White Collar

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Avoids Prison For Ch. 11 Lies

    A former BigLaw partner on Tuesday was spared any prison time for lying to a New York bankruptcy court in his 2022 personal Chapter 11 case, in an attempt to shield his assets from creditors.

  • February 20, 2024

    Georgia Attorney Disbarred For Court Lies, Hiding Money

    The Supreme Court of Georgia has stripped an Atlanta-area attorney of her license to practice in the Peach State, ruling the drastic move was appropriate after the lawyer's years of lies to a state court regarding the location of $80,000 tied up in a contract dispute.

  • February 20, 2024

    Jurors' Death Penalty Views Not Tied To Race, Colo. Justices Say

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday unanimously rejected a Black man's efforts to reverse his 2008 murder conviction for a drive-by shooting, with the justices finding that prosecutors' dismissal of two Black jurors did not amount to improper racial bias.

  • February 20, 2024

    Trivest Can Seek 6th Circ. Review Of RICO Jurisdiction Ruling

    A Michigan federal judge will allow a Florida-based private equity firm to appeal a decision denying its bid to escape a Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act lawsuit scrutinizing its funding of a solar company accused of scamming customers.

  • February 20, 2024

    Binance, Prosecutors Urge Court To Affirm $4.3B Penalty

    Binance Holdings Ltd. and federal prosecutors have called on a Washington federal court to confirm a historic $4.3 billion penalty, including a $1.8 billion criminal fine and a $2.5 billion forfeiture, that the crypto exchange agreed to pay last fall when admitting to a series of banking and sanctions violations.  

  • February 20, 2024

    Pharma Co. Can Get D&O Coverage For Securities Suit

    A pharmaceutical company that developed a drug for rare genetic blood disorders is covered under a recent directors and officers policy for a securities class action, a Delaware state court ruled, rejecting its insurers' contention that the action was related to an SEC subpoena and thus fell under an older policy. 

  • February 20, 2024

    Warhol Faker Gets 37 Mos. As He Awaits Murder Trial

    A Massachusetts man who is awaiting trial for allegedly murdering his wife was sentenced Tuesday to just over three years in federal prison for a yearslong scheme to sell forged artworks purporting to be original Andy Warhol pieces.

  • February 20, 2024

    Steward Health CEO Accused Of $45M Dividend Fraud

    A California medical staffing agency says embattled Steward Health Care owes it a whopping $45 million, telling a Texas federal court that Steward CEO Ralph de la Torre should cough up part of the sum because he issued a $111 million fraudulent dividend even though his company was drowning in debt.

  • February 20, 2024

    New Yorker Writer Pans Subpoena Over Adams' Ties To Pastor

    A writer for The New Yorker said that being forced to testify about an indicted Brooklyn pastor's ties to Mayor Eric Adams would step on journalistic privilege, arguing that Manhattan federal prosecutors could instead rely on other sources.

  • February 20, 2024

    Sullivan & Cromwell Accused Of Aiding FTX Fraud

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP has been accused of knowing about and helping facilitate the massive fraud that brought down cryptocurrency exchange FTX while serving as FTX's outside counsel, and profiting on the back end by overseeing FTX's ongoing bankruptcy, according to a racketeering lawsuit filed last week.

  • February 20, 2024

    Girardi Keese Trustee Recovers $1.8M In Fees For Exide Case

    A U.S. bankruptcy judge on Tuesday approved an agreement between the Girardi Keese bankruptcy trustee, a former attorney for the firm and the Mandell Law Firm to end an adversary proceeding connected to $1.8 million in attorney fees from a lawsuit over the toxic Exide battery plant in Vernon, California.

  • February 20, 2024

    Los Angeles FBI Head, Recused From Girardi Case, Retires

    The head of the FBI's Los Angeles office, who recused himself from investigations into indicted ex-lawyer Tom Girardi, has retired after nearly a year and a half in the post, the agency said Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Seeks June Trial Date In 'Rust' Shooting

    Alec Baldwin's attorney urged a New Mexico judge Tuesday to set a June trial date for the actor on involuntary manslaughter charges in the shooting death of "Rust" cinematographer Halyna Hutchins.

  • February 20, 2024

    Former EDNY Prosecutor, Bomb Expert Joins McGuireWoods

    McGuireWoods LLP has added a former federal prosecutor with the Eastern District of New York as counsel in the government investigations and white collar litigation department in North Carolina and Washington, D.C. Garen Marshall — a former bomb expert with the U.S. Navy — spoke to Law360 Pulse about joining the military-friendly firm.

  • February 20, 2024

    FBI Looks Within In Naming Its Next GC

    The FBI said Tuesday that it has elevated one of its attorneys, who has worked in the government sector for a large part of his career, to serve as the agency's general counsel in Washington, D.C.

  • February 20, 2024

    Paul Hastings, Others Seek $9.9M In Kwok Ch. 11 Case Fees

    Paul Hastings LLP and six other law firms and professional services organizations have filed applications seeking more than $9.9 million in fees and expenses in the global Chapter 11 saga of Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok, leaving the cost of the two-year-old case at well more than $30 million.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Decline Bid For Unanimous Court-Martial Verdicts

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday refused to take up a former U.S. Air Force sergeant's petition seeking to make court-martial rulings unanimous, leaving in place his divided guilty verdict on two counts of attempted sexual abuse.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Declines To Review Trump Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to review onetime Trump lawyer Sidney Powell's and six other attorneys' claims that they were wrongly sanctioned and referred for bar discipline for filing a frivolous challenge to Michigan's 2020 presidential election results.

