White Collar

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-Monsanto Scientist Stole Trade Secrets For China: Feds

    A former scientist for Bayer AG's Monsanto Co. has been indicted by a Missouri federal grand jury on allegations that he attempted to give a secret algorithm developed by the agrochemical giant to improve farmers' agricultural productivity to the Chinese government, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-Airport X-Ray Exec Hit With Insider Trading Charges

    A former executive for airport X-ray developer OSI Systems has been charged with using his inside knowledge of OSI and another company to earn more than half a million dollars on illegal securities transactions, federal prosecutors in California said Thursday, months after securities regulators sued over the same transactions.

  • November 21, 2019

    House Panel Asks Justices To Allow Trump Record Subpoena

    President Donald Trump’s “extravagant legal claims” aren’t enough to temporarily pause enforcement of the House committee’s subpoena for eight years of Trump’s business records from his longtime accounting firm, the House told the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday.

  • November 21, 2019

    Boies Schiller Adds Ex-Associate AG Panuccio In Fla., DC

    Boies Schiller Flexner LLP has announced that former Associate U.S. Attorney General Jesse Panuccio will join the firm in early December as a partner in its Washington, D.C., and Florida offices.

  • November 21, 2019

    Trump Not Immune From Investigation, Vance Tells High Court

    President Donald Trump isn’t immune from an investigation into acts he committed while a private citizen, New York County District Attorney Cyrus Vance told the Supreme Court on Thursday, disputing Trump’s attempts to quash a subpoena for his tax returns.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-Baltimore Mayor Cops To Kids' Book Scheme, Tax Dodging

    Former Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh pled guilty to conspiracy and tax evasion on Thursday, a day after prosecutors accused her of bilking the city and customers by overselling and underdelivering her "Healthy Holly" children's books and of hiding the revenue on tax returns.

  • November 21, 2019

    Proskauer Pushes To Halt Stanford Ponzi Suit In Antigua

    Proskauer Rose LLP has asked a Texas federal court to move quickly to end litigation in Antigua that the firm says is barred after it paid $63 million to settle claims over a former partner's work for entities affiliated with the R. Allen Stanford $7 billion Ponzi scheme.

  • November 21, 2019

    3rd Circ. Nixes Ex-Atty's New Trial Bid Over Billing Scam

    The Third Circuit on Thursday shot down a disbarred immigration attorney’s bid for a new trial on charges of bilking two multinational companies out of hundreds of thousands of dollars for advertising services that were never provided, saying his purportedly newly discovered evidence would not likely lead to an acquittal.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-Twitter Worker Wins Release Pending Trial On Spy Charges

    A California federal judge will allow the pretrial release of a former Twitter employee accused of helping Saudi Arabia spy on users deemed critics of the regime, saying prosecutors did not sufficiently demonstrate that the Seattle resident is a flight risk.

  • November 21, 2019

    Mortgage Fraudster Sees Sentence Reduced By 2 Years

    An Illinois federal judge cut a mortgage fraud scheme leader's prison sentence from 12 years to 10 years on Thursday after the Seventh Circuit ordered that he be resentenced in light of miscalculations over how much money he should repay lenders.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-Investment Manager Pleads Guilty To FATCA Fraud

    A former investment manager with shuttered English brokerage firm Beaufort Securities has pled guilty in a New York federal court to defrauding the U.S. by violating the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • November 21, 2019

    Investors Urge 5th Circ. To Revive Ponzi Claims Against SEI

    A group of investors in Robert Allen Stanford's massive Ponzi scheme are asking the Fifth Circuit to revive their claim that investment processor SEI Investments Co. could have provided them with the information they needed to avoid the scheme's collapse.

  • November 21, 2019

    Israeli PM Netanyahu Charged With Corruption Offenses

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been formally charged with fraud, breach of trust and bribery, the country’s attorney general announced on Thursday, around nine months after stating his intention to charge Netanyahu.

  • November 21, 2019

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Guilty In Crypto Money Laundering Trial

    A Manhattan federal jury on Thursday found former Locke Lord LLP corporate partner Mark S. Scott guilty of helping "CryptoQueen" Ruja Ignatova, the fugitive head of the global OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, launder $400 million and lie to banks.

