White Collar

  • February 15, 2024

    Fla. Couple Get 57 Mos. For Evading $42M In Plywood Duties

    A Florida couple were sentenced to nearly five years in prison each after confessing to disguising the Chinese origin of millions of dollars' worth of plywood imports to avoid paying $42 million in import tariffs.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOJ Says It Disrupted Russian Router Malware Network

    The U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday it had disabled a network of office internet routers that were being used by a Russian intelligence unit to engage in malware campaigns against U.S. and foreign governments as well as military officials and corporations.

  • February 15, 2024

    9th Circ. Unconvinced That Theft Doesn't Warrant Removal

    A Mexican man fighting deportation after he was convicted of robbery couldn't convince the Ninth Circuit that the state robbery law supporting his conviction was too broad to force his removal.

  • February 15, 2024

    Chancery Nixes Most Of Frank Founder's $835K Fee Demand

    The indicted founder of student financial planning venture Frank may not "shoehorn" new legal fee claims into a May 2023 court order that JPMorgan Chase Bank NA pay her defense on charges that she defrauded the bank when it bought her startup for $175 million in 2021, Delaware's Court of Chancery has ruled.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    8 Men Get Jail Time In $2M Hemp Wine Pump-And-Dump Ploy

    Ohio federal prosecutors have announced the convictions of eight men charged with participating in a pump-and-dump scheme meant to boost the Global Resource Energy Inc. stock price, which purportedly planned to offer hemp-infused wine.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ga. Jury Convicts PPP Fraudsters In $11M Case

    A Georgia federal jury found a man and woman guilty on Thursday of involvement in a sprawling Paycheck Protection Program loan fraud scheme that defrauded the government of more than $11 million.

  • February 15, 2024

    Feds Say Tax Prepper Filed Over $1M In False 2020 Returns

    The U.S. Department of Justice's Tax Division took an Ohio tax preparer and his two businesses to federal court alleging he has employed "at least four definable schemes to generate or inflate his customers' refunds" and cost the government $1 million in revenue for the 2020 tax year alone.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Prosecutor Blasts DQ Bid: 'Contrary To Democracy'

    Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani Willis delivered fiery testimony Thursday during a hearing seeking to have her office removed from the election interference case of Donald Trump and his allies, forcefully denying an improper relationship with a special prosecutor tapped for the high-profile case.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-McElroy Deutsch CFO Charged With $1.5M Theft From Firm

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP's former chief financial officer has been hit with criminal charges in New Jersey state court alleging he embezzled more than $1.5 million from the firm over a five-year period in unauthorized compensation and company credit card charges for personal expenses, prosecutors said Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Gets March 25 Trial Date In NY Hush Money Case

    The Manhattan district attorney's hush money case against Donald Trump is on track to be the first of the former president's four criminal matters to go to trial, after a state judge on Thursday denied his motion to dismiss the charges and confirmed a March 25 date for jury selection.

  • February 14, 2024

    New Criminal Charges Don't End Forced Rehab, 4th Circ. Says

    The Fourth Circuit has upheld the tossing of a man's bid to end a forced civil commitment following his time in prison for two federal crimes, ruling that his criminal convictions have no effect on his civil status as a sexually dangerous individual.

  • February 14, 2024

    Epstein Survivors Say FBI's 'Botched' Probes Allowed Abuse

    Twelve survivors of sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein claim the FBI failed to investigate numerous allegations that he was trafficking and sexually assaulting young women and children, allowing the abuse to continue for more than two decades, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in New York federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Top Court Weighs Weinstein's 'Prior Bad Acts' Evidence

    New York's highest court asked tough questions of all sides as they heard former Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein's appeal of his rape conviction Wednesday, focusing on whether it was fair to present accusations of uncharged crimes to the jury.

  • February 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Open To Rebooting Suit Over Apple App Crypto Theft

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared open Wednesday to reviving a putative class action alleging Apple misrepresented the safety of its App Store after users' cryptocurrency was stolen from an app, with two judges questioning why the allegations can't survive when Apple has consistently touted its security in separate antitrust litigation.

  • February 14, 2024

    FinCEN Head Vows No 'Gotcha' Enforcement Of New Rules

    The director of the U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network said during a Wednesday congressional hearing that the agency is not pursuing "gotcha" enforcement when it comes to companies complying with new rules for reporting their beneficial ownership information.

  • February 14, 2024

    San Francisco's Ankle Monitor Rules Put On Hold

    A federal judge in California has halted the San Francisco Sheriff's Office from enforcing rules that forced criminal defendants released pretrial under electronic monitoring to agree to be subjected to warrantless and suspicionless searches at any time and allow their GPS data to be shared among law enforcement agencies, court documents show.

  • February 14, 2024

    First Purely Tax Crypto Indictment Signals More On Tap

    Federal prosecutors' first public indictment of an individual who underreported the capital gains from a nearly $4 million legal sale of bitcoin indicates that authorities have opened the floodgates for more criminal cases that deal purely with undisclosed gains on legitimate cryptocurrency transactions.