  • February 20, 2024

    Extraditing Assange For Political Offenses Breaches Int'l Law

    Extraditing Julian Assange to face espionage charges in the U.S. would be a fundamental breach of international laws that protect "pure political offenses," lawyers for the WikiLeaks founder argued at his last-ditch appeal in London on Tuesday.

  • February 19, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Boss Wants SFO Docs To Sink DOJ Fraud Case

    Mike Lynch wants the Serious Fraud Office to turn over information it holds on him over concerns that U.S. authorities sought international assistance to avoid running out of time to charge him for fraud, according to particulars of the extradited entrepreneur's legal claim against the U.K. agency.

  • February 19, 2024

    Assange Poised To Make Final Bid To Halt Extradition To US

    Julian Assange will make what could be his final legal challenge on Tuesday in his long-running battle to avoid being sent to the U.S. on espionage charges arising from the publication of classified documents more than a decade ago.

  • February 16, 2024

    Atty Convicted Of $5.5M Client Theft Asks 9th Circ. To Vacate

    The prosecution of a former California personal injury attorney sent to jail for 12 years for embezzling as much as $5.5 million in clients' settlement money was riddled with error, and his conviction and sentence should be vacated, his counsel told the Ninth Circuit at a hearing Friday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Feds Charge Ex-Commodities Trader With $3.7M Scheme

    A former commodities trader has been charged with misappropriating $3.7 million from would-be investors using misrepresentations that he later repeated to undercover agents, New Jersey federal prosecutors said Friday.

  • February 16, 2024

    JPMorgan Faces $350M Fine Over Trade Reporting Gaps

    JPMorgan Chase & Co. revealed in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing Friday that it expects to pay $350 million in civil penalties to settle claims it failed to enter certain trading data into market surveillance systems.

  • February 16, 2024

    Leon Black Accuser Agrees To Drop Assault Claims

    A woman who accused former Apollo Global Management CEO Leon Black of sexually assaulting her during the late Jeffrey Epstein's decadeslong sex trafficking scheme has agreed to drop her claims against the billionaire, although other claims against Epstein's trust co-executors are still pending, according to court documents filed Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • A Former Bankruptcy Judge Talks 2023 High Court Rulings

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    In 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court issued four bankruptcy law opinions — an extraordinary number — and a close look at these cases signals that changes to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will have to come from Congress, not the courts, says Phillip Shefferly at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • 3 Defense Takeaways From The Bankman-Fried Trial

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    FTX founder and former CEO Sam Bankman-Fried’s recent fraud conviction offers several key lessons for future white collar defendants, from the changing nature of cross-examination to the continued risks of taking the stand, say Jonathan Porter and Gregg Sofer at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    What Happens If High Court Rejects Releases In Purdue Ch. 11

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    Reading the tea leaves following the U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, it appears likely that the justices will decide that bankruptcy courts lack the power to release third-party claims against nondebtors, which would result in one of three scenarios, says Gregory Germain at Syracuse University.

  • Lessons From DOJ's Wave Of Labor Market Prosecutions

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    Attorneys at Patterson Belknap consider lessons learned and future meaningful challenges following the U.S. Department of Justice's first six criminal antitrust cases targeting employee no-poach and wage-fixing agreements, in which just one case resulted in a guilty plea.

  • DOJ Officials' Remarks Signal New Trends In FARA Activity

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    Three U.S. Justice Department officials' remarks at a recent forum reinforce the department's renewed focus on aggressively enforcing the Foreign Agents Registration Act, which has been transformed into a significant national security and criminal enforcement tool, and its efforts to tightly regulate the activities of foreign agents in the U.S., say attorneys at Covington.

  • 3 FinCEN Fraud Alerts To Remember In 2024

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    With financial fraud now the largest source of illicit proceeds in the U.S., banks should review this year's key Financial Crimes Enforcement Network alerts to ensure their employees know the warning signs of three types of rising scams and understand how to effectively report suspicious activity, says Memrie Fortenberry at Jones Walker.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • 7 Enforcement Predictions For US Export Controls, Sanctions

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    Federal agencies' assertions of coming increases in export-control and sanctions-violations enforcement are not new, but recent improvements in resources and inter-agency cooperation allow for certain predictions about how the administration’s latest approach to enforcement may be applied going forward, say attorneys at Akin.

  • SDNY Ruling Warns Parties To Heed Amended Disclosure Rule

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    A Manhattan federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Mrabet forewarns both prosecutors and defense counsel that amended expert witness disclosure obligations will be rigorously enforced by judges, and gives some insight into how courts may deal with related constitutional challenges, say John Siffert and Brandon Davis at Lankler Siffert.

  • 8 Ways To Negotiate Improved Disgorgement Outcomes

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's nearly $3.4 billion collected in disgorgements in 2023 shows that substantial disgorgement claims from regulators and law enforcement are the new norm, but corporations may be able to dramatically reduce what they owe by using eight strategies to argue for reduced net profit calculations, say experts at AlixPartners.

  • How The NY AG Leads Investigations In Civil Securities Fraud

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    Although investigating white collar fraud can put significant strain on state and local resources, the New York Attorney General's Office has continued to use its expansive statutory authority to take a leading role in bringing civil enforcement actions in highly complex financial matters, say Carrie Cohen and Nathan Reilly at MoFo.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Navigating Asset Tracing Challenges In Bankruptcy

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    A Virginia court’s recent ruling in Health Diagnostic Laboratory Inc.'s bankruptcy highlights the heightened demand for asset tracing and the strategic use of the lowest intermediate balance rule in recovering funds from commingled accounts, says Daniel Lowenthal at Patterson Belknap.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

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