  • November 21, 2019

    Russian Billionaire Loses Doc Fight After London Raid

    A London court on Thursday blocked a Russian billionaire featured in the Mueller report from learning why U.S. prosecutors had records seized from a company he controlled, saying disclosure could harm relations with U.S. authorities. 

  • November 21, 2019

    Esformes Told To Pay $44.2M In Massive Health Fraud Case

    A Florida federal judge came in under prosecutors' goal Thursday when he ordered convicted nursing home mogul Philip Esformes to pay $44.2 million in restitution and forfeiture for orchestrating what the U.S. Department of Justice earlier billed as the largest health care fraud case it has ever prosecuted.

  • November 21, 2019

    Investigator Strips After Being Accused Of Wearing Wire

    A private investigator began taking his clothes off in a London courtroom on Thursday after a lawyer representing the owner of a bank accused him of wearing a wire — but was saved from going any further when he was admonished by the judge.

  • November 20, 2019

    UAW President Resigns After Union Moves To Oust Him

    The president of the United Automobile Workers, Gary Jones, resigned on Wednesday after the union moved to oust him from his post amid a bribery and accounting scandal, according to an attorney for the ex-labor leader.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-Twitter Worker Accused Of Spying Is Flight Risk, Feds Say

    Prosecutors asked a California federal judge Wednesday not to release a former Twitter employee accused of helping Saudi Arabia spy on users deemed critics of the regime, arguing that the Seattle resident is a flight risk.

  • November 20, 2019

    NC Insurer's Consultant Wants Out Of $2M Bribery Case

    A consultant for the owner of a North Carolina insurance conglomerate charged in a $2 million bribery scheme to derail an investigation into the insurer has asked a federal judge to dismiss him from the case, saying the attempted reassignment of an investigator does not constitute conspiracy.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-Baltimore Mayor Used Kids' Books To Commit Fraud: DOJ

    Former Baltimore Mayor Catherine Elizabeth Pugh has been hit with fraud charges stemming from an alleged scheme to use her “Healthy Holly” children’s books to defraud consumers, Baltimore schools and taxpayers, according to an indictment unsealed Wednesday in Maryland federal court.

  • November 20, 2019

    Ex-Chicken Of The Sea Exec Admits Price-Fix Deal At Trial

    Two former Chicken of the Sea executives testified Wednesday that ex-Bumble Bee Foods CEO Chris Lischewski approached them about pricing, with one executive admitting he entered a price-fixing agreement with Lischewski and the other saying he lied about having been in a car accident to avoid the meeting.

  • November 20, 2019

    Jussie Smollett Says False Reporting Charges Were Frame-Up

    Jussie Smollett said Wednesday that the city of Chicago, its police department and others participated in a malicious prosecution of the "Empire" actor after he was attacked earlier this year and then accused of staging the incident himself.

  • November 20, 2019

    Divulging Password Violates 5th Amendment, Pa. Justices Say

    Pennsylvania state investigators can't force a defendant in a child pornography case to surrender the password to his encrypted computer because doing so would violate his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination, the state's top court held Wednesday.

  • November 20, 2019

    Centra Investors Lose 2nd Bid For Cert. In Crypto Fraud Case

    A Florida federal judge denied certification to a proposed class of Centra Tech investors for the second time in a suit over a fraudulent initial coin offering, saying Wednesday that the investors failed to justify allowing a do-over.

Expert Analysis

  • Key Aspects Of DOJ's Gov't Procurement Antitrust Initiative

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recently announced interagency strike force targets bid-rigging and other antitrust crimes at every level of government, meaning individuals and companies involved in government procurement or grants should prepare for increased scrutiny and enhanced enforcement, say attorneys at Latham.

  • Health Care Fraud Lessons For Lawyers Advising Doctors

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's seven recent health care fraud takedowns reflect an overall shift in how this type of fraud works, from doctor-driven to doctor-enabled schemes, says Stephen Lee at Benesch.

  • 7 Steps For Managing Private Equity Whistleblower Risk

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    In light of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's report last week that whistleblower payouts have declined, private equity firms — which face unique risks — should shore up policies to encourage internal reporting and discourage retaliation, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • How To Hire Lateral Partners More Effectively

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    Although lateral partner hiring is the preferred method of inorganic growth among law firms, the traditional approach to vetting does not employ sufficient due diligence by the hiring firm, says Michael Ellenhorn at executive search firm Decipher Competitive Intelligence.

  • High Court's Pass On 1 SEC Case Offers Insight Into Another

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    The U.S. Supreme Court effectively recognized the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's extraterritorial reach in denying certiorari in Scoville v. SEC. The move may foreshadow the high court's eventual ruling in Liu v. SEC, which will determine the regulator's authority to seek disgorgement, say Adam Schwartz and Russell Koonin at Homer Bonner.

  • Record Spoofing Settlement Provides Guidance For Traders

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    A record $67.4 million settlement the U.S. Department of Justice and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission recently negotiated with Tower Research Capital over alleged futures market spoofing offers commodities traders enforcement and compliance guidance, and reflects increasing coordination among regulators, say Charley Mills and Matt Kulkin at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • 4 Months After Kisor V. Wilkie, Auer Deference Survives

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    Recent federal appellate and district court rulings suggest that the predicted radical curtailing of Auer deference in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Kisor v. Wilkie has not come to fruition, say Jeffrey Karp and Edward Mahaffey at Sullivan & Worcester.

  • Adapting 4th Amendment Standards To Connected Tech

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    An evolving view of the Fourth Amendment acknowledges that the detailed and sensitive nature of internet of things data — which is starting to find its way into courtroom evidence — requires strong privacy protections and a shift away from a blunt, either-or approach to third-party access, say Jennifer Huddleston and Anne Philpot of George Mason University.

  • Key Takeaways From Ex-Alstom Exec's FCPA Conviction

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    In U.S. v. Hoskins, a Connecticut federal court last week convicted a foreigner who did not work for a U.S. company of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations, presenting valuable lessons about the scope of FCPA liability and how to effectively withdraw from a bribery scheme, say Sunil Shenoi and Kim Nemirow at Kirkland.

  • Texas Could Take Page From Mass.'s Judicial Selection Book

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    As Texas and other states review their judicial election processes, they would be well served by taking guidance from Massachusetts' Governor’s Council system, which protects the judiciary from the hazards of campaigning, says Richard Baker of New England Intellectual Property.

  • Genetic Testing Gold Rush Gives Rise To Fraud Allegations

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    As Medicare payments for genetic testing rise, recent federal indictments over related fraud schemes suggest that a crackdown is already underway, says Alexander Owens of Pietragallo Gordon.

  • Opinion

    What Headlines Missed About ‘Cartel’ Traders’ Trial 1 Year Ago

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    In U.S. v. Usher, a Manhattan federal jury acquitted three British forex traders known as "the cartel" of antitrust allegations one year ago, but some common myths about the case, perpetuated by flashy headlines, still need to be debunked, say White & Case's Samuel Feldman and Mark Gidley, who represented one of the defendants.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McKeown Reviews 'Conversations With RBG'

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    Reading Jeffrey Rosen’s "Conversations With RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law" is like eavesdropping on the author and his subject while they discuss how the restrained judicial minimalist became the fiery leader of the opposition, says Ninth Circuit Judge M. Margaret McKeown.

  • Teaching Witnesses To Avoid Cross-Examination Traps

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    It’s common for inexperienced witnesses to become ensnared in their own responses during cross-examination, so they should be coached in advance on how to break down each question-and-answer scenario into three distinct phases, says Jeff Dougherty of Litigation IQ.

  • Support For Federal Anti-Doping Bill Seems To Be Waning

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    A federal bill that would criminalize international doping fraud conspiracies in sports would fill a necessary gap in U.S. enforcement policy, but it may take several more doping scandals before this type of legislation becomes reality, say Gavin Parrish and Miguel Salcedo of FTI Consulting.