  • February 14, 2024

    Debt Box Calls SEC Dismissal Bid 'Gambit' To Avoid Sanctions

    Crypto project Debt Box urged a Utah federal judge Wednesday to deny the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's motion to dismiss the controversial enforcement action against it for now, calling the action a "gambit" from the regulator to avoid potential sanctions and a permanent dismissal over alleged misconduct.

  • February 14, 2024

    Fund Administrator Negligent In $9M Fraud, NC Justices Told

    A group of investors who were fleeced for nearly $9 million by a crooked hedge fund manager urged the North Carolina Supreme Court Wednesday to revive their negligence suit against the fund's administrator, arguing it blindly accepted whatever the manager said without verifying whether his investments were legitimate.

  • February 14, 2024

    OECD Chief Claims No Knowledge Of Aussie PwC Breaches

    The OECD's top official had no knowledge of PwC Australia's breaches of confidentiality when he took equity in its former CEO's consulting firm that he relinquished when the existence of the equity became public knowledge, his spokesperson told Law360.

  • February 14, 2024

    Man 'Knew The Shit Was Wrong,' Jury Told As Fraud Trial Ends

    Federal prosecutors hoping to score convictions in a vast pandemic loan fraud operation told jurors on Wednesday that not only had an Atlanta man on trial worked with the scheme's ringleader to file loan applications with forged tax records, but admitted to the FBI that he "knew the shit was wrong" all along.

  • February 14, 2024

    Trump Prosecutor Asks Justices To Pass On Immunity Issue

    Special counsel Jack Smith urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to reject former President Donald Trump's request for a stay of his federal election interference case, arguing that there's no merit to Trump's "radical claim" he is immune from prosecution, and that the public deserves a prompt verdict.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-US Diplomat Pleads Not Guilty To Spying For Cuba

    A diplomat who served on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration and as U.S. ambassador to Bolivia entered a not guilty plea Wednesday to charges that he secretly acted as an agent of the Cuban government for decades.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Suggests LaPierre Owes Millions As NRA Trial Ends

    New York state attorneys on Wednesday scrutinized former National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre's testimony that he rectified all his improper spending by repaying $1 million to the gun group, pointing out that LaPierre racked up nearly $13 million in charges for private jet travel alone.

Expert Analysis

  • What EU And UK Corp. Corruption Reform Means For US Cos.

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    Legislative developments in the U.K. and European Union have signaled that the prosecution of fraud and corruption is becoming a greater priority, and large U.S. companies with a global presence should view them as an opportunity to create and revise their global compliance programs, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Opinion

    History Reveals Folly Of Absolute Presidential Immunity

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    As a federal appeals court grapples with former President Donald Trump’s claims that he’s immune from prosecution on election interference charges, it’s a fitting time for lawyers to reflect on the rule of law — from 13th century jurisprudence to Watergate and the Clinton impeachment — and how the idea of absolute presidential immunity is unwise, says attorney Steven Reske.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • How US Companies Can Wield The New Foreign Bribery Law

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    U.S. companies operating in high-risk markets can use the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act that passed last month to their advantage both in preventing bribe demands and in negotiating with the Justice Department to prevent prosecution or to receive cooperation credit, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • New Tech, Old Tricks: How GCs Can Fight White Collar Crime

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    As emerging technologies like artificial intelligence and cryptocurrency provide bad actors with new avenues to commit classic crimes, general counsel should develop a strategy to future-proof their organizations against such threats and prepare for regulatory scrutiny, say directors at FTI Consulting.

  • Unpacking PCAOB's Sanctions Against China-Based Auditors

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    Following the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board's first major enforcement actions against audit firms located in China and Hong Kong for violating quality control standards, China-based U.S. issuers should be prepared for more rigorous audits in the upcoming cycle, and for continuing strict scrutiny from the regulator, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • 3 Areas Of Focus In Congressional Crosshairs This Year

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    Companies must prepare for Congress to build on its 2023 oversight priorities this year, continuing its vigorous inquiries into Chinese company-related investments, workplace safety and labor relations issues, and generative artificial intelligence, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Perspectives

    Justices May Clarify Expert Witness Confrontation Confusion

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    After oral arguments in Smith v. Arizona, the U.S. Supreme Court seems poised to hold that expert witness opinions that rely on out-of-court testimonial statements for their factual basis are unconstitutional, thus resolving some of the complications created by the court’s confrontation clause jurisprudence, says Richard Friedman at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • What's On Tap For Public Corruption Prosecutions In 2024

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    All signs point toward another year of blockbuster public corruption prosecutions in 2024, revealing broader trends in enforcement and jurisprudence, and promising valuable lessons for defense strategy, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Global Cartel Enforcement Looks Set To Intensify In 2024

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    The cartel enforcement winds may strengthen this year, with the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as regulators in other countries, placing a renewed focus on pursuing international cartels and more traditional, hard-core cartel conduct, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

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