign bribery risk and strengthen compliance programs.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